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Non discrimination on the Basis of

Disability in Air Travel:


Screening Guidelines to be
followed by CISF Security Staff for
Passengers with Disabilities at
Indian Airports
Total Pages: 33

Compiled by:
Rajesh Bhatia, Shivani Gupta, Smiti
Bhatia and Suranjana Ghosh Aikara
May 2014

Table of Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.

Golden Rules for CISF Staf


3
List of Screening of travelers with various disabilities
4
List of Screening of travelers with various medical conditions
4
Screening Guidelines including Dos and Donts and Etiquette for
Screening of Passengers with Mobility Impairment
5
5. Annexure A on Screening Guidelines including Dos and Donts of
Screening of Passengers with Prosthetic Devices
6
6. Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of Travelers with
Intellectual Disabilities
7
7. Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of Travelers with
Developmental Disabilities
8
8. Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of Blind or
Persons with Low Vision
9
9. Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of Deaf or Hard
of Hearing Persons
9
10.Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of persons with
Deafblindness
10
11.Screening Guidelines including Etiquette for Screening of persons with
Speech Impairments
10
12.Screening Guidelines for Children with Disabilities
10
13.Screening of Travelers with Medical Conditions:1) Travelers with
Bandages and Dressings; 2) Travelers with Internal Medical Devices;
Travelers needing medication
11
14.Screening medically necessary liquids and Passengers Who Have
Undergone a Medical Treatment with Radioactive Materials and Those
with Radioactive Medication
12
15.Screening of Portable Oxygen & Passengers with related respiratory
equipment
12
16.Screening of Passengers using Nebulizers
13
17.Screening of Passengers with Diabetes
14
18.Screening of Passengers with Ostomies
14
19.Screening of Breast Cancer Survivors and those who have difficulty
waiting in line
15
20.Reference to Power Point Slide numbers to view images of several
types of mobility equipment
15
21.Quiz for CISF staf with questions and answers
15
22.Disclaimer
17

70 million Indians have a disability.


On average, one out of every 10 travelers has some level of disability. Not
just major disabilities, but also the elderly and the injured. This percentage is
growing as the baby boomers are aging.
India ratified CRPD, Convention on the Rights of Persons with
Disabilities, in 2007. By doing so, it recognized among other things:
a) That discrimination against any person on the basis of disability is a
violation of the inherent dignity and worth of the human person;
b) The need to promote and protect the human rights of all persons with
disabilities, including those who require more intensive support;
c) The importance for persons with disabilities of their individual
autonomy and independence, including the freedom to make their own
choices;
d) Recognizing that children with disabilities should have full enjoyment
of all human rights and fundamental freedoms on an equal basis.
An airport can be a stressful environment and poses challenges for all
travelers. Imagine encountering those challenges with a disability --- now
imagine how you can help alleviate those challenges.
CISF personnel in charge of security screening at airports, should ensure that
passengers with disabilities have a positive experience by being kind,
courteous and knowledgeable.
The key to providing exemplary service is knowing how to efectively interact
with people with disabilities let us learn how.

Content and Objectives of this Manual

Content:
Screening Dos and Donts for the passengers with disabilities, at
airports in India.
Objectives:
Train CISF staf in charge of airport security screening, with appropriate
protocol for screening passengers with disabilities satisfactorily,
without compromising dignity of people with disabilities, and national
security and the security of the travellers.

Golden Rules for CISF Staff

Remember to pay emphasis and attention on the person, not the


disability.
People with disabilities are people first, people who happen to have a
disability.
Assist passengers with disabilities in a pleasant, helpful & respectful
manner.

Consider, Remember and Practice the following:

Show respect for the individual


Be kind, courteous, pleasant and helpful
Speak to the person, not their companion
Look for opportunities to assist
Request Permission before assisting
Listen and follow directions
Try to be on same eye level, if possible
Be Patient and Calm
Do not ask any personal questions
Do not make any disgraceful/humiliating comments
Bring them to the front of the line
Respect person's mobility equipment and handle with care

In Section I, this manual covers Screening


Techniques for Travellers with the following
Disabilities:

Have mobility impairment


o Use Wheelchair or Scooters
o Cannot Remove Shoes
o Have Metal Joint Implants
o Have a Prosthetic device (Annexure A)
o Have a Cast, Brace, or Support Appliance
Have Intellectual Disabilities
Have Developmental Disabilities
Are Blind or Have Low Vision
Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Have Deafblindness
Are Speech Impaired

There is a separate section on Children with Disabilities

In Section II, this manual covers Screening


Techniques for Travellers with the following
Medical Conditions:

Passengers with bandages and dressings


Have Internal Medical Devices
Need Medication
Have Medically Necessary Liquids
Have Medically Necessary Radioactive Substances
Use Portable Oxygen and have CPAPs, BiPAPs, and APAPs (Respiratory
Machines)
Use Nebulizers
Have Diabetes

Have Ostomies
Are Breast Cancer Survivors
Have Difficulty Waiting in Line

* Those who want to wear gloves, socks, scarf or facial / nasal mask and
cannot remove due to their sensitivity to external temperature like cold, air
condition, smoke, etc.

Section I: Travellers with Disabilities:

1. Screening of Passengers with Mobility Impairment may:


Use Wheelchair or Scooters
Use Prosthetic Devices (Annexure A)
Use Mobility Devices like canes, crutches or braces
Have Metal Joint Implants like artificial knees or hips
Have a Cast, Brace, or Support Appliance
Have difficulty walking or standing
Cannot remove shoes

Passenger with any of the mobility impairment listed above should inform the
CISF officer before screening begins if he or she has:
Difficulty Walking or Standing including difficulty standing from the
wheelchair
Uses Mobility Devices like canes, crutches, braces or calipers
Has a Cast, Brace, or Support Appliance
Cannot Remove Shoes
Have Metal Joint Implants

Do's of Screening of Passengers with Mobility Impairment:

Screen all such passengers with a thorough pat down process.


Screening be conducted in a private area with the CISF officer of the
same gender as that of the passenger.
Use ETD, Explosive Trace Detection to screen the passenger's
wheel-chair, scooter including the seat cushions and any nonremovable pouches or fanny packs. Any removable items be required
to undergo X-ray screening.
The passengers walker, crutch, cane, or other device must
undergo X-ray screening, unless it cannot fit through the X-ray.
If an item cannot fit through the X-ray, or the passenger cannot be
separated from the item, it must be inspected by an officer. The
passenger should tell the officer if he/she needs to be immediately
reunited with the device after it is screened by X-ray.
Passengers who cannot remove shoes be screened with a
thorough pat down process. Screening to be conducted with the
CISF staf of the same gender as that of the passenger. Use ETD to
screen shoes.

Passengers who have metal implants such as artificial knees or


hips, should inform a CISF officer before screening begins. If a
passenger cannot or chooses not be screening by imaging
technology/ETD or the passenger alarms a walk-through metal
detector, the passenger be screened using a thorough pat-down
procedure.
Passengers with cast, brace or calipers or supportive
appliances should be screened without removing them with a
thorough pat down process. Screening be conducted with the CISF
staf of the same gender as that of the passenger. Use ETD to screen
cast, brace or calipers.
Passengers who intend to check-in with their own wheelchair be given
the option of using a station/airport wheelchair. If the passengers
prefer to use their own wheelchair, they shall be permitted to
use it.

Don'ts of Screening Passengers with Mobility Impairment

Do not force wheel chair users to stand from their wheel chairs
Do not attempt to manually lift the wheel chair user as this is
against his/her dignity and most of all it jeopardizes his/her safety
Under no circumstances should the passenger be asked to
remove cast, brace, calipers, metal implants or supportive
alliances and even shoes if the passenger cannot remove
shoes.
Annexure A: Screening of Passengers with Prosthetics
Prosthetic limbs are mechanical devices worn by amputees. They can
be worn above knee, below knee, on the elbow or shoulder,
depending on the nature of amputation.
Parts of a prosthetic limb:
Pylon - internal frame or skeleton of the prosthetic limb. Provides
structural support and formed of metal rods or lighter carbon-fibre
composites.
Foam cover - Pylons are enclosed with a foam-like material, shaped
and coloured to match the persons skin tone to make the prosthetic
limb look lifelike.
Socket - the portion of the prosthetic device where the amputees limb
stump is fitted in.
Advanced prosthetic limbs can be equipped with a microprocessor
(computer chip) and sensors. They may have a power charging point.

Do's of Screening of Passengers with Prosthetics

Passengers with prostheses (usually worn by patients with


mobility impairment) should be screened without removing
them.

The passenger should inform the CISF Officer of the existence of a


prosthetic device or caliper, his or her ability, and of any need for
assistance before screening begins.
Upon production of the Government Disability ID Card (if available), the
security official should begin the specified screening process ensuring
discretion and privacy for the passenger.
Passengers with prostheses should be screened using
advanced technological mechanisms such as Explosive Trace
Detectors (ETD). Airport Operators should be mandated to procure
Explosive Trace Detectors and other necessary equipment according to
international standards.
If additional screening aside from ETD is required, the passenger
should be screened using a thorough physical pat-down procedure
instead.
A physical pat-down procedure should be used to resolve any alarms of
ETD.
If a physical pat-down is required in order to complete
screening, the following points should be considered:
a. The pat-down should be conducted by an officer of the same
gender. The passenger can request a private screening at any time
and a private screening should be ofered when the officer must
pat-down sensitive areas. During a private screening, another CISF
employee of the same gender as the passenger should also be
present and the passenger may be accompanied by a companion of
his or her choosing.
b. A passenger may ask for a chair if he or she needs to sit down.
c. A passenger should be given the right to inform an officer before
the pat-down begins, of any difficulty in raising his or her arms,
remaining in the position required for a pat-down, or any areas of
the body that are painful when touched.
d. A passenger should not be asked to remove or lift any article of
clothing to reveal.

Don'ts of Screening of Passengers with Prosthetics

Under no circumstances should the passenger be asked to


remove his/her prosthesis.
Under no circumstances should the passenger be asked to
strip to remove prosthesis.
Under no circumstances should the passenger's prosthesis be
put through X-Ray machine.
2. Intellectual Disabilities
Intellectual Disability, also known as learning disability, and previously
known as mental retardation, is a generalized disorder characterized by
significantly impaired cognitive functioning. Cognitive functioning is
performance in mental processes such as thinking, understanding and
remembering. It may include impairments such as Down Syndrome and
children with behavioral and emotional disorders.

Screening:

Passengers with intellectual disabilities be screened without being


separated from their traveling companions.
The passenger or his or her traveling companions be allowed to ofer
suggestions on the best way to approach and screen the passenger,
especially if it is necessary to touch him or her during screening.
The passenger be given the option of being screened using walkthrough metal detectors.
If the passenger declined this option, then he/she be screened using a
thorough pat down process instead.
Tell the passenger exactly what is going to happen. For example, I will
have to pat you along your arms, your body, and legs. I will also use
this (ETD) to pat you down.

Etiquette for Screening of Individuals with Intellectual


Disabilities

Speak directly to the passenger when making a request or giving an


instruction, eg Lift your arms etc. The passenger might seem
unfocussed, looking away, and not listening to at all. She/he might just
have difficulty in looking at you. The does not mean she/he is not
listening.
Passenger might need a minute or so to process information and allow
the screening. Wait. A moments patience will enable successful
screening.
Use short sentences giving one piece of information at one time.
Be prepared to repeat or rephrase the information
Act naturally and maintain eye contact
Do not be confrontational or frighten the individual.
Focus on the person not the disability.
3. Developmental Disabilities
Developmental disabilities are severe, impairments. They may be physical,
such as blindness. They may afect mental ability, such as learning disorders.
Or the problem can be both physical and mental, such as Cerebral Palsy,
Autism.

Screening Method:

Passengers with developmental disabilities may experience impaired


cognition, mobility and/or sensory deficit. They must be screened
without being separated from their traveling companions.
If the passenger uses a wheelchair follow direction provided in the slide
on screening passengers with mobility impairments
Allow passenger or travelling companions to ofer suggestions on the
best way to approach and screen the passenger, especially if it is
necessary to touch during screening.
Ofer to screen passenger using walk-through metal detectors.
If passenger declines this option, then screen using a thorough pat
down process instead.

Etiquette for Screening Individuals with Developmental


Disabilities

4. Are

Use short sentences giving one piece of information at one time.


Be prepared to repeat or rephrase the information
Be calm and patient.
Act naturally and maintain eye contact.
Maintain or enhance self-esteem.
Do not be confrontational or frighten the individual.
Focus on the person not the disability.
Blind or Have Low Vision
Passenger to be screened using ETD and a thorough pat down
procedure.
In addition to screening the passenger, canes and other devices like
Braille note takers must undergo X-ray screening, unless they cannot
fit through the X-ray. If an item cannot fit through the X-ray, or the
passenger cannot be separated from the item, it should be inspected
by an officer. Passengers should tell the officer if they need to be
immediately reunited with the device after it is screened by X-ray.

Etiquette for Screening of Blind or Persons with Low


Vision

Introduce yourself as a CISF officer and give your name.


Address the person directly when starting a conversation.
Be aware that a noisy environment might be a distraction.
Dont touch the person without asking permission.
Dont engage with a guide dog without permission. Remember, they
are working!
Be specific when giving directions, but do not point!
To act as a Human Guide, ofer your elbow for the person to take.
o When faced with an obstruction, straighten your arm behind you
so the person knows to move in behind you.
o When approaching steps or a slope, pause and explain whats
ahead. Ask if they would like to hold on to the handrail.
o Keep in mind the importance and dignity of a cane.
5. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Passengers
Ask the passengers about the type of assistance needed or technology
used, such as hearing aids or cochlear implants, before screening
begins.
Passengers be screened using walk-through metal detectors. If a
passenger cannot or chooses not to be screened by a walk-through
metal detector, the passenger be screened using a thorough pat down
procedure instead.
If a passenger who is deaf or hard of hearing uses hearing aids or a
cochlear implant, he or she be screened without removing the device.
Additional screening, including a patdown or inspection of a device,
may be required if it alarms a walk-through metal detector or appears
as an anomaly when screened by imaging technology. Devices may

also be subject to additional screening if they are X-rayed as part of


the passengers carry-on bags.

Etiquette for screening of Deaf or Hard of Hearing


Passengers

Get the persons attention. The best method is to wave, but its also
okay to touch the person on the shoulder or back of the arm.
Have a pen and paper handy.
Speak directly to the person.
Speak clearly and at a normal speed. Be patient.
If you need to speak loudly, do so for the entire conversation. Avoid
sounding harsh.
Provide a clear view of your face.
Body language and facial expression should match the message.
6. Persons with Deafblindness
Deafblindness is a condition in which the person may have a partial or
complete loss of vision and hearing. Helen Keller was Deafblind.

Screening Method

Ask the passengers about the type of assistance needed or technology


used, e.g. hearing aids or cochlear implants, before screening begins.
Screen passengers by walk-through metal detectors. If unable to,
conduct a pat-down.
Do not remove hearing aids or cochlear implant.
White Canes and other devices like Braille note takers may undergo Xray screening.
If an item doesnt fit in the X-ray, or the passenger cannot be
separated from the item, it should be inspected with ETD.
CISF staf to ask passenger if he/she needs to be immediately reunited
with the device after X-ray screening

Etiquette

Get the persons attention. Touch the person on the shoulder or back of
the arm.
Communicate by spelling the alphabets on the passengers palm and
ofer your palm for response (Tactile sign).
Do not touch the passenger or hand something to them without prior
explanation.
Guide the passengers hand to objects by letting their hand rest lightly
on the back of yours.
Do not leave without letting the passenger know by touch or by signal,
even for short periods.
7. Have Speech Impairments
Passengers be screened by a walk-through metal detector and ETD.

If the passenger chooses not to be screened by a walk-through metal


detector, the passenger be screened using a thorough pat down
procedure instead.

Etiquette for screening of Individuals with Speech


Impairments

Listen, but if you have difficulty understanding, dont pretend you


understand. Be patient.
Repeat what you do understand for confirmation.
Ask person to spell, rephrase or write down the information. Have pen
and paper handy.
If possible, ask questions that require short answers or a nod or shake
of the head.
Maintain eye contact.
Move to a quieter location if necessary or possible.
Children With Disabilities
Parent/Guardian should inform the CISF Officer if the child has a
disability, and if they think the child may become upset during the
screening process. Welcome suggestions from parent/guardian on how
to best accomplish the screening process to minimize any confusion for
the child.
The parent/guardian should be responsible for removing child from
equipment, at parents/guardians discretion, to accomplish screening.
Parent/Guardian to tell Security Officer what the child's abilities are. For
example: whether the child can walk through the metal detector or can
be carried through the metal detector by the parent/guardian.
At no time should the Security Officer remove your child from
his/her mobility aid (wheelchair or scooter). The parent/guardian
should be responsible for removing his/her child from his/her
equipment, at parent's/guardian's discretion, to accomplish screening.
If the child is unable to walk or stand, the Security Officer should
conduct a pat-down search of your child while he/she remains in their
mobility aid, as well as a visual and physical inspection of their
equipment. Parent/guardian to remain with his/her child at all times,
and to can ask the child screened in private.

Section II: Travellers with Medical Conditions:

1. Travelers with Bandages and Dressings.


If a passenger has dressings or bandages used to cover wounds from
an injury or surgical procedure, he or she should inform the CISF officer
of the location of the dressings and/or bandages and of any need for
assistance before screening begins.
Passengers with dressings or bandages can be screened using walk
through metal detector, ETD or a thorough pat down.
2. Travelers with Internal Medical Devices
If a passenger has an internal medical device, such as a pacemaker or
a defibrillator, it is important for him or her to inform the officer
conducting his or her screening before the screening process begins.

Do's of screening passengers who have internal medical


devices
They should be screened by a pat down process.

Don'ts of screening passengers who have internal medical


devices

They should not be screened by a metal detector as that could have a


harmful afect on their medical devices.
3. Passengers Needing Medication
Passengers should be allowed to bring medications in pill or other solid
form through security screening checkpoints in unlimited amounts, as
long as they are screened.
Passengers should inform officers of medications and separate them
from other belongings before screening begins. Medication should be
screened by X-ray; however, if a passenger does not want a medication
X-rayed, he or she may ask for an inspection instead. This request
must be made before screening begins.
The medication may be screened through ETD.
4. Medically Necessary Liquids
Medically required liquids, such as baby formula and food, breast milk
and medications be allowed in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable
quantities for the flight.
Liquids, gels, and aerosols be screened by X-ray and, medically
necessary items in excess of 3.4 ounces should receive additional
screening.
Accessories required to keep medically necessary liquids, gels, and
aerosols cool such as freezer packs or frozen gel packs be
permitted through the screening checkpoint and may be subject to
additional screening.
Supplies that are associated with medically necessary liquids and gels
such as IV bags, pumps and syringes be allowed through a
checkpoint once they have been screened by X-ray or inspection.

5. Passengers Who Have Undergone a Medical Treatment with Radioactive


Materials and Those with Radioactive Medication
Such passengers be screened with a thorough pat down process or a
walk-through metal detector.
If a passenger has radioactive medication, it should be permitted
through a screening checkpoint once screened.
6. Portable Oxygen & Passengers with CPAPs, BiPAPs, and APAPs (Respiratory
Equipment)

If a passenger uses a portable oxygen concentrator, the manner in


which the passenger is screened should depend on whether he or she
can disconnect from the oxygen concentrator. Passengers should check
with their doctors to determine whether they can safely disconnect
during screening. It is important for a passenger to inform the officer
conducting the screening whether he or she can disconnect before the
screening process begins.
Passengers who can disconnect be screened with ETD or with a pat
down process.
If the passengers respiratory equipment cannot be disconnected, it
should be tested for traces of explosives. If explosive material is
detected, the passenger should be asked to undergo additional
screening.
All CPAPs, BiPAPs, and APAPs must be screened by X-ray. If the X-ray
cannot see through all parts of the CPAP, BiPAP, or APAP, additional
screening by X-ray or other methods may be required.
Passengers should be required to remove CPAPs, BiPAPs, and APAPs
from its carrying case, though facemasks and tubing can remain in the
case.
7. Passengers Using Nebulizers (Drug delivery devices used to administer
medication in the form of a mist inhaled into the lungs).

Nebulizers should be allowed through CISF security checkpoints once


they have been screened.
A Nebulizer should be screened by x-ray, and passengers should be
required to remove their Nebulizer from its carrying case; facemasks
and tubing may remain in the case.
A passenger may provide a clear plastic bag in which to place the
Nebulizer during x-ray screening; however, a CISF officer may need to
remove it from the bag to test it for traces of explosives.
8. Passengers with Diabetes
Diabetes-related supplies, equipment, and medication, including
liquids, be allowed through the checkpoint once they have been
properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection.
Accessories required to keep medically necessary liquids, gels, and
aerosols cool such as freezer packs or frozen gel packs be subject to
additional screening.
Liquids, gels, and aerosols be screened by X-ray and medically
necessary items in excess of 3.4 ounces receive additional screening.
If a passenger uses an insulin pump, he or she must be screened
without disconnecting from the pump.
The passenger using the insulin pump to be screened by a thorough
pat down followed by an explosive trace detection sampling of the
hands.
The passengers insulin pump to be subject to additional screening.

9. Ostomies (Ostomy is a Surgical procedure that creates an artificial opening


for the elimination of bodily wastes)
Ostomy images:

If a passenger uses an ostomy, he or she be screened without having


to empty or expose the ostomy. However, it is important for
passengers to inform the officer conducting the screening about the
ostomy before the screening process begins.
Passengers with ostomies be screened using metal detector, or a
thorough patdown.
Regardless of whether the passenger is screened with a a walk-through
metal detector, the passengers ostomy be subject to additional
screening. Under most circumstances, this should include the
passenger conducting a self patdown of the ostomy, followed by an
explosive trace detection sampling of the hands.
10. Breast Cancer Survivors
CISF officers should make every efort to accommodate a persons
needs and to treat all such passengers with respect and dignity.
All such travelers must undergo security screening including with walk
through metal detectors, ETD or a thorough pat down procedure.
11. Have Difficulty Waiting in Line
There should be separate lanes at screening check points specifically
for use by passengers with disabilities and medical conditions or those
traveling with young children.
The passenger should inform the personnel overseeing the line that he
or she may have difficulty standing or waiting in line due to a disability
or medical condition before entering the line.
The CISF staf should courteously screen such passengers first and
foremost before they screen the rest.
Refer to Power Point Presentation to view images of:
1) Common Types of Wheelchairs (Slide 10)
2) Common Types of Braces, Calipers and Casts (Slide 11)
3) Common Types of Mobility Devices (Slide 12)
4) Different Types of Prosthetic Limbs (Slide 14)
Take the following quiz. If you do not get all of the questions correct, please
review that section again.
1. If possible, one should sit down when speaking with a person
who uses a wheelchair.
True
False

2. When talking with a person who is deaf and is accompanied by


a sign language interpreter, speak directly to the interpreter.
True
False
3. The first thing to do when greeting a person who is using a
guide dog is to kneel and pet the dog.
True
False
4. You should always have a pen and pad of paper available.
True
False
5. Asking a person with speech impairment to repeat themselves
will only make matters worse.
True
False
6. Only people who are legally blind may bring service dogs into
the Airport terminals.
True
False
7. If you are not sure how to assist a person with a disability,
asking them for advice will embarrass them. Just use your best
judgment.
True
False
8. It is okay to touch the arm of a person who is deaf in order to
get their attention before speaking to them.
True
False
9. When giving directions to a person who uses a wheelchair,
telling them about distance and ramps puts unnecessary
emphasis on their disability.
True
False
10.
When guiding a person who is blind, let them take your
arm.
True
False
Answers
1. For an extended conversation, pull up a chair if convenient. It is also
okay to kneel on one knee.
True
2. Always talk with the person directly, not to a travel companion or
assistant.
False
3. Never engage with a guide dog without first asking permission.
Remember, they are working!

False
4. Absolutely! They can come in handy in a variety of scenarios.
True
5. Dont assume you know what the person is trying to say. Ask for
clarification.
False
6. Anyone with any disability may utilize a service animal.
False
7. The person with the disability knows best the method and degree of
assistance needed. Ask, then follow their direction.
False
8. The best method of getting the attention of a person who is deaf or
hard of hearing is to wave, but is also okay to touch or tap the shoulder
or back of the arm.
True
9. It is very helpful to persons who use wheelchairs to know distances,
level changes, and ramp locations. You should also consider weather
conditions and time constraints.
False
10.You should let the person know that you are to their right or left, and
announce that your elbow is extended for them to take.
True

Disclaimer:

In order to keep the recommended guidelines in synch with internationally


followed screening practices for People with Disabilities, this document has
been put together with references from:
1) The Transport Security Guidelines of the United States of America
(http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/travelers-disabilities-andmedical-conditions); and
2) Recommendations from representatives of various constituencies of
disabilities in India.

****THANK YOU****