· MAKER

;

59

'GIFT FROM

!l.k 1=; ;mrs. C;;; 0 Camp!"'/I

LLI U

« A.

Des Moines, Iowa Volume I

Dedication

In place of the usual dedication to a faculty member or a campus queen,

We, the Class of '59, wish to dedicate this book

To those who have helped us gain our position as Members of the Osteopathic Profession.

Parents, Wives, Sweethearts, and-last but not leastThe Veterans Administration

Our hope for the future is that this book will be a reminder Of not only the school, classmates and associates

But of those who sacrificed their own desires-perhaps their dreams-

So that ours might be fulfilled.

2

Foreword

This publication is presented in a multiple approach presenting several tangible features to establish a definite pattern. This book represents the ideals, the time and the energies of those who have volunteered their services in order to crystallize a mere conjecture into a tangible and creative work. Their satisfaction is derived from their accomplished product. It represents the contiguity of the actions and thoughts of the graduating class without which this book and other notable events would not have been possible. It thus remains as a record of their achievements, both in the academic and social levels, by which they may reminisce in the following years. Throughout the arduous tasks of maintaining academic achievements, it represents a goal for future classes to improve upon. Therefore, this single but composite effort, the pace necessary for achievement, is offered in anticipation of establishing a pattern.

SOL WEISS Editor

3

The Osteopathic Oath

I do hereby affirm my loyalty to the profession I am about to enter. I will be mindful always of my great responsibility to preserve the health and the life of my patients, to retain their confidence- and respect both as a physician and a friend who will guard their secrets with scrupulous honor and fidelity, to perform faifhfully my professional duties, to employ only those recognized methods of treatment consistent with good judgment and with my skill and ability, keeping in mind always nature's laws and the body's inherent capacity for recovery.

I will be ever vigilant in aiding in the general welfare of the community, sustaining its laws and institutions, not engaging in those practices Which will in any way bring shame or discredit upon myself or my profession. I will give no drugs for deadly purposes to any person, though it be asked of me.

I will endeavor to work in accord with my colleagues in a spirit of progressive co-operation, and never by word or by act cast imputations upon them or their rightful practices.

I will look with respect and esteem upon all those who have taught me my art. To my college I will be loyal and strive always for its best interests and for the interests of the students who will come after me. I will be ever alert to further the application of basic biologic truths to the healing arts and to develop the principles of osteopathy which were first enunciated by Andrew Taylor Still.

John

aker,

h.

u

eno" CoU~

5

6

Sol Weiss ___Editor

Harold B. Van Maren Business Manager

Raymond A. Conn__ _Art Editor

E. Lynn Baldwin Photographer

Robert E. Lane

Norman W. Jankowski

Martin S. Grubin Assistant Editors

Vincent S. Granowicz

Martin B. SiegeL Copy Editors

Edward R. Minnick, B.S., M.D., D.O. Proofreader

Henry W. Harnish

Robert P. Gash

Russell W. Watts Staff Assistants

Mrs. D. C. Sprague

Mrs. H. B. Van Maren _

_________ Typists

_ _.Advisor

Wendell R. Fuller, B.S., M.S. _

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Ted llynn, Hiram S. Hunn, J. R. Astley, Marion E. Wallace, J. R. McNerney, D.O., Simpson P. Smith (Vice ~hairman), Harold L. Calkins (Chairman), 'Karl B. Greenlee (Secretary), Roy W Swarzman, Donald R. Hickey, D.O., Daniel E. Hannan, Mary E. Golden, D.O.

Dean and Secretary

In the day to day workings of any business, there is a multitude of bookkeeping, recording, correspondence, and coordination which must be done. At Still College these jobs are in the able hands of the "front office."

10

Accountant and Secrelary

Front Office

At the apex of this pyramid of problems is the acting President and Dean, John B. Shumaker. It is his chief concern to ~ee that the operations of the school function smoothly, and also to put into effect the plans of the Board of Trustees and I.G.C.

Dr. Shumaker has as his able assistant Mr. Wendell R. Fuller, who holds the titles of Registrar, Director of Public Relations, and Secretary of the National Alumni Association. In this post Mr. Fuller has been instrumental in heading many fund raising drives for the college; and in spreading the name of Still College by whatever means of mass communication is available.

Reception Commlttee

Registrar and Secretary

Accounting Department

As for the fiscal end of operations, it is handled by Cecil C. Looney, Accountant. rt is Mr. Looney's job to make sure that the bills are paid, tuition is collected and the books belenced.

All of these men are aided by a secretarial corps which includes: Evelyn Norman, Secretary to the Dean; Frances Lynn, Secretary to the Registrar, Juanita Grey and Opal Andrews, aides to Mr. Looney; and Donna Sutton, Receptionist.

II

College Library

The college librarian is Mrs. Mary Bell Ken· derdine, A.B., and she is assisted by Mrs. Mary Morrow.

The college library occupies the entire third floor of the college building with partitions or book shelves five feet high and glass:ed above so that all of the library is visible from any point.

Reception Desk

Study Hour

The arrangement is unusual and has proved to be most satisfactory. Instead of the traditional Reserve Book Collection, there are three Seminar Rooms-one for each division of the curriculum.

_ library Office

12

and Bookstore

In the Basic Science Seminar are placed all of the recent and fundamental books on the various sciences, on open shelves, so ther the student may examine and compare one or a dozen and draw his own conclusions.

Surgery and Osteopathic Medicine are the other two rooms, all equipped with tables and chairs for study. This arrangement· rends to give the student a broader knowledge of all evailable reference material in addition to a particular reference suggested by a professor or instructor.

Book loa"

Research

Our library is also fortunate in having ecce.ss to af'l author-subject index of all scientific articles which have been published in Osteopathic publications from 1949 to date. These publications are available for use.

Bookstore

13

Class of 1958

Class Officers

Dr. B. E. Laycock

Dr. H. J. Ketman Dr. Jeri-Yah Hsi

16

!Dr. Wilbur Chinn, Vice President Dr. Robert A. Sybert, President Dr. Daniel S. Slevin, Treasurer

Dr. Pauline A. Kopec, Secretary

AGUSTIN ACOSTA, B.S., D.O. Hato Rey, Puerto Rico

Dalla. Osteopathic Hospital

LEONARD BARROW, D.O. Jackson, Michigan

Mt. Clemens General Hospital

JAMES BROWN, B.S., D.O. Canton, Ohio

Green Cross General Hospital

WILBUR CHINN, B.A., D.O. Seattle, Washington

Portland Osteopathic Hospltel

ROBERT CORNWELL, D.O. Wayne, Michigan

Riverside Osteopathk Hospital

MARK FOLEY, A.B., D.O. New castle, Pe. Grandview Hospital

GERALD BRODIE, B.S., D.O. Detroit, Michigan

Civic Center Hospital

GILBERT BUCHOlZ, B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

Brooklyn, New York Doctors Hospital

ARTHUR CLEVENGER, B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

McNary. Arizona

Oklahoma Osteopathic Hospital

FRANCIS DONO, B.S., D.O. Brooklyn, New York Doctors Hospital

HUGH FURNESS, B.A., D.O. Inglewood, California Davenport Osteopathic Hospital

DoNALD HARRINGTON, B.S., D.O. Pittsburgh, Pa.

Riverside Osteopathic Hospital

DONALD KING,.B.A., D.O. Young. town, Ohio

Doctors Hospital

PAULINE K0PEC" B.S., D.O. Curwensville, Pa.

Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital

JERRY MARGOLIS, B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

Detroit, Michigan

Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital

WATSON G.UTOWSKI, B.S., D.O. Swedesburg, Pennsylvania Norristown Osteopathic Hospital

BERTON KESSLER, A.B., B.S. In Pharm., D.O.

Providence, Rhode Island

Rhode Island OsteopatHic Hospital

ROBERT KOEPKE, D.O. Flint, Michigan

Oklahoma Osteopathic Hospital

GEORGE KOSS, B.S., D.O. Detroit, Michiga'n

Ponland Osteopathic Hospital

JOHN OLSZEWSKI, B.A., D.O. Detroit, Michigan

Mt. Clemens General Hospital

CONRAD PEARL, B.S., D.O. Detroit, Michigan

Zieger Osteopathic Hospital

WIUIAM SEIFER, B.A., D.O. Warren, Ohio

Stili Osteopathic Hospital

SAUL SHAPIRO, D.O. Detroit, Michigan Northwest Hospital

JAMES SOVE, B.S., D.O. St. Clair Shores, Mich.

Mount Clemens General Hospital

ROOSEVELT TAYLOR, B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

Flint, Michigan

Flint Osteopathic Hospital

JACK PEARL, B.S. in Pherm., D.O. Windsor, Canada

Still Osteopathic Hospital

ROGER SENTY, D.O. Madison, Wisconsin Doctors Hospital

DANIEL SLEVIN, A.B., B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

Omaha, Nebraska

Des Moines General Hospital

ROBERT SYBERT, B.S., 0'.0, Nanty-Glo, Pennsylvania Dayton Osteopathic Hospital

THOMAS THESING, B.A., D.O. Lancaster, Ohio

Dayton Osteopathic Hospital

HOWARD WEISSMAN, D.O. Detroit, Michigan

Zieger Osteopathic Hospital

CLARENCE WILSON, B.S. in Pharm., D.O.

Detroit, Michigan

Flint Osteopathic Hospital

THE NAMES OF THOSE NOT APPEARING IN PICTURES

DR. BERYL CHABY

DR. STANLEY DANIELS DR. SHELDON EPSTEIN DR. GILBERT HOWE DR. MERL JACOBSEN DR. GEORGE KONOLD DR. ALLAN LANS

DR. LOUIS LA RICCIA

20

DR. DONALD MILLAR DR. JAMES O'DAY

DR. STANLEY OZOG DR. CHARLES PARROn DR. FRANK POCHIK DR. MARTIN WEDGLE DR. ELIAS YURICK

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, B.A., D.O. Girard, Ohio

Doctors Hospital

The Graduating Class of 1959

Class OHicers

Dr. E. R. Minnick

Dr. B. Poundstone Dr. S. Miroyiannis

22

Joseph S. Chirillo, Treasurer

M. Jack Singer, President

Robert D. Brainerd, Vice President John S. MoJea, Secretary

CYRIL R. ALLEN, JR., B.S. Ohio State University

Proctorville, Ohio

NED BARON, B.S.

low. Wesleyan College Philadelphia. Pennsylvania

ROBERT l. BEECH

Drake University Des Moines, Iowa

STANLEY S. BERN HANG. B.S. in Pharm. Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (l.I.U.)

New York, New York

HAROLD L. BIENENFELD, B.S. in Pharm.

Wayne State University Detroit, Michig~n

JAMES F. BLEM

University of Detroit Detroit, Michigan

MICHAEL BOUSAMRA

Michigan State Normal College Detroit, Michigan

ROBERT DONALD BRAINERD, B.A.

State Universi1y of Iowa Fort Dodge. Iowa

HERBERT LOWE CHAMBERS, B.S. Prairie View A&M College

Dallas, Texas

JOSEPH S. CHIRILLO

Wayne State University Allen Park. Michigan

WARREN T. CHRISTENSEN, A.B.

University of South Dakota Viborg. South Dakota

DONALD M. COHEN, B.S. in Pharm. Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (LI.U.)

Brooklyn. New York

RAYMOND A. CONN

Wayne State Ul1iversity Detrojt1 Michigan

LAWRENCE DI DONATO, A.B. University of Missouri

Bayonne. New Jersey

JAMES MEl VillE FOX, B.A.

Princeton University Jenkintown, Penl1sylvania

GENE WALLACE FREDERICKS

State University of Iowa Buffalo Center, Iowa

STEPHEN S. FRIEDMAN, B.S.

Marietla College Brooklyn, New York

ROBERT POLLOCK GASH, BA

University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

VINCENT J. GRANOWICZ

Wayne State University Detroit, Michigan

ROBERT W. GREINER

Eastern Michigan State College Wyandotte, Michigan

MARriN J. GRUBIN, B.S. in Pharm. Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (l.I.U.)

Brooklyn, New York

DONALD E. HANLON

Iowa State College Perry, Iowa

HENRY W. HARNISH, B.A.

Goshen College Lancaster. Pennsylvania

JEAN B. IPPOLITO, A.B.

Boston University lawrence, MassachuseHs

NORMAN W. JANKOWSKI, B.'S.

Union College Schenectady, New York

DONALD LAWRENCE KAY, B.A. Michigan State University

Detroit; Michigan

MORTON PAUL KNOPPER, B.S. Wayne State University

Detroit, Michigan

LELAND E. LANE, B.S. Lewis and Clark Ccllege Portland, Oregon

ROBERT E. LANE, B.S. University of pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

CHARLES FRANCIS lIBElL, B.S. University of Pittsburgh

Plttsbvrqh, Pennsylvania

MElviN DONALD LINDEN, B.S.

Michigan State University Oetroit, Michigan

FRED MELTZ, B.S.

Temple University Bordentown, New Jeney

JOHN S. MOlEA, B.A.

University of B.uffalo Buffalo, New York

FRANK W. MYERS, B.A.

State University of South Dakota Hudson, South Dakota

LEONARD RAY NAGLE, B.S., B.A. Westem Micnig-an University

Detroit, Michigan

ORMAN NELSON, BA

University of Iowa Jefferson, Iowa

lEROY S. NEUMANN, B.S. in Pharm. University of Toledo

Detroit, Mich~gan

EDMUNDS OlA OLOWOSUKOi B.A.

Emmanuel Missionary College Nigeria, We.s, Africa

F. SIMS POUNDS, JR., BA

Pennsvlvenle State University Jewell, Iowa

MANOEL MIKE PRINEAS, B.S. University of Washington

Seattle, Washington

BEN W. RODAMAR, BA

Iowa SIBle Teachers- College Cedar Falls. Iowa

NORMAN SCHEINER, B.S.

long Island University Far Rockaway, New York

PAUL SCHNEIDER, B.S.

Wayne Slate. University Detroit, Michigan

MARTIN BERNARD SIEGEL

St. John's University Jamaica, New York

FRED SILVERS, B.S.

Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (LI.U.) Brooklyn, New York

JACK SINGER Wayne State Universily Detroit, Michigan

BILL C. STOERKEl, B.A. Norwich University

Salem, Ohio

EUGENE L. TIMMONS, B.A.

Drake University Aberdeen, South Dakota

HAROLD. 6. VAN MAREN

University of Califomia Berkeley, California

CHRISTY A. VENTRESCO

Youngstown College Yocnqstown, Ohio

JOHN P. WAKEFIELD, 6.5,

Iowa State College IDes Moines, Iowa

EUSTACE JOHN WARE, B.S.

Drake University Oes Moines, Iowa

RUSSELL W. WATTS, B.S. SI. l.ouis College of Pharmacy

St. louis, Missouri

SOL WEISS, B.S. in Pharm. Wayne State Unillersity

Detroit, Michigan

Class of 1960

Class OHicers

Donald Beckman, President John Raedy, Vice President Robert Slocum, Treasurer Frank Roth, Secretary

Dr. J. Seibert

Dr. M. P. Moon

37

Top Row

RICHARD COA1NEY

Tuls., Oklahoma

WINSTON CENAC, B.S. S1. Lucia, West Indies

BoHom Row

STEPHEN CHANKI N, B.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

NICHOLAS CONWAY Detroit, Michiga.,

RICIrlARD BROWN Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

MARVIN BERKOWITZ Bell Harbor, New York

CLEOPHAS BARNEn, B.S. Dallas, Texas

Boltom Row

DONALD BECKMAN, B.A., 0.0. OaYlon, Iowa

CLARK BARCZEWSKI EagJe Grove, Iowa

'BERNI\RO ARDEN Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

ALLAN CROSBY, BA MinneaP9lis, Minnesota

LEONARD FAYMORE, B.S. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Bottom Row

LUDWIG GINKEl, SA Sao Diego~ California

CHARLES CROOK, SA Iowa City, Iowa

MILTON FIELDS Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

VICTOR GOBLE, B.S. Ravenna, Ohio

JOHN HARTEN, B.A. Sault sre, Marie, Canada

Bottom Row

VICTO~ GORDON, ·B.S. Detroit, Michiga,n

JOHN GRACE, B.S. Brooklyn, New York

LAWRENCE GOLDMAN Detroit. Michigan

Top Row

THOMAS KOVAN Detroit, M1chlgan

JOSEPH LACASSt, 8.S:

Detroit, Michigan

Boltom Row

SAMUEL KLIGERMAN, B.A. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SANDER KUSHNER Detroit, Michigan

JOHN KNABLE, B.A. Youngstown, Ohio

Top Row

THOMAS HENN Des Moines, lowe

MICHAEL KIRSCHENBAUM New York, New 'fork

Bottom Row

SHELDON KAFTAN Detroit, Mkhig,ln

JAMES HICf(S. Chattanooga, Tennessee

JAMES JACKSON Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

HARVEY MICKlIN, B.S. in Pherm. Brooklyn, New York

LESTER MULLINS, B.S. Youngstown, Ohio

Bottom Row

ANTONE MA.RTINHO, A.B. Wilmington, Delaware

SAMUEL LOSSOS Brooklyn, New York

JAMES PAYNE, B.S. Philippi, West, Virgihia

Top Row

MYRON LA€:KEY Detroit, Michigan

WILLIAM LAVENDUSKY Henryetta, Oklahoma

Bottom RoW

ROBERT LlVONGXA Phnom penn, Cambodia

RALPH LEVY, B.A. Brooklyn, New York

TIMMIE LEE, A.B. Honolulu, Hawaii

Top Row

DANIEl PIPINO. B.S. NileslOhio

HARVEY RING, A.B. Fllnt, Michigan

Bottom Row

JOHN RAEDY, B.S. in Pharm. New York, New York

CARL ROBERTS, B.S. Starke, Florida

Top Row

EDWIN RUNNING, B.A. Oelwein, Iowa

FRANK ROTH, B.S. Detroit; Michigan

Bottom Row

MALCOLM RUBINOFF, B.S. Detroit, Michigan

FRED SEliGMAN, B.S. Toledo, 0hio

Top Row

THEODORE WEINER, B.S. in Pharm. Detroit, Michigan

EDWARD YAROllN, B.S, New MJlford, Ohio

Bottom Row

RICHARD VERMILLION Newton, Iowa

JOHN WAITE, B.S. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

HENRY WICK, B.A. Janesville, Wisconsin

Top Row

DAWIN SP.RAGUE Westlake! Ohio

ROBERT SLOCUM, B.A. Des Moines, Iowa

Bottom Row

PHILIP TRUAN Knoxville" Tennessee

GERALD THURBER, B.S. In Phsrm. Brooklyn, New York

RONALD STRICKMAN Brooklyn, New York

Class OHicers

Class of 1961

Carolyn Davidson, Secretary

James Leach, Treasurer

Edwin Blumberg, President Robert O'Neil, Vice President

Dr. R. Solkot

Dr. R. B. Juni Dr. R. Tolman

42

Top Row

LOUIS BASCOY, B.A. los Angeles, California

FRANKLIN AKS, BA. Brooklyn, New York

801101)1 Row

ARNOLD. AARON Detroit, Michjgan

STANLEY ABRAMS, A.B. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

BERT BEl. B.S. in Pharrn.

Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

RICHARD CULP. B.S .• M.S. ElversQnl Pennsylvania

HARRY DAVIS. B.A .• B.S. in Pharrn. Youngstown, Ohio

JOSEPH DALE, B.A. Seattle, Washington

Bottom Row

ELWOOD COHEN, A.B. Woodbury. New Jersey

CAROLYN DAVIDSON Scottsdale, Arizona

FREDRICK CURLIN, B.A. Brooklyn, New York

Top Row

FRED CARPENTER, B.A. Newton, Iowa

EDWIN BLUMBERG, B.S. in Pherrn. Detroit, Michigan

ROBERT CAMPBELL Giltnan, Iowa

Bottom Row

ALVIN CHONG, B.S. in Pliarm. Waimanalo, Oahu, Hawaii

lEON COGAN, B.A. Detroit, Michi9~m

BOBBY BLACK Tempe, Arizona

Top Row

ARTHUR GRISWOLD South lyon .. Michigan

PAUL GLASSMAN Detroit, Michigan

Bottom Row

SIDNEY GROBMAN, B.S. Philadelphia, Pennevlvenla

RICHARD GARRm, B.S. Baltimore, Maryland

DALE GIERTHY, B.S. Royal Oek, Michigan

ANDREW DZMURA, B.A. Clairton, Pennsylvania

SEYMOUR GARDNER, B.S. In Pharm. Detroit, Michigan

JOHN FERAROLlS, B.S. Detroit, Michigan

JOHN EICH0RST South Bend, Indiana

PAUL FLEISS, B.S. Ih Pherm, Detroit, Michigan

Top Row

FLOYD HENRY Des Moines, Iowa

WILLIAM HENDRICKS los Angeles, California

Bottom Row

FERAYDOON KHANI Teheran, Iran

HUGH GROVER, B.S. Flint, Michigan

ARNOLD JACOBS, B.A. Detroit, M1chigan

Top Row

STEPHEN KOFFLER, A.B. Brjstol, Pennsvlvanie

JAMES LEACH, B.S. in Pharm, V~lIey View, Texas

BERNARD LANG, B.S. in Pharm. Flushing, New York

BcHom Row

SHELDON KULE, B.A. Bellerose, New York

RICHARD LEECH Texarkana, Texas

PATRICK KIRLIN, B.S. Council Bluffs, Iowa

Top Row

HARRY PHILLIPS, A.B. Detroit, Michigan

MILTON RASKIN Detroit, Michigan

Bottom Row

ROBERT PUSHKIN, B.A. los Angeles, 'California

NEIL PURTELL, B.S. Mlfwaukee, Wisconsin

OLIVER POPA, A.B. River Rouge, Michigan

Top Row

HERBERT MOSS, B.S. In Pharm. Philadelphia, Pennsvlvante

R1CHAlID NUSKIEVICZ, A.B. Youngstown, Ohio

ROBERT O'NEIL Shercn, Pennsylvania

Bottom Row

STANfoRD LUBECK Phil.d~lphi •• Pennsylvania

PHILLIP NAPLES Youngstown, 0hio

ROBERT LOWRY Dimondale, Michigan

Top Row

JOHN RUSINA, B.S .. Joliet, Illinois

LOUIS SCHANER, B.S. Toledo, Ohio

Bottom Row

NEil RUSSACK Youngstownt Ohio

RICHARI} .sCOURFIEt:D, B:S. Dayton. Ohio

EARL SCHEIDLER, B.S. Cjncinneti, Ohio

Top RoW'

RONALD ROSENGARD, A.B. Camden, New Jersey

HECTOR RIVERA, B.S. Bayarnonf Puerto Rico

Bottom Row

JEROME ROSE, B.S. in Pharrn. Brooklyn, New York

ALAN ROSS, B.S. In Pharrn. Bayside, New York'

RICHARD RHODES

East liverpool, Ohio

Top Row

WILLIAM SILVERSTONE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan

BENJAMIN SHER,BIN Detroit, MicHigan

Bottom Row

WILLIAM TERRY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan

GEORGE: THOMPSON, B.S. Watertown, SOuth Dakota

FRANK TEPNER. B.A. Omaha, Nebraska

Top Row

JOSEPH TREON, B.S'. Dayton, Ohio

GERALD TOLAN, B.S. Green Bay, Wisconsin

Bot/om Row

EDMOND TOUMA, B.S. Port Huron, Michigan

DAVID UISELT, A.B. Wheatland, Pennsylvania

DONALD TURNER, B.S. Dayton, Ohio

o

Top Row

JAMES WHITE Wayne, Michigan

GEORGE WRIGHT, B.A. Carlisle, Iowa

ROBERT WAITE Columbus, Ohio

Bottom Row

SIDNEY WEINSTEIN, A.B. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WALTER WUNDERliCH, B.S. In Pharm. Voltaire, North Dakota

GERALD WEINGARDEN Detroit, Michigan

JOHN WALKER Jackson, Michigan

47

48

A

C

A

D E

M

I C

5

Admini

Business Office

Slall Assignment

Administration of the clinic, with its manifold problems, is the special domain of Milton G. Kuolt, Ed.D., who has been with the clinic since 1955, and his staff. The girls at the reception desk, Willa Tucker and Charlene Black, are the ones with whom both patients and students become best acquainted.

nle

tration

Records Room

Mrs. Venna Houser and Mrs. Iva French, of the record room, are of great aid to the students in keeping their clinical records in proper order. The business office is staffed by Pat Vermillion and Lois Cornwell.

Case Discussion with clinic supervisor, Dr. Glenn E. Bigsby.

Clinic Reception

E

Administration of local nasal trea'tmen1

Dr. Raymond B. Juni takes special pride in the teaching program which he is able to carry out in his department. This is extended throughout the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In exemplifying this, D~. Juni teaches three classes; Rhinolaryngology, Ophtlaalmology, and Otology, in the Sophomore and Junior years. It is his practice to pick two Junior students semi-annually as assistants for special training in EENT. On the Postgraduate level Dr. Juni participates in the O.C.O.O. basic science training, and the Intern-Resident program. A Preceptorship is offered in EENT and special training in Endoscopy is available.

Or. Junl In consultation

NT

Ophthalmalogic Examination

Examination Room

The extensive consultaticn service which Dr. Juni offers to the physicians of the surrounding area can be considered as part of his teaching program. "A physician learns by seeing and doing, and he must see things properly in order to again recoqnize them in the future."

Though the department has no grants, for research, Dr. Juni Is currently interested in a . research problem to determine the effect of capillary integrity on postoperative complications of tonsillectorny with special attention to hemorrhage.

Proctology

Rroctology has been the bailiwick of Dr. Burton E. Poundstone, D.O., F.A.O.C.Pr., for the past eleven year period. Dr. Poundstone, who is also the Director of Outpatient, believes:

"For any department to function properly in a teaching capacity, It is desirable to have a sufficiently large volume of patients to accurately demonstrate the greatest number of rectal pathologies, that the prospective doctor may recognize them in his g~neral practice."

Checking records

Demonstration of Proctoscopic Examination

From the pictures on this page it is clearly seen the individual aid that Dr. Poundstone gives the students requesting help.

Dermatology

The Department of Dermatology, although not housed in the clinic, is still an oft visited one. Harry B. Elmets, D.O., permits students to bring their clinic patients to his private downtown office. Dr. Elmets is noted for his cooperation not only on the clinic level, but in the academic field as well.

Dermatology Clinic

Consultation

The varied phases of dermatological diagnosis and treatment are taught in the classroom and brought into sharper focus 011 presentation of patients to Dr. Elniets. In' the confines of his office, Dr. Elmets gives complete consultation service to the student physician, as well as instruction in the examination, special equipment, and techniques of Dermatology.

57

Forceps Delivery

Maintenance of OB Records

Dr. Chapman, 01) his entrance to the Department in 1954, continued the OB lab and teach ing methods of the now Professor Emeritus Ropert B. Bachman, D.O., F.A.C.O.O.G. It is our belief that formal lectures should not be the only means of teaching. Their method of conveylnq this is exemplified in the OB lab. Here, a number of weeks are given to the practical application of the techniques lectured upon, including: suturing, sterile technique and forceps delivery.

58

Obstetrics

From the classroom 10 the delivery room, the student physician learns that in caring for the pregnant female he has two equally important patients. An Obstetrical patient is one of the first a new Junior sees 011 his initiation into 1he' clinic. By this time, J. Dudley Chapman, D.O., head of the Department of OB-Gyn, has instilled in the student the basic knowledge needed in prenatal care. From this point on it is Dr. Chapman's opinion that his job is, " ... I~elping the student in the formation of the correct habit-patterns. For these habits are the ones needed throughout the life of the physician in .order to give the patient the full benefit of his knowledge."

Demonstration of Speculem Examinatlon (below)

Gynecology

Some of the innovations to the Clinic brought in by Dr. J. D. Chapman have been the "Prenatal Clinic," the use of Hypnosis. seminars in the "psychology of women," "the Journal Club," and the more frequent application of new concepts in the field as they appear in the current literature. Although, the department has not requested funds to carry out research. Dr. 'Chapman is extremely interested in the effects of nutrition on pregnancy. and he is also contemplating a study of the implications of psychosomatic medicine on those patients who have undergone a prenatal training program.

Suturing Practice

Sterile Technique

Forceps Demonstration Dr. Rober. B. Bachman

It has been learned that by publication Dr. Chapman will have left his department. It is our hope that the concepts continued by him and those introduced by him will be continued by his successor.

59

Prenatal Clinic

The Prenatal Clinic is a service innovated by Dr. Chapman. It is open to the populace as a means of understanding the physiology, anatomy and progress of a pregnancy. Its theme is "Educated Childbirth." Assisting Dr. Chapman in this educational program for laymen, are students who volunteer their services.

Demonstration of Prenatal Care

Prenatal Exercises

Delivery (below)

These weekly meetings not only aid the prospective parents and the student lecturers, but also the Clinic in its public relations program. There has been valuable cooperation of the local newspaper, radio and television facilities. This publicity has been of great aid in increasing the attendance to the Prenatal clinic.

To the student physician it offers added training in public speaking, practice in preparafion of papers to be presented to lay groups, as well as an expansion and review of his Obstetrical knowledge.

60

"Peds"

In the. summer of 1957 Dr. Rachel Woods, D.O., retired as head of Pedietrics, and was replaced as head of the department by Myron S. Magen, D.O. Some of the changes that Dr. Ma.gen has brought about have been: setting up a laboratory for complete ultramicroscopic chemical analysis and construction of a' play room in conjunction with the psychiatric department as an additional mode of therapeusis.

One of Dr. Magen's aims is to expand the teaching and training' facilities in Pediatrics. In accordance with this policy Dr. Magan has reinstituted the resident training program, and is presenti~g SeniorSeminars in addition fo the regular classroom work.

Playtime

Of the functions of the department possibly one of the most fundamental is the "Well Baby Clinic," for it is the aim of every physician not only to cure, but to prevent. In this respect we of the clinic strive to fulfill our obligations to our patients and ourselves.

Weight Check

61

U~ology

The department of Urology has been under the supervision of Dr. H. E. Dresser since April, 1950. This service is part of the general clinic which not only provides patients with specialty care, but gives the student specific training in the diagnosis of urogenital problems, and in the use of special equipment needed in this field, wifh particular emphasis on urethral soundings, irrigations, and cystoscopy.

Case Discussion

Chief Complaint

Catheterization Demonstration

Cystoscopy

62

Tumor Clinic

Formulations for a Tumor Clinic began in 1950, with a United States Public Health Grant from the National Cancer Institute in June, 1951, under the direction of Stuart F. Harkness, D.O. Since June, 1953, the Tumor Clinic has been under the direction of E. R. Minnick, D.O., and continues to function by a committee composed basically of those specialty components pertinent to neoplastic diseases.

The basic objective of the teaching grant, the Tumor Clinic, the Tumor Registry capably maintained by Miss Dorothy Stahl, and wide use of the Medical Photography Laboratory directed by Mr. Lynn Baldwin, is to allow the student an opportunity to appreciate the many latitudes peculiar to malignant diseases.

This knowledge is obtained through a horizontal approach in each respective course and supplemented with two courses in the junior year, correlative in one instance and saturation in the other, and the responsibility of the Director of the Tumor Clinic.

The resultant objective desired is to imbue into the student a hard core of basic medical science concerning cancer and instill a seed of critical logic and philosophy as a foundation upon which to begin his art of practice.

Or. MinniCK and $tudents

Examination

Mrs. Stahl

63

Physical Medicine

When "Dr. John" Woods retired in September of 1957, the Department of Structure was combined with the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation under the direction of Dr. Byron E. Laycock, D.O., who had been head of the Department of Structure since 1940. Dr. Laycock holds the distinction of being a professor in Osteopathic Principles and Technique, clinic supervisor, and certified in physical medicine.

Demonstration of Intratherm

Instruction in Technique

In Dr. Laycock's own words, "The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is responsible for maintaining a consistency of regular treatment of patients, to enhance the effectiveness of other treatment w.ith a particular Intent to maintenance of the best function of the musculoskeletal and visceral systems in conjunction with the other departments of the clinic."

Using Anatomotor 'for Traction

I~Or. John" Woods

Orthopedics

l

Casting

A recent addition to our clinic is Richard Borman, D.O., Orthopedist. He fills q vacancy left by the departure of Dr. Robert Fagan.

Procaine Injection

Dr. Borman has already brought many interesting problems to the attention of the students, not only in the clinic but as classroom demonstrations.

65

Demonstration

This department, although not housed within the clinic walls, is, in fact, an integral part of the service rendered to the patient by the clinic. This service includes not only the iaking of pictures but a consultation between Dr. Ketman and the student on the interpretation of the Roentgenogram and the possible therapeutic measures available to rid the patient of any existing abnormality.

Radiology

Henry J. Kelman, D.O., certified Radiologist, is the chairman of the department of Radiology. Dr. Ketman also holds the title of Associate Professor in Radiology at Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy and Surgery. Until July of 1958, Dr. Ketman was assisted by Irwin Z. Phillips, D.O.

Staff

We feel the primary purpose of this department is fourfold:

1. To give the students some background in electricity and physics necessary for an understanding of 1he basic equipment utilized in an X-ray department. A presentation of the duties and functions of the radiologist in relation to the attending physician in what one should expect reasonably from the other and what the department should have to offer as an aid in diagnosis. Sufficien't film demonstration for an idea as to some of the basic principles in film interpretation.

X-ray Equipment

66

2. To cooperate with the students, supervisors, and the other departments associated with the clinic, to furnish a diagnostic service to the clinic patients equal to that available to private patients and at a much reduced C0S1.

Darkroom

4. To provide the private practitioner a convenient service twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Illustrating

X·ray of Palient

3. To essume our proper position in the hospital team so that the in-patient may be assured of a complete service.

Anesthesiology

With the recent addition of Dr. Joseph E. Prior, D.O., head of the department of anesthesio[ogy, stabilization of didactic and practical training has occurred. Dr. G. Ro.bert l.oerke, D.O., who in the past has taught anesthesiology as well as being a member of the Staff in addition to having a private practice, is pictured in conference with Dr. Prior. Also shown are examples of the training in anesthetic technique given to the students by Dr. Prior.

Anesthetic Technique

Instruction

Demonstration on use of. the Cardiac Pacemaker (below).

Time cut

Surgery is one of the major portions of any O.1"H~n"t'hjl; .t...,Hnn,'. "duc"fiot"l. I, i. brousht to the student on the academic level by

Ronald K. Woods, D.O., member of the department of Surgery who conducts both minor and major surgery classes.

On the clinic level, Dr. Woods conducts a surgical service whereby students bring their patients to him for evaluation.

The clinic service includes the performance .of minor surgical procedures by Dr. Woods or by the surgical resident, Dr. Donald Rose. All this adds up to a well-rounded academic and practical training for the student physician.

Surgery

Opera1ion

Surgery (I)

Acute Abdomen

Surgery (II)

69

The manifold duties of the department of Internal Medicine are under the administration of Richard P. DeNise, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Professor of Medicine.

Office-Internal Medicine

Internal

The department has two residents, although only Robert Kreamer, D.O., is now on duty. Frank King, D.O., is expected to start his duties as resident shortly. We can also remember the services of Lee Moore, D.O., and David Rothman, D.O., the previous residents, to the school in both an academic and clinical way.

As pad of the clinic service to both the patient and the student, the department holds many specialty clinics where we may go with our patients for advice on diagnosis and therapy.

Fluoroscopy

Medicine

Cardiology

These specialty clinics are moved by members of the staff, aided by senior students. Among the specialty clinics are Heart Station and Peripheral V e S cui a r Diseases.

Electrocardiography

Staff members other than those already mentioned who gllle' freely of their time in the clinic are Stuart Harkness, D.O., F.A.C.O.J., Joseph McNerny, D.O., and Milton Dakovich, D.C.

Aiding the department on a clinical level are Miss Hilda Severoid and Miss Katherine Comstock, Technician.

Peripheral Vascular Ox.

The Department of Psychiatry today consists of three Doctors of Osteopathy, and one Doctor of Philosophy in psychology. Dr. Higley, D.O., has headed the department since 1955, and. has been instrumental in acquiring grants from the National Institute of Mental Health. In 1956, Dr. Erie W. Fitz re-entered the department as assistant professor of Psychiatry. In 1957 Leo Subotnik, Ph.D., entered the department as instructor in Psychiatry and fulltime Clinical Psycholoqist. Dr, Lillian Dunlop, D.O., received a fellowship in Psychiatry in that same year, the first psychiatric Fellowship to be given at Still College.

Psychiatry

'Seminar

Dr. Higley's plans for the department's growth are the addition of a second training fellowship of two years and change of the current fellowship from one year to two.

72

The functions of the departmenf may be summed up in the following:

To provide. undergraduate Iralnlng and correletion In psvchophysiologic medicine.

To Improve basic information regarding personality structure and function, and its correlation with disease processes.

To provide post-qreduate training in the specialty of Psychiatry. To provide psychiatric consultation services for the profession in the area and psychiatric care for their patients.

Anat

Anatomy in all its aspects, gross and microscopic, is the field in which the freshman student becomes most wellversed. From the day he first ascends the stairs, through the long afternoons in dissection laboratory, to his final examinations, the first-year student at Still College is constantly confronted with the various aspects of the maze. of organs making up the human body.

ABOVE, teft to Mlroylannis, Dr. and Dr. Lvty.

RIGHT:

Examination of Anatomical Specimens.

Along with this modernized form of instr.uction in anatomy, Dr. Miroyiannis, Lt. Colonel in the U. S. Medical Service Corps, allows the student more hOUfS in the actual dissection than in didactic lectures. In Neuroanatomy, the system is similar. The student spends his time examining the neurological system, and at the same time receiving instruction in its function.

In contrast 10 many schools, the system by which Anatomy is taught at Still covers a full year. It is believed that Anatomy is the basis of all medicine, and is therefore justly stressed. The department is most fortunate in having abundant facilities as well as competent instructors. Stanley D. Miroyiannis, Ph.D., heads the department and serves as professor of Gross Anatomy and Neuroanatomy.

omy

Above, Dr. Enzmann during lecture

Special Instruction

Below, Neuroanatomy leoture

Histology and Embryology, under the direction of Ernest V. Enzmann, Ph.D., present the student with a comprehensive view of prenatal life and the microscopic anatomy of the body.

Assistinq Dr. Miroyiannis in the instruction of Anatomy and Neuroanatomy is Dr, John C. Luly.

Biochemistry

This department is headed by John Shumaker, Ph.D., acting president of the school. Because of the administrative duties of Dr. Shumaker, Roy Solkot, M.S., has had to carry the majority of the academic load to the student.

The course in Biochemistry is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of the chernleel structure and the functions of the human body and the practical applications of chemistry to diagnosis and therapeutics.

Normal Solutions

Clinical Pathology

In close association with Biochemistry is the field of Clinical Pathology which is devoted to the study of various Bacteriological, Biochemical, Hematological, Mycological, Parasitological, Virulogical, and Urinary tests for the laboratory diagnosis of many diseases. the laboratory work done in Ihis course is devoted to perfecting techniques for the various and commonly used tests.

Physiology

This department is under the direction of Richard Tolman, Ph.D., with assistance from Wilford Nusser, ph.D.

Physiograph

Both Dr. Tolman and Dr. Nusser strive to insure that each student becomes thoroughly familiar with all body systems and their individual and integrated functions. This IS achieved by extensive lecturing, classroom discussions, examinations, and laboratory exercises.

Staff

Within the laboratory, practical application of all theory leerned and discussed in the lecture room is carried out, specific emphasis being placed on minor surgery on small animals.

Physiology Experiment

Pharmacology

This department is headed by Professor Rheinhard H. Beutner, Ph.D., M.D. The main aims of Dr. Beutner lie not only in familiarizing the student with the composition and uses of all types of drugs by classroom lectures and laboratory experimentation, but also in extensive research for the advancement in the field of medicine.

Cardiograp~

I'

Dr. Beumer's primary research is on the basic cause of heart disease with much experimentation as to the parts which saturated and unsaturated fatty acids play in the conduction of electrical impulses to propagate the heart. For this work he receives a, Public Health grant and an American Heart Association grant.

Dr. Beutner and Assistant

Dr. Beutner also developed a new and complicated transmembrane theory.

Pharmacology Experiment

Microbiology

This department is directed by Jen-Yah Hsle, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., and is devoted to the study of pathogenic bacteria, Rickettsiae, and Viruses. Their etiological relationship to disease, their immunological aspect, and the laboratory diagnosis of diseases caused by those microbes are elaborated. Diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic vaccines and serums are prepared, and serological technique is exercised.

Dr. Hsie

Dr. Hsie is most ably assisted by I. Ben Chakin, M.S. Mr. Chakin is best known for his close work with the student physician in the determination of specific pathogenic agents.

Sterilization

Pathology

The department of Pathology is presently directed by Lloyd Ficke, D.O., with able assistance from John Seibert, D.O.

Heart Demonstration

This department is devoted to fhe study of the general processes observed in the pathologies of all types of disease.

The extensive didactic work carried on in the classroom is supplemented by correlative Histopathologic laboratory work.

The Pathology laboratory operates in close association with the general clinic set-up, since it is an important tool in the attainment of a final, definite diagnosis from obtained tissue specimens.

Dr, Seibert

Thus, the student becomes proficient in diagnosis from Histological and gross Pathological structures, as well as from clinical signs and symptoms.

Gross -Specimens

81

82

JEAN lEROQUE, D.O. Instructor in Pathology

RUTH HUSTON Instructor in Dietetics

Members of

STUART HARKNESS. D.O.

Instructor in Endocrine and Mefabolic Disease. and Cardiology

JOSEPH McNERNEY, D.O. Instructor In Rheumatology

MERL MOON, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Public Health

the Team

LLOYD FICKE, D.O. Pathologisf

BERNARD KAY, D.O. Resident in Pediatrics

ELIZABETH BURROWS, D.O. Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

G. I. G. SHAMBAUGH, D.D.Sc. Instructor in Oral Medicine

83

Student-Faculty Council

Seated, V. Gehle, S. Chenktn, W. Levendusky, E. Seheidler, A. Dzmura, S. Rcdemer. Standing, S. Koffler, f. earpenter, E. Ware, N. Jankowski, l. DiDonato. .

The Council of the school .is a combination of elected student representatives and appointed faculty members. Because of its composition, the council voices a cross section of student opinions and ideas at all scholastic levels. Its aims are to do whatever possible fo improve the students' association with the college, not only academically but socially as well.

Picnic: Supper

Chow line

86

Interfraternity Council

Front row: F. Myers, W. Stoerke], N. Baroni C.' Moser, G. KOS!I B. Goldman. Back row; J. Brow." J. Hicks, B. Rodamar, L. Knable, C. ventresco. President-F. Myers.

Under the guidal'lce ef Dr. Rasmussen, the Newman Club provides religious, educational and -social activities for its members. Monthly meetings provide ample material for guiding the Catholic students toward the formation of conscientious, ethical physicians. The annual picnic, held this year at Walnut Woods State Park is the highIjght of the social aspect of the society.

Membership is open to all members of "the Catholic faith within the student body.

• • •

Newman Club

87

This council serves as the integrating orqeriizetion of the social fraternities Oll the college campus. Annually, this group sponsors Cln all-colleqe dance as the kick-off for each year's rushing season. A revision of its constitution and by-laws was emonq fhe rnajor achievements of the past year.

The desire of this council is to perpetuate and promote the interests and ideals ef a wellcoordinated program centered about the aims of all the fraternitles.

NEWMAN CLUB OFFICERS-M. 8ousamra, President, R. Greiner, Secretary, J. Blem, Treasurer.

fir-sf row: W. Terry, J. Rosine, R. Watts. O. Pope, H. " Rivera, G. Kess, J. Molea, L. DiDonato, J.

Ippolito, D. Turner, l. Schaner. J. Soye, J. Eichorst; A. Chonq, L. Mullens.

Second row, B. Arden, J. Knable, M. Russack, W. Lewendusky, J. Fox, M. Lackey, J. Treon, J. Payne.

J. laCasse, F. Myersf H. Ring, F. Henry, A. Aron, R. Senty, N. Conway, V. Granowlcz, E. Yarolin. R. lane.

Third row: 8. Williams, A. Martino, L. Bascoy, C. Libell, N. Jankowski, C. Roberts, D. Gierthy, R.

Campbell, J. Hicks, l. Barrow, M. Bousamre, E. Scheidler, B. 8ez, J. Grace, J. Harten, J. Olszewski, R. Strlckmen.

Fovrth row: R. Coatney, J. Blem, M. Prineas. G. Thompson, A. Jacobs, R. Ncsklevlcz, J. Fererclis, R. Greiner, G. Bucholz/ S. KoHler, J. Waite, J. Reedy, W. Chrtsrensen, C. Crook.

Missing: R.Cornwell, F. Dono. D. Harrington, l. laRicca, J. O'Day, S. Ozog, F. Pochik, 1. lhesing, C. Perrott, G. Predrtcke, R. Beech, L.. faymore.

Phi Sigma Gamma

Phi Sigma Gamma is q Greek Lefler Osteopathic Fraternity whose activities encompass every phase of the educational life of the student, preparing him to lead in the social. scholastic, polifical, religious and public relations of Still College.

While professional education is emphasized with work niqhts, bull-sessions and private tuterinq=social activities are freely participated in to insure the development of a well-rounded physician.

88

Fri1lernify Officers

The House

.r.

89

First row: N. Baron, S. Lubek, R. Conn, J. Singer, S. Kvle, H. Micklin. . Rol". 0-. Kay, M. Knepper, T. Koven, M. Grubin, M. Fields.

Second row: A. Lens, J. P.earl, R. Rosengard, S. Kligermant F. Meltz, L. Rubtnof+, M. Raskin. R.

Pushkin, D. Cohen, H. Bienenfeld, V, Gordon, P. Glassman, J. Margolis, S. Chank;~, S. Weiss,S. Wein$lein.

Third f,OW: S. Preldmen, t.. Neumann, l. Goldman, R. Brown, J. Rose, H. Moss, R. levy, S. Grobrnan, N. Scheiner, B. Kessler .. M. linden. R. Gash. N. Sherbin, l. Gogan.

Fourth row: P. Fleiss, F. Seligman, F. Silverstein. P. Schneider, J. Thurer, H. Chambers; M. Kirshenbaum. B. Chaby, M. Siegel, S. Kusnner, R. Garrett, J. Weingsrden, R. Silverstone, E. Blumberg, S. Kafton, S. Abrams, F. Aks.

Missing, C. Pearl, H. Weissman, M. Wedgl., R, Taylor.

Lambda Omicron Gamma

lambda Omicron Gamma was founded in 1924 at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy.

The Calvarian Chapter at Still College was granted its charter in 1938. The chapter has grown in size until at present it boasts an active membership of sixty-six.

The aims of the fraternity are to strive for advancernent of' the Osteopathic profession, encouraqernent of <scholastic endeavor, the pinding together of the students of Still College on a firm, iasting, and fraternal basis.

Fraternit.y Officers

90

QUeen

91

First 10l1li: 0, Uiselr, R. OJNlel. H. Furness, R. Black. A. Acosta.

Second row; P. Naples. G. Wri9h1. J. Jackson, C. Ventresco. E. Timmons. Third row: J. White, J. Brown, H. Davis. F. Fepner, J. Dale.

Missing: E. Yurick, S. Daniel." W. Seifer.

Atlas Club

Fraternity Officers

The Atlas Club was founded on G>ecember 10, 1898, and was named after the most superior vertebra of the spinal column-the Atlas. There are now Atlas chapters at all schools of Osteopathy, with ·the Xyphoid Chapter at Still College.

Atlas boasts the largest number of active members of all Osteopathic fraternities-20 per cent of all practicing physicians are members. This fraternity strives to attain men with integrity and leadership, working always for a team spirit at both work and play.

92

Or. Ketman

Open House

Work Nigh.

93

First ro"'(: R. lowry, .E. Tovma~ J. Walker,. F-. Khani, C. Allen, E. Running, J. Wakefield~ S. Gardner. Second row~ M. Hamidi, W. Stoerkel, D. Slevin, O. Nelson, R. Sccurfield, R~ Brainerd, P. Kirlin, W.

Chinn, R. Waite. H. Phillips.

Third lOW, II. Griswoid, F. Carpenter Jr .. R. Rhodes, L. Lane. H. Harnish, H. Wick., V. Goble. D.

Sprague.. R. Leech, G. Tolan.

Fourth row: N. Purtell, A. Crosby, J. leach, C. Barcaewskt, R. Slocum. T. Henn. 8. Rodamar. J. Ware.

W. Gutowski, F. Pounds.. (

M;ss;n9~ 0, Beckman, M. Kurch, B, lang. R. Dzumura, 1. Weiner, G. Howe, M. Jacobsen, H. Grover.

C. Wilson, R. Vermillion, A. prescott.

Iota Tau Sigma

Officers.

The honor of being the oldest Greek Letter fraternity within the realm of osteopathic colleges belongs to the order of Iota Tau Sigma. Coupling extrecurricular entertainment with worknight sessions, the fraternity establishes what it believes to be the proper balance 'necessery to provide the best atmosphere in the development of its members.

The past year has been a successful one for this orqanizetion. highli@hte'd by the establishment of a Flying Club which lends wholesome and worthwhile hours of enjoyment to the brothers.

It i~ the aim of this fraternity to instill in its members diligence and a progressive attitude to produce the best in Osteopathic physicians.

PreXY and th~ "Magician"

IPS ih'fo the air

Go, man, Go!

'<Queen Sally"

"What now, Doc1Q(?"

95

First

Scouts

• • •

Aid

Boy

• • •

Treating burns

Splinting fractures

.Artificii5\ respiration

First row: o. Nelson, J. Singer, C. Pearl, S. Weiss, G. Koss.

Second row~ W. Chinn, l. OiDona1o, R. Brainerd, l. Neuman,.." F. Myers, E. Timmons_, W. Stoerkel. Third row: H. VanMaren, S. Bernhong, Dr, Chapman, J. Chirillo. B. Rodomar.

96

Basketball

First row: R. Beech, E. Scheidler, S. Grobman, W. Chinn,

Second row: S. Koffler (Assistant Coach), C. Parrot], J. Ferarolis, R. Nuskievica. M. Prineas, G. Fredricks (C08ch).

Team Picture

Breaking Through

97

Fir.st row: B. Jeckson, J. Fredericks, J. Sprague, D. Sybert, G. M_argolisJ Mrs. C. Waterbury. Mrs. G. P.

Peterson, l. Stoerkel. J. Ginkel. B. .Gash. E. Kushner, l. Purtell, B. Rose.

Seczoncl row: B. Tolan, A. Grubin, B. Kovan, G. Abrams, F. Koss, E. Wunderlich, P. Furness, S. lowry, J. leach. C. Bleck, G. Meitz, M. Phillips, R. Kule, R. Pushkln, B. Gardner, S. Brown, D. Knopper, C; Ippolito, S. .Scourfietd, C. Brainerd.

Third tow, R. Chirrilo, P. Fiela" L Arden, E, Jeccbs, S. Nagle, J. Seifer. P. Schneider, J. Chinn, B. Parrott, M~ Dono, P. Klrlln, D. Icvme.

Fourth row: J. Siegel. A. Baron, G. Kliggerman, S. Moss, S. Friedman. J. Bienenfeld, B. Kay, l. Myers, C. Silverstone, B. Gordon, B. Bernhang, P. welker, C. Berkowitz, E. Losses, V. Ross, P. Griswolcl G. Libel], B. Rodomor, G. lone.

FIRST SEMESTER. OFFICERS, G. Margolis, l. Stcerkel. J. Frederlcks, J. Sprague, D. Sybert. S'EC0ND .SEMESTER OFFICERS, l. Stoeikel, J. Ginkel" B. Gash, E. Kushner, l. Purtell.

Still College Student Wives Club

Still Colleqe Student Wives' Club is the junior organization of ihe Auxiliary of the American Osteopathic Association. The object of the club. is educational as well as social, With programs emphasizing particulady the ethics of professional life.

One 'of Ihe projects of ihe organization is the annual purchase of a gift for the school, clinic, or hospital, the funds for which are derived from an all-school dance. This year's gift was acornoressor for the Pediatrics department.

Other activities of the year encompassed such, diversified lJndertakings as a fashion show, a Christmas party for the Des Moines Children's Home, the Christmas Dance, the annual Senior Banquet, in addition fo the monthly lecture series coverinq such pertinent topics as child development, adoptien problems, and hypnosis.

A special note of thanks to our wonderful auxtlierv sponsors, Mrs. G. P. Peterson and Mrs. Carl Waterbury.

98

Wives Club Dance _ ..

Glimpses of the evening's highlights.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful