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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Mohamad Sabrie Mohamad Salleh


Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Contents

TITLE PAGE

Key Highlights 3

Key Ideas From Youths 4

Researcher’s Background 5

Purpose of Report 6

Snippets from out Social Media Partners 7

Profile of Respondents 9

Interest In Entrepreneurship 10

Entrepreneurship Behaviour and Character 12

Barriers In Starting Up A New Venture 16

Entrepreneurship In Malaysian Universities 19

Pitch-for-Funding Readiness 23

Acknowledgement & Closure 25

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Key Highlights

Survey reached 6,488 Malaysian youths through facebook.

75% of youths categorized themselves as social entrepreneurs aiming for profit and social
objectives (people & environment).

85% of youths would reinvest an amount of RM100 million they earned from a commercial
project, for sustainability and future profitability.

95% of youths want to start a venture in the future but 76% do not know a Non Disclosure
Agreement helps to protect their business ideas .

73% of youths believe their business ideas will work even if they fail to obtain funding from
180 investors.

62% of youths listed “no funding” as their main barrier in starting a venture while the second
highest barrier is lack of experience in managing a venture (46%).

72% of youths disagree or undecided whether their degree subjects train them to be
entrepreneurial.

60% of youths would think of “stall in a bazaar” or “multi level marketing” as an


entrepreneurship activity.

66% of youths agree managing a venture for 1 year while they are in the university would
help them to succeed as an entrepreneur.

62% of youths have written a business plan once or more but 82% have never
applied for funding from any financial institutions.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Key Ideas from Malaysian Youths

“Subjects that can train my mentality


“Creatively learn from failure, make
toughness (to prepare myself for
something different.”
failure).”

“A marketing subject where it


“Assignments that require starting a required me to work in groups with
small business group, instead of other students to do business plan
computer simulations using large and present them to university clients.
companies.” I felt it was a very good learning
experience.”

“An assignment to start business


selling things in college for 3 months
“A program where students become
and then competing with classmates
personal assistants for CEOs and later
in groups. This will enable us to keep
open up a business after getting
track of our money, stocks, learn to
experience as CEO’s personal
market products etc. At the end of 3
assistant.”
months can enable us to experience
the life of an entrepreneur. “

“Final year assessment based on real


“Commercialise R&D results and
profit generated from business
create a student-run investment
venture created and managed by
fund.”
students.”

“Gather a group of students from


different faculties in producing a
business idea, and finally a business
plan. I have seen this model work in
RMIT, Melbourne.”

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Researcher’s Background

Mohamad Sabrie Mohamad Salleh is pursuing his Masters of Entrepreneurship from HELP University
College and currently working with a venture capital company, Malaysia Venture Capital Management
Berhad in the Investment team.

He graduated with Bachelors of Accountancy (Honours) from Universiti Putra Malaysia. He received his
early education from Victoria Institution Kuala Lumpur.

He is the Research partner for Youth Entrepreneurs Malaysia and presented his paper titled
“Information Availability For Entrepreneurial Creation” to the Kauffman Foundation representative
during the Global Entrepreneurship Week 2009, Malaysia. He also co-ordinates a website dedicated to
entrepreneurial issues called “Malaysia Entrepreneurship Project”.

He experienced his first startup when he was 18 years old selling sandwiches during the KL rush hour
and subsequently started an electronics importing trading company when he was in university. Upon
graduation he laid the foundation for a greeting card company, later headed by his close friend, Jason
Yong which established Chozit Sdn Bhd.

His university years were dedicated primarily towards community growth. He participated in campus
elections and subsequently elected as the President of Universiti Putra Malaysia Students’
Representative Council under the provisions of the University and University Colleges Act 1971. He was
entrusted with the welfare of 17,000 students from the Serdang and Bintulu campus. He was also a
member of National Students Consultative Council chaired by the Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Purpose of Report

Dear Readers,

The purpose of the report previously was to help me justify my literature findings for my Masters of
Entrepreneurship assignment. However, after discovering interesting findings from the survey, I decided
to make this report available for the Prime Minister’s Tea Party on March 13th 2010, to represent the
voice of Malaysian youth entrepreneurs.

The survey is also a part of a new-born social enterprise dedicated towards the pursuit of applied
knowledge in entrepreneurship. Information disclosure in this report is for public purposes and is FREE.
However, I appreciate proper attribution and references made when this report is used as a
primary/secondary resource for academic or commercial work.

This survey is also a part of an expanded survey, where insights and views of established Malaysian
entrepreneurs will be recorded through interviews. The purpose of the amended report will be for
Michael Teoh Su Lim’s visit to Stanford University in the middle of this year, to present the views of
Malaysian youths regarding entrepreneurship.

Thank you.

Mohamad Sabrie Mohamad Salleh


Founder
Malaysia Entrepreneurship Project (http://mentproject.wordpress.com)
E-Mail (sabriesalleh@gmail.com)
8th March 2010

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Snippets from Our Social Media Partners


This report is made possible with the efforts of our social media partners:
Youth Entrepreneurs Malaysia
•Michael Teoh Su Lim
"Our entrepreneurs can leverage on the term - Glocalization, where i believe
we should develop our aspiring entrepreneurs to realise global potentials and
being world class, while acknowledging the need to utilize and distinguish our
competitive advantage with our local skills, talents and cultures. What makes
Malaysian entrepreneurs truly special is our upbringing where we are already
enriched with a multi-diversity environment, which equips us to work and build
ventures across borders and people even without realising it."

Malaysia Youth and Entrepreneurs Movement


•Danial Fahmi
•"This report is a living proof that Malaysian Youth today is stepping up to the
challenges to be a successful entrepreneur. It's up to the Government to help
them develop into World Class entrepreneur who is going to change Malaysia's
face and bring our country to greater heights."

Leadership Engagement Network


•Shannon Chow (shannon.chowmy@gmail.com)
•"The report has spoken itself by the Youths of Malaysia who desire to change
and improve themselves. Are they given enough chances and opportunities?
They can inspire many lives and bring Malaysia to the next level. Look out for
them in the near future and never underestimate them."

South East Asia Children Charity Community


•Ping Fen (pang.pingfen@yahoo.com)
•"This report tells everything. Our youth nowadays are moving ahead in this era.
Can we be one of the successful World Class entrepreneur and stand as tall as
the rest of the world? It's up to you to decide."

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Beyond University
Mohd Firdaus Johari (furydose@gmail.com)
•Mohd
•"Entrepreneurship
"Entrepreneurship misconceptions: it is not only about making money, starts
with innovation, skill and knowledge, not only about what sell, it's how you sell
it and is an attitude, mentality and though processes."

Alumni MPP Malaysia


Sabrie Salleh (sabriesalleh@gmail.com)
•Sabrie
•"Hopefully
"Hopefully this report could shed some light regarding entrepreneurship among
youth below the age of 25 years old and help the present Student Council in
organizing programmes effectively to grow talented entrepreneurs."

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS


Age Profile

Age group of 30 years old and


below formed 93% of total Figure 1 - Age
respondents.
Less than or equal to
7% 16% 20 years old
11%
21 - 25 years old

26 - 30 years old

31 years old and


66%
above

Majority of the respondents belonged to age group of 30 years old and


below which comprises a total percentage of 93%. The largest age group is
the “21 – 25 years old” segment which forms a 66% block.

Racial Composition

Figure 2 - Racial Composition

54%
46%

Bumiputera Non-Bumiputera

The highest number of responses came from Malaysian youths of


bumiputera origin at 54% followed by non-bumiputera
bumiputera at 46%. Total
response from surveys disbursed was 2.3%.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Interest in Entrepreneurship
Do you want to open up a new venture in the future?

95% of youths would open up


Figure 3 - Open Up a Venture?
a new venture in the future.
5%

Yes
No
95%

The respondents were asked two questions in this section. Do they want to
open up a new venture and what is the motivating factor behind opening
op up
a new business?

According to the respondents, 95% answered “Yes” for the first question. This
shows a strong interest among respondents to start their own business.

Why do you want to open up a new venture?

Figure 4 - Why do you want to open up a new


More than half of youths want
venture?
to start a new business
because of passion and 57%
50%
wealth.
23%
13%

It's my Money Early Others


passion Retirement

Respondents were given multiple “c “checkboxes”


heckboxes” to be selected for the
question above. Majority of respondents selected “it’s my passion” at 57%
followed by money at 50% and early retirement at 23%.

Based on the question, respondents were primarily motivated by passion and


wealth (money) to open up a new venture.

Minority 13% selected “Others” and notable subjective answers by


respondents are as below:

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

• Business helps to spread your ideologies effectively.


• To help others.
• I want to be able to do what I want to do instead of working for
someone else where my options might be limited when I reach a
certain point.
• Self Challenge.
• Helping to grow the Malaysian economy.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Entrepreneurial Character & Behaviour


How do you define yourself as an entrepreneur?

Figure 5 - How do you define yourself as an


75% of youths define
entrepreneur?
themselves as “social
entrepreneurs” who aim for
profit, people and
environment.
3% 5% 9% Traditional entrepreneur
8% (profit maximization)

Social Entrepreneur
(profit, people and
environment)
Religious entrepreneur

I am not interested in
75% business

Other

75% respondents categorized themselves as social entrepreneurs which aim


for triple bottom line objectives which are creating profit, contributing to the
society (people) and protecting the environment.

Another 9% respondents categorized themselves as a traditional entrepreneur


aiming for profit maximization (shareholders wealth) and next came religious
entrepreneur at 8% aiming for social justice.

This question shows that respondents (Malaysian youth) has a high awareness
level in terms of environmental protection and social issues which contribute
towards defining themselves as “social entrepreneurs”.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Do you want to start a business venture with a business partner?

Figure 6 - Do you want a business partner?

Yes we could use more talents No, I can do it alone.


89% of youths welcome
business partners in their
startups.
11%

89%

Almost all of the respondents (89%) answered “Yes, we could use more
talents” for this question.

This shows that respondents understand the importance of diverse talents to


create a successful startup. The results are consistent with Flamholtz’s
“Pyramid of Organizational Development” which categorized “human
resources” aass one of the challenges that need to be addressed in Stage II firms.

This character could contribute towards sustainability of a venture.

After meeting with 20 banks, 10 government agencies and 150


investors, you still FAIL to secure funding for your startup, what do
you do next?

Figure 7 - Financing Scenario

Figure 7 - Financing Scenario

35% 38%

73% of youths would keep


13% 15%
searching for financing even
if they are rejected by 180
financiers.
I don't think Keep Ue your own Other
the business searching for money to
idea works. new fund the
Stop investors. venture.
searching for
funding.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

The question above was to evaluate respondents’ resilience towards rejection


by investors. 38% of respondents agreed they would use their own money to
fund their venture while another 35% would keep searching for investors.

A minority 13% would stop searching for funding. Notable answers from
respondents are:
• Reconsider the whole plan and make improvements.
• Gather comments from these people and see if my idea works or
improve it and try again.
• Try to revise back the idea and d proposal, if there is nothing much to
change, keep searching.
• Creatively learn from failure, make something different.
• Ask my parents to loan me some money.
• Start small and prove to them it all works.
• Enter another business to gain funding for the business
busine idea.
• Come out with a new business model.

From the results, a combined 73% of youths possess strong resilience; believes
in their business idea and will go for bootstrapping or search for funding
although they are rejected multiple times by investors.

If you are awarded a project of RM100 million by the government,


what would be the first thing on your mind?

85% of youths choose to find Figure 8 - Evaluating Sustainability Mentality


ways to double/triple their
profits rather than retiring 85%
after obtaining a RM100
million project.
5% 10%

I'll retire and I'll find ways to Other


have a good life double/triple
with the RM100 the amount the
million following year

Almost all of the respondents answered “I’ll find ways to double/triple the
amount the following year” should they receive RM100 million project by the
government. Only 5% responded that they’ll retire with the project.

This shows that respondents (Malaysian youth) puts long


long-term profit as a
measure of importance than short term gains. This attitude would be a key
factor in ensuring a sust
sustainability of a firm.

Notable answers for “others” are:


• Build up my reputation by being socially responsible for the project
assigned to me.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

• It’s not all about the money, I need more experience.


• Invest real estate, buy a franchise, build my own business and
a its
operation system.
• Make the project a success, increase government confidence and use
it as a stepping stone for other ventures.
• Will allocate the proportions for various investments inject the
money into the existing business line for expansion.

Yo
Your
ur first business venture had just made a positive RM1 million
profit this year. What would be your next MOST IMPORTANT priority?

85% of youths would reinvest Figure 9 - Priority In Retained Earnings


profits in their company to
expand their business. 85%

11% 5%

Declare Reinvest the Other


dividends for the retained
entrepreneurs earnings to
expand the
business

The main priority of respondents is to reinvest their retained earnings to


expand their business when their venture is pro
profitable. Almost all respondents
(85%) answered this question.

The results are consistent with “Figure 8” where 85% respondents prioritize on
the long term profits of the company.

Only a 5% minority selected others and there are no notable subjective


ans
answers.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Barriers In Starting Up A New Venture


What are the main barriers stopping you from pursuing your venture?

Figure 10 - List of barriers


Main barrier for youths are
no funding (62%), lack of
experience in managing a 62%
venture (46%) and lack of
business contacts (36%).
46%
36%
32%
28%
17%

5% 9% 8% 9%

Respondents were given multiple “checkboxes” for the question above.


Majority of the respondents selected lack of funding at 62% as the main
barrier, followed by no experience in managing a venture at 446% and no
business contacts at 36%.

Other significant factors are lack of entrepreneurship training (32%), do not


know how to start (28%) and fear of failure (17%).

A minority 9% responded Others and gave their answers as below:


• I have multiple obligations
ns which leave me little time to focus on
pursuing a business.
• Need to build my contacts and skills first through employment.
• Haven’t found the right, solid idea.
• Afraid of bureaucracy roadblocks.
• Still young, I think the best way to learn and gain experience first.
Then venture into business.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

You have a great business idea which you believe can bring in millions
of profit! What would be the FIRST thing you DO after identifying the
idea?

Figure 11 - Acquisition of Resources


47% of youths would find
talented people to run a
Pitch for funding
startup after identifying a
business idea. 12%
3%
Find talented people
38% to start the idea

Tell no one to avoid


someone from
stealing it
47%
Other

Majority of respondents answered “Find talented people to start the idea” at


47%, followed by pitch for funding at 38% and Others at 12%.

Notable subjective answers from “Others” are:


• Let go, do not want to take any risk.
• Do some research and analyze the idea.
• Identify my role in my own idea, that the system should absolutely
require my presence and hardwork such that no one could replace
me.
• Share it with someone who are trustworthy.
• Share and leverage on talented, trusted partners having some
aspirations and belief.
• Seek advise from experienced, talented person.

The results show that majority of respondents understand the importance of


talents in commercializing a business idea. This is consistent with Flamholtz’s
pyramid of organizational development where a business idea could grow to a
sustainable company with the right talents and funding (resources).

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Do you understand how a Non-Disclosure Agreement works?

Figure 12 - Non Disclosure Agreement


76% of youths do not know
how a Non Disclosure
Agreement works and hence Yes
lack legal protection on their 24%
business ideas.

No
76%

More than half of the respondents (76%) answered “No” for the question
above. Almost a quarter (24%) answered Yes regarding knowledge of Non-
Disclosure Agreement.

The results reveal a significant disadvantage to Malaysian youths which


aspires to create a new venture (Figure 3 – 95%). Non-disclosure agreement
(NDA) is a mechanism to protect a person’s business idea from being stolen by
another party.

Lack of understanding on NDA could lead to increased startup failures.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Entrepreneurship In Malaysian Universities


From a rate of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree), do the
subjects in your degree help to increase your entrepreneurship skills?

72% of youths disagree or Figure 13 - Entrepreneurship Skills From Degree


undecided whether their
degree subjects help Strongly Agree 11%
increase their
entrepreneurial skills. Agree 17%

Neither agree nor disagree 38%

Disagree 18%

Strongly Disagree 16%

Majority of respondents are undecided (38%) whether they have earned


entrepreneurship skills from their degree while another 34% (disagree and
strongly disagree) do not think they have learnt entrepreneurship skills from
their degrees and lastly a 28% group (strongly agree and agree) gave their
opinion that their degree helped them to be entrepreneurial.

A combined group of 72% which do not agree and is undecided whether their
degrees helped them to be entrepreneurial shows that majority of students
graduated with lack of practical skills to succeed as an entrepreneur in the
industry.

What subjects in university could have helped develop your


entrepreneurial skills to start a new venture?

Respondents were asked the question above and the response is as below:
• A real opportunity in the real world; internship while studying the
theory of apprenticeship with successful people.
• I’d strongly recommend a distinctive entrepreneurship course like the
one offered by Olympia College. Similar courses need to offer basic
lessons on everything an entrepreneur needs to know.
• Subjects taught in universities only prepare you theoretically. We
need to be exposed to the real business world, to the real contacts
and fund sources.
• Seminars by entrepreneurs and pitching class by venture capitalists.
• Experimental food, restaurant operation, marketing, commercial food
and food processing.
• Entrepreneurship subject should be aligned to the real world.
• Not too much on subjects though, but instead universities should
invest heavily on various workshops concerning entrepreneurship,
how-to-pitch to investors workshop.
• Subjects that can train my mentality toughness (to prepare myself for

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

failure).
• A marketing subject. It required me to work in groups with other
students to do business plan and present them to university clients. I
felt it was a very good learning experience.
• Assignments that require starting a small business group, instead of
computer simulations using large companies.
• Fundaments in business will do provided is it delivered by lecturers
that have “real” experience in that area.

Would a “stall in a bazaar” or “Multi Level Marketing” be the first


concept in mind when your society president suggests you to organize
an entrepreneurship activity?

Figure 14 - Stall Mentality


60% of youths perceive
entrepreneurship activity as
“stall in a bazaar” or “multi
level marketing”. No
40%

Yes
60%

More than half of the respondents answered “Yes” which accounts to 60%
while 40% respondents answered No for the question above.

The results show that majority of students adopt a stall mentality or multi level
marketing in undertaking entrepreneurship activities.

The subsequent question was; If you answered “No”, what is your


entrepreneurial concept?

Response is as below:
• Transit of import-export agricultural based products.
• Freelancing business; motivator for secondary school and organize big
carnivals.
• Entrepreneurship means starting your own business and creating
something unique that could solve other people problem.
• Entrepreneurs are creative and innovative by starting up a stall in a
bazaar and multi level marketing is just a Business owner not an
entrepreneurs.
• I would find other alternative to start raising fund such as
competitions.
• Selling something but not stall in bazaar concept. More towards
marketing and expand the network.
• Crowd sourcing.
• Product demo and conferences.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

• Organize a concert or some kind of large fair and place up some


seminar by calling few entrepreneurs to give a talk. Call in investors
and banks to be vendor and advertise their good points.
• I love music so everything might be related to music or entertainment
– battle of the band, gig, stage show.
• Authorised 1st hand distributor.
• Service based transactions such as car wash service.
• Organize a fair or event and then find for sponsorship for the event
and fair which can help promote sponsors' products. At the same
time, get some cash from the sponsor to rent the location in the
event.

If you are given tasks/roles in managing a mini business venture with


your friends 1 YEAR in university, would it help you succeed as an
entrepreneur upon graduation?

Figure 15 - Manage A Venture In University


66% of youths agree,
managing a venture for 1 Strongly Agree 26%
year before graduation
would help them succeed as Agree 40%
an entrepreneur.
Neither agree nor disagree 28%

Disagree 7%

Strongly Disagree 1%

More than half of the respondents agree (66%) that managing a venture would
help them succeed as an entrepreneur upon graduation. 28% of respondents
are undecided while a combined 8% disagree it will help them as an
entrepreneur.

The response above shows significant support by respondents to manage a


venture before graduation.

If you are the Vice Chancellor of a university, what training would you
create to help produce graduates capable of starting up a new
venture?

Respondents were asked a subjective question as above and notable answers is


as below:
• Create an environment of “mini business” in university.
• Actual business training than all those theory. Similar to UUM which
train their students to be business oriented.
• Make an apprentice program in university; give task and some funds
to survive a venture.
• Lectures by experienced businessman.
• An assignment to start their business selling things in college for 3

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

months and then competing with their classmates in groups. This will
enable them to keep track of their money, stocks, learn to market
their products etc. At the end of 3 months can enable them to
experience the life of an entrepreneur.
• Allocation of university funds should be allowed for students who are
really interested in entrepreneurship. Likewise, procedures like
proposing a business plan till applying for loans should be supervised
and monitored.
• A program where students become personal assistants for CEOs and
later open up a business after getting experience as CEO personal
assistant.
• Create an environment where undergraduates can develop these
skills. Perhaps marketing and encouraging organizations like SIFE.
• Direct information about grants and business loans.
• Provide seed funding for students with solid business plan to start
their business.
• Business simulation or actual business enterprise for candidates to
work on.
• Practical training for one semester.
• Final year assessment based on real profit generated from business
venture created and managed by students.
• Internship with new startups.
• Annual competition: It will be categorized into 2, individual and a
team of 3. Each will be given a certain amount of money to start a
business. They will be given a duration of time to double or triple the
amount of money they received. The individual/team whom manages
to increase the amount of money the most will win the competition.
• Change the CGPA concept in the co-curriculum. Make a system that
could produce graduates that could apply the theory that he/she
studied in the university and creatively make money out of it.
• Cross education (business students taking elective in psychology) will
allow students to have a more varied knowledge base.
• Skills in professional negotiation, personal philosophy and survival
spirit.
• Provide some training on how to write business proposals, business
plans, get people from the industry to come and talk and so forth;
prepare the students for what they may face in industry.
• Legal training for future entrepreneurs.
• Commercialise R&D results and create a student-run investment fund.
• Cashflow board game clubs.
• Throw a challenge for students to start a venture. When they are
successful, get endorsement from university and connect them to the
industry.
• Invite a person from industry, preferably CEO who is capable to share
experience on the industry. Example; Cradle, MAVCAP, TEKUN,
INSKEN, MARA & SME Corp.
• Gather a group of students from different faculties in producing a
business idea, and finally a business plan. I have seen this model work
in RMIT, Melbourne.
• Constant coaching for students who start a business in a team.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Pitch-For-Funding Readiness
How many times have you written a business plan?

Figure 16 - Business Plan Writing


38% of youths have never
written a business plan.

18%
Never
38%
Once
19% Twice
3 times and above
25%

Majority of the respondents (38%) answered “never”, another 25% answered


“once” followed by 19% which answered “twice” and lastly 18% which
answered “3 times an above”.

The results show that 38% of respondents from 95% which aspires to open up
a new venture in the future have never written a business plan.

Have you applied for government grants, loans, financing from banks,
etc.?

Figure 17 - Financing Application


89% of youths have never
applied for financing from Yes
financial institutions. 11%

No
89%

Almost all of the respondents (89%) answered “no” to the question above. A
minority 11% answered “yes”.

The results shows that respondents possess once or more business plan writing
experience (Figure 16 – 62%) but did not know their financiers requirements
because they have never filed for financing application (89% - no).

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

In your opinion, do the subjects/extra curricular activities in your


university prepare or teach you on the methods in obtaining funding
successfully from financial institutions (banks, government agencies,
venture capitalists, etc.)?

Figure 18 - Do university subjects teach you how to


obtain funding from financial institutions?
73% of youths disagree or
unsure whether their
subjects help them to obtain 36% 37%
funding from financial
26%
institutions.

Yes Maybe No

Majority of respondents (37%) answered “no” for question above; another 36%
are undecided while a minority 26% answered “yes”.

The results above show that 73% of respondents disagree and unsure whether
their subjects do help them to obtain funding from financial institutions.

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

Acknowledgement & Closure

The researcher hopes this report would help provide an indicator of entrepreneurship behaviour among
Malaysian youths. The response was mainly based on views from age group of 21 – 25 years old which
experienced different teaching methods in different universities from all over Malaysia.

To those who participated and contributed time for answering the survey, we thank you. Special thanks
to our social media partners for distributing the survey and to Azim Azman who is residing in Pakistan
for the press release write-up.

If you require any information regarding the “Entrepreneur Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010”, do
drop me an email as per the address below.

Mohamad Sabrie Mohamad Salleh


Founder / Researcher
Malaysia Entrepreneurship Project (http://mentproject.wordpress.com)
sabriesalleh@gmail.com

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Entrepreneurship Survey Among Malaysian Youths – 2010

The information in this report is for public release and is not intended to address any particular individual or
entity. Although the information may be correct at the date it was retrieved, there is no guarantee it will be accurate in the future. Professional
advice recommended should they wish to act based on the information provided.

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