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Cranston School District

Grade 3 Quarter 3

Teacher Modeled Prompt

Reading and Analyzing Non-Fiction; Opinion Writing


Common Core Writing Standard W.3.1
Text: Reading Street, Unit 4: Americas Champion Swimmer; Gertrude Ederle
Prerequisite Skill: Character Traits
Teacher Directions
1. This lesson should follow the whole class reading and discussion of the stories, Gerturde Ederle.
2. This prompt is to be used as a model lesson so that students understand how to answer this type
of prompt and respond in writing.
3. Read the prompt to the class. Then provide each student with a copy of the prompt and the text.
This text gives all the information needed to address the prompt. It should be read and analyzed
with the students carefully before writing. Model the process and teach the students to refer
back to the texts while writing and to take notes. They may use a graphic organizer and mark up
the texts as needed.
4. Teachers and students should take as much time as needed to plan, write, and proofread.
Day 1-2

(A) Provide each student with a copy of the prompt and the text, Gerturde Ederle, from Reading
Street. The students should independently reread the text carefully.

(B) Be sure to review the concept of character

traits. The class should brainstorm a list of

traits to describe Gertrude. As a class, decide upon one word and complete the graphic
organizer together.
Day 3-5
Today the teacher will model and write an essay with the class. Review essay format, using either
the Painted Essay structure or one similar and familiar to students.
(A) Remind students about the elements of a good introduction/hook, summary and focus
statement.
(B) Continue with the rest of the essay, stopping to remind students about topic sentences, use
of evidence and transitional language.
(C) Model a good conclusion paragraph which restates the focus statement and provides further
thoughts on the topic.

Cranston School District

Grade 3 Quarter 3

Teacher Modeled Prompt

Reading and Analyzing Non-Fiction; Opinion Writing


Common Core Writing Standard W.3.1
Student Directions
Directions: You have read Americas Champion Swimmer: Gertrude Ederle. Today
you will form an opinion about Gertrude and find evidence from the text to
support that opinion.
Prompt: What word would you use to describe Gertrude Elderle? Provide
evidence from the text to support your opinion.

Remember, a good opinion essay:


Has an introduction
Clearly states your opinion/claim in a focus statement
Uses specific evidence from the text(s) to support your opinion and
explains your thinking
Groups ideas in paragraphs
Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example)
to connect opinion and reasons.
Uses language that makes sense to the reader
Has a conclusion
Has correct spelling, capitalization, and punctuation

A word to describe Gertrude Elderle is _______________________.

Evidence-what did she do or say?

How does this show proof of that


trait?

Cranston School District


GRADE 3 Writeopinionpiecesontopicsortexts,supportingapointofviewwithreasons
Expectations
Establishes
context and
purpose
W.3.1a ; W.3.2a

Demonstrates
critical thinking
and
understanding of
content in order
to develop the
topic
W.3.1b & W.3.2b

Creates an
organizing
structure
W.3.1a, c &
W.3.a, c, d

Exceeds Standard
4
Effectively introduces the topic
and sets context (background
information).
The student effectively states an
opinion (takes a stance) and
writes to a clear focus/point of
view.
The student uses relevant and
insightful examples and/or
references from texts to support
focus/opinion.

Meets Standard
3
Introduces the topic and sets some
context (background information)
The student states an opinion (takes a
stance) and writes to a clear
focus/point of view.

Studentusessomerelevantexamples
and/or references from texts to
support focus/opinion
The reasons may be in a list.

Developsthetopicwithfacts,
definitions,concretedetails,
quotations,orotherinformation
andexamplesrelatedtothe
topic.
The student uses effective essay
and paragraph structures and
formatting.
The opening, body, and closure
are skillfully organized.
The student uses effective
linking words, transitions.
The student provides an
effective conclusion.

Somewhatdevelopsthetopicwith
factsandexamplesrelatedtothe
topic.

The student uses essay and paragraph


structures appropriately.
The opening, body, and closure are
effectively organized.
The student uses appropriate
transitions.Linksideaswithin
categoriesofinformationusingwords
andphrases(e.g.,another,for
example,also,because)
Thestudentprovidesaconclusion.

Uses voice and


style to enhance
meaning.
L.3. 3a, c

The student skillfully uses


language and establishes an
authoritative and academic
voice.
The student uses varied
sentence length and structure.

Demonstrates
command of
written language
conventions
L.3.1 a-g; L.3.2ad; L.3.6

The student demonstrates


consistent control of grade-level
grammar, usage, punctuation,
sentence construction, and
spelling.

The student uses precise and domainspecific language that establishes an


authoritative and academic voice.
The student uses some varied
sentence length and structure.

The student demonstrates control of


grade-level usage, grammar,
punctuation, capitalization, sentence
construction, and spelling.
The errors do not interfere with
meaning.

Nearly Meets
Standard
2
Introduces the topic
with little context
(background
information).
The student may
have some
digressions from the
focus.
Information may be
lacking and/or not
accurate.

Below
Standard
1
Begins with focus.

The student does not


write to the
focus/point of view.
The student gives
inappropriate
information.

The student
examples and/or
references are
limited.

The student shows


little or no examples
and/or references to
text.

The student uses an


organizational
structure that may
cause confusion.

The students writing


shows little evidence
of organization.

The student uses a


few
transitions/linking
words.
Attempts a
conclusion, but it
may be weak.
The language is
pedestrian and may
not establish an
authoritative or
academic voice.
The student does not
vary sentence length
and structure.
The student
demonstrates some
control of gradelevel usage,
grammar,
punctuation,
sentence
construction, and
spelling.
The errors may
interfere with
meaning.

The student uses no


transitions/linking
words.
Conclusion is abrupt
or missing.
The students
language is limited.
The student does not
vary sentences and
uses only
subject/verb order.
The student
demonstrates little
control of usage,
grammar,
punctuation,
sentence
construction, or
spelling.
The numerous errors
interfere with
meaning.