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Faculty of Education

Assessment Cover Sheet


OFFICE USE ONLY
Assessment received:

Unit Co-ord./Lecturer Noleine Fitzallen


Tutor:(if applicable) Michelle Smith
Student ID 161809
Student Name Neneh Webb
Unit Code

ESH203

Unit Name Teacher as Planner, Assessor & Reporter


Assessment
1
Title/Number
Word Count Part 1: 600 Part 2: 999 Total: 1599
I declare that all material in this assessment is my own work except where there is clear acknowledgement or reference to
the work of others and I have complied and agreed to the University statement on Plagiarism and Academic Integrity on the
University website at www.utas.edu.au/plagiarism *

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Date

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Dated:

ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

Sequence of Learning Experiences developed by Neneh Webb


Title
Days of the week
Overarching
Students will

Understanding/

understand that

Organising ideas

time has been

understand how

categorised using

time is measured?

Why do we need to

terms such as day


and week so that
we are best able to
describe the
passage of time.
Year Level

Foundation/Year one

Learning Area

Mathematics- Measurement and


geometry.

Describe duration using months,


weeks, days and hours
(ACMMG021)

Foundation: Understanding
includes connecting names,
numerals and quantities
(ACARA, 2013).

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Year One: Fluency includes

ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

counting number in sequences


readily forward and backwards,
locating numbers on a line, and
naming the days of the
week(ACARA, 2013).

General Capabilities

Literacy :

Use simple sentences


to record ideas and
events with
emerging knowledge

Numeracy:

Sequence familiar actions and


events using the everyday
language of time
(ACMMG007).

of word order
(ACMNA005).

Spell words using


growing sound and
letter knowledge and
spell words with
regular letter patterns
(ACMNA001).

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Essential Question

Assessment # 1

Focus Questions

Evidence of Development of

Activities

1) To what extent

1) Can you correctly order

Understanding
i)
i) Students contribute to

1a)

does the

the days of the week?

measurement of
time impact on our
daily activities?

discussion and recitation


of the order of the days of

Closed question. They could


ii)

So the evidence you are

week in the right

looking for is. They

order?...perhaps

each join in and do not

Read the book The Very


Hungry Caterpillar as a class

the week (ACMMG007).

answer Yes. Why do we


have to know the days of the

group.

Talk about how each day the


caterpillar ate a varying amount
of food.

stumble on the words?

Ask students to help write the


days of the week out in order on
the whiteboard.

Recite the days of the week as a


class.

ii) Students cut out and glue the days

1b) Might be good to look at a calendar

of the week in to booklets in the

here for authenticity.

correct order (ACMMGO21).

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Provide each student with a

ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

paper booklet and a worksheet


with the days of the week typed
in jumbled order.

Students to glue the days into


their booklets in correct order.

2) Which activities do you

i) Students can identify activities

associate with each different

specific to each day of the week by

day of the week?

means of class discussion and

2a)

As a class group students will be


asked if they can think of

through completion of work in their

specific activities which are

booklets (ACMMG007) Yes.

performed on different days.

(ACMNA005).Literacy assessed here


too?

Students directed to illustrate an


activity performed on each day
of the week on the appropriate
page in their booklets.

Students to write a sentence


describing illustration.

ii) Students can fill in the days of the


week worksheet using the letter-sized
text boxes as a clue if needed

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2b)

As students complete their


booklet they are to move on to

ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

(ACMNA001).Looking for correct

days of the week worksheet, on

formation and spelling?

which textboxes in appropriate


sizes are provided as clues to
which day is which with several
letters filled in on each day (e.g.
for Sunday the S and the n
may be filled in).

3) Can you not only

i) Students demonstrate

correctly order the days of

understanding of.through

the week but also recognise

contribution to class discussion.

3a)

teacher in order to share and

the letters used to form each


day in written form? Closed

ii) Understanding of..demonstrated

again. This also does not

by matching the correct letters from

point to your overall

magazines (ACMNA005).

Students divided into pairs by


discuss their completed
booklets.

understanding but is

Willing students to share booklet


with the class group.

associated with Literacy

3b)

skills. You can assess this


within the evidence

Students will be provided with a

gathering, while focussing

piece of A3 paper and days of

on a bigger question.

the week typed on a separate

Perhaps - to do with passage

piece of paper.

of time as you have that in

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

your Understanding goal.

Students instructed to cut out


and glue these on to A3 paper (in
order) and then to use magazines
to find matching letters to stick
over the top of these letters to
create a collage.

Resources

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2013). The Australian curriculum.
Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/
Carle, E. (1969). The very hungry caterpillar. New York, NY: The World Publishing Company.
Traver, R. (1998). What is a good guiding question? Educational Leadership, 55(6), 70-73.

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


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Assessment # 1

Days of the week


Neneh Webb
Foundation/year one students may not yet have the capacity to name the
days of the week in correct order, or to understand why it is necessary to provide each day with a
different name; as such I selected days of the week as the topic for my learning sequence
(ACARA, 2013) (Arthur, Beecher, Death, Dockett & Farmer, 2007). According to Siemon,
Beswick, Brady, Clark, Faragher & Warren (2011), time is one of the most difficult of
measurement concepts for children to grasp as it cannot be explicitly taught with the use of
tangible experiences. The purpose of this learning sequence is essentially for students to develop
competence in recognising that days of the week are a means which we measure time by, and in
this way, similar to the measurement of other attributes (Killen, 2009).
The learning sequence links to the Australian Curriculum Mathematics, to
the strand of measurement and geometry, stating the following outcome as an expectation for
foundation students: Connect days of the week with familiar events and actions (ACMMG008)
(ACARA, 2013) with additional expectation for year one students: Describe duration using
months, weeks, days and hours (ACMMCO21) (ACARA, 2013).
Another learning area at the forefront of this learning sequence is English.
Oral language skills are utilised when reciting the days of the week and engaging in classroom
discussions, linking with an Australian Curriculum outcome for foundation students: Use
interaction skills including listening while others speak, using appropriate voice levels,
articulation and language, gestures and eye contact (ACELY1784)(ACARA, 2013). The
following outcome is for grade one students: Engage in conversations and discussions, using

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

active listening behaviours, showing interest, and contributing ideas, information and questions
(ACELY1656) (ACARA, 2013). Letter recognition is promoted, particularly in the magazine
letter cut out activity during which students are required to read the words, then match the letters
which they find in magazines with the letters which make up the days of the week on their
posters (ACELA1778)(ACARA, 2013).
This learning sequence has been strategically planned, using an approach
designed to best fulfil students potential to grasp the proposed overarching understanding
concept; on completion of this learning sequence students are expected to recognise why we
must to categorise time into key terms such as day and week (ACARA, 2013). This intention is
realised through the succinct teaching of the order of the days of the week, so that students
understand that the week progresses through different stages, therefore affecting our daily
activities (Siemon et al., 2011). By the linkage of activities commonly performed on specific
days in their lives, students are able to put the concept of measuring time into perspective and
understand why time must be measured (Perkins,1998).
One of the general capabilities as identified in the Australian Curriculum for
Literacy: Use simple sentences to record ideas and events with emerging knowledge of word
order (ACELA1435) will be targeted as a result of students writing a sentence to describe an
event which may occur on a particular day (ACARA, 2013). Another general capability which is
targeted in the planned learning sequence is numeracy based Sequence familiar actions and
events using the everyday language of time (ACMMG007); an example of this criteria being
met is given in the curriculum: associating familiar activities with times of the day or days of
the week using pictorial, written or technology formats(ACARA, 2013, p.18). The activity

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


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Assessment # 1

requiring students to relate their activities specifically to each day of the week integrates this
capability (Earl, 2003).
While planning this learning sequence I followed Madeline Hunters lesson design plan.
Reference? Initially I identified the main element of the lesson and from there, moved into the
anticipatory set which included reading the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar to the class
(Carle, 1969) (Marzano, 2007). The next phase of planning in the lesson sequence adhered to the
third step in Hunters model: objective and purpose, this element of planning focuses on the
belief that students benefit from knowing exactly what it is they are supposed to be learning
(Marzano, 2007). Using the latter information as a guide in each of my learning activities, I
planned to give students an explanation regarding the importance of learning the days of the
week whilst gauging their current level of understanding (Whitton, Barker, Nosworthy, Sinclair
& Nanlohy, 2010).

Hunters Modelling phase was incorporated into each activity to demonstrate what was
required of students in order to complete each activity successfully (Killen, 2005). Checking for
understanding (the next identified step by Hunter) is unquestionably necessary as it is imperative
that students have a complete understanding of the task requirements (Glasson, 2009). Guided
practise was incorporated into my learning activity as before students were to commence work
on the allocated task, I planned to have them participate as class group in repeating the days of
the week (Brady & Kennedy, 2012). The independent practice element is present in each of my
proposed learning activities as they all contain an aspect in which students are required to work
individually (Brady & Kennedy, 2007). The only element of the Madeline Hunter model which I

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

chose to exclude from my planning process was the input section as this element was addressed
in other components of the planning process (Marzano, 2007).

The planned learning activities will promote student understanding through the explicit
teaching of the correct sequencing of the days of the week along with connections to students
everyday lives (ACMMG007)(ACARA, 2013). Students will have learnt to associate each day
with particular tasks and to understand the importance of measuring time in order to attend or
participate in scheduled activities (Arthur, Beecher, Death, Dockett & Farmer, 2007). On
completion of this unit students should have completed their booklets with the days of the weeks
glued as headings in the correct order with illustrations and text detailing a relevant activity for
each day (Whitton et al., 2010). Students should also have demonstrated understanding through
the completion of the text-box worksheet and the magazine cut out collage (Earl, 2003).

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


Neneh Webb 161809

Assessment # 1

References
Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2007). Programming and planning
in early childhood settings. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2013). The Australian
curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Brady, L., & Kennedy, K. (2007). Curriculum construction. (3rd ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW:
Pearson Australia.

Brady, L., & Kennedy, K. (2012). Assessment and reporting: Celebrating student achievement.
(4th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.

Carle, E. (1969). The very hungry caterpillar. New York, NY: The World Publishing Company.

Earl, L. M. (2003). Assessment as learning: Using classroom assessment to maximize student


learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Glasson, T. (2009). Improving student achievement: A practical guide to assessment for learning.
Carlton South, VIC: Curriculum Corporation

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ESH203 Teacher as Planner Assessor & Reporter


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Assessment # 1

Killen, R. (2005). Programming and assessment for quality teaching and learning. South
Melbourne, VIC: Thomson Social Science Press.

Killen, R. (2009). Effective teaching strategies: Lessons from research and practice. (5th ed.).
South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage.

Marzano, R. J. (2007). What will I do to develop effective lessons organised into a cohesive unit?
The art and science of teaching (pp. 174-190)

Perkins, D. (1998). Teaching for Understanding. In: T. Blythe, T., & Associates. (Eds). The
teaching for understanding guide (pp. 17-24). San Francisco, C.A: John Wiley & Sons
Inc.

Siemon, D., Beswick, K., Brady, K., Clark, J., Fragher, R., & Warren, E. (2011). Teaching
mathematics foundation to middle years. South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University
Press.

Whitton, D., Barker, K., Nosworthy, M., Sinclair, C., & Nanlohy, P. (2010). Learning for
teaching: Teaching for learning. (2nd ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage

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Assessment # 1

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