Global Underwater Explorers General Training Standards, Policies, and Procedures

Version 5.1 © GUE, 2010

Table of Contents
1. PURPOSE OF GUE ..................................................................................................................................1 1.1. GOALS ........................................................................................................................................1 1.1.1. Education ........................................................................................................................1 1.1.2. Research ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1.3. Exploration .....................................................................................................................1 1.2. TRAINING PHILOSOPHY ...............................................................................................................1 1.2.1. Education ........................................................................................................................1 1.2.2. Equipment .......................................................................................................................1 1.2.3. Experience ......................................................................................................................2 1.3. TRAINING STRUCTURE ................................................................................................................2 1.3.1. Outline of Diver Training ...............................................................................................2 1.3.2. Diver Assessment (Qualification, Provisional Qualification, Failure) ...........................3 1.3.3. Training Categories ........................................................................................................4 1.3.4. General Training Standards ...........................................................................................4 1.4. GENERAL TRAINING LIMITS........................................................................................................5 1.4.1. PO2 Limits ......................................................................................................................5 1.4.2. END Limits .....................................................................................................................5 1.4.3. Breathing Gas Requirements ..........................................................................................5 1.4.4. Parameters for Critical Skills .........................................................................................5 1.4.5. Issuing Qualification under Other Agencies ...................................................................6 1.4.6. Teaching and Rebreathers ..............................................................................................6 1.4.7. Buoyancy Considerations ...............................................................................................6 1.4.8. Conservation ...................................................................................................................6 1.4.9. Decompression Parameters ............................................................................................6 1.4.10. Course Size ......................................................................................................................6 1.5. GENERAL DIVING SKILLS............................................................................................................7 1.6. GENERAL PREREQUISITES FOR ALL GUE COURSES....................................................................7 1.7. CYLINDER MARKING STANDARDS ..............................................................................................7 1.8. QUALITY CONTROL .....................................................................................................................8 1.8.1. Instructor Evaluations ....................................................................................................8 1.8.2. Instructor Peer Review ...................................................................................................8 1.8.3. Instructor Renewals ........................................................................................................8 1.8.4. Instructor Re-Qualification .............................................................................................8 1.8.5. Diver Re-Qualification ....................................................................................................8 1.9. RECOGNITION OF CREDENTIALS .................................................................................................9 1.9.1. Waivers ............................................................................................................................9 1.10. COMPLAINTS ...............................................................................................................................9 1.10.1. Complaint Submission ....................................................................................................9 1.10.2. Complaint Procedure ......................................................................................................9 1.10.3. Penalties and Remedial Actions ......................................................................................9 1.10.4. Rights of Appeal ............................................................................................................10 1.10.5. Executive Suspension of Membership ...........................................................................10

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1.12. CONDUCT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES .....................................................................................10 1.13. RECORDS ..................................................................................................................................10 2. GUE COURSE TRAINING STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES ....................................................12 2.1. RECREATIONAL DIVER CURRICULUM .......................................................................................12 2.1.1. GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 - Nitrox Diver ..........................................................12 2.1.1.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................12 2.1.1.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................12 2.1.1.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................12 2.1.1.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................12 2.1.1.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................12 2.1.1.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................12 2.1.1.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................13 2.1.1.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................13 2.1.1.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................13 2.1.1.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................14 2.1.2. GUE Recreational Diver Level 2 - Triox Diver ............................................................15 2.1.2.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................15 2.1.2.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................15 2.1.2.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................15 2.1.2.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................15 2.1.2.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................15 2.1.2.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................16 2.1.2.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................16 2.1.2.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................16 2.1.2.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................16 2.1.2.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................17 2.1.3. GUE Recreational Diver Level 3 - Trimix Diver ..........................................................18 2.1.3.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................18 2.1.3.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................18 2.1.3.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................18 2.1.3.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................18 2.1.3.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................18 2.1.3.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................18 2.1.3.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................19 2.1.3.8. Land Drills & Topics .......................................................................................................19 2.1.3.9. Required Dive Skills & Drills .........................................................................................19 2.1.3.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................20 2.1.4. GUE Fundamentals Course ..........................................................................................21 2.1.4.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................21 2.1.4.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................21 2.1.4.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................21 2.1.4.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................22 2.1.4.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................22 2.1.4.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................22 2.1.4.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................22 2.1.4.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................22 2.1.4.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................23 2.1.4.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................24 2.2. TECHNICAL DIVER CURRICULUM .............................................................................................25 2.2.1. Technical Diver Level 1 ................................................................................................25 2.2.1.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................25 2.2.1.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................25 2.2.1.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................25 2.2.1.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................25 2.2.1.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................25

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2.2.1.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................26 2.2.1.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................26 2.2.1.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................27 2.2.1.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................27 2.2.1.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................28 2.2.2. Technical Diver Level 1 “Plus” Upgrade .....................................................................29 2.2.2.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................29 2.2.2.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................29 2.2.2.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................29 2.2.2.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................29 2.2.2.5. Course Contents ..............................................................................................................30 2.2.2.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................30 2.2.2.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................30 2.2.2.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................30 2.2.2.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................30 2.2.2.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................31 2.2.3. Technical Diver Level 2 ................................................................................................31 2.2.3.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................31 2.2.3.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................31 2.2.3.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................31 2.2.3.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................31 2.2.3.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................32 2.2.3.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................32 2.2.3.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................32 2.2.3.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................32 2.2.3.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................32 2.2.3.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................33 2.2.4. Technical Diver Level 2 “Plus” Upgrade .....................................................................34 2.2.4.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................34 2.2.4.2. Course contents ...............................................................................................................34 2.2.4.3. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................34 2.2.5. Technical Diver Level 3 ................................................................................................34 2.2.5.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................34 2.2.5.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................35 2.2.5.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................35 2.2.5.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................35 2.2.5.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................35 2.2.5.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................35 2.2.5.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................35 2.2.5.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................35 2.2.5.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................36 2.2.5.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................36 2.3. CAVE DIVER CURRICULUM .......................................................................................................38 2.3.1. Cave Diver Level 1 ........................................................................................................38 2.3.1.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................38 2.3.1.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................38 2.3.1.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................38 2.3.1.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................38 2.3.1.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................39 2.3.1.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................39 2.3.1.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................39 2.3.1.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................39 2.3.1.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................40 2.3.1.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................41 2.3.2. Cave Diver Level 2 ........................................................................................................42 2.3.2.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................42 2.3.2.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................42
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2.3.2.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................42 2.3.2.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................42 2.3.2.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................42 2.3.2.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................43 2.3.2.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................43 2.3.2.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................43 2.3.2.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................43 2.3.2.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................45 2.3.3. Cave Diver Level 3 ........................................................................................................46 2.3.3.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................46 2.3.3.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................46 2.3.3.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................46 2.3.3.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................46 2.3.3.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................46 2.3.3.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................46 2.3.3.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................46 2.3.3.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................47 2.3.3.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................47 2.3.3.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................48 2.4. AUXILIARY TRAINING CURRICULUM ........................................................................................49 2.4.1. GUE Doubles Primer ....................................................................................................49 2.4.1.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................49 2.4.1.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................49 2.4.1.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................49 2.4.1.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................50 2.4.1.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................50 2.4.1.6. Training Materials ...........................................................................................................50 2.4.1.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................50 2.4.1.8. Land Drills ......................................................................................................................50 2.4.1.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................51 2.4.1.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................51 2.4.2. GUE Dry Suit Primer ...................................................................................................52 2.4.2.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................52 2.4.2.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................52 2.4.2.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................52 2.4.2.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................52 2.4.2.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................53 2.4.2.6. Training Materials ...........................................................................................................53 2.4.2.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................53 2.4.2.8. Land Drills ......................................................................................................................53 2.4.2.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................53 2.4.2.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................54 2.4.3. GUE Primer ..................................................................................................................55 2.4.3.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................55 2.4.3.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................55 2.4.3.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................55 2.4.3.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................55 2.4.3.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................56 2.4.3.6. Training Materials ...........................................................................................................56 2.4.3.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................56 2.4.3.8. Land Drills ......................................................................................................................56 2.4.3.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................56 2.4.3.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................57 2.4.4. Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 1 ..................................................................................57 2.4.4.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................57 2.4.4.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................57 2.4.4.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................58

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2.4.4.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................58 2.4.4.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................58 2.4.4.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................58 2.4.4.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................58 2.4.4.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................58 2.4.4.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................59 2.4.4.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................59 2.4.5. Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 2 / Cave DPV .............................................................60 2.4.5.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................60 2.4.5.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................61 2.4.5.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................61 2.4.5.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................61 2.4.5.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................61 2.4.5.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................61 2.4.5.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................61 2.4.5.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................62 2.4.5.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................62 2.4.5.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................62 2.4.6. Rebreather Diver ..........................................................................................................64 2.4.6.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................64 2.4.6.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................64 2.4.6.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................64 2.4.6.4. Course Limits ..................................................................................................................64 2.4.6.5. Course Content ...............................................................................................................64 2.4.6.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................64 2.4.6.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................64 2.4.6.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................65 2.4.6.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................65 2.4.6.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................66 3. GUE INSTRUCTOR STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES ...............................................................67 3.1. ACTIVE STATUS INSTRUCTOR....................................................................................................67 3.1.1. Maintaining Active Status .............................................................................................67 3.2. SUSTAINING STATUS INSTRUCTOR ............................................................................................68 3.2.1. Maintaining Sustaining Status ......................................................................................68 3.3. INACTIVE STATUS INSTRUCTOR ................................................................................................68 3.4. PROVISIONAL STATUS INSTRUCTOR ..........................................................................................68 3.5. INSTRUCTOR STATUS CHANGES ................................................................................................69 3.6. INSTRUCTOR CANDIDATE TRAINING PROCEDURES ...................................................................69 3.6.1. Description ....................................................................................................................69 3.6.2. ITC Prerequisites ..........................................................................................................69 3.6.3. Recreational Instructor Training Courses ....................................................................70 3.6.4. Technical Instructor Training Courses .........................................................................70 3.6.5. Cave Instructor Training Courses ................................................................................70 3.6.6. GUE Instructor Training Progression ..........................................................................70 3.6.7. GUE Instructor Upgrades within the Same Training Category ...................................71 3.6.8. Fulfillment of Internship Requirement ..........................................................................72 3.7. INSTRUCTOR TRAINER (IT) QUALIFICATIONS ...........................................................................72 3.7.1. Purpose .........................................................................................................................72 3.7.2. IT Prerequisites .............................................................................................................72 3.8. INSTRUCTOR EVALUATOR (IE) QUALIFICATIONS ......................................................................72 3.8.1. Purpose .........................................................................................................................72 3.8.2. Prerequisites .................................................................................................................72

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3.9. RECREATIONAL DIVING INSTRUCTOR COURSES........................................................................72 3.9.1. GUE Recreational Instructor Training Course ............................................................72 3.9.1.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................72 3.9.1.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................73 3.9.1.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................73 3.9.1.4. Program Limits ................................................................................................................73 3.9.1.5. Program Content .............................................................................................................73 3.9.1.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................73 3.9.1.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................73 3.9.1.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................73 3.9.1.9. Required Skills (Academic and In-Water) ......................................................................74 3.9.1.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................74 3.9.2. GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 Instructor ...........74 3.9.3. GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Level 2 Instructor .....................74 3.9.4. GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Diver Level 3 Instructor ...........74 3.9.5. GUE Recreational 1 to GUE Recreational 2 Instructor ...............................................75 3.9.6. GUE Recreational 2 to GUE Recreational 3 Instructor ...............................................75 3.9.7. GUE Recreational 1 to GUE Fundamentals Instructor ................................................75 3.9.8. Cave or Tech Instructor to Recreational Level 1 Diving Instructor .............................75 3.9.9. Technical Diver Instructor Course ................................................................................75 3.9.9.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................75 3.9.9.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................75 3.9.9.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................75 3.9.9.4. Program Limits ................................................................................................................75 3.9.9.5. Program Content .............................................................................................................76 3.9.9.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................76 3.9.9.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................76 3.9.9.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................76 3.9.9.9. Required Skills (Academic and In-water) .......................................................................76 3.9.9.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................77 3.9.10. Progress from Tech 1 Instructor to Tech 2 Instructor ...................................................78 3.9.10.1. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................78 3.9.11. Progress from Tech 2 Instructor to Tech 3 Instructor ...................................................78 3.9.11.1. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................78 3.9.12. Progress from Tech 2 Instructor to Rebreather Instructor ............................................78 3.9.12.1. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................78 3.9.12.2. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................78 3.9.13. Cave Diver Instructor Course .......................................................................................80 3.9.13.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................80 3.9.13.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................80 3.9.13.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................80 3.9.13.4. Program Limits ................................................................................................................80 3.9.13.5. Program Content .............................................................................................................80 3.9.13.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................80 3.9.13.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................80 3.9.13.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................81 3.9.13.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................81 3.9.13.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................81 3.9.14. Progress from Cave 1 Instructor to Cave 2 Instructor .................................................82 3.9.14.1. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................82 3.9.15. Progress from Cave 2 Instructor to Cave 3 Instructor .................................................83 3.9.15.1. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................83 3.9.16. DPV Instructor Course .................................................................................................83 3.9.16.1. Purpose ............................................................................................................................83 3.9.16.2. Prerequisites ....................................................................................................................83

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3.9.16.3. Duration ..........................................................................................................................83 3.9.16.4. Program Limits ................................................................................................................83 3.9.16.5. Program Content .............................................................................................................83 3.9.16.6. Required Training Materials ............................................................................................84 3.9.16.7. Academic Topics .............................................................................................................84 3.9.16.8. Land Drills and Topics ....................................................................................................84 3.9.16.9. Required Dive Skills and Drills ......................................................................................84 3.9.16.10. Equipment Requirements ................................................................................................84 3.9.17. Progress from DPV 1 Instructor to DPV 2 Instructor ..................................................86

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1.

Purpose of GUE

Global Underwater Explorers was founded to improve the quality of aquatic education and to actively engage in the exploration and conservation of the underwater world. It was founded by conservationists, explorers, and educators with a desire to share the mystery of the underwater world.

1.1 Goals
1.1.1 Education
GUE’s educational platform was designed for divers seeking quality dive instruction. Its courses combine rigorous in-water training with comprehensive academic instruction, to produce divers who are skilled, competent and safe. GUE’s instructors, like its other representatives, are carefully chosen for their ability to enrich the organization—not for their capacity to generate revenue. As a result, GUE brings together a wide array of professional talents, ranging from expertise in training, exploration and the sciences, to expertise in education and conservation. GUE is also dedicated to the global dissemination of educational information. To this end, our educational outreach programs provide valuable information to schools, the media, and the general public.

1.1.2

Research

GUE is committed to promoting underwater research, focusing significant resources on scientific study. GUE supports the efforts of a membership conducting original research around the globe. GUE seeks to promote the research interests of other organizations. This is done by sharing successful methodologies, helping to cultivate effective funding and sponsorship strategies, and constructing a comprehensive database available to anyone working in education, conservation, or exploration. This datasharing will include both conventional publications and technological advancements—e.g., an interactive web database.

1.1.3

Exploration

GUE is committed to global underwater exploration. It focuses assets on long-term exploratory activity; it helps other organizations develop effective exploration techniques; and it shares the results of its findings with other exploration groups.

1.2 Training Philosophy
1.2.1
1.

Education
Standards: GUE’s curriculum maintains the highest training standards, combining strong academics with exacting practice (in-water training). Additionally, GUE requires diver and instructor currency and a gradual building of experience. Classes: GUE classes are lengthy and rigorous, demanding preparation before they begin. Instructors: GUE instructors are encouraged to exceed minimum training standards when these safely contribute to a participant’s learning process. Instructors are also actively encouraged to deny qualification to students who are not completely prepared for the level pursued.

GUE maintains that a good education is vital for the safe enjoyment of recreational and technical diving, and must include both a strong academic component and a rigorous practical one. This is achieved by:

2. 3.

1.2.2

Equipment

GUE is committed to a standardized equipment configuration, a holistic approach to equipment configuration that sees each element of a system as an integral part of the whole.

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1.2.3

Experience

GUE maintains that extensive in-water diver experience is at the core of diver proficiency. To cultivate this proficiency, GUE incorporates critical-skills training, experience dives, and post-class practice in its divertraining platform. 1. Critical-Skills Training This is the first step toward acquiring the requisite skills that prepare divers for the rigors of diving. Undertaken during formal training conditions, GUE employs a building-block method and allows trainees to learn at their own rate, introducing new skills only when students are able to incorporate them. An important aspect of critical-skills training is that failures and stressful situations are simulated in a controlled and safe environment. Competence is established by skill review, practice and repetition. 2. Experience Dives Undertaken during formal training conditions, this phase of training seeks to cultivate real diving experience, while providing a controlled context for further skill solidification. 3. Interim Class Requirement GUE requires that formal diver training be punctuated by breaks, during which students must practice a given skill set before progressing to a higher level of training. Before entering a higher level of training in a given curriculum, all students must have undertaken a minimum of twentyfive practice dives.

1.3 Training Structure
1.3.1
1.

Outline of Diver Training
Screening GUE seeks to promote the best interests of students by establishing whether they are capable of meeting the demands made on them during training. This is done by careful screening during registration, during which all student candidates must furnish GUE representatives with a completed registration outlining their personal experience, medical history and previous training.

2.

Advance Preparation GUE maintains that some advance preparation is necessary for student’s to optimize their training. Such preparation may include familiarization with a certain set of materials and/or a set of skills.

3.

Academics GUE academic sessions seek to instill in students a detailed comprehension of the theoretical components of relevant diver training. Ideally, academic portions of GUE classes rely on advance student preparation, so that the theoretical component of the class is more substantive.

4.

In-water Training (confined and open water) GUE in-water training is designed to help students cultivate essential diving skills and to test student knowledge in a controlled environment; skills include problem-solving and emergency management. By “confined water,” GUE means areas: • • • • • that do not exceed 30 feet/9 meters in depth where visibility is sufficiently good to allow instructors to maintain a view of their students that are not overhead areas that are lit by illumination levels comparable with daylight where surface conditions are relatively calm (no greater than 1- to 3-foot surge)

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where currents are negligible (under 1 knot). Such environments allow instructors maintain maximum control over trainees.

Suitable open-water conditions are areas that allow instructors reasonable control over students; depths are contingent on specific course requirements. 5. Testing, Evaluation and Qualification Testing and evaluation is a vital part of the GUE training process. GUE requires students to pass final exams with a score of 80 percent or higher. On review, students must demonstrate proficiency with all test questions. Student in-water performance is evaluated during post-dive debriefs. Upon completing a course, instructors submit a Course Completion Form to GUE HQ, outlining student strengths and weaknesses; such forms are available to students upon request. GUE qualification is ultimately an instructor’s decision. However, students, on request, should be provided with a written account of what remedial training they need in order to progress further with their training. At any point during their training, GUE trainees may request an evaluation from their instructor. GUE’s evaluation scale ranges sequentially from 1 (failure) to 5 (excellence) as follows: Grade 1: Indicates an unsafe diver in both ability and/or demeanor. The student should be removed from the course immediately. Grade 2: Indicates that the student cannot complete the required skill/task satisfactorily. If, at the discretion of the instructor, continued practice of a skill/task places either the student or the class at risk, the instructor may decide not to continue practicing a skill/task and fail the student. Grade 3: Indicates that the student has completed the skill/task satisfactorily (passed) but needs improvement. Grade 4: Indicates that the student has completed the skill/task well. Grade 5: Indicates that the student has completed the skill/task extremely well and deserves commendation.

1.3.2

Diver Assessment (Qualification, Provisional Qualification, Failure)

At the completion of GUE training, instructors must: a) decide whether a student is properly qualified to pursue the type of diving for which they sought training; b) decide to make qualification conditional on a student’s improving a given skill-set, specific to the particular diving activity; or c) decide that the student is not able to dive in that environment. These assessments take the form of: 1. 2. 3. Full qualification Provisional qualification Failure

Provisional certifications are designed as an interim measure for student divers whose skill level in a given class was close but not sufficient to pass a given class. Provisional qualification is not a form of accreditation, and does not represent any certification status within GUE. Divers should be aware that the original instructor is solely responsible for updating this rating. An instructor may make specific arrangements with another GUE instructor but the original instructor is ultimately responsible for upgrading their student’s provisional rating. The time and fees associated with provisional upgrades are entirely at the discretion of the instructor.

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1.3.3

Training Categories
This training category is designed for individuals seeking training in the fundamentals of sound recreational diving; recreational diving here is to be understood as diving in non-overhead environments.

Recreational Diver

Technical Diver This training category is designed for divers seeking training in technical diving. Technical diving goes beyond the domain of recreational diving by exposing divers to (among other things) greater depths, longer diving exposures, decompression, and to the requirements of gases other than air. Cave Diver This training category is designed for divers seeking training in cave environments. Cave-diver training focuses on the skills and knowledge most specifically geared toward cave-diving penetrations, yet these techniques are invaluable in a wide array of diving environments. Auxiliary Training This training category is designed for divers seeking instruction in a range of diving techniques including rebreathers, diver propulsion vehicles and a range of other subjects not directly related to the categories above.

1.3.4

General Training Standards

The general standards outlined below govern all GUE courses and those involved in them. These standards seek to ensure that GUE courses remain consistent with respect to a common foundation (primary skills and knowledge) necessary for building further skill and knowledge. Additional standards, governing specific training categories and specific levels within these categories, are outlined in the relevant course sections. 1. 2. 3. An Active Status GUE instructor, qualified to teach the level of training being conducted, is to be present and in control during any and all activities, including academic and in-water training. All Active Status GUE instructors must have obtained, and be familiar with, a copy of the current versions of the standards. i.e. this document. With the exception of GUE cave instructors during cave or Rebreather training courses, no GUE instructors may conduct critical-skill training in an overhead environment during any GUE training course. Experience portions (experience dives) of Technical or Rebreather classes may be conducted in a cave environment, provided that the following requirements are met: •Students engaged in such experience dives must be cave-qualified, to the skill level required by the environment in which diving is undertaken. •GUE instructors conducting experience dives in the cave environment must be cave instructors. •Instructors must be certified at least one level higher than that of the experience dive. For example, dives carried out within Cave 1 limits require an instructor who is Cave 2 rated. 5. The minimum number of required dives for a given level of training must be completed before moving on to the next level of training. Dives cannot be credited across curricula or across levels of a given curriculum. Students may not take two courses concurrently (at the same time). Students must receive full qualification for a level of training before progressing to the next level of training. GUE instructors conducting a particular course are required to use the equipment required of that course. All decompression and/or stage cylinders are to be clearly labeled in accordance with the “Cylinder Marking Standards” set forth in section 1.7.

4.

6. 7. 8.

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9.

Visibility is defined as the minimum distance in which divers can see one another and communicate effectively. •Delicate or sensitive formations •Structures that are in relatively pristine condition •Sensitive biological or archeological resources

10. GUE instructors should refrain from conducting training dives and drills in areas that contain:

11. GUE instructors should consider the impact of training on the sites they select, and should opt for sites that are appropriate to the current skill and training level of their student(s). Instructors should also refer to the recommended locations for certain training drills (see Appendix A), and are encouraged to seek the advice of local divers and instructors when conducting training in unfamiliar areas. 12. Careful selection of dive sites should take place during DPV training 13. GUE instructors must ensure that instructor-to-student ratios during land or surface drills do not compromise the quality of student education.

1.4 General Training Limits
The following limits apply to ALL GUE classes (course-specific limits can be found in the relevant sections).

1.4.1

PO2 Limits

All dives are to maintain a working PO2 of no greater than 1.4ATA and a resting PO2 of 1.6ATA +/- .05. Oxygen partial pressures are adjusted downward, according to the demands made by diving conditions with an average working PO2 of approximately 1.2ATA. “Resting dives” are defined as dives during which it is not reasonably expected that a diver will have to expend any unusual amount of energy, for example during decompression.

1.4.2

END Limits

No dives are to be planned to exceed an Equivalent Narcotic Depth (END) of 100 feet/30 meters; END is established by the following equations

(((1− fHe) × D ) −1) ×10m END( ft) = (((1− fHe) × D ) −1) × 33 ft
END(m) =
ATA ATA

Where END is the equivalent narcotic depth in meters or feet and DATA is the depth, expressed in ATAs.

1.4.3

Breathing Gas Requirements

All dives must begin with “minimum gas.” Minimum gas is defined as the volume needed for two divers sharing gas to reach the surface or another breathable gas supply.

1.4.4

Parameters for Critical Skills

Drills or skills that involve loss of visibility; loss of lights; simulated out-of-gas scenarios; simulated manifold failures; and rescue techniques involving assisting panicked divers, convulsing divers and unconscious divers, are to be considered critical skills. • • Critical skills must first be conducted in a confined-water setting, after which instructors can progressively increase the depth and/or penetration in which these are executed. Mask removal is restricted to confined water; under such training conditions, only the trainees themselves are allowed to remove their masks, at the prompting of their instructor. Mask removal is not permitted in any overhead environment (save decompression).

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• • • •

For the DPV program the following skills are considered critical: out of gas, towing a diver and dealing with a runaway DPV. “Air gunning,” a form of simulating manifold failure, is restricted to Technical, Cave, Rebreather and DPV level 2 courses. Under no circumstance should critical skills be conducted in delicate cave environments where damage to the environment may occur. GUE instructors are prohibited from turning off student cylinder valves (right, left, or isolator) EXCEPT in the event of a real regulator or manifold failure where turning off the relevant valve would be required. However, during rebreather training, instructors may interrupt gas addition to the rebreather.

1.4.5

Issuing Qualification under Other Agencies

Another agency’s qualifications may be awarded to a student - as a dual qualification - only if the student has met GUE standards and has been awarded full GUE qualification. The student can then receive both a GUE qualification card and the equivalent qualification of another agency. Qualification from another agency may not be issued instead of a GUE qualification. This means that if a trainee does not warrant full qualification under GUE’s standards and procedures, no qualification from another agency can be awarded in its stead.

1.4.6

Teaching and Rebreathers

GUE instructors may not teach GUE courses while on a rebreather. The only exceptions are when training rebreather instructors during an instructor training course (ITC), or when critical-skill testing is complete during rebreather classes.

1.4.7

Buoyancy Considerations

Some diving environments (e.g., shallow caves) permit divers with no buoyant lift (e.g., failed buoyancy compensator) to exit along a floor of reasonable depth; other environments, because of their depth, do not. Divers should account for such conditions and seek to ensure that their systems enable them to return safely to the surface in the event of a loss of buoyancy or a low-on-gas situation.

1.4.8

Conservation

As part of GUE’s commitment to global environmental conservation, Appendix A details recommended areas for simulated zero-visibility drills, required by all GUE Cave programs.

1.4.9

Decompression Parameters

GUE recognizes that events may conspire to result in decompression sickness, despite the care exercised by those involved. Nonetheless, GUE requires that, when training, GUE instructors follow conservative decompression schedules and evaluate decompression schedules using GUE’s DecoPlanner as a standard. Decompression times during training should approximate the time indicated by DecoPlanner when using either gradient factors of 20/85 when using the Buhlmann algorithm, or on a conservatism setting of 2 when using the Variable Permeability Model. These profiles will be known as Unadjusted Decompression profiles. These may be adjusted in a pragmatic manner to enable simpler in-water implementation. Dives where DecoPlanner does not indicate any decompression requirement longer than one minute at any single stop depth are known as Minimum Decompression dives. These should be implemented by slowing the ascent rate in the final half of the ascent.

1.4.10 Course Size
GUE courses must not be run with only one student. The only exception to this stipulation involves instructor training courses, which may be conducted with one candidate.

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1.5 General Diving Skills
All GUE courses must ensure proficiency in the following diving skills; proficiency is measured by a final grade of 3 (satisfactory) or better when demonstrating the skill. Course-specific requirements including any deviation from a particular skill will be listed under the appropriate course section. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving practices; this would include pre-dive preparation, in-water activity, and post-dive assessment. Demonstrate awareness of team-member location and a concern for safety, responding quickly to visual cues and dive partner requirements. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver in multiple gassharing episodes. Be able to comfortably demonstrate the frog and modified frog kicks, the flutter and the modified flutter kicks, the helicopter turn and the backwards kick. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training.

All GUE instructors are encouraged to exceed minimum training standards when by doing so they are promoting the best interests of the student. Instructors are actively encouraged to deny qualification to students when students have not met the standards of the certification level they are pursuing to the satisfaction of the instructor.

1.6 General Prerequisites for All GUE Courses
All GUE courses have the following prerequisites (any additional prerequisite, as well as any deviations from the following, will be listed under the specific course section): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Must submit a completed registration form, complete with medical history, and liability release to GUE Headquarters. Must be physically and mentally fit. Must hold insurance that will cover diving emergencies such as hyperbaric treatment e.g. DAN Master-level insurance or equivalent. Must be a nonsmoker. Must obtain a physician’s prior written authorization for the use of prescription drugs, except for birth control, or for a prior medical condition that may pose a risk while diving. A partial list of such conditions may be found on GUE’s medical history form. Conditions that pose a risk to students while diving require a physician’s written approval to dive; this information must be disclosed to their GUE instructor before the onset of training. Physician clearance for a specific condition is valid for one year from the date it is given, assuming there are no further changes to the student’s medical conditions. Physician clearance to dive under a specific medical condition does not obligate GUE or a GUE representative to clear a trainee for diving; this remains at the sole discretion of the instructor.

1.7 Cylinder Marking Standards
1. Dive cylinders should be free of unnecessary stickers and markings. They should bear a current Visual Inspection sticker and Hydro test sticker, as detailed by current country-specific regulations. VIP stickers (if required) should be placed so as to create minimum distraction from the MOD markings. All stage/decompression cylinders must be marked with the maximum operating depth (MOD) in approximately 3-inch/7.5-centimeter numbers. Markings should be oriented in such a way as to be easily read by both divers and their team members. In countries where the metric system is used in diving, stage/decompression cylinders should be marked in METERS.

2.

3.

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4. 5.

In countries where the imperial system is used in diving, stage/decompression cylinders marking should be in FEET. In all countries, in addition to the MOD, Oxygen cylinders should be marked with the word “OXYGEN” (or the local equivalent) in approximately 3-inch/7.5-centimeter-high letters running horizontally down the side. No additional Nitrox stickers, or indication that the cylinder does not contain air, are required. Once filled, cylinders must be all analyzed and the results, to the decimal point, placed near the neck of the cylinder. The label should include the date the cylinder was analyzed and the tester’s initials. Dedicated cylinders used for the inflation of drysuits are exempted from analysis requirements.

6.

1.8 Quality Control
GUE’s quality control program seeks to ensure that GUE courses, instructors, and members maintain the highest standards possible before, during, and after training. This is done through: instructor evaluations, instructor renewals, instructor and diver re-qualification, detailed course completion objectives, and rigorous training in conformity with agency standards.

1.8.1

Instructor Evaluations

GUE’s qualification process requires all GUE trainees to complete an Instructor Evaluation Form at the completion of their training. Available electronically, GUE’s Quality Control Form enables: 1) students to evaluate their training experience; and 2) GUE to monitor instructional quality.

1.8.2

Instructor Peer Review

GUE maintains a peer-review program that encourages instructor cooperation and requires them to report to GUE Headquarters any practices not in keeping with GUE’s standards.

1.8.3 1.8.4

Instructor Renewals Instructor Re-Qualification

To insure currency of qualifications, all GUE instructors are required to renew annually.

GUE instructors must formally re-qualify every three years. This must be performed in each curriculum (Recreational, Tech, Cave) in which they are qualified to teach. This requirement must be fulfilled by joining a formal GUE workshop, usually organized around an event such as the GUE conference. This workshop is conducted by a GUE IE and is tailored to the specific curricula in need of update. Instructors may choose to reset the three-year clock at any point within this three-year window. GUE instructors must also re-qualify anytime the safety or effectiveness of their training is questioned. In such a case, GUE’s Quality Control Board may immediately suspend an instructor’s teaching privileges until a thorough review of these allegations is made. Instructors who fail to re-qualify within three years will be put on inactive status and required to return their instructor cards to GUE Headquarters at once.

1.8.5

Diver Re-Qualification

All GUE diver-qualification cards expire three years after the date of issue. A diver can be re-qualified six months before or six months after the expiration of their qualification period by having his/her individual dive experience reviewed by either a qualified GUE instructor or by GUE Headquarters. To maintain GUE qualification, GUE divers must certify that they have conducted twenty-five dives at the level of their qualification within a three year period. Upon review, divers can be issued a new qualification card for a nominal fee. This re-certification process may be completed up to five years from the last re-qualification. If the duration between either the initial class or the last re-qualification exceeds five years, then formal approval from a GUE instructor at the appropriate level will be required.

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1.9 Recognition of Credentials
Accomplished divers from other agencies who wish to be qualified as GUE divers may petition GUE HQ to have their training and experience recognized, and a suitable level of GUE qualification issued. Upon receipt of such a request, GUE HQ will arrange for an in-water evaluation of the petitioning diver by a GUE instructor trainer. If, upon evaluation, the GUE IT considers that the petitioning diver’s request should be honored, s/he should recommend to GUE HQ, in writing, that it issues an appropriate level of GUE qualification. Upon receipt of this recommendation, GUE HQ will consider awarding the petitioning diver a suitable level of GUE qualification.

1.9.1

Waivers

Qualified GUE divers seeking upper-level qualification can petition a GUE Instructor Evaluator to waive the 25-dive prerequisite between GUE courses.

1.10Complaints
GUE’s Quality Control Board is responsible for handling complaints promptly and thoroughly. Following an investigation of a complaint, the Quality Control Board will decide whether or not disciplinary action is warranted.

1.10.1 Complaint Submission
Complaints can be lodged against any GUE member, all of whom are bound by GUE’s standards and procedures. Formal complaints against any GUE member must be sent to GUE’s Director of Quality Control at GUE Headquarters and must include: • • • • A written statement outlining the nature of the complaint, Name and contact information The date, time, and location of incident A complete account of the event, including names and contact information (if possible) of any witnesses

Complaints can be lodged either by mail or electronically. Mail should be sent to the Director of Quality Control, Global Underwater Explorers, 15 South Main Street, High Springs, FL, 32643, USA. Email should be send to qc@gue.com. No action, other than review, can be taken as a result of an anonymous or a verbal complaint.

1.10.2 Complaint Procedure
1. Following review of a complaint, a summary of the complaint is sent to a charged member by regular and/or electronic mail. Charged member(s) must respond in writing to the complaint (by mail or electronically) within thirty days from the date the review was sent. It is the responsibility of GUE members to maintain current contact information with GUE HQ. Charged members who fail to respond to a written complaint within thirty days are automatically suspended, and all membership privileges are revoked until resolution of the matter. Charged members who respond to a written complaint are able to maintain their membership privileges until a final determination is reached by GUE’s Quality Control Board. Upon receipt of a charged member’s response, GUE’s Quality Control Board can decide to dismiss the complaint, resolve the matter by negotiation, suspend the member in question, or terminate his/her membership.

2. 3.

1.10.3 Penalties and Remedial Actions
GUE’s Quality Control Board is empowered to render the following decisions: 1. Private censure
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Public censure Prescribed educational rehabilitation Defined probationary period Defined suspension Revocation of membership and/or teaching privileges

1.10.4 Rights of Appeal
Charged members who have been subject to an unfavorable decision by GUE’s Quality Control Board may, within thirty days of the decision, appeal the decision to GUE’s Board of Directors. Such an appeal must be lodged in writing to the Board of Directors, Global Underwater Explorers, 15 South Main Street, High Springs, FL, 32643, USA.

1.10.5 Executive Suspension of Membership
In cases where GUE’s Director of Training or GUE’s officers suspect that student safety has been or is believed to be compromised, GUE HQ has the right to immediately suspend the GUE instructor(s) in question WITHOUT going through a formal complaint process. This suspension will be followed by a review of the case by GUE’s Quality Control Board, who will be responsible for rendering a final decision.

1.11Conduct Policies and Procedures
1. 2. 3. GUE representatives must promote the best interests of GUE. GUE members and its representatives must demonstrate financial responsibility when transacting business with GUE. GUE instructors must process student Course Completion Forms in a professional and timely fashion. GUE instructors must cooperate with GUE Headquarters when certification-card issues arise. All correspondence found on the Instructors Forum, instructors@gue.com, is confidential. Any instructor who knowingly allows these discussions to become public may be subject to disciplinary action. GUE instructors must behave professionally when interacting with GUE trainees, with GUE HQ and with other persons who have been solicited to help promote GUE (e.g., diving facilities). All GUE members and its representatives are bound by the standards and procedures outlined in this document. GUE membership and renewal applications do not constitute perpetual offers of membership. GUE HQ reserves the right to refuse membership or renewal to any party without assigning any reason. GUE instructor qualification cards issued by GUE Headquarters are the property of Global Underwater Explorers, and must be surrendered upon request to the Board of Directors or their representatives.

4.

5. 6. 7.

8.

1.12Records
GUE headquarters will maintain the following records (if applicable) for each instructor, student, and class for up to seven years after the class: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Student Registration Student Liability and Release and Assumption of Risk Student Agreement Student Medical Questionnaire Accident Report
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Instructor Registration Instructor Liability and Release and Assumption of Risk Instructor Agreement Course Completion Form

10. C-Card Replacement Form 11. Instructor Evaluation Form 12. Membership Registration

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2. GUE Course Training Standards and Procedures
2.1 Recreational Diver Curriculum
2.1.1
2.1.1.1

GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 - Nitrox Diver
Purpose

The GUE Recreational Diver level 1 course is designed to develop the essential skills required in all sound diving practice. This course provides the non-diver with an opportunity to develop fundamental diving skills that will support comfort, confidence, and competence in the water. This course also provides a solid diving foundation for individuals with aspirations for more advanced diver training. Divers who successfully complete the GUE Recreational Diver level 1 course will not be required to pursue the GUE Fundamentals course.

2.1.1.2
1. 2.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6. Must be a minimum of sixteen years of age. This may be reduced under exceptional circumstances, and with written approval from GUE HQ,

2.1.1.3

Duration

The GUE Recreational Diver level 1 class must be conducted over at least eight full days; course time should total at least sixty hours, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.1.1.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4. Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 8:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 4:1 during any direct in-water training In-water ratios should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 70 feet/21 meters. No decompression. No overhead environment diving. No night diving

3. 4. 5. 6.

2.1.1.5

Course Content

The GUE Recreational Diver level 1 course is normally involves a minimum sixty hours of instruction including ten lectures, ten confined water dives and 10 open water dives. If the course is conducted in drysuit there will be additional confined and open water dives. The GUE Recreational Diver level 1 course emphasizes creating the fundamental diving skills required for all sound diving practice. This focus in creating a proper set of skills increases diving fun by reducing stress and increasing diver proficiency; this is accomplished through educating students on GUE principles including but not limited to proper control of buoyancy, trim, propulsion, breathing gases and teamwork.

2.1.1.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Submerged: Mastering the Art and Science of Scuba Diving. Global Underwater Explorers, 2006, High Springs, Florida. Beginning with the End in Mind - The Fundamentals of Recreational Diving. Jesper Berglund. Global Undwerwater Explorers. 2008. Stockholm, Sweden.

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2.1.1.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

Introduction to Scuba Diving Physics, Physiology, and basic diving techniques Diving Equipment The Balanced Rig and Going Beyond the Basics Going Beyond Basic Physiology and Physics Breathing Gas Dynamics Decompression Dive Planning Accident and Problem Solving Underwater

10. The Aquatic Realm

2.1.1.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Land Drills and Topics

Equipment fit and function Dive team protocols Analyze and mark cylinders Pre-dive drills Basic 5 scuba skills S-drill and valve-drill Propulsion techniques Surface-marker deployment Straight line compass navigation

10. Basic 5 Rescue skills

2.1.1.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 300 yards/275 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold. Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques, including pre-dive preparations, in-water activity, and post-dive assessments. Demonstrate awareness of team-member location and a concern for safety, responding quickly to visual cues and dive-partner needs. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver followed by an ascent to the surface, utilizing Minimum Decompression. Comfortably demonstrate at least two propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; students should demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary for a successful backward kick. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training.

9.

10. Demonstrate proficiency in the ability to deploy a surface marker while utilizing a spool.

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11. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5 feet/1.5 meters of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. 12. Demonstrate proficiency in underwater communication. 13. Demonstrate basic equipment proficiency and an understanding of the GUE equipment configuration. 14. Demonstrate aptitude in the following open-water skills: mask clearing, mask removal and replacement, regulator removal and exchange, long hose deployment. 15. Demonstrate safe ascent and descent procedures. 16. Demonstrate proficiency in executing a valve drill. 17. Demonstrate dive rescue techniques

2.1.1.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use a single tank/cylinder with a K-, H-, or Y-valve. Students may also use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5 to 7 foot/1.5 to 2 meter hose. One of the firststages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband prevents the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, and the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs/25kgs for a single tank and 80 lbs/40kgs for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time-/depth-measuring device Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver

2. 3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 11. One wrist compass 12. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure the use of necessary equipment before the start

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of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.1.2
2.1.2.1

GUE Recreational Diver Level 2 - Triox Diver
Purpose

GUE’s Recreational Diver level 2 course is a no-decompression class structured to prepare divers for deeper recreational diving using proper equipment, diving techniques, and breathing mixtures. In this class, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of decompression and schooled in correct ascent procedures. GUE’s Recreational Diver level 2 training focuses on expanding the fundamental skills learned in GUE’s Recreational Diver level 1 course and/or the GUE Fundamentals course (or elsewhere), and is designed to cultivate, integrate, and expand the essential skills required for safe deeper diving. This will include problem identification and resolution, and building the capacity for progressively more challenging diving. In this class, students will be trained in: a) the use of single or double back gas tanks/cylinders, and in the potential failure problems associated with them; b) the use of Nitrox and Triox for extended bottom times; and c) the use of Helium to minimize narcosis, CO2, gas density, and post-dive “nitrogen stress.”

2.1.2.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of 16 years of age. This may be reduced under exceptional circumstances, and with written approval from GUE HQ, Must have passed the GUE Recreational Diver level 1 class or a GUE Fundamentals class Must have a minimum of twenty five dives beyond open-water qualification.

2.1.2.3

Duration

The GUE Recreational Diver level 2 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.1.2.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any direct in-water training In-water ratios should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 30 m / 100 ft. No overhead environment diving

3. 4.

2.1.2.5

Course Content

The GUE Recreational Diver level 2 course normally involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction designed to provide a working knowledge of Nitrox, Triox, the history of decompression and practice, physics, physiology, tables, and operational considerations. Course requirements include nine hours of academics and twelve dives. The initial two dives will be conducted in water no deeper than 15 m / 40 ft to evaluate the diver’s ability and to identify any skill deficiencies. The last two dives are to be Triox dives at depth for experience, but not in excess of course depth limitations.

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2.1.2.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beginning with the End in Mind - The Fundamentals of Recreational Diving. Jesper Berglund. Global Undwerwater Explorers. 2008. Stockholm, Sweden.

2.1.2.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Academic Topics

Applied diving physics Applied diving physiology Understanding compressed gas elimination Introduction to Triox Triox versus other gases GUE equipment configuration Dive planning and logistics Rescue skills

2.1.2.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Land Drills and Topics

Situational awareness Dive team order and protocols Pre-dive drill Gas sharing and touch contact Use of safety spools and surface marker buoy Basic navigation skills Rescue skills

2.1.2.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 275m / 300yds in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold Demonstrate proficiency in procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation and gassharing. Demonstrate proficiency in lift bag/surface-marker buoy deployment. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5 feet/1.5 meters of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. Comfortably demonstrate four propulsion techniques. Students should demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary for a successful backward kick. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of touch-contact communication during out-of-gas situations. Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment.

7. 8. 9.

10. Gas-sharing scenarios to include a gas-sharing horizontal swim for at least 200 feet/60 meters.
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11. Gas-sharing scenarios to include a direct ascent while managing decompression obligations. 12. Demonstrate effective proficiency with proper ascent/descents, including the implementation of deep stops. 13. Demonstrate proficiency in recovering an unconscious diver to the surface and the surface management of a range of simulated diving incidents.

2.1.2.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use single or dual tanks/cylinders with a single outlet, Y-valve, or if in doubles, a dual-outlet isolated manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. Regulators: Single first-stage if using a single tank with single outlet, or two first-stages if using either a single tank with Y-valve or double tanks. A minimum of two second-stages. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. The diver must have a pressure gauge and BCD inflator. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform, of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs/25kgs for a single tank and 80 lbs/40kgs for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time-/depth-measuring device Compass Appropriate minimum and no-decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split Minimum of one cutting device Wet Notes

2.

3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 11. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 12. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

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2.1.3
2.1.3.1

GUE Recreational Diver Level 3 - Trimix Diver
Purpose

The GUE Recreational Diver level 3 course is a minimum decompression class structured to prepare divers for deeper recreational diving using proper equipment, diving techniques and breathing mixtures. In this class, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of decompression and trained in correct ascent procedures. Recreational Diver level 3 training builds on the fundamental skills learned in previous GUE Recreational courses (GUE Fundamentals, Level 1 and Diver level 2) and is designed to cultivate the essential skills required for safe diving at greater depths. The training will include problem identification and resolution as a means of building capacity for progressively more challenging dives. In this class, students will be trained in: a) the use of double, back-gas tanks/cylinders as well as the problem resolution skills required for safe doubles diving; b) the use of Nitrox for decompression; c) the use of Helium to minimize narcosis, CO2, gas density, and post-dive “nitrogen stress”; and d) the use of a single decompression cylinder for stage decompression techniques.

2.1.3.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE General Course Prerequisites outlined in Section 1.6 Must be a minimum of 18 years of age Must be GUE Recreational Level 2 or GUE Fundamentals certified Must have a minimum of seventy-five non-training dives, 10 dives using doubles

2.1.3.3

Duration

The GUE Recreational Level 3 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.1.3.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General Training Limits as outlined in Section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any direct in-water training In-water ratios should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth of 39 m / 130 ft No overhead environment diving Dives should not be planned to incur more than 15 minutes of decompression

3. 4. 5.

2.1.3.5

Course Content

The GUE Recreational Diver level 3 course normally involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction designed to provide a working knowledge of enriched air diving as well as normoxic and hyperoxic Trimix; this overview includes instruction in proper decompression procedures with hyperoxic mixes, including the use of decompression tables and proper ascent practices. Fundamental aspects of physics and physiology will be reviewed as a means to support safe diving at greater depths. Divers will also be trained in the proper operational and dive planning procedures necessary to conduct recreational dives in deeper water, including accident management and problem resolution. The course includes nine hours of academics and eight dives. Of these dives, four will be critical skill dives and four will be experience dives.

2.1.3.6
1.

Required Training Materials

Submerged: Mastering the Art and Science of Sport Diving. Jablonski, Alexakos, GUE, 2005, High Springs, Florida

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2. 3.

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.1.3.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

Applied diving physics Applied diving physiology Introduction to normoxic trimix Nitrogen narcosis Gas density Carbon dioxide Oxygen limitations Understanding inert gas on-gassing and elimination Decompression theories

10. Decompression practices while using nitrox 11. Decompression planning using decompression tables and DecoPlanner 12. Decompression sickness 13. GUE equipment configuration 14. Dive planning and logistics

2.1.3.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Land Drills & Topics

Situational awareness Dive team order and protocols GUE-EDGE and Pre-dive drill Out of gas scenarios and touch contact Valve management including failure procedures Use of safety spools and lift bag Ascent and decompression protocols Gas switching protocol Unconscious/Toxing Diver

10. Descent/Ascent Drill

2.1.3.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Required Dive Skills & Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, Section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 300 yards/275 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold Demonstrate proficiency in procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation and gassharing. Demonstrate proficiency in lift bag/surface marker buoy deployment.

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6.

Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5 feet/1.5 meters of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate for delicate and/or silty environments. Students should demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary for a successful backward kick. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of touch contact communication during out-of-gas situations. Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment.

7.

8. 9.

10. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the primary light including passive and active communication. 11. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with a single decompression cylinder. 12. Gas-sharing scenarios to include a gas-sharing horizontal swim. 13. Gas-sharing scenarios to include a direct ascent while managing decompression obligations. 14. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with valve-management by conducting a GUE “valve drill” which includes: shutting down one’s valve, switching regulators and returning the valve to an open position. 15. Demonstrate proficiency with proper ascent/descents, including the implementation of SMB usage, deep stops and safe gas switches. 16. Demonstrate proficiency in surfacing an unconscious diver from depth and administering rescue breaths.

2.1.3.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment. Tanks/Cylinders: Students required to use dual tanks/cylinders with a dual outlet isolated manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. Students also need one decompression tank/ cylinder. The cylinder should not be smaller than approximately 30 cubic feet / 4 liters and no big larger than approximately 80 cubic feet / 11 liters. Cylinders must be free from any unnecessary decals/stickers or cylinder wraps. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2 meter hose and provide inflation for a wing style BCD. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge. One first-stage regulator for shallow decompression gas, supplying a single second-stage and a pressure gauge. One first stage fitted with an over pressure valve providing dry suit inflation (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform, of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband will prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. The webbing should support five D-rings. The first should be placed at the left hip. The second should be placed in line with the diver’s right collarbone. The third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone. The fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80lbs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training.

2.

3.

4.

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5.

One primary light. A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external head (fitted with a Goodman handle) via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of a 50watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. Two reserve lights; Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. At least one time/depth-measuring device Compass Appropriate Decompression and No-Decompression tables

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Mask and fins: Mask should be low volume; fins should be rigid, non-split 11. Reserve Mask 12. Minimum of one cutting device 13. Divers note book 14. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters line 15. One surface marker buoy 16. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s web site.

2.1.4
2.1.4.1

GUE Fundamentals Course
Purpose

The GUE Fundamentals course is designed to cultivate the essential skills required by all sound diving practice, irrespective of level or environment. A prerequisite for all GUE classes, save Recreational Diver level 1 course, GUE Fundamentals performs a three-fold function: • it provides the recreational diver, who does not desire further diver training, with an opportunity to advance his/her basic diving skills, thereby developing more comfort, confidence, and competence in the water it provides the diver with aspirations of more advanced diver training with the tools that will contribute to a greater likelihood of success it provides non-GUE trained divers with a gateway to GUE training.

• •

2.1.4.2
1. 2. 3.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites, as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of sixteen years of age Must be a certified open-water diver from a recognized training agency

2.1.4.3

Duration

The GUE Fundamentals class must be conducted over at least four full days, encompassing both classroom and in-water work. Classes in which the student-to-instructor ratio (both in water and surface) does not exceed 3:1 may be conducted in no fewer than three full days. Course requirements include a minimum of
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ten hours of academics and five in-water sessions; at least two of these dives must include a depth of at least 25 feet / 8 meters.

2.1.4.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 8:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 4:1 during any direct in-water training In-water ratios should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 60 feet/18 meters No decompression No overhead environment diving

3. 4. 5.

2.1.4.5

Course Content

Combining lecture and in-water sessions, this course focuses on cultivating the basic skills required for all sound diving practice. It is focused on increasing diving fun by reducing stress and increasing diver proficiency through proper control of buoyancy, trim, propulsion, teamwork, and other GUE principles. Course requirements include a minimum of ten hours of academics and five in-water sessions; at least two of these dives must include a depth of at least 25 feet / 8 meters.

2.1.4.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. GUE Fundamentals Workbook.

2.1.4.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

GUE organization Why GUE Fundamentals? Diving proficiency Buoyancy and trim Streamlining and equipment configuration Propulsion techniques Situational awareness Communication Breathing gas overview

10. Decompression overview 11. Dive planning and gas management 12. Diver preparedness

2.1.4.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Land Drills and Topics

Dive team protocols S-drill and valve-drill Equipment fit and function Propulsion techniques Pre-dive drills

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6. 7.

Surface-marker deployment Unconscious diver recovery

2.1.4.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques; this would include pre-dive preparations, inwater activity, and post-dive assessment. Must be able to swim at least 300 yards/275 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold Demonstrate awareness of team-member location and a concern for safety, responding quickly to visual cues and dive-partner needs. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver followed by an ascent to the surface, utilizing minimum decompression. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; students should demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary for a successful backward kick. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training. Demonstrate proficiency in the ability to deploy a surface marker while using a spool.

8. 9.

10. Demonstrate proficiency in underwater communication. 11. Demonstrate basic equipment proficiency and an understanding of the GUE equipment configuration. 12. Demonstrate dive-rescue techniques, including effective management of an unconscious diver. Differences between the management of an unconscious diver and a convulsing diver should be noted. 13. Demonstrate a comfortable demeanor while swimming without a mask, in touch contact. 14. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5 feet/1.5 meters of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. 15. Demonstrate aptitude in the following open-water skills: mask clearing, mask removal and replacement, regulator removal and exchange, long-hose deployment. 16. Demonstrate safe ascent and descent procedures. 17. Demonstrate proficiency in executing a valve drill. 18. Demonstrate proficiency in four propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; students should also demonstrate competence in the backward kick. * 19. Demonstrate proficiency with a primary light by using it during all skills except SMB deployment.* 20. Demonstrate efficient deployment and stowage of a reserve light.* 21. Demonstrate an efficient valve drill with double tanks.* 22. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1.0 meters of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.* *Skills and drills 18-22 apply only to students seeking admittance into Tech or Cave training. These students must perform skills 16-19 at a grade of 4 or above to qualify for registration into the Tech or Cave curriculum (see 1.3.1 Outline of Diver Training).

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2.1.4.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Students may also use a single tank/cylinder with a K-, H-, or Y-valve. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5- to 7-foot/1.5- to 2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, and the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs/25kgs for a single tank and 80 lbs/40kgs for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver

2. 3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 11. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 12. Double cylinders with isolation manifold, and appropriately sized double-tank buoyancy compensation device.* 13. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater.* 14. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel.* *Required equipment 12 through 14 applies only to students seeking admittance into Tech or Cave training. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure the use of necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

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2.2 Technical Diver Curriculum
2.2.1
2.2.1.1

Technical Diver Level 1
Purpose

GUE’s Technical Diver Level 1 (Tech 1) course is structured to prepare divers for the rigors of technical diving and to familiarize them with the use of different breathing and decompression mixtures. Tech 1 training focuses on expanding the fundamental skills learned in the GUE Fundamentals course (or elsewhere), and is designed to cultivate, integrate, and expand the essential skills required for safe technical diving. This will include problem identification and resolution, and building the capacity for progressively more challenging diving. In this class, students will be trained in: a) the use of double tanks/cylinders and in the potential failure problems associated with them; b) the use of Nitrox for accelerated and general decompression strategies; c) the use of Helium to minimize narcosis; and d) the applications of singledecompression stage diving, with respect to decompression procedures. The class will focus on nitrox and Trimix as breathing gases for dives down to 170 feet/51 meters, and provides an excellent foundation on which divers can build their technical diving experience and prepare for GUE’s Technical Diver 2 course (Tech 2).

2.2.1.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of eighteen years of age Must have passed GUE Fundamentals using the equipment outlined in section 2.1.4.10, and have demonstrated competence in skill and drills listed in section 2.1.4.9 at a grade of 4 or above Must have a minimum of 100 dives beyond open-water qualification Students participating in a Tech class conducted in a cave must be at least GUE Level 2 Cave divers

2.2.1.3

Duration

The Tech 1 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.2.1.4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any direct in-water training. Maximum depth 170 feet / 51 meters Dives should not be planned to incur more than 30 minutes of Unadjusted Decompression (see section 1.4.10) No overhead diving except by active GUE Cave 2 Level instructors while teaching in the cave environment

2.2.1.5

Course Content

The GUE Tech 1 course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction designed to provide a working knowledge of nitrox, normoxic and hyperoxic Trimix and decompression mixtures, including history, physics, physiology, tables, and operational considerations. Course requirements include ten hours of academics and eight dives, six of which will be critical-skill dives and two will be experience dives.

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Initial dives will be conducted in shallow water to test diver ability and to fill in any deficits in skill levels. The last two dives are to be Trimix dives at depth for experience.

2.2.1.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.2.1.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

Physics Pressure and gas-law review Equations relevant for planning, mixing, and using enriched air Physiology Hypoxia Hyperoxia Oxygen toxicity CNS Pulmonary toxicity

10. Tracking multilevel, multi-dive, and multi-day exposures 11. Inert gas narcosis 12. Inert gas absorption and elimination 13. Carbon dioxide toxicity 14. Carbon monoxide toxicity 15. Hyperthermia 16. Hypothermia 17. Decompression illness 18. Accelerated and general decompression strategies 19. Decompression practices on air, enriched air, and Oxygen 20. Generic tables, computers, and custom tables 21. Introduction to normoxic and hyperoxic Trimix 22. Advantages over deep air 23. Equipment considerations 24. Stage cylinders 25. Doubles 26. Decompression stage cylinders 27. BC/harness 28. Regulators, depth gauges, pressure gauges, and hose routing 29. Manifolds 30. Surface-marker buoys and spools (for deco platforms)

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31. Computers and bottom timers 32. Exposure suit appropriate for the environment 33. Dive planning 34. Operational planning 35. Support 36. Teams 37. Team planning 38. Gas matching 39. Oxygen limits 40. Nitrogen limits 41. Emergency procedures 42. Omitted decompression procedures 43. Miscellaneous issues, including limited deco gas, out of gas, team separation, etc. 44. Procedures 45. Bottom and deco gas 46. Normal operations 47. Procedures for failure, loss, or inadequate supply 48. Gas mixing 49. Analyzing and labeling gas supplies 50. Line following

2.2.1.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Land Drills and Topics

Reel and guideline use Dive team order and protocols Touch contact Manifold operation and failures Use of safety spools and reels Basic navigation skills Pre-dive drills

2.2.1.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 400 yards/375 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping (This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection) Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold Procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching as appropriate. Surface-marker buoy deployment. Use of touch contact for limited and simulated zero-visibility situations. Reel and guideline use.

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8. 9.

Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment. Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event.

10. Demonstrate the effective deployment of a reserve light in under thirty seconds. 11. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; one of these kicks must include the backward kick. 12. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. 13. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with a single decompression cylinder. 14. Demonstrate proficiency with effective decompression techniques, including depth and time management. 15. Demonstrate a comfortable demeanor while sharing gas without a mask. 16. Demonstrate dive-rescue techniques, including effective management of unconscious diver. Differences between the management of unconscious and toxing diver should be noted. 17. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.2.1.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. Divers must also have access to one deco tank/cylinder of 50-percent Nitrox. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). One first-stage regulator for shallow decompression gas, supplying a single second-stage and pressure gauge. 3. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device

2.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

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9.

Wet Notes

10. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 16. One wrist compass 17. One reserve mask Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.2.2
2.2.2.1

Technical Diver Level 1 “Plus” Upgrade
Purpose

The Tech 1 Plus Upgrade is designed to allow the Tech 1 certified diver to develop their technical diving skills and to progress towards more complex and advanced dives. The existing skills learned at Tech 1 will be expanded to include the use of a bottom stage to either allow more flexibility for multiple dives, or to allow longer bottom times. Students will be trained in safe gas planning and management strategies, failure management and resolution and contingency measures.

2.2.2.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of 18 years of age Must have passed GUE Technical Diver level 1 Must have a minimum of 25 technical dives at the Tech 1 level. Students participating in a Tech class conducted in a cave must be at least GUE Level 2 Cave divers

2.2.2.3

Duration

The Tech 1 Plus Upgrade is normally conducted over a 1-2 day period. It normally involves a minimum of 8 hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.2.2.4
1. 2. 3.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 3:1 during any in-water training Maximum depth 54 m / 180 ft

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4. 5.

Dives should not be planned to incur more than 45 minutes of Unadjusted Decompression (see section 1.4.10) No overhead diving except by active GUE Cave 2 Level instructors while teaching in the cave environment

2.2.2.5

Course Contents

The GUE Tech 1 Plus Upgrade course involves a minimum of eight hours of instruction designed to extend the Tech 1 divers knowledge and capacity using nitrox, normoxic and hyperoxic Trimix and decompression mixtures. Course requirements include four hours of academics and two dives, one of which will be critical-skill dives and one will be an experience dive. Initial dives will be conducted in shallow water to test diver ability and to fill in any deficits in skill levels. The last dive is to be a Trimix dive at depth for experience.

2.2.2.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.2.2.7
1. 2. 3. 4.

Academic Topics

Gas management Equipment configuration Decompression strategies Contingency planning

2.2.2.8
1. 2.

Land Drills and Topics

Gas switch procedures Failed/lost decompression gas strategies

2.2.2.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching as appropriate. Surface-marker buoy deployment. Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment. Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; one of these kicks must include the backward kick. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with a single decompression cylinder. Demonstrate proficiency with effective decompression techniques, including depth and time management.

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10. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. 11. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with a bottom stage cylinder including ensuring that the correct gas is being breathed at all times, and a proficient switch from the stage to backgas. 12. Demonstrate the ability to manage a failed or lost decompression gas scenario.

2.2.2.10

Equipment Requirements

As outlined in 2.2.1.10 One bottom stage cylinder. This should be a minimum of 80 cuft / 11L capacity, and marked as outlined in section 1.7. One first-stage regulator for bottom stage gas, supplying a single second-stage and pressure gauge.

2.2.3
2.2.3.1

Technical Diver Level 2
Purpose

GUE’s Technical Diver 2 (Tech 2) course is the second in a series of three courses designed to develop technical diving excellence, building upon previously learned skills with a focus on extending essential technical diving skills. Tech 2 training focuses on building diving proficiency at increasing depth, using Helium diving gases with Oxygen-enriched decompression gases. These skills include: the use of multiple stages; the use of Trimix; the use of greater percentages of Helium; gas management; Oxygen management; decompression; accelerated, omitted and general decompression strategies; dive planning, and technical equipment configurations. Course participants will gain experience working with a variety of different gas mixtures for use as bottom-mix and multiple-decompression gases.

2.2.3.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of twenty-one years of age Must have passed GUE Tech 1 Must have a minimum of 200 dives, with at least fifty dives on double tanks/cylinders; twenty-five of these should have utilized a single decompression cylinder Must have a minimum of twenty-five dives beyond Technical Diver Level 1 qualification Students participating in a Tech class conducted in a cave must be at least GUE Level 2 Cave divers

2.2.3.3

Duration

The Tech 2 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.2.3.4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any direct in-water training. Maximum depth 75m / 250 ft Dives should not be planned to incur more than 60 minutes of Unadjusted Decompression (see section 1.4.10) No overhead diving except by active GUE Cave 2 Level instructors while teaching in the cave environment
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2.2.3.5

Course Content

The GUE Tech 2 course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, designed to instill in divers a working knowledge of extended-range diving, including physiology, tables and logistics. Special emphasis is placed on extended exposures and on their associated considerations (gas consumption, DCS, Oxygen toxicity, and thermal concerns). Course requirements include a minimum of six hours of academics, and eight dives, four of which will be critical-skill dives and four will be experience dives. Four dives must utilize Helium.

2.2.3.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.2.3.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Academic Topics

GUE organization Limits of training Course completion requirements Review of decompression, gas utilization and risk, diving physiology Accelerated, omitted, and general decompression strategies Dive logistics and planning

2.2.3.8
1. 2. 3. 4.

Land Drills and Topics

Spool, reel, and guideline use Dive team order and protocols Gas-switching procedures and protocols Bottom stage, and decompression cylinder use

2.2.3.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold Review procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching (as appropriate). Effectively and comfortably demonstrate the ability to deploy a lift bag/surface-marker buoy in under two minutes while hovering stationary. Participants should not vary in depth more than 5 feet/1.5 meters. Demonstrate the clean and effective removal and exchange of multiple stages and decompression cylinders while hovering horizontally. The participant must be capable of removing and replacing each of at least two cylinders in under one minute, i.e. one minute per cylinder. Equipment familiarization. Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event. Demonstrate the effective deployment of a reserve light in under thirty seconds.

6.

7. 8. 9.

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10. Demonstrate excellent buoyancy-control skills, including when conducting stage and decompression gas-switches. 11. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under ten seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under ten seconds. 12. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments; one of these kicks must include the backward kick 13. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.2.3.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Also required are a bottom gas stage cylinder (80cuft/11L) and two decompression cylinders: one greater than 40 cubic feet/6 L for Nitrox and one 40 cubic feet/6 L, or greater, for an additional deco gas. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). One first-stage regulator for shallow decompression gas and one first-stage regulator for travel/decompression gas; each one is to supply a single secondstage and a single pressure gauge. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve light lights.. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth measuring device Compass Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes

2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater.

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13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure. 15. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver. 16. One reserve mask 17. Diver’s breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.2.4
2.2.4.1

Technical Diver Level 2 “Plus” Upgrade
Purpose

The Tech 2 Plus Upgrade is designed to recognize the experienced Tech 2 certified diver to progress towards more complex and advanced dives. The existing skills learned at Tech 2, combined with post class experience will be recognized, and the certification depth and decompression limits will be extended to reflect the students progression, allowing the diver to execute dives to a maximum of 90m / 300ft, and to plan no more than 90 minutes Unadjusted Decompression (see section 1.4.10). Divers will be limited to using a maximum of three stages or decompression cylinders.

2.2.4.2

Course contents

The Tech 2 upgrade is an experience based qualification. Students wishing to obtain the Tech 2 upgrade should provide GUEHQ with evidence of 25 dives at the tech 2 level. Depth, bottom time, decompression time, date and location of dives, gasses used and team members should all be included in the information provided.

2.2.4.3

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of eighteen years of age Must have passed GUE Technical Diver level 2 Must have a minimum of 25 technical dives at the Tech 2 level.

2.2.5
2.2.5.1

Technical Diver Level 3
Purpose

GUE’s Technical Level 3 (Tech 3) course is the culmination of a series of three courses designed to establish technical diving excellence and facilitate deep, mixed-gas diving. Emphasis is placed on aggressive diving profiles, including advanced decompression theory, advanced gas mixture/management, control over extreme exposures to Oxygen, and proficiency in the use of a DPV for propulsion at depth. This course is heavily experience-based and deals mostly with the practical implications of deep diving; divers are expected to be capable technical divers.

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2.2.5.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of twenty-one years of age Must have passed GUE Tech 2 and GUE Cave Level 1 Must have a minimum of 300 dives, with at least 200 dives in double cylinders Must have at least fifty dives beyond Tech 2 training

2.2.5.3

Duration

The GUE Tech 3 class is normally conducted over a seven-day period and involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction. Training consists of at least ten dives, of which six are critical skills/drills and four are experience dives, as defined by GUE standards.

2.2.5.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any direct in-water training.

2.2.5.5

Course Content

The GUE Tech 3 course involves a minimum of forty hours of class-oriented instruction (lecture and inwater) designed to instill divers with an advanced understanding of mixed-gas diving. Special emphasis will be placed on extended exposures and their associated considerations (dive planning, gas management, DCS, Oxygen toxicity, DPV propulsion, and thermal concerns). Course requirements include a minimum of six critical-skill dives (three days) with training in scooter diving, multiple stage/deco cylinders, navigation, advanced gas management and advanced decompression strategy; and four Trimix experience dives (four days) with practical implementation of critical skills during deeper/longer diving.

2.2.5.6
1. 2. 3. 4.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. The Physiology and Medicine of Diving. Peter Bennett and David Elliott, W. B. Saunders Company Ltd, London.

2.2.5.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Academic Topics

GUE organization Limits of training and course completion requirements Conservation Logistical planning, project support, and operational planning Advanced diving techniques, including scooter diving, use of multiple stage and decompression cylinders, navigation, advanced gas management, and advanced decompression strategy

2.2.5.8
1.

Land Drills and Topics

Spool, reel, and guideline use
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2. 3. 4. 5.

Dive team order and protocols Scootering protocols Touch contact Advanced navigation skills

2.2.5.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold Assess and review diving limitations. Skillfully demonstrate gas-failure procedures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching (as appropriate). Demonstrate the ability to deploy a lift bag/surface-marker buoy in under two minutes while hovering stationary. Participants should not vary in depth more than 5 feet/1.5 meters. Demonstrate good touch-contact skills for limited and simulated zero-visibility situations. Demonstrate excellent reel and guideline use. Demonstrate proficiency in gas-sharing while managing multiple stages.

10. Demonstrate safe and efficient operation of a DPV. 11. Demonstrate proficiency in gas-sharing while piloting a DPV. 12. Demonstrate the ability to run/retrieve a guideline while using a DPV. 13. Demonstrate the ability to tow a diver with a failed DPV. 14. Demonstrate proficiency in DPV power management. 15. Demonstrate the effective deployment of a reserve light in under thirty seconds. 16. Demonstrate excellent buoyancy control skills. 17. Demonstrate clean and efficient removal/attachment of multiple stage and/or decompression cylinders while hovering horizontal. 18. Demonstrate an understanding of advanced decompression techniques by: 1) explaining trends in decompression tables, and 2) explaining how to manage decompression in the event of a lost decompression gas. 19. Be able to explain how to safely carry out all decompression obligations, assuming the loss of all back gas. 20. Demonstrate proficiency in navigation, using both a compass and natural navigation. 21. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.2.5.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Divers must also maintain the use of at least four appropriately marked decompression cylinders. Decompression cylinders should include: one Oxygen cylinder, one cylinder for use at 70 feet/21 meters, one cylinder for use at 120 feet/36 meters, and one cylinder for use at 190 feet/57 meters.
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Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit where applicable. Four first-stage regulators, one for each stage/decompression cylinder; each one is to supply a single second-stage and a single pressure gauge.

3.

Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. Approved tow behind DPV At least one time/depth-measuring device One wrist compass Survey compass and slate Decompression tables

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split 11. At least one cutting device 12. Wet Notes 13. One reel/spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 14. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 15. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 16. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 17. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 18. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 19. One reserve mask 20. Diver’s breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However,
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students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.3 Cave Diver Curriculum
2.3.1
2.3.1.1

Cave Diver Level 1
Purpose

GUE’s Cave Diver Level 1 (Cave 1) course is a diver education program that introduces divers to the underwater cave environment and to an appreciation of its subtle dangers. The course covers the basic principles of cave diving and is designed to introduce divers to the skills and knowledge required for limited penetration into the underwater cave environment. Training includes an emphasis on awareness, dive-planning, teamwork, cave environments, stress management, navigation, conservation, standard and emergency procedures, cave-diving techniques, and the hazards of cave diving. To qualify for this type of instruction, participants do not need prior overhead training, but must be proficient with advanced buoyancy control skills. Only very capable divers should consider this training.

2.3.1.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of 18 years of age Must have passed GUE Fundamentals using the equipment outlined in section 2.1.4.10 and have demonstrated competence in skill and drills listed in section 2.1.4.9 at a grade of 4 or above Must have a minimum of seventy-five dives beyond open-water qualification

2.3.1.3

Duration

The GUE Cave 1 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.3.1.4
1. 2. 3.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any overhead diving activity. Gas consumption: 1/3 of the starting gas supply should be subtracted from the total and reserved for emergencies. Of the remaining amount divers may use up to 1/3 for penetration. This process may be continued until divers reach the minimum starting volume of 100ft3 / 2832 liters. Maximum depth: 100 feet / 30 meters Minimum 30 feet/9 meters of visibility to enter a cave Minimum 100 cubic feet/2832 liters of gas to begin a Cave 1 dive No passages in which divers are forced to travel single file for a prolonged distance. (i.e. approximately 10 ft/3 meters). No complex navigation (jumps, traverses, circuits) Allowed to navigate past one permanent intersection

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Allowed to navigate “gaps”, a gap occurs where the main line ends and begins a short distance later; normally this occurs where the line has reached another entrance/exit point 11. No planned decompression 12. No scooter diving

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13. No exploration 14. No stage-cylinder use allowed

2.3.1.5

Course Content

The GUE Cave 1 course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction (lecture and in-water) designed to instill in divers an appreciation of the dangers, challenges, and beauty of the cave environment. Special emphasis is placed on the unique challenges posed by overhead exposure and the identification, management, and resolution of these. Course requirements include ten hours of academics and twelve dives at a minimum of three different locations. At least eight of these dives will be beyond the daylight zone. During flood conditions, this requirement can be modified with the prior consent of the Cave training director.

2.3.1.6
1. 2.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2003, High Springs, Florida.

2.3.1.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

GUE organization, limits of training, and course completion requirements Conservation Spool, reel, and guideline use Dive team order and protocols Touch contact Basic navigation skills Dive Planning Gas management Accident Analysis

10. Stress 11. Environment 12. Communication

2.3.1.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Land Drills and Topics

Reel and guideline use in standard operating procedures Team order and protocols Use of safety spools and reels Reel and guideline use in emergency procedures, including touch contact and gas-sharing techniques Lost-diver procedures Lost-guideline procedures Basic navigation skills Visual referencing skills

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2.3.1.9
1. 2. 3. 4.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 400 yards/375 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold Pre-dive planning to include: • • • • Assess and review diving limitations Dive plan review Equipment review Equipment familiarization Visual reference Guideline use Limited and simulated zero visibility Demonstrate proficiency deploying, installing and retrieving a line marker

5.

Navigation, to include: • • • •

6. 7. 8.

Procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching (as appropriate). Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques, including pre-dive preparations, in-water activity, and post-dive assessment. Gas-sharing scenarios to include: • • • Breath-hold management Out-of-gas diver Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event.

9.

Use of various propulsion techniques.

10. Use of touch contact for limited and simulated zero-visibility situations. 11. Use of line-following techniques for limited/no visibility experiences. 12. Demonstrate the ability to mentally record depth, time and gas consumption during a dive and apply these parameters to future dive planning 13. Demonstrate the efficient deployment of a reserve light in under thirty seconds. 14. Perform a lost-diver drill while remaining calm and maintaining a horizontal attitude and neutral posture. 15. Perform a lost-line drill while remaining calm and maintaining a horizontal attitude and neutral posture. 16. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds, and then returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. 17. Demonstrate proficiency with guideline management in the following situations: • • • Simulated zero-visibility line following; this would incorporate touch-contact skills Efficient deployment of the guideline Efficient removal of the guideline

18. Show aptitude in resolving line entanglement where appropriate.

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19. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.3.1.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. One time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split One cutting device Wet Notes One spool with 150 feet/45 meters of line per diver

2.

3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 11. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 12. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 13. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 14. At least six line markers, of which at least three should be directional (line arrows) and three nondirectional 15. One wrist compass 16. One reserve mask Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the
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course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.3.2
2.3.2.1

Cave Diver Level 2
Purpose

GUE’s Cave Diver Level 2 (Cave 2) course is the second in a series of three courses designed to develop cave-diving proficiency. This very demanding course seeks to refine the cave-diving techniques of divers who have mastered the requirements of Cave 1. To succeed in this course, students must be practiced in the fundamental aspects of cave diving and comfortable in the use of double tanks/cylinders. The Cave 2 course builds upon previously learned skills, focusing on extending essential cave-diving techniques. These skills include: a focus on environmental awareness, dive-buddy awareness, problem resolution, stress management, and advanced navigation. This course is heavily experience-based, and includes many practical, task-oriented skills that must be mastered before a student is competent to dive at this level.

2.3.2.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of eighteen years of age Must have passed GUE Cave 1 Must have proof of at least 200 dives, with at least twenty dives in double tank/cylinder configuration; twenty-five of these must be non-training cave dives Must be Nitrox-trained

2.3.2.3

Duration

The GUE Cave 2 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.3.2.4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any overhead diving activity. Gas consumption: maximum use of 1/3 of gas supply for cave penetration No training dives are to exceed a depth of 100 feet / 30 meters Minimum 20 feet/6 meters of visibility to enter a cave Minimum 150 cubic feet/3950 liters of gas necessary to begin a Cave 2 dive No scooter diving

2.3.2.5

Course Content

The GUE Cave 2 course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction (lecture and in-water) designed to instill in divers an appreciation of the dangers, challenges, and beauty of the cave environment. Special emphasis here will be placed on: the demands of extended overhead penetration, advanced navigation techniques (including traverses, circuits and siphons), advanced gas management, restrictive passage negotiation, precision propulsion techniques, and decompression risk, management and protocol.

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Course requirements include a minimum of ten cave dives at a minimum of three different diving locations. During flood conditions, this requirement can be modified with the prior consent of the Cave training director.

2.3.2.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2003, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.3.2.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

Spool, reel, and guideline use Dive team order and protocols Touch contact Basic navigation skills Dive Planning Gas management Accident Analysis Stress Environment

10. Communication 11. Restrictions 12. Basic Survey Techniques 13. Decompression

2.3.2.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Land Drills and Topics

Spool, reel, and guideline use in standard operating procedures Team order and protocols Spool, reel, and guideline use in emergency procedures, including touch contact and gas-sharing techniques Lost-diver procedures Lost-guideline procedures Basic and advanced navigation skills, including gaps/jumps and circuits/traverses Visual referencing skills Basic survey techniques

2.3.2.9
1. 2. 3.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold

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4.

Pre-dive planning to include: • • • • Assess and review diving limitations Dive-plan review Equipment review Equipment familiarization Visual reference Guideline use Demonstrate proficiency deploying, installing and retrieving a line marker Limited and simulated zero visibility

5.

Navigation, to include: • • • •

6. 7.

Procedures for gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas sharing, and regulator switching (as appropriate). Gas-sharing scenarios to include: • • • Breath-hold management Out-of-gas diver Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event.

8. 9.

Demonstrate a comfortable demeanor while sharing gas without a mask. Use of various propulsion techniques.

10. Use of touch contact for limited and simulated zero-visibility situations. 11. Use of line-following techniques for limited/no visibility situations. 12. Demonstrate the effective deployment of a reserve light in under thirty seconds. 13. Perform a lost-diver drill while remaining calm and maintaining a horizontal attitude and neutral posture. 14. Perform a lost-line drill while remaining calm and maintaining a horizontal attitude and neutral posture in simulated zero-visibility conditions. 15. Demonstrate effective valve-management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in less than ten seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under ten seconds. 16. Demonstrate proficiency with guideline management in the following situation: • • • Simulated zero-visibility line following; this would incorporate touch-contact skills Efficient deployment of the guideline Efficient removal of the guideline

17. Problem resolution, including line entanglement, navigation in restrictive areas, and multiple line management. 18. Demonstrate advanced navigational technique by completing at least two jumps and by successfully completing a circuit and/or traverse. 19. Demonstrate a calm demeanor while sharing gas in simulated zero-visibility for a prolonged distance. 20. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of a stage cylinder for the purpose of extending penetration. 21. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.
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2.3.2.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. One aluminum 80 cubic feet/10 liter cylinder, rigged for stage diving, is also required. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). One additional regulator, with first and second-stages, outfitted with a pressure gauge, and a 40”-inch low-pressure hose is also required. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve light powered. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes

2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 150 feet/45 meters of line per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/ 90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. At least twelve line markers, of which at least six should be directional (line arrows) and six nondirectional. 16. One wrist compass 17. One reserve mask Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However,
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students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.3.3
2.3.3.1

Cave Diver Level 3
Purpose

GUE’s Cave Diver Level 3 (Cave 3) course is the culmination of a series of three courses designed to establish cave-diving excellence. Cave 3 schools divers in the techniques necessary to sustain longer-range cave dives. Training emphasis is placed on advanced cave-diving strategies, advanced gas management, efficient manipulation of multiple-penetration stage cylinders, cave-survey techniques, and scooter diving. Participants must be experienced cave divers who are dedicated to mastering the art of cave diving.

2.3.3.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of twenty-one years of age Must have passed GUE Cave 2 and GUE Tech 1 Must have proof of at least 300 dives, with at least 100 dives in the GUE double tank/cylinder configuration; 100 of these must be cave dives with fifty cave dives beyond Cave 2 training

2.3.3.3

Duration

The GUE Cave 3 class is normally conducted over a seven-day period and involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction. Training consists of at least ten dives, of which six are critical skills and four are experience dives.

2.3.3.4
1. 2. 3. 4.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any overhead diving activity. Gas consumption: maximum use of 1/3 of gas supply for cave penetration No training dives are to exceed an equivalent narcotic depth of 100 feet / 30 meters

2.3.3.5

Course Content

The GUE Cave 3 course involves a minimum of forty hours of class-oriented instruction (lecture and inwater) designed to instill divers with an advanced understanding of cave diving. Special emphasis here will be placed on extended cave diving penetrations/bottom times and their associated considerations (dive planning, gas management, DCS, Oxygen toxicity, and thermal concerns).

2.3.3.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

2.3.3.7
1. 2.

Academic Topics

GUE organization Limits of training and course completion requirements
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3. 4. 5.

Conservation Logistical planning, project support, and operational planning Advanced diving techniques, including scooter diving, use of multiple stage/deco cylinders, navigation, extended penetration, advanced gas management, and decompression strategy

2.3.3.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Land Drills and Topics

Use of safety spools/reels Reel and guideline use in emergency procedures, including touch contact and gas-sharing techniques Lost-diver procedures Lost-guideline procedures Basic and advanced navigation skills, including gaps, jumps, and survey techniques Visual referencing skills

2.3.3.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold Effective pre-dive planning. Use of various propulsion techniques. Use of touch contact for limited and simulated zero-visibility situations. Use of line-following techniques for limited/no visibility situations. Demonstrate efficient deployment of a reserve light in under ten seconds. Perform a lost-diver drill while remaining calm and maintaining both a horizontal and neutral position in the water.

10. Perform a lost -line drill in simulated zero-visibility conditions while remaining calm and maintaining both a horizontal and neutral position in the water. 11. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under ten seconds, and returning the valve to the open position again in under ten seconds. 12. Demonstrate proficiency with guideline management in the following scenarios: • • • • Simulated zero-visibility line following; this would incorporate touch-contact skills Efficient deployment of the guideline Efficient removal of the guideline Problem-solving, including line entanglement, navigation in restrictive regions, and multipleline management

13. Demonstrate advanced navigational skills by completing at least two jumps and successfully completing a circuit and/or traverse. 14. Demonstrate a calm demeanor while sharing gas in simulated zero visibility for at least 300 feet/ 90 meters. 15. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of stage cylinders. 16. Demonstrate proficiency in gas-sharing while managing multiple stages.

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17. Demonstrate safe and efficient operation of a DPV. 18. Demonstrate proficiency in gas-sharing while piloting a DPV. 19. Demonstrate the skill required to run a guideline while using a DPV. 20. Demonstrate the skill required to tow a diver with a failed DPV. 21. Demonstrate the ability to mentally record depth, time and gas consumption during a dive and apply these parameters to future dive planning 22. Demonstrate facility with advanced decompression techniques by: 1) explaining trends in decompression tables, and 2) explaining how to manage decompression in the event of a lost decompression gas. 23. Demonstrate the skill required to carry out all decompression obligations, assuming the loss of all back gas. 24. Demonstrate the ability to manage failed regulators, first- and second-stages. 25. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.3.3.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. All dives must start with a minimum of 140 cubic feet/2250 liters of gas. Divers must also maintain the use of at least four appropriately marked stages. Stage cylinders should include one Oxygen stage, one decompression cylinder for use at 70 feet/21 meters, one cylinder for use at 120 feet/36 meters, and one cylinder for use at 190 feet/57 meters. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Four first-stage regulators for decompression gases, each supplying a single second-stage and a pressure gauge. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. Approved DPV At least one time/depth-measuring device Survey compass and slate Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split
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2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

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10. At least one cutting device 11. Wet Notes 12. One spool with 150 feet/45 meters of line per diver 13. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 14. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 15. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 16. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 17. At least twelve line markers, of which at least six should be directional (line arrows) and six nondirectional. 18. One wrist compass 19. Diver’s breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air bottle. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site

2.4 Auxiliary Training Curriculum
2.4.1
2.4.1.1

GUE Doubles Primer
Purpose

GUE’s Doubles course is designed to prepare divers for diving a double tank/cylinder configuration using proper equipment and techniques. In this class, students will be trained in the use of double tanks/cylinders and in the potential failure problems associated with them.

2.4.1.2
1. 2. 3.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of 16 years of age. Must be a certified open-water diver from a recognized training agency

2.4.1.3

Duration

The GUE Doubles Course must be conducted over at least two days, encompassing both classroom and inwater work. Course requirements include a minimum of 6 hours of academics & land drills and a minimum of four in-water sessions; at least two of these dives must include a depth of at least 40ft/12m. Course time should total at least 16 hours encompassing classroom, land drills and in-water work.

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2.4.1.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any in-water training, and should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 60 feet/18 meters No decompression No overhead environment diving

3. 4. 5.

2.4.1.5

Course Content

Combining lecture and in-water sessions, this course focuses on cultivating the basic skills required. The GUE Doubles course is focused on increasing proficiency with double tank configuration, through proper control of the buoyancy, trim, propulsion, teamwork and other GUE principles.

2.4.1.6

Training Materials Academic Topics

GUE Doubles Presentation

2.4.1.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Class Overview GUE Introduction Double Tank Introduction Developing Diver Capacity Tanks/Cylinders and bands Manifolds Regulators, depth gauges, pressure gauges and hose routing Buoyancy and Trim Skills overview

10. Pre dive sequence 11. Situational Awareness

2.4.1.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Land Drills

Gas analysis and labeling Valve Drill S-Drill Valve failure procedures SMB deployment (review) Backup light deployment (review) Pre-dive sequence Team positioning Communication

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2.4.1.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques; this would include pre-dive preparations, inwater activity and post-dive assessment Must be able to swim at least 300 yards/275 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold Demonstrate proficiency with required course equipment and an understanding of the GUE equipment configuration. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5ft/1.5m of the target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver, followed by an ascent to the surface, utilizing minimum decompression. Demonstrate proficiency in executing a valve drill with double tanks. Demonstrate safe ascent and descent procedures.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Demonstrate proficiency in the ability to deploy a surface marker while using a spool. 11. Comfortably demonstrate at least three propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments. 12. Demonstrate proficiency with effective valve management by first sharing gas with a team member (as a receiver), then shutting down a valve and returning it to the open position. 13. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training. 14. Demonstrate proficiency in underwater communication. 15. Demonstrate proficiency with a primary light by using it during all skills except SMB deployment.* 16. Demonstrate efficient deployment and stowage of a backup light.* 17. Demonstrate an efficient valve drill with double tanks.* 18. Comfortably demonstrate an efficient backwards kick.* 19. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3ft/1m of the target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.* *Skills 12-17 apply to students wishing to use the GUE Doubles class to upgrade a GUE Fundamentals Recreational pass to a Technical pass. These students must perform all skills, including 12-16, at a grade 4 or higher to qualify for registration to the Cave or Tech curriculum.

2.4.1.10
1. 2. 3.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5- to 7-foot/1.5- 2-meter hose. One of the first stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimum padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of webbing. This webbing should be adjusted through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and hoped through the waistband prevents the system from riding up on the divers

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back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed on the left hip, the second should be placed in line with the divers right collar bone, the third should be placed in line with the divers left collar bone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. 4. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should be free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs/25kg for a single tank and 80 lbs/40kg for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. Wet Notes One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; it’s power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10watt HID or greater. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. One spool with at least 100ft/30m of line per diver. At least one surface marker buoy per diver.

5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

10. At least on time-/depth-measuring device with stop watch and/or seconds display 11. Mask and fins: mask should be low-volume, fins should be rigid, non-split 12. At least one cutting device 13. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure

2.4.2
2.4.2.1

GUE Dry Suit Primer
Purpose

GUE’s Dry Suit course is designed to prepare divers for dry suit diving using proper equipment and techniques. The GUE Dry Suit course is designed to provide a diver the opportunity to develop proficiency using a dry suit, thereby developing more comfort, confidence and competence in the water.

2.4.2.2
1. 2. 3.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum of sixteen years of age Must be a certified open-water diver from a recognized training agency

2.4.2.3

Duration

The GUE Dry Suit Course must be conducted over at least two days, encompassing both classroom and inwater work. Course requirements include a minimum of 6 hours of academics & land drills and a minimum of four in-water sessions; at least two of these dives must include a depth of at least 40ft/12m. Course time should total at least 16 hours encompassing classroom, land drills and in-water work.

2.4.2.4
1.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4

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2.

Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any in-water training, and should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 60 feet/18 meters No decompression No overhead environment diving

3. 4. 5.

2.4.2.5

Course Content

Combining lecture and in-water sessions, this course focuses on cultivating the basic skills required. The GUE Dry Suit course is focused on increasing dry suit proficiency through proper control of the buoyancy, trim, propulsion, teamwork and other GUE principles.

2.4.2.6

Training Materials Academic Topics

GUE Dry Suit Presentation

2.4.2.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Class Overview GUE Introduction Dry Suit Introduction Developing Diver Capacity Dry Suit Selection Undergarment Selection Dry Suit Inflation Cold water equipment considerations Cold water dive planning and logistics

10. Buoyancy and Trim 11. Dry Suit skills overview 12. Pre dive sequence 13. Situational Awareness 14. Dry Suit maintenance and field repairs

2.4.2.8
1. 2. 3. 4.

Land Drills

Pre-dive sequence Team positioning Communication Equipment fit and function

2.4.2.9
1. 2. 3.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques; this would include pre-dive preparations, inwater activity and post-dive assessment. Must be able to swim at least 300 yards/275 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 16 yards/15 meters on a breath hold

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Demonstrate proficiency with required course equipment and an understanding of the GUE equipment configuration. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver, followed by an ascent to the surface, utilizing minimum decompression. Demonstrate proficiency in executing a valve drill, including dry suit inflation if appropriate. Demonstrate the ability to connect/disconnect the dry suit inflation hose. Demonstrate the ability to manage a dry suit inflation valve that is stuck in the open position by disconnecting the inflation hose and dumping gas.

10. Demonstrate the ability to connect/disconnect the buoyancy compensator inflation hose. 11. Demonstrate the ability to manage a primary inflator that is stuck in the open position by dumping gas and disconnecting the inflation hose. 12. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum 30 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 5ft/1.5m of the target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria. 13. Demonstrate proper management of a free flowing second stage regulator. 14. Demonstrate safe ascent and descent procedures. 15. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training. 16. Demonstrate proficiency in underwater communication.

2.4.2.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use a single tank cylinder with a K-, H- or Y-valve. Students may also use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5- to 7-foot/1.5- 2-meter hose. One of the first stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimum padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of webbing. This webbing should be adjusted through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and hoped through the waistband prevents the system from riding up on the divers back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed on the left hip, the second should be placed in line with the divers right collar bone, the third should be placed in line with the divers left collar bone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should be free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs / 25kg for a single tank and 80 lbs / 40kg for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. Wet Notes Wet Notes One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; it’s power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a

2. 3.

4.

5. 6.

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light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10watt HID or greater. 7. 8. 9. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. At least one time-/depth-measuring device with stop watch and/or seconds display Mask and fins: mask should be low-volume, fins should be rigid, non-split

10. At least one cutting device 11. Dry suit and undergarments appropriate for the duration of exposure

2.4.3
2.4.3.1

GUE Primer
Purpose

The GUE Primer course is designed to introduce students to the essential skills required for sound diving practice. The course is non-certification; therefore completion of this class has no bearing on future GUE dive training. The GUE Primer is designed to accomplish the following goals: 1. 2. Provide the recreational diver an opportunity to advance his/her basic diving skills, thereby developing more comfort, confidence and competence in the water Provide an introduction to GUE training while demonstrating the techniques necessary for success in future GUE courses

2.4.3.2
1. 2.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Students that are not able to meet the prerequisites in section 1.6 are able to participate in the GUE Primer Course, provided they obtain a physician’s written approval to dive and disclose this information to the GUE instructor before the onset of training. Physician clearance to dive does not obligate GUE or a GUE representative to clear a trainee for diving; this remains at the sole discretion of the instructor. Must be a certified open-water diver from a recognized training agency Must be a minimum of fourteen years of age

3. 4.

2.4.3.3

Duration

The GUE Primer Course must be conducted over at least two days, encompassing both classroom and inwater work. Course requirements include a minimum of 6 hours of academics & land drills and a minimum of four in-water sessions. Course time should total at least 14 hours encompassing classroom, land drills and in-water work.

2.4.3.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 8:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 4:1 during any in-water training, and should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 40 feet/12 meters No decompression No overhead environment diving

3. 4. 5.

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2.4.3.5

Course Content

The GUE Primer Course is a non-certification class, normally conducted over a two-day period, combining lecture, land drills, and in-water sessions. The GUE Primer course is focused on increasing diver proficiency through proper control of buoyancy, trim, propulsion, teamwork, and other GUE principles.

2.4.3.6
1. 2.

Training Materials

GUE Primer Workbook Doing it Right: the Fundamentals of Better Diving, Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs Florida.

2.4.3.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Academic Topics

GUE Introduction What is the GUE Primer? Why this discipline? Developing Diver Capacity Pre Dive Overview Equipment Buoyancy Body Position Trim

10. Propulsion 11. Situational Awareness

2.4.3.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Land Drills

Pre-dive sequence Body Positioning Trim and Balance Equipment overview & fitting Propulsion Techniques Team Communication

2.4.3.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving techniques; this would include pre-dive preparations, inwater activity and post-dive assessment. Demonstrate awareness of team-member location and concern for safety, responding quickly to visual cues and dive-partner needs. Demonstrate a safe and responsible demeanor throughout all training Demonstrate proficiency in underwater communication. Demonstrate basic proficiency managing a GUE equipment configuration. Demonstrate safe ascent and descent procedures. Demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary for successfully performing at least two propulsion techniques that would be appropriate in delicate and/or silty environments. Demonstrate comprehension of the components necessary to maintain good buoyancy and trim.
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2.4.3.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use a single tank cylinder with a K-, H- or Y-valve. Students may also use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5- to 7-foot/1.5- 2-meter hose. One of the first stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimum padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of webbing. This webbing should be adjusted through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband prevents the system from riding up on the divers back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed on the left hip, the second should be placed in line with the divers right collar bone, the third should be placed in line with the divers left collar bone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while scootering or towing/stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should be free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs / 25 kg for a single tank and 80 lbs / 40 kgfor double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time-/depth-measuring device Mask and fins: mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure

2. 3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

2.4.4
2.4.4.1

Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 1
Purpose

GUE’s Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 1 course (Open Water DPV) is a diver education program that introduces divers to the use of underwater propulsion vehicles. The course covers the basic principles of DPV diving and is designed to introduce divers to the skills and knowledge required for limited use of propulsion vehicles. Training includes an emphasis on awareness, dive-planning, teamwork, environment, stress management, navigation, conservation, standard and emergency procedures, DPV maintenance and trouble shooting and the potential hazards of diving with a DPV. To qualify for this type of instruction, participants do not need prior DPV training, but must be proficient with advanced buoyancy control skills and high awareness level.

2.4.4.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6. Must be a minimum of 16 years of age. Must have passed GUE Recreational Level 1 Diver or GUE Fundamentals. Must have a minimum of seventy-five dives beyond open-water qualification. Must have a minimum of fifty dives beyond GUE Recreational level 1 or GUE Fundamentals

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2.4.4.3

Duration

The GUE DPV 1 class is normally conducted over a three-day period. It involves a minimum of twenty four hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.4.4.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any in-water training, and should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. Maximum depth 30m / 100ft, or the limit of the students qualification, whichever is shallower. No overhead diving Minimum starting visibility of 20ft/6m

3. 4. 5.

2.4.4.5

Course Content

The GUE DPV 1 course involves a minimum of twenty four hours of instruction designed to provide a working knowledge in the use of tow-behind propulsion vehicles, and operational considerations. Course requirements include four hours of academics and five dives, two of which will be critical-skill dives and three will be experience dives. Initial dives will be conducted in confined water to test diver ability and to fill in any deficits in skill levels.

2.4.4.6
1.

Required Training Materials Academic Topics

GUE DPV Powerpoint

2.4.4.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Equipment considerations DPV components DPV maintenance Surface-marker buoys and spools (for deco platforms) Towing a surface marker while using a DPV Exposure suit appropriate for the environment Dive planning Operational planning Support

10. Teams 11. Team planning 12. Procedures 13. Gas Planning 14. Gas matching 15. Considerations for managing and stowing a DPV while not in use.

2.4.4.8
1. 2.

Land Drills and Topics

Proper position while using a DPV Runaway DPV

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Use of Goodman handle while riding a DPV Dive team order and protocols Use of spools and reels Basic navigation skills Pre-dive drills

2.4.4.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 400 yards/375 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold. Demonstrate proficiency adjusting buoyancy while using a DPV Demonstrate effective use of compass and navigation Matching speeds with team members Towing diver with non-functional DPV Demonstrate control while dealing with a runaway DPV Procedures for gas-sharing, and regulator switching as appropriate.

10. Surface-marker buoy deployment. 11. Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment. 12. Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event. 13. Demonstrate competence with diver rescue skills. 14. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. 15. Demonstrate proficiency with effective decompression techniques, including depth and time management. 16. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.4.4.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students may use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. Students may also use a single tank/cylinder with a K-, H-, or Y-valve. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5 to 7 foot/1.5 to 2 meter hose. One of the firststages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, and the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for
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2. 3.

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the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. 4. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 50 lbs/25kgs for a single tank and 80 lbs/40kgs for double tanks. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. DPV: The DPV should be of a tow-behind type. It should have variable speed adjustment, as well as a clutch. The DPV must include an attached cord at the back with a bolt snap to be clipped on the front D-ring located in the crotch strap, used to tow the diver. The DPV should also have a leash attached to the front to be used for towing it in case it fails to work. At least one time/depth-measuring device Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device One wrist compass

5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One reserve mask 11. Wet Notes 12. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 13. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 16. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure the use of necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.4.5
2.4.5.1

Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 2 / Cave DPV
Purpose

GUE’s Diver Propulsion Vehicle Level 2 (Cave DPV) course is a diver education program that introduces divers to the use of underwater propulsion vehicles in the overhead environment. The course covers the basic principles of DPV diving and is designed to introduce divers to the skills and knowledge required for the use of propulsion vehicles in the overhead environment. Training includes an emphasis on awareness, dive-planning, teamwork, environments, stress management, navigation, conservation, standard and emergency procedures, DPV maintenance and trouble shooting and the potential hazards of diving with a DPV and managing multiple DPVs. To qualify for this type of instruction, participants need prior DPV training, and/or experience and must be proficient with advanced buoyancy control skills.

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2.4.5.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6. Must be a minimum of 18 years of age. Must have passed GUE Cave 2 or equivalent as outlined in section 1.9. Must have passed GUE DPV 1 or show proficiency in the use of DPVs. Must have a minimum of two hundred dives beyond open-water qualification. Must have a minimum of fifty non training cave dives

2.4.5.3

Duration

The GUE DPV 2 class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.4.5.4
1. 2.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 4:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 2:1 during any in-water training, and should be adjusted downward to account for bad conditions and/or poor visibility. No training dives are to exceed a depth of 100 feet (+/- 30 feet)/30 meters (+/- 9 meters). Minimum 215 cubic feet/6,600 liters of gas necessary to begin a cave DPV dive. During overhead dives no gas in doubles can be used. Only gas from stage cylinders will be used

3. 4. 5.

2.4.5.5

Course Content

The GUE DPV 2 course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction designed to provide a working knowledge in the use of tow-behind propulsion vehicles, and operational considerations in overhead environments. Course requirements include four hours of academics and seven dives, four of which will be critical-skill dives and three will be experience dives. Initial dives will be conducted in open water to test diver ability and resolve any deficiencies in skill level. If a diver doesn’t hold GUE DPV 1 qualification all critical skills need to be conducted in open water before entering the overhead environment

2.4.5.6

Required Training Materials Academic Topics

GUE DPV Powerpoint

2.4.5.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Equipment considerations DPV Components DPV maintenance Stage cylinders Exposure suit appropriate for the environment Dive planning Operational planning Matching different speeds while using a DPV Emergency procedures (to include: gas sharing, towing diver and run away scooter)

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10. Procedures 11. Gas Planning 12. Considerations for DPV while not being used 13. Towing a DPV 14. Towing stage cylinders 15. Line use (installing, following and retrieving)

2.4.5.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Land Drills and Topics

Proper position while using a DPV Runaway DPV Use of Goodman handle while riding a DPV Reel and guideline use Use of spools and reels Basic navigation skills Pre-dive drills

2.4.5.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in section 1.5 Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold. Demonstrate effective use of compass and navigation Matching speeds with team members Towing diver with non-functional DPV Demonstrate control while dealing with a runaway DPV Procedures for gas-sharing, and regulator switching as appropriate. Reel, spool and guideline use.

10. Demonstrate familiarity with required course equipment. 11. Gas-sharing scenarios, to include a prolonged gas-sharing event. 12. Demonstrate effective valve management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. 13. Demonstrate proficiency towing a second scooter and multiple cylinders 14. Demonstrate proficiency with effective decompression techniques, including depth and time management. 15. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.4.5.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. All dives must start with a

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minimum of 215 cubic feet/6,600 liters of gas. Divers must also maintain the use of four appropriately marked stages. Stage cylinders should include one Oxygen stage. 2. 3. Regulators: One of the second-stages must be on a 5 to 7 foot/1.5 to 2 meter hose. One of the firststages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, and the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach, with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs/40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. 2 Approved DPVs (tow behind type) At least one time/depth-measuring device Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 150 feet/45 meters of line per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. At least twelve line markers, of which at least six should be directional (line arrows) and six nondirectional. 16. Diver’s breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. 17. One compass 18. One reserve mask Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure the use of necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information

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about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

2.4.6
2.4.6.1

Rebreather Diver
Purpose

GUE’s Rebreather Diver course is designed to 1) educate individuals in basic rebreather technologies and 2) cultivate diver proficiency in the use of Halcyon’s semi-closed-circuit technology. The course assumes that divers are not experienced in the use of rebreather technology but are very capable open-circuit divers.

2.4.6.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6. Must be a minimum of twenty-one years of age. Must have passed GUE Tech 2. Must have at least 300 scuba dives beyond open-water qualification. Fifty must have been in doubles, with twenty-five dives at the Tech 2 level.

2.4.6.3

Duration

The Rebreather class is normally conducted over a five-day period. It involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction, encompassing both classroom and in-water work.

2.4.6.4
1. 2. 3.

Course Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Student-to-instructor ratio is not to exceed 6:1 during land drill or surface exercises, but cannot exceed 3:1 during any in-water training. Maximum depth 100 feet/30 meters

2.4.6.5

Course Content

The GUE Rebreather course involves a minimum of forty hours of instruction designed to ensure a working knowledge of rebreather diving, failures and life-saving solutions. Course requirements include a minimum of twelve hours of academics and at least eight open-water dives.

2.4.6.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Recommended rebreather training materials.

2.4.6.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Academic Topics

Purpose Common components of the Halcyon RB80 and how they function Inherent risks of rebreathers Introduction to the Halcyon rebreather Halcyon rebreather alarms and warnings The physics behind a Halcyon rebreather

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7. 8. 9.

Configuration Halcyon rebreather physical design Problem recognition and management

10. The importance of instinctive physiological monitoring 11. Pre-dive planning 12. Diving the Halcyon rebreather 13. Post-dive procedures 14. Need for continuing education and skill reinforcement

2.4.6.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Land Drills and Topics

Flow-checks Manifold failures Gas-addition failures Gas-sharing Rebreather functions

2.4.6.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

All skills and drills as outlined in General Diving Skills, section 1.5. Must be able to swim at least 500 yards/450 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. This test should be conducted in a swimsuit and, where necessary, appropriate thermal protection. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 20 yards/18 meters on a breath hold An understanding of diving limitations. Skill required to manage gas failures, including valve manipulation, gas-sharing, and regulator switching as appropriate. Demonstrate the ability to deploy a lift bag/surface-marker buoy in under two minutes while hovering stationary. Participants should not vary in depth more than 5 feet/1.5 meters. Demonstrate the ability to recognize, evaluate and correct floods, and then discharge excess water. Demonstrate the ability to diagnose and correctly respond to simulated rebreather problems. Gas-sharing scenarios to include breath-hold management for gas-sharing for at least 200 feet/60 meters.

10. Demonstrate effective valve-management by switching regulators, shutting down a valve in under fifteen seconds and returning the valve to the open position again in under fifteen seconds. 11. Demonstrate proficiency in removing/attaching stage and/or decompression cylinders while hovering horizontal. Trainees must be capable of removing, replacing and plugging in a deco cylinder in under ninety seconds. 12. Demonstrate the ability to comfortably switch gases using the gas-addition manifold while maintaining good trim and neutral buoyancy. 13. Demonstrate proficiency in safe diving procedures, including assembly, vacuum and pressure test, pre-dive preparations, pre-dive vacuum test, flow check, in-water activity, and post-dive assessment and breakdown. 14. Comfortably swim for at least 50 feet/15 meters without a mask while diving, breathing on semiclosed circuit. 15. Demonstrate the ability to safely switch between semi-closed circuit and open circuit; i.e., flow check.
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16. Efficiently and comfortably demonstrate how to donate gas to an out-of-gas diver in multiple gassharing episodes from semi-closed circuit, with one or more experiences to include a distance of at least 30 feet/9 meters. 17. Be able to comfortably demonstrate use, manipulation and failures of the gas-addition system. 18. Demonstrate awareness of a team member’s rebreather function and a concern for safety, responding quickly to visual cues and dive-partner needs during diving and failures. 19. Demonstrate reasonable proficiency with use of the rebreather during ascents, descents and diving. 20. Demonstrate good buoyancy and trim, i.e. approximate reference maximum of 20 degrees off horizontal while remaining within 3 feet/1 meter of a target depth. Frequency of buoyancy variation and the divers control of their buoyancy and trim are important evaluation criteria.

2.4.6.10
1. 2.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Rebreather: Halcyon semi-closed circuit rebreather. Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. The double cylinders must be accessible by both the rebreather and the open-circuit regulators. Two aluminum cylinders of 30 cubic feet/840 liters or greater are required for deco gases. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). One first-stage regulator for shallow decompression gas and one first-stage regulator for travel/ decompression gas; each one is to supply a single second-stage and a single pressure gauge. 4. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs, or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device

3.

5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Wet Notes 11. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 12. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 13. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light
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cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 14. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 15. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 16. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 17. One wrist compass 18. One reserve mask 19. Diver’s breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

3.

GUE Instructor Standards and Procedures

3.1 Active Status Instructor
To teach GUE-sanctioned training courses, one must be a GUE Active Status instructor.

3.1.1
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Maintaining Active Status
Maintain a current mailing address with Headquarters. Annually complete and submit an Instructor Renewal Form. Own current versions of all relevant GUE instructor manuals and current GUE standards and procedures. Meet the standards required to teach a specific training category and/or training level. Pay all outstanding debts owed GUE. Be a non-smoker. Log twenty-five, non-training, qualification dives per year. Qualifying dives should encourage personal skill development by challenging the instructor’s comfort level while also facilitating personal experience across the range of classes in which the instructor is qualified to teach. Half of these qualifications dives may be varied across multiple environments and depths but should be oriented toward enhancing personal skill development. At least twelve of these dives should occur at the highest level of instructional qualification—e.g. Cave 2 instructors must perform (minimally) twenty-five non-training dives per year, twelve of which must be at the Cave 2 level. Complete at least one of the following training obligations: • • • Conduct and act as the lead instructor in one formal GUE course. Attend, serve on staff, or lecture at one GUE ITC. Serve as an assistant, audit, or participate in three complete GUE-sanctioned diving courses.

To maintain an Active Status instructor rating in GUE, instructors must:

8.

9.

Be current in CPR and First-Aid
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10. Instructional insurance: Instructors residing in the United States of America and/or who teach U.S. citizens while maintaining American citizenship themselves are required to have Instructional Liability Insurance, and must obtain it as offered by GUE or, obtain a similar Instructional Liability Insurance policy. Minimum coverage: $1 million. Terms: Substantially the same as those in the current policy offered through GUE (submit a certificate of insurance, which covers GUE in case of a claim). Instructors who are covered by city, state, federal or private institutional insurance must request, in writing, an exemption from the insurance requirement. U.S. military personnel who teach diving as part of their military duties are exempt from the insurance requirement but must apply, in writing, for the exemption and provide letters of exemption from their commanding officers. 11. Maintain a good state of mental and physical fitness. In the event that any substantive health changes occur, instructor members are obliged to refrain from both teaching and supervising diving students, and/or divers, until such time as they can meet GUE leadership medical requirements for diving. With each yearly renewal, Active Status instructors must furnish GUE Headquarters with proof of compliance with respect to items 2, 7, 8, 9, and 10.

3.2 Sustaining Status Instructor
Sustaining instructors are instructors who opt not to actively conduct formal GUE courses or act as lead instructors, but who want to retain the option of doing so at a later date (subject to the provisions of section 3.5). In the interim, sustaining instructors retain their GUE instructor-certification status, are able to participate in GUE forums (Quest and instructor e-mail list) and receive all GUE instructor information.

3.2.1
1. 2. 3. 4.

Maintaining Sustaining Status
Maintain a current mailing address with Headquarters. Annually complete and submit an Instructor Renewal Form. Assist an Active Status GUE instructor in one formal GUE course. Pay all outstanding debts owed GUE.

To maintain Sustaining Status, GUE instructors are annually required to:

With each yearly renewal, Sustaining Status instructors must furnish GUE Headquarters with proof of compliance with respect to items 2 and 3.

3.3 Inactive Status Instructor
Inactive Status instructors are instructors who fail to meet the criteria for either Active or Sustaining Status. Inactive instructors are instructors who no longer conduct formal GUE courses, act as lead instructors or assist in GUE courses, and who no longer pay instructor membership dues or participate in the benefits of GUE membership. Inactive instructors must return their Instructor Certification cards to GUE Headquarters.

3.4 Provisional Status Instructor
Provisional-status instructors are GUE instructor candidates who have completed an instructor evaluation, but who in the judgment of their instructor evaluators (IEs) are not yet prepared to teach independently. To be upgraded to Active Status, Provisional Status instructors must: (1) remedy shortcomings outlined by the IEs; (2) be re-evaluated by a GUE IE to determine whether these shortcomings have been satisfactorily addressed; and (3) have the unanimous written support of both GUE instructor evaluators. Provisional Status instructors are not qualified to independently conduct formal GUE classes; an Active Status instructor must always be present during such activities.

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3.5 Instructor Status Changes
Sustaining or Inactive Status instructors may change their status at any time by meeting the following requirements: 1. If in Sustaining Status for under one year, instructors seeking to renew their Active Status must: • • 2. Meet all Active Status instructor requirements Obtain a letter of recommendation from a GUE training director

If in Sustaining Status for more than one year, but under three years, instructors seeking Active Status must: • • • • Meet all Active Status instructor requirements Obtain a letter of recommendation from a GUE training director Assist an approved GUE instructor (see section 3.6.8) with one formal GUE course, and obtain a letter of recommendation from that GUE instructor Submit a letter requesting a status change

3.

If in Sustaining Status for more than three years, or if in Inactive Status, instructors seeking to regain Active Status must: • • • Meet all Active Status instructor requirements Obtain a letter of recommendation from a GUE training director Successfully pass an instructor evaluation; needs unanimous support by two GUE instructor trainers

3.6 Instructor Candidate Training Procedures
3.6.1 Description
GUE’s training curriculum is designed around a common training and diving platform; all GUE courses, regardless of environment, cultivate a common set of concepts and skills. Nonetheless, GUE recognizes the need for environment-specific practices, and requires that GUE instructors take Instructor Training Courses (ITCs) in the type of diving they wish to teach before being qualified to do so in an instructor evaluation. GUE offers Instructor Training Courses (ITCs) in: Recreational, Technical, Cave, and Rebreather diving. Specific details and pre-requisites for the recreation, technical and cave ITCs are listed in sections 3.9.1, 3.9.9 and 3.9.13 respectively.

3.6.2
1. 2. 3.

ITC Prerequisites
Must meet GUE general course prerequisites as outlined in section 1.6 Must be a minimum twenty-one years of age With the exception of GUE Recreational instructor candidates, all GUE ITC candidates must be qualified as GUE Recreational diving instructors or their equivalent (e.g., GUE Fundamentals instructors) Must be able to swim at least 600 yards/ 550 meters in under fourteen minutes without stopping. Must be able to swim a distance of at least 70 feet/21 meters on a breath hold Must have submitted a completed application packet to both GUE HQ and the ITC instructor before the commencement of the ITC; this would include: registration, medical history, liability release, instructional insurance (where applicable), and a dive resume Must have satisfied all GUE internship requirements (see section 3.6.8) Must be qualified in CPR and First-Aid

4. 5. 6.

7. 8.

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9.

Must be a nonsmoker

3.6.3

Recreational Instructor Training Courses

Recreational instructor training develops instructor proficiency in training principles applicable to those GUE courses not part of the Technical, Cave, or Rebreather curricula (i.e., GUE Recreational Diving programs 1 - 3). Instructor candidates who matriculate in a GUE Recreational ITC, and who pass a GUE Fundamentals instructor evaluation, will be qualified to teach GUE-sanctioned courses at the level determined by their evaluation (.g., GUE Recreational 1, GUE Fundamentals). Instructors may progress within their training category to other courses (i.e., from Fundamentals to Recreational Diver level 1) in the manner described in section 3.6.7. GUE ITC candidates who are certified diving Instructors with another agency for a minimum of 1 year and have conducted a min of 10 classes or certified 25 students may receive 2 signatures at the ITC and as a result be certified to teach GUE Recreational 1 courses directly after the ITC. Alternatively, instructors who wish to teach courses in another training category (e.g., going from Recreational to Technical) must undergo an ITC and an evaluation in the manner discussed in section 3.6.6

3.6.4

Technical Instructor Training Courses

Technical instructor training develops instructor proficiency in training principles directly applicable to those GUE courses that are not part of the Cave, Rebreather, or Recreational curricula (i.e., GUE Tech 1, 2, and 3). Instructor candidates that matriculate in a GUE Technical ITC, and who pass a GUE Technical instructor evaluation, will be qualified to teach GUE-sanctioned courses at the level determined by their evaluation (e.g. Tech 1). Instructors may progress within their training category to other courses (i.e., from Tech 1 to Tech 2) in the manner described in section 3.6.7. Alternatively, instructors who wish to teach courses in another training category (i.e., from Technical to Cave) must undergo an ITC and an evaluation in the manner discussed in section 3.6.6.

3.6.5

Cave Instructor Training Courses

Cave instructor training develops instructor proficiency in training principles directly applicable to those GUE courses that are not part of the Technical, Rebreather, or Recreational curricula (i.e., GUE Cave 1, 2, and 3). Instructor candidates who matriculate in a GUE Cave ITC, and who pass a GUE Cave instructor evaluation, will be qualified to teach GUE-sanctioned courses at the level determined by their evaluation (e.g., Cave 1 ). Instructors may progress within their training category to other courses (e.g., from Cave 1 to Cave 2) in the manner described in section 3.6.7. Alternatively, instructors who wish to teach courses in another training category (e.g., from Cave to Technical) must undergo an ITC and an evaluation in the manner discussed in section 3.6.6.

3.6.6
1.

GUE Instructor Training Progression
With the exception of GUE Fundamentals instructor candidates, all GUE instructor candidates must first qualify as instructors at the entry level of a particular training curriculum (e.g., as a Tech 1 instructor within the Technical diving curriculum). All GUE instructor candidates must first serve as interns/assistants with an appropriate GUE instructor (see section 3.6.8) in at least one complete GUE-sanctioned diving course at the entry level of the category sought (e.g., Tech 1), before matriculating in an appropriate GUE ITC (with the exception of GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 instructor candidates). This requirement is waived in ITCs were an entire course of the level sought is incorporated (e.g., a Tech ITC that begins with a Tech 1 class taught by GUE instructor trainers and assisted by GUE instructor candidates). Before enrolling in a GUE ITC, candidates must furnish both their training director and GUE HQ with documentation showing compliance with ITC prerequisites. ITC prerequisites pertinent to all GUE curricula are detailed in section 3.6.2 of this document; additional ITC prerequisites specific to a given curriculum are detailed in each relevant section.

2.

3.

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4. 5.

A GUE ITC is normally conducted over a minimum seven-day period and schools candidates in the theory and practice of a given GUE curriculum and how to communicate these effectively. Upon completing a given ITC, instructor candidates may either 1) be recommended for an instructor evaluation by his/her GUE instructor trainer (IT) or 2) be instructed by his/her IT to undertake further internships with a GUE instructor to correct some instructional deficiency before they are eligible for an instructor evaluation. The IT may require that the candidate co-teach with a specific instructor; alternatively, the IT may allow the candidate to gain experience with any active GUE instructor. GUE Fundamentals instructor candidates must demonstrate competence using a drysuit during the evaluation process. GUE instructor evaluation is conducted using the “signature” process. A candidate must obtain the signature, or approval, of two GUE instructor trainers, one of which must be a GUE instructor evaluator. The first signature awarded can only be awarded as an IT signature, and the final signature must be awarded by an IE. For example, a candidate being evaluated for a first signature may only be awarded an IT signature, even if the trainer holds IE status. The second signature can only be awarded by an IE. This evaluation process may take place at separate events. They are are normally conducted during a GUE sanctioned course at the level requested (e.g., Tech 1). During the instructor evaluation, instructor candidates must be able to demonstrate the ability to communicate all relevant course material in a usable fashion while also demonstrating an ability to maintain control over class participants, to help ensure their safety. Instructor Evaluation forms must bear the signatures and comments of both instructor trainer / evaluators.

6. 7.

8.

Upon the satisfactory completion of an instructor evaluation, an instructor candidate will be considered an Active GUE instructor, provided that they: 1) have submitted all relevant documents (enumerated above) to both GUE HQ and their training director; 2) have ensured that all their instructional documentation is in order (it is the candidate’s responsibility to ensure that all the relevant documents are properly executed); and 3) submit a signed instructor agreement letter, along with the appropriate instructor fee..

3.6.7

GUE Instructor Upgrades within the Same Training Category

GUE instructor candidates must first qualify as instructors at the entry level of a particular training curriculum (e.g., Tech 1 instructor in the Technical Diving curriculum) before being qualified to teach at the next level (Tech 2). Thereafter, GUE instructors may progress within a given training curriculum (e.g., Tech) by: 1. 2. Having acted as a lead instructor in at least five GUE-sanctioned courses at their given qualification level. Having interned with an approved GUE instructor (see section 3.6.8) in at least two GUEsanctioned courses at the next level (e.g., in a Tech 2 course). Instructors pursuing upgrades must secure executed GUE internship evaluations from the approved GUE instructor at the completion of each course and submit each within thirty days of completion to GUE HQ. By being successfully evaluated by one GUE instructor evaluator while teaching a GUEsanctioned course at the next-highest level.

3.

GUE Recreational instructors wishing to teach the primers (GUE Primer, doubles and drysuit) must become GUE Fundamentals instructors. No further evaluations will be required. Instructors are not required to undertake additional ITCs within a given category unless deemed necessary by a GUE instructor trainer. However, except for Tech instructors who wish to qualify to teach Level Two Recreational classes, all other GUE instructors seeking to move from one training curriculum to another (e.g., from Technical to Cave) must undertake an additional GUE ITC (e.g., a Tech instructor wishing to teach cave-diving must complete a Cave ITC) and be evaluated successfully by at least two GUE instructor evaluators (at least one of whom is a GUE training director) during the teaching of a sanctioned entry-level GUE course in the new training category.

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3.6.8

Fulfillment of Internship Requirement

To fulfill GUE's training prerequisite, internships must be conducted under the supervision of GUE instructors who have taught at least three classes in the given curriculum. It is the responsibility of instructor-candidates to obtain all properly executed evaluation forms and submit these within thirty days of completion to GUE HQ In extraordinary cases where appropriate GUE instructors are either unavailable, or access to whom subjects an instructor candidate to unreasonable duress, a candidate can petition GUE HQ to have their internship requirement amended to allow the required internship to be carried out with a GUE instructor who does not meet the requirements outlined above. Though GUE HQ in principle discourages this, it will consider petitions on a case-by-case basis

3.7 Instructor Trainer (IT) Qualifications
3.7.1 3.7.2
1.

Purpose IT Prerequisites
Must meet all the requirements of an Active Status GUE instructor at the level that the ITC candidates are pursuing. Must have taught at least five entry-level courses in any curriculum in which they are seeking IT status. Staff at least one ITC in any curriculum in which they are seeking IT status. Must receive a “signature” from a GUE IE while acting as a lead IT at a GUE ITC. Be approved by a majority of the GUE Training Council

A GUE IT is qualified to conduct GUE ITCs in preparation for a final GUE instructor evaluation.

2. 3. 4.

3.8 Instructor Evaluator (IE) Qualifications
3.8.1 Purpose
A GUE instructor evaluation is the final check on the instructor-development process; they are responsible for determining whether a candidate is able to autonomously conduct training safely and knowledgeably at a given level.

3.8.2
1.

Prerequisites
Must meet all the requirements of an Active Status GUE instructor and IT at the level that the ITC candidates are pursuing. Must have taught at least five entry-level courses in any curriculum in which they are seeking IT status. Staff at least one ITC in any curriculum in which they are seeking IE status. Must receive a “signature” from a GUE IE while acting as a lead IE at a GUE ITC. Be approved by a 2/3rds majority of the GUE Training Council.

2. 3. 4.

3.9 Recreational Diving Instructor Courses
3.9.1
3.9.1.1

GUE Recreational Instructor Training Course
Purpose

The GUE Recreational Instructor Training Course (ITC) is designed to teach instructor candidates how to effectively communicate relevant course information in a safe and positive manner.

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3.9.1.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prerequisites

Must comply with GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in sections 3.6.2 and 3.6.8 Must have passed GUE Fundamentals at the technical level or GUE Recreational Level 3 Diver. Must have suitable in-water and surface rescue skills. Must have proof of at least 200 dives, with at least fifty dives in a GUE single tank/cylinder configuration. At least twenty-five dives must have been in a double tank/cylinder configuration. Candidates aspiring to teach the GUE Fundamentals class must also have passed GUE Tech 1 prior to a final evaluation (see section 3.6.6, point 7).

3.9.1.3

Duration

The GUE Recreational ITC is conducted over a minimum seven-day period. This time period may be extended if prerequisites or program requirements have not been met to the instructor ’trainer’s satisfaction.

3.9.1.4
1. 2. 3. 4.

Program Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Instructor candidate-to-IT ratio is not to exceed 4:1 (adjusting downward for environmental conditions) No overhead diving Dives not to exceed 21m / 70ft

3.9.1.5

Program Content

The GUE Recreational ITC is a comprehensive training program conducted by a GUE instructor trainer. This program is conducted over a minimum of seven days and is designed to prepare an instructor candidate for a GUE instructor evaluation, which is conducted at a later date as per section 3.6.6.

3.9.1.6
1. 2. 3. 4.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2003, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beginning with the End in Mind - The Fundamentals of Recreational Diving. Jesper Berglund. Global Undwerwater Explorers. 2008. Stockholm, Sweden.

3.9.1.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Academic Topics

Discussion and implementation of GUE course content GUE organization, limits of training, and course completion requirements Conservation GUE standards and procedures Demonstrate mastery of relevant topics contained within GUE Recreational diver training

3.9.1.8

Land Drills and Topics

Discussion of land drills pertinent to GUE Recreational Training

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3.9.1.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Skills (Academic and In-Water)

Every ITC candidate must be able to perform or demonstrate: Prepared classroom presentations Impromptu classroom presentation Relevant land drills Relevant simulated training dives Simulated in-water emergency/rescue scenario Any relevant diving skill at a demonstration level when asked by the ITC staff A safe, effective, and personable approach to teaching An understanding of GUE standards and procedures A respect for the conservation of the environment

10. Proper in-water positioning to provide appropriate care for, and control of, students 11. An awareness of each student’s ability level

3.9.1.10

Equipment Requirements

ITC candidates must be well versed in both GUE single tank/cylinder and double tank/cylinder equipment configurations, with either configuration available as needed.

3.9.2

GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE.

GUE Fundamentals instructors seeking qualification to teach GUE’s Recreational Diver Level 1 class: 1. 2.

3.9.3

GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Level 2 Instructor

In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Recreational Level Two instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Recreational Level Two instructors: 1. 2. 3. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2 Be a GUE Recreational Level 1 instructor Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE.

3.9.4

GUE Fundamentals Instructor to GUE Recreational Diver Level 3 Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2 Be a GUE Recreational Level 2 instructor Be a GUE Technical Diver 1 Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE while using a dry suit.

In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Recreational Level 3 instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE 1. 2. 3. 4.

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3.9.5
1. 2. 3.

GUE Recreational 1 to GUE Recreational 2 Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must meet the requirements outlined in 3.6.7 Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE.

GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 instructors seeking qualification to teach GUE’s Recreational Diver Level 2 class:

3.9.6
1. 2. 3.

GUE Recreational 2 to GUE Recreational 3 Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must meet the requirements outlined in 3.6.7 Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE, during which they must also demonstrate competence using a drysuit.

GUE Recreational Diver Level 2 instructors seeking qualification to teach GUE’s Recreational Diver Level 3 class:

3.9.7
1. 2. 3.

GUE Recreational 1 to GUE Fundamentals Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must meet the requirements outlined in 3.6.7. Must successfully undergo a GUE instructor upgrade and evaluation by a GUE IE, during which they must also demonstrate competence using a drysuit.

GUE Recreational Diver Level 1 instructors seeking qualification to teach GUE’s Fundamentals class:

3.9.8
1. 2.

Cave or Tech Instructor to Recreational Level 1 Diving Instructor
Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must successfully undergo GUE instructor evaluation by a GUE IE.

GUE Cave or Tech instructors seeking qualification to teach GUE’s Recreational Level 1 class:

3.9.9
3.9.9.1

Technical Diver Instructor Course
Purpose

The GUE Tech instructor training course (ITC) is designed to teach instructor candidates how to effectively communicate appropriate course content for a GUE Tech 1 course in a safe, usable, and positive manner.

3.9.9.2
1. 2. 3.

Prerequisites

Must comply with GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in sections 3.6.2 and 3.6.8. Must have proof of at least 300 dives with fifty dives in doubles. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Tech 2, and GUE Cave 1

3.9.9.3

Duration

The Tech ITC is structured around a minimum five-day period. This time period may be extended if prerequisites or program requirements have been met to the instructor trainer’s satisfaction.

3.9.9.4
1.

Program Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4

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2. 3. 4.

Instructor candidate-to-IT ratio is not to exceed 3:1 Maximum depth 170 feet / 51 meters Minimum of 20 feet/6 meters of visibility

3.9.9.5

Program Content

The GUE Tech ITC is a comprehensive training program conducted by a GUE instructor trainer. This program is conducted over a minimum of five days and is designed to prepare an instructor candidate for a GUE instructor evaluation, which is conducted at a later date as per section 3.6.6.

3.9.9.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2003, High Springs, Florida.

3.9.9.7
1. 2. 3. 4.

Academic Topics

GUE organization, limits of training, and course completion requirements Conservation Review of GUE standards and procedures Demonstrate a thorough understanding of all topics relevant to the GUE Tech 1 course

3.9.9.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Land Drills and Topics

Reel and guideline use in standard operating procedures Team order and protocols Use of safety spools/reels Reel and guideline use in emergency procedures, including touch contact and gas-sharing techniques Basic navigation skills Visual referencing skills Be able to demonstrate capacity with all Tech 1 drills and topics

3.9.9.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Required Skills (Academic and In-water)

Each Tech ITC candidate must be able to perform or demonstrate: At least three prepared classroom presentations At least one impromptu classroom presentation At least one prepared line drill session At least three impromptu Tech 1 simulated training dives At least one simulated in-water emergency/rescue scenario Any Tech 1 diving skill at a demonstration level when asked by the ITC staff member A safe, effective, and personable approach to teaching An understanding of GUE standards and procedures

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A respect for the conservation of the environment

10. Proper in-water positioning to provide appropriate care for, and control, of their students 11. An awareness of each student’s ability level 12. Demonstrate full capacity with all topics contained within GUE Tech 1 diver training

3.9.9.10
1.

Equipment Requirements

Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use a dual cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. All dives must start with a minimum of 80 cubic feet/2250 liters. Regulators: Two first-stages; each supplying a single second-stage, one of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit where applicable. Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensator Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kg. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes

2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line, per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10-watt HID lighting or greater. 13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. Divers breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas.

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Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

3.9.10 Progress from Tech 1 Instructor to Tech 2 Instructor
3.9.10.1 Prerequisites
In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Tech 2 instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Tech 2 instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in sections 3.6.2. Must have proof of at least 400 dives with 100 dives in doubles. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Cave 1, and GUE Tech 2. Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

3.9.11 Progress from Tech 2 Instructor to Tech 3 Instructor
3.9.11.1 Prerequisites
In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Tech 3 instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Tech 3 instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must have proof of at least 700 dives with 150 dives in doubles. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Cave 1, and GUE Tech 3. Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

3.9.12 Progress from Tech 2 Instructor to Rebreather Instructor
3.9.12.1 Prerequisites
In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Rebreather instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Rebreather instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must have proof of at least 500 dives with 200 rebreather dives. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, Tech 2, and GUE Rebreather. Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

3.9.12.2
1. 2.

Equipment Requirements
Rebreather: Halcyon semi-closed circuit rebreather Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dualoutlet isolator manifold, which allows for the use of two first-stages. The double cylinders must be accessible by both the rebreather and the open-circuit regulators. All dives must start with a minimum of 40 cubic feet/1120 liters of gas.
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Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment:

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3.

Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs / 40 kg. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device

4.

5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Wet Notes 11. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 12. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 13. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/10watt HID lighting or greater. 14. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 15. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 16. At least one surface-marker buoy per diver 17. Divers breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site

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3.9.13 Cave Diver Instructor Course
3.9.13.1 Purpose
The GUE Cave Instructor Training Course (ITC) is designed to teach instructor candidates how to effectively communicate relevant course information for the Cave 1 course in a safe, usable, and positive manner.

3.9.13.2
1. 2. 3. 4.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2 and 3.6.8 Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Tech 1, and GUE Cave 2 Must have proof of at least 300 dives, with 100 cave dives beyond Cave 2 certification or their equivalent. Training dives are not included. Must have completed teaching outlines as assigned by GUE instructor trainer

3.9.13.3

Duration

The GUE Cave instructor training course (ITC) is structured around a minimum five-day period. This time period may be extended if all prerequisites or program requirements have not been met to the training director’s satisfaction.

3.9.13.4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Program Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Instructor candidate-to-IT ratios are not to exceed 3:1 Gas consumption: 1/3 of double cylinders for cave penetration Maximum depth: 100 feet/30 meters Minimum of 20 feet/6 meters of visibility to commence training cave dive Minimum of 80 cubic feet/2250 liters of gas to commence training cave dive

3.9.13.5

Program Content

The GUE Cave ITC is a comprehensive training program conducted by a GUE instructor trainer. This program is conducted over a minimum of seven days and is designed to prepare an instructor candidate for a GUE instructor evaluation, which is conducted at a later date as per section 3.6.6.

3.9.13.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Beyond the Daylight Zone: The Fundamentals of Cave Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, Panos Alexakos, and Todd Kincaid, GUE, 2003, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida.

3.9.13.7
1. 2. 3. 4.

Academic Topics

GUE organization, limits of training, and course completion requirements Conservation Review of GUE standards and procedures Demonstrate full capacity with all topics contained within GUE Cave 1 diver training

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3.9.13.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Land Drills and Topics

Reel and guideline use in standard operating procedures Team order and protocols Use of safety spools/reels Reel and guideline use in emergency procedures, including touch contact and gas-sharing techniques Lost-diver procedures Lost-guideline procedures Basic navigation skills Visual referencing skills Demonstrate a complete understanding of all topics contained within the GUE Cave 1 curriculum

3.9.13.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Each Cave ITC candidate must be able to perform or demonstrate: At least three prepared classroom presentations At least one impromptu classroom presentation At least one prepared line-drill session At least three impromptu Cave 1 simulated training dives At least one simulated in-water emergency/rescue scenario Any cave-diving skill at a demonstration level when asked by the ITC staff A safe, effective, and personable approach to teaching An understanding of GUE standards and procedures A respect for the conservation of the environment

10. Proper in-water positioning to give appropriate care for, and control of, their students 11. An awareness of each student’s ability level 12. Demonstrate capacity with all required dive skills and drills

3.9.13.10 Equipment Requirements
Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: 1. Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. All dives must start with a minimum of 80 cubic feet/2250 liters of gas. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7-foot/2-meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable). Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for
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the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. 4. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device Wet Notes

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 11. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 12. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/ 10-watt HID lighting or greater. 13. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 14. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 15. At least six line markers, of which at least three should be directional (line arrows) and three nondirectional 16. Divers breathing Helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

3.9.14 Progress from Cave 1 Instructor to Cave 2 Instructor
3.9.14.1 Prerequisites
In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Cave 2 instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Cave 2 instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2 Must have proof of at least 400 dives with 150 cave dives beyond Cave 2 certification or equivalent. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Cave 2, and GUE Tech 1 Diver. Must have experience in high-flow systems and systems that require decompression. Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

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3.9.15 Progress from Cave 2 Instructor to Cave 3 Instructor
3.9.15.1Prerequisites
In addition to the general requirements specified in section 3.6.8, prospective GUE Cave 3 instructors must also fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE Cave 3 instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must have proof of at least 700 dives with 300 cave dives beyond Cave 2 certification or equivalent. Training dives are not included. Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Cave 3, and GUE Tech 2 Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

3.9.16 DPV Instructor Course
3.9.16.1 Purpose
The GUE DPV instructor workshop is designed to teach instructor candidates how to effectively communicate relevant course information for the DPV 1 course in a safe, usable, and positive manner.

3.9.16.2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Prerequisites

Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2 and 3.6.8. Must be certified as a GUE Tech 1 diver. Must be an active GUE Fundamentals instructor or above. Must have taught at least 5 GUE Fundamentals classes. Must have completed at least 300 dives excluding training dives. Must have experience using DPVs during at least 50 dives. Must have completed requirements as assigned by GUE DPV instructor trainer. Own a DPV

3.9.16.3

Duration

The GUE DPV 1 workshop is structured around a minimum one-day period. This time period may be extended if all prerequisites or program requirements have not been met.

3.9.16.4
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Program Limits

General training limits as outlined in section 1.4 Instructor candidate-to-IT ratios are not to exceed 3:1. Gas consumption: 1/3 of double cylinders Maximum depth: 100 feet/30 meters. Minimum of 20 feet/6 meters of visibility to commence training dive. Minimum of 80 cubic feet/2,250 liters of gas to commence training dive.

3.9.16.5

Program Content

The GUE DPV 1 workshop is a comprehensive training program conducted by a GUE DPV Instructor Trainer. This program is conducted over at least one day and is designed to evaluate the candidate’s ability to teach recreational DPV diving.

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3.9.16.6
1. 2. 3.

Required Training Materials

Doing it Right: The Fundamentals of Better Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. Getting Clear on the Basics: The Fundamentals of Technical Diving. Jarrod Jablonski, GUE, 2001, High Springs, Florida. GUE DPV Power Point

3.9.16.7
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Academic Topics

GUE organization, limits of training and course completion requirements Conservation GUE standards and procedures Use and maintenance of DPVs Procedures and emergency management while diving DPVs

3.9.16.8
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Land Drills and Topics

Reel and guideline use while using a DPV Team order and protocols Use of safety spools and surface markers Emergency procedures, including towing a DPV while gas-sharing Managing a runaway DPV Lost-diver procedures Basic navigation skills Visual referencing skills

3.9.16.9
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Required Dive Skills and Drills

Demonstrate proficiency in the presentation of course content. Demonstrate capacity with DPV line drills. Demonstrate the ability to manage students during DPV training dives. Demonstrate a safe, effective, and personable teaching style. Demonstrate an understanding of GUE standards and procedures. Demonstrate respect for the conservation of our aquatic environment. 7. Demonstrate proper control and in-water positioning so as to promote student safety. Demonstrate the capacity for critical analysis of student performance. Demonstrate capacity with all required dive skills and drills.

3.9.16.10 Equipment Requirements
Each student should have, and be familiar with, all of the following required equipment: 1. Tanks/Cylinders: Students are required to use dual tanks/cylinders connected with a dual-outlet isolator manifold, which allows the use of two first-stages. All dives must start with a minimum of 80 cubic feet/2,250 liters of gas. Regulators: Two first-stages, each supplying a single second-stage. One of the second-stages must be on a 7 foot/2 meter hose. One of the first-stages must supply a pressure gauge and provide inflation for a dry suit (where applicable).

2.

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Backplate System: A rigid and flat platform of metal construction with minimal padding, held to a diver by one continuous piece of nylon webbing. This webbing should be adjustable through the plate and should use a buckle to secure the system at the waist. A crotch strap attached to the lower end of this platform and looped through the waistband would prevent the system from riding up a diver’s back. A knife should be secured to the waist on the left webbing tab. This webbing should support five D-rings; the first should be placed at the left hip, the second should be placed in line with a diver’s right collarbone, the third should be placed in line with the diver’s left collarbone, the fourth and fifth should be affixed to the crotch strap to use while using a DPV or towing/ stowing gear. The harness below the diver’s arms should have small restrictive bands to allow for the placement of reserve lights. The system should retain a minimalist approach with no unnecessary components. Buoyancy Compensation Device: A diver’s buoyancy compensation device should be backmounted and minimalist in nature. It should come free of extraneous strings, tabs or other material. There should be no restrictive bands or “bungee” of any sort affixed to the buoyancy cell. In addition, diver lift should not exceed 80 lbs/40 kgs. Wing size and shape should be appropriate to the cylinder size(s) employed for training. At least one time/depth-measuring device A wrist mounted compass Decompression tables Mask and fins: Mask should be low-volume; fins should be rigid, non-split At least one cutting device

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Wet Notes 11. One spool with 100 feet/30 meters of line per diver 12. One primary reel per team, with a minimum of 300 feet/90 meters of line 13. DPV: The DPV should be of a tow-behind type. It should have variable speed adjustment, as well as a clutch. The DPV must include an attached cord at the back with a bolt snap to be clipped on the front D-ring located in the crotch strap, used to tow the diver. The DPV should also have a leash attached to the front to be used for towing it in case it fails to work. 14. One primary light: A primary light should be minimalist in design; its power source should consist of a rechargeable battery pack residing in a canister, powering an external light head via a light cord. Primary lights should produce the equivalent output of 50-watt halogen/ 10-watt HID lighting or greater. 15. Two reserve lights: Reserve lights should have a minimum of protrusions and a single attachment at its rear. The light should be activated and de-activated by twisting the front bezel. 16. Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure 17. One surface marker per team 18. Divers breathing helium mixtures and utilizing a dry suit must have a separate (from the back gas) dry suit inflation source, such as an argon/air cylinder. Divers may not inflate the dry suit from the back gas. Note: Prior to the commencement of class, students should consult with a GUE representative to verify equipment requirements. Whether or not a piece of equipment fulfills GUE’s equipment requirement remains at the discretion of GUE and its instructor representatives. Participants are responsible for providing all equipment or for making provisions to secure all necessary equipment before the start of the course. In general, it is better for the student to learn while using his or her own equipment. However, students should exercise caution before purchasing new equipment to avoid acquiring substandard equipment. Please contact a GUE representative prior to making any purchases. Information about recommended equipment can be obtained from the equipment considerations section of GUE’s Web site.

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3.9.17 Progress from DPV 1 Instructor to DPV 2 Instructor
GUE DPV 2 instructors must fulfill the following prerequisites before they are eligible to become qualified GUE DPV 2 instructors: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Must meet GUE instructor candidate general prerequisites as outlined in section 3.6.2. Must be a GUE DPV 1 instructor Must have completed at least 700 dives with 300 cave dives beyond Cave 2 certification or equivalent. Training dives are not included. Must have completed at least 50 cave dives using multiple DPV Must be an active GUE Cave 2 Instructor who has taught at least 10 Cave 2 classes Must have passed GUE Fundamentals, GUE Cave 2, and GUE Tech 1 Diver. Must have experience in high-flow systems and systems that require decompression. Must meet all upgrade requirements outlined in section 3.6.7.

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Appendix A Recommended Cave Training Sites for Simulated Low-Visibility Drills
1. Cave Sites: Florida •Cow Springs: The downstream section; no training dives are allowed in upstream Cow Springs. •Devil’s Eye and Ear System: From the Keyhole out, and the first 200 feet/60 meters of the Catacombs. •Little River: From Table Rock out on the main line. •Orange Grove: From the warning sign. •Peacock Spring 1: From the breakdown room out of the Peanut Tunnel. •Telford Spring: The section between Telford Sink and Telford Spring. 2. Cave Sites: Mexico The following is a list of suggested training sites for critical skills: • Aktun Ha (Carwash): Upstream to Luke’s hope • • • • • • • • Ponderosa; Left side River Run: Up to first 90 degree turn right. Right side River Run: Up to cenote Little Joe Mayan Blue; A Tunnel: Up to second jump to Death Arrow Passage (third jump). B Tunnel: Up to 90 degree turn left before jump to E Tunnel Taj Mahal; Jumna River Line: Up to dome. Line to Room of Cheers: Up to first jump right Xtabay; Downstream line: Before Wizard’s Den Temple of Doom; Madonna Passage: No zero-visibility drills. Canyons: No zero-visibility drills Naharon; Double Domes Line: No zero-visibility drills Aktun Koh; Upstream: Up to second jump. No zero-visibility drills Chac Mool; Kukulcan: Up to first jump. Downstream: Up to first big room, 90 degree turn right. Upstream: Up to beginning of cave line.

Additional sites may be used for training as long as no critical skills are conducted in them. Lost-line drills should ONLY be done on the following sites: 1. 2. 3. 4. Aktun Ha (Carwash): Upstream Ponderosa: both sides of River Run, close to cavern Mayan Blue: B Tunnel, beginning of permanent line Mayan Blue: Dead Zone, beginning of permanent line on right side

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Appendix B Approved GUE Forms
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Course Completion Form/Student Final Evaluation Student Certification Agreement Accident Report Form (two pages) Intern Evaluation Form ITC Completion Form Instructor Evaluation Form Instructor Agreement (two pages) Instructor Application Form Instructor Renewal Form

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