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Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Thinking Like A
Historian

First Grade Unit


Written by Kelly Gaule
SST 309
Section 02

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Table of Contents

Overview, Rational, Introduction, Michigan Social Studies


GLCEs 3
KUD
One: 1-H2.0.1 Demonstrate
chronological thinking by
Kelly
Gaule
SST 309
Section 02
distinguishing among past, present, and future using family
or school
events.. 4
Lesson 1: Past, Present,
Future5
Lesson 1 Attachments
A. Past, Present, Future Flow
Chart.8
B. Past, Present, and Future
Pictures..9
C. Past, Present, Future
Me.10
KUD Two: 1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important ideas and
details from stories about families or
schools....12
Lesson 2:
Storytellers.13
Lesson 2 Attachments
A. Story Flow Chart
.17
B. Folded and Expandable Book
Directions.18
C. David Goes to School Folded Book
Example..19
D. Ordering Stories
Worksheet20
E. Ordering Stories Answer Key
.21
KUD Three: 1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and artifacts
(e.g. photos, diaries, oral histories, and videos) to draw
possible conclusions about family or school life in the
past..29
Vocabulary
Lesson...23
Vocabulary Attachments
A. Historical
Sources27
Lesson 3: Exploring
History...29
Lesson 3 Attachments
A. How We Learn About the Past
Board32
B. Civil War Family
Photo..33
C. Parent
Letter.34
D. Thinking Like a
Historian.35
KUD Four: 1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in the
past using criteria of family, school, jobs, or
communication...37
Lesson 4: Life Today Vs. Life in the

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Overview:
This unit and the Grade Level Expectations associated with this unit focus on
students beginning to think about the past like a historian. They will develop an
understanding of the past, present and future with family and school events. The
students will use this understanding of chronological thinking to retell stories in
correct order. The students will be using various historical records and artifacts
including pictures, diaries, and videos to draw conclusions about life in the past
and be able to compare it with life today. After the unit is finished students will
understand the importance of telling chronological order and be able to compare
life today with how it was in the past.

Rationale:
It is vital that students learn to retell stories in chronological order so that they
can retell them accurately. Understanding the past, present, and future allows
students to do just that. It is important for everyone to be able to recall
information in a chorological order to avoid confusion and be accurate. It is just as
important for students to look at and study the past. Students must be able to
understand where we came from, what happened in the past, and how we got
here from the past to set our students up for the future to become responsible
citizens.

Introduction:
This Social Studies Unit allows students to study the concepts of past, present,
and future to be able to tell stories in chronological order. It also allows students
to look at and study school and family life in the past to be able to draw
conclusions about them and compare them to life today. The students will do this
by being involved in activities that explore the past, present, and future. They will
be using historical documents and artifacts including pictures, diaries, videos, and
other resources to look at the past. At the end of the unit the students will
individually complete an assessment combining all the content information.

Michigan Social Studies GLCEs Addressed:

1-H2.01 Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among


past, present, and future using family or social events.
1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important ideas and details from stories about
families or schools.
1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and artifacts (e.g. photos, diaries, oral
histories, and videos) to draw possible conclusions about family or school
life in the past.
1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in the past using criteria of family,
school, jobs, or communication

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

KUD 1
GLCE (coding and
wording); Verb(s)
underlined; type
of learning:
Knowledge, Skill,
Reasoning,
Product
Knowledge (K)

Past is a time that


has already gone by.
The present is the
time that is
happening right now.
The future is the time
that has not
happened yet, at a
later time. There has
been events with
family and school
that happened in the
past, that are
happening now in the
present, and will
happen later in the
future.

1-H2.0.1 Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among


and future using family or school events.

Type of learning: Skill


Understand (U)

DO:
Demonstration of
Learning (DOL)

Vocabulary

The students will


understand the order
of past, present, and
future.

The students will


demonstrate their
knowledge by drawing
a picture of themselves
in school in the past
(kindergarten), present
(first grade), and the
future.

Past
Present
Future

IC

I can
in th
pres
futu

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Lesson 1: Past, Present, and Future


Lessons: How will you take them where
they need to go? (Step-by-Step plan)
Instructional strategies/Social constructs: How
will they work?
(AND what will YOU do?)
Anticipatory Set:
Read the book The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
aloud to the whole class.
After reading, ask the students the following
questions to get them thinking about the past,
present, and future.
1. What happened when the boy was young?
2. What happened when the boy was growing up?
3. What happened when the boy was old?

Resources needed:
What materials and
resources will they
need?

The Giving Tree


Silverstein, S., Silverstein,
S., & Row, P. (1964). The
giving tree. New York:
Harper & Row.

Modeling:
The teacher will recreate the flow chart that is on
Attachment A Past, Present, Future Flow Chart
and put it on the board.
Point to the past box and explain that the past is a
time that has already gone by.
In the number 1 box under past the teacher will put
an example of something the class did in the past (for
example we had gym yesterday or we went on a
field trip yesterday).
Read it to the class and then ask What else is
something that we did in the past? Have the
students raise their hands and give an example. Write
that on the board in box number 2.

Chalk/ wipe board


Attachment A: Past,
Present, Future Flow
Chart

Point to the box labeled present. Explain that the


present is the period of time that is happening right
now. Just like before, write an example of the present
in box 1 (We are in first grade we are learning
about past, present and future)and read it to the
class. Then ask for their example for box 2.
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SST 309

Repeat these steps for the future.


Guided Practice:
Divide students up into groups of 3-4 students.
Write the words past, present, and future cross the
board similar to the flow chart but do not but boxes
around them. You can draw the arrows from the past
pointing to the present and from present pointing to
future.
Each group will cut out the pictures on Attachment
B labeled Past, Present, and Future Pictures .
Explain that each of those pictures is something that
they have done in the past, can do in the present,
and could do in the future. Their job is to put each
picture under the past, present, or future headings on
the board.
The teacher will walk around the class and watch for
any misconceptions within the groups.
When each group is done go through each heading
and pick groups to explain why they put the picture
under that title.

Section 02

Independent practice:
Students will bring in a picture of themselves as a
baby (if students do not have pictures as a baby they
can draw themselves as one for this activity).
Students can also bring in current pictures of
themselves or the teacher can take these photos in
the classroom. Each student will get a worksheet
titled Past, Present, and Future Me which is
Attachment C. On the worksheet they will glue
their pictures under the correct title of past, present,
or future. For the future one student will draw a
picture of what they want to do in the future.

Teacher will walk around and look for any


misconceptions or confusion about what they are
supposed to do for the assignment.

Chalk/wipe board
Attachment B Past,
Present, and Future
Pictures
Past, Present and
Future. (2011, March
24). Retrieved April
18, 2015, from
https://dbsenk.wordp
ress.com/2011/03/24
/past-present-andfuture/
Scissors
Magnets or clips to
put pictures on the
board.

Baby pictures of the


students
Current pictures of
the students
Crayons or colored
pencils
Attachment C Past,
Present, Future Me
Glue

Students own
Attachment C Past,
Present, Future Me

Checking for Understanding:


The students will each present what they did on their
Past, Present, and Future Me worksheets. For this,
each student will come up and show the picture of
them in the past and say one thing that they did in
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SST 309

Section 02

the past. For the present the student will say


something that they are doing in the present (for
example, playing soccer, in first grade, ect.). They
will then explain what they are doing in their future
picture.
Instructional strategies/Social constructs: How
will they work?
Collaborative work
Thinking Maps
Independent
Sharing in front of class
Assessment ideas:

The students will demonstrate their knowledge by drawing a picture of themselves in


school in the past (kindergarten), present (first grade), and the future.

Give the each of the students three blank pieces of white paper. Have the students
write past, present, and future on each of the papers respectively. The students will
then draw a picture of themselves doing something in school in the past (kindergarten or
preschool), present (first grade), and the future. Tell them to color the page neatly and
completely so the teacher can tell what it is.

Check list rubric


Each criterion is worth one point for a total of five points.
Yes

No

Criteria
Past, present, and future are written at the tops of the
papers.
The past picture accurately reflects something the
child did in school in the past.
The present picture accurately reflects something the
child can do school in the present.
The future picture accurately reflects something the
child can do school in the future.
Pictures are relatively neat.

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Attachment A
Past, Present, Future Flow Chart

Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

Attachment B

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Attachment C

Past, Present, and Future Me


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Your Job: Glue the picture of you as a baby and your current
photo under the correct time period. Then, for whatever time
period is left over draw a picture of yourself in that time.

Past

Present

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SST 309

Section 02

Future

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Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

KUD 2
GLCE (coding and
wording); Verb(s)
underlined; type
of learning:
Knowledge, Skill,
Reasoning,
Product
Knowledge (K)

Stories are told in

exact order.
Sequence is a
particular order in
which related
events,
movements, or
things follow each
other. Main ideas
are the most
important points of
a story. Details are
less important
information that
complete story.

1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important ideas and details from stories a


or schools.
Level of learning: Knowledge
Understand (U)

DO:
Demonstration of
Learning (DOL)

Vocabulary

The students will


understand that
stories are told in
sequential order

The students will


create their own book
that tells the main
ideas and details of a
book.

Sequence
Details
Main Ideas

I Ca

I can
in se

Lesson 2 Storytellers
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Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Lessons: How will you take them where they


need to go?
Instructional strategies/Social constructs: How will
they work?
Anticipatory Set:
Read the book David Goes To School by David Shannon
aloud to the students.
After reading, ask the students the following questions.
1. What happened in the story?
2. What did David do first in the book?
3. What did David have to do in the end?
4. What did David do to have to stay at school?
5. What happened on the last page?
Modeling:
Recreate the flow chart on Attachment A Story Flow
Chart on the board so all students can see it. Explain
that stories are told by putting the events of the story in
order or a sequence. (Write sequence on the board) A
sequence is a particular order in which related events,
movements, or things follow each other. For example,
first we all came to school by walking or in a car or bus.
Then we went to our classroom. We would not want to
say we went to our classroom and then came to school
because it would not make sense. Today we are going to
put the book David Goes to School in the correct
sequence. To do this we need to think about the main
ideas of the story (point to the main ideas boxes). Main
ideas are the most important points of a story. For
example the first main idea of David Goes to School is
that David gets in trouble a lot at school! (Write this in
the first main idea box). Then explain that details (point
to details boxes) are less important parts of a story but
still complete the story like that the teacher had to tell
David to sit down because he was standing in the front of
class.

Section 02

Resources needed: What m


resources will they n
Resources needed:

David Goes To School

Shannon,D.(1999).Davidg
NewYork,NewYork:Blue

Attachment A Story Flow


Chalk or wipe board

Attachment B Folded an
Book Directions .

Help the students brainstorm ideas to fill out the rest of


the flow chart.
Guided Practice:
Using the flow chart in the Modeling section the students
will be making their own folded and expandable book
about David Goes to School.

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Section 02

To create the booklet follow the directions on


Attachment B Folded and Expandable Book
Directions .

After all the students have made the book they will then
write the title and author on the front of their books. On
the right side pages of their books students will write
Main Idea on the top . On the Left side pages they will
right details at the top. On each of the pages that fold
up and out to reveal a whole page the students will write
picture at the top.

Attachment C David Goe


Folded Book Example
3 pieces of 8x11 while pap
student.
Crayons or colored pencils
Pencils

Instruct that the students will you the flow chart created
by them about the book to fill in each of the pages. The
main ideas will be written on the main idea pages and
at least one detail on the details pages. The student
will then draw a picture of the main ideas on the
pictures pages to complete their book.
Example of the book is seen on Attachment C David
Goes to School Folded Book Example
Teacher will work with the students step by step to insure
all students understand.
Independent practice:
The teacher will read the book No, David! by David
Shannon to the class. She will then draw the flow chart
attachment A Story Flow Chart on the board again.
The students will all have a large piece of white paper
(11x 17 will work best).
The students will work independently to draw the flow
chart on their papers large enough so they can draw a
small picture inside of the boxes. They will then draw
pictures of what they think the main ideas of the No,
David! In the main idea boxes and draw at least one
detail in a detail box.
The teacher will walk around to assist those who are
struggling with the concept. The book may also be
passed around to the students to refresh memories.
When students are completed, you can display them in
the classroom.

Attachment A Story Flow


Large piece of white paper
student
Chalk or wipe board
Pencils
Crayons or colored pencils
No, David!
Shannon, D. (1998). No, Da
Blue Sky Press.

Checking for Understanding:

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Section 02

Each student will receive Attachment D Ordering


Stories Worksheet
For this student have to put the pictures in order by
labeling them 1st, 2nd, 3rd.
While the students are completing the worksheet, the
teacher will answer questions on what the pictures are of.
Attachment E ordering Stories Answer Key has the
correct answers for the worksheet. This is not graded.
The teacher is looking for any misconceptions or wrong
answers. If a child has a wrong answer ask them for their
reasoning and explain why it is incorrect.
Worksheets are made by GreatSchools.org
Instructional strategies/Social constructs: How will
they work?
Collaborative work
Thinking Maps
Foldables

Pencils
Attachment D Ordering S
Worksheet
Attachment E Ordering S
Key
Story sequence. (n.d.). Retrieved
2015, from
http://www.greatschools.org/wor
activities/5316-story-sequence.g

Foldables by Zike, Dinah (


Foldables. New York, NY:
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Assessment ideas

Students will create another folded and expandable book. This time they use a story they ab
their family at home.. Students will think of something that happened to them at home and
same book as they did in the Guided Practice section. They will need to think of the main id
details of their own story and write them or draw them in the correct spots. The will also dra
the main idea like before

Rubric for their own foldable book:


Complet Mostly
ed
comple
correctly te with
.
few
minor

Not
complet
ed or
does
not

Criteria

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(2
points)

SST 309
errors.
(1point
)

Section 02

pertain
to
subject
(0
points)
Foldable is made correctly
Title and author (their name) are
written on the front.
Headings on each side of the paper are
correct (headings include main idea,
details, and picture.
Each main idea is important to their
story
Each detail is a relevant detail and less
important to the story.
Pictures display the main idea
Book looks neat without errors.

Attachment A
Story Flow Chart

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Attachment B
Folded and Expandable Book Directions
To create the folded and expandable book, each person needs 3 pieces of 8x11
paper.
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Section 02

Step 1
Fold one piece of paper in half
hamburger style shown below:

Step 2
fold that piece again hamburger
style so that it closes like a book

Step 3
Now you should have one expandable
book. The book should be able to open
to the right and then you can lift up
the page to reveal a full piece of
paper. Shown below:

Step 4
Glue each book together. Do this by
gluing the back of the first book to the
front of the second. Then glue the
back of the second to the front of the
third.

Then you are finished and have a


folded and expandable book!
Repeat steps 1 and 2 with the other
two papers so that you have 3
expandable books.

Attachment C
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David Goes to School Folded Book Example

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Attachment D Ordering Stories Worksheet

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Attachment E Ordering Stories Answer Key

KUD 3
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Kelly Gaule

GLCE (coding and


wording); Verb(s)
underlined; type
of learning:
Knowledge, Skill,
Reasoning,
Product
Knowledge (K)

Historical means that


something relates to
the past. Historical
records are writings
from the past that
describe what life
was like.
Artifacts are objects
from the past that
was man made.

SST 309

Section 02

1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and artifacts (e.g. photos, diaries, oral
videos) to draw possible conclusions about family or school life in the p
Level of learning: Reasoning
Understand (U)

DO:
Demonstration of
Learning (DOL)

Vocabulary

I Ca

The students will


understand that life
was different in the
past than it is now.

The students will be


given pictures about a
school in the past.. The
students must draw
conclusions about what
students had to do in
that school in the past.

Historical
Historical record
Artifacts

Vocabulary Lesson
The lessons below are Marzanos Six (6) Steps. This is a template for your own
vocabulary ideas. The choices you make in the various steps will depend on the
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Kelly Gaule

SST 309

Section 02

grade level of your unit and the words that need to be taught. ALL of these Six
(6) steps need to be evident in your lessons.
Vocabulary Lessons: How will you
Resources needed: What
take them where they need to
materials and resources will they
go? (Step-by-Step plan)
need?
Instructional strategies/Social
(Page #s read,
constructs: How will they work?
graphic
(AND what will YOU do?)
organizers,
books, posters,
realia, etc)
Lessons:
Resources needed: What materials
Using Marzanos Six Steps for Intentional
and resources will they need ? (also
Instruction in Vocabulary:
included on Works Cited page)
Includes:
Step 1
Provide a description, explanation, or example of the
At least 3 historical artifacts
new term.
such as old photographs,
pottery, artwork, old-fashioned
The teacher will bring in examples of historical
phones, and other types of
artifacts and historical records. The items will be
realia. (If you do not own any
displayed at the front of the class or where everyone
research to see if you can
can see. Teacher will invite 3-6 students at a time to
borrow them from libraries, city
come up and look at them for 90 seconds. All students
government, museums, friends,
will study them by looking and picking them up if
family members etc.).
they are not fragile.
At least 1 real life example of a
historical record such as old
After all of the student have looked at them the teacher
diaries, journals, newspapers. (If
will ask the students what they are and to give details
you do not own any research to
about what they are or what they look like. For
see if you can borrow them from
example, the student might say that one of the items is
libraries, city government,
a brown phone, a picture of something, or a painting
museums, friends, family
of something.
members etc.).
After multiple students have given their descriptions
Vocabulary words:
and the teacher will explain that what they are looking
Historical
at are examples of historical artifacts. This means
Historical Records
that they are objects that were man made that are from
Artifacts
the past. Historic or historical describes something that
is from or about the past. An artifact is a man made
object that is from or was used in the past. Examples
*Step one Script:
could include phones, pottery, household items, tools
etc.
The teacher will then pick up the examples of
historical records. He or she will explain that this/these
is/are example(s) of a historical record. The teacher
will ask the students what they think a historical
record is based on the example. Based on the students
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Reponses explain that a historical record is writing


from the past that describes what life was like in the
past. For example if someone from long a go wrote a
diary about their life, the diary would be a historical
record. This can include diaries, newspapers, written
interviews etc.
Step 2, 3, and five 5
Ask students to restate the description, explanation,
or example in their own words

3 pieces of blank paper


per child.
Markers/crayons/ colored
pencils
Pencils

The students will each get out three pieces


of paper. At the top of each page they will
write one of the vocabulary words:
historical, artifact, historical record. Each
student will draw a picture of an example
of the word and on that same page write a
short description. For example, the word
historical would be written at the top of the
page. They will draw a picture of what they
think the word means like an example of
something historical. They will then write a
brief description like something that is
from the past or something that was
used in the past
The teacher will walk around while the
students are doing this task in order to
clear up any misconceptions at this point in
order to clarify and correct students
understanding.
When the student have completed their
three pictures and sentences the student
will find one partner. With their partner
they will share each of their pictures and
sentences with their partner. The partners
will have the opportunity to ask questions
or discuss the picture or definition with
their partner.
Step 4
Engage students periodically in activities that help
them add to their knowledge of the terms in their
notebooks.
Students will be given the worksheet

ResourceA:HistoricalSources
Scissors
Gluesticks
Pencil
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labeled resource A. The students will cut


out the pictures and place them under the
correct vocabulary word. If they do not
match up with historical, artifact, or
historical record they will be placed in the
neither box.

Picturesfrom:
MuseumCollections.(n.d.).Retrieved
April1,2015,from
http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibits/categor
y/about/56/table/paged/title

The teacher will walk around answering


any questions and addressing any
misconceptions students may have.
Students will be graded on if their pictures
are in the correct box.

SesameStreet.(n.d.).RetrievedApril1,
2015,from
http://store.sesamestreet.org/Dept.aspx?
cp=21415_21456_21463
HistoricRecordsFairfaxCounty,
Virginia.(n.d.).RetrievedApril1,2015,
from
http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/courts/circ
uit/historical_records.htm

Script For Vocabulary Lesson


Step one:
The teacher will bring in examples of historical artifacts and historical records. The items
will be displayed at the front of the class or where everyone can see. The teacher will
(TTW) say: Today I decided to bring in some things that I found. All of these objects have
something in common. When I call you up I want you to look at each object. Look at every
part of them but be careful because they are very old.
Teacher will s invite 3-6 students at a time to come up and look at them for about 90
seconds or enough time that all the students look at the objects.
After all of the student have looked at them TTW ask the students: What do you notice
about these objects? What are they like? Call on at least 5 students so you can get
multiple opinions. The student might say that one of the items is a brown phone, a picture
of something, or a painting of something. Try to get the students to be specific. Write
down their observations on the board.
After multiple students have given their descriptions, TTW say Great job! Can anyone tell
me what all of these items have in common with each other? The students will answer
by raising their hands and guessing. Their guess could include old things. TTW with then
say Good guesses, but what I had in mind is that you all are looking at examples of
historical artifacts.. This means that they are objects that were man made that are from
the past. Give students a second to understand that and if they have questions then ask
Lets break it down, do any of you know what historic or historical means? The students
will raise their hands. Allow at least 2 students to answer. If they are having a hard time
say Historic or historical describes something that is from or about the past, for
example Pick up one of the objects that you brought in and say this is a from a long
time agopeople in the past used it for.

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TTW say Now for the word artifact. An artifact is a man made object that is from or was
used in the past. All of these objects are artifacts because they are from the past and
made by people. Examples of these are phones, pottery, household items, tools etc.
The teacher will then pick up the example(s) of a historical record. TTW explain this is an
example of a historical record. TTW ask the students what do you think a historical
record is based on the example? Based on the students Reponses TTW explain, A
historical record is writing from the past that describes what life was like in the past. For
example if someone from long a go wrote a diary about his or her life, the diary would be
a historical record. This can include diaries, newspapers, written interviews etc. The
TTW ask the students if they have any questions about the words historical, artifacts and
historical records.
Step 2, 3, 5
TTW Now that you have a little information about these words I will pass out three
pieces of paper to each of you. Once this had been done remind the students to put their
name at the top of each of the pages. TTW write the words historical, artifacts, and
historical record on board. On the first page, write the word historical on the top of the
page neatly. Point to the word so the students know how it is spelled. Now, you will
write a short sentence on what the word historical means, I will be around to help with
spelling. Allow students about 5-10 minutes to write their sentence, when they are done
tell them Next, draw a picture of what you think a historical item is. It can be an
example we already used. Allow students 5- 10 minutes to draw their example. Repeat
this for each word.
The teacher will walk around while the students are doing this task in order to clear up
any misconceptions at this point in order to clarify and correct students understanding.
When the students have completed their three pictures and sentences tell the students to
each find one partner. Once they have gotten with their partner TTW say, Show your
partner the picture you drew for each of the words and tell them your definition that you
wrote. The partners will have the opportunity to ask questions or discuss the picture or
definition with you Allow the students 15 minutes to discuss with their partners. Walk
around the classroom to correct any misconceptions
Step 4 and 6
Pass out a worksheet labeled resource A to each student. Explain to them on the first
sheet there are boxes. Read off each box while pointing to it. The students will cut out
the pictures and place them under the correct vocabulary word. If they do not match up
with historical, artifact, or historical record they will be placed in the neither box.
The teacher will walk around answering any questions and addressing any
misconceptions students may have.
Students will be graded on if their pictures are in the correct box.

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ResourceA

HistoricalSources
Name______________________________________Date______________
YourJob:CutouteachofthepicturesfromtheHistoric,Artifact,andHistorical
RecordPicturesworksheet.Placethepictureunderthecorrectheadingofwhateach
picturewouldbeconsidered.Somemaynotmatchupatallsoputthemintheneither
box.

Historical

Artifacts

Historical Records

Neither
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Historic, Artifact, and Historical Record Pictures:

NEW!

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Lesson 3 Exploring History


Lessons: How will you take them
where they need to go? (Step-by-Step
plan)
Instructional strategies/Social constructs:
How will they work?
(AND what will YOU do?)
Anticipatory Set:

Resources needed: What


materials and resources will
they need?
(Page #s read, graphic
organizers, books, posters,
realia, etc)

The teacher will bring in their own photos from


the past, pictures of people they know, artifacts
from their childhood, and documents from their
past. (these could include pictures of their
house, picture of their parents, old toys, and
report cards).

Teachers Artifacts:
Photograph
Photograph of an
important person
A personal artifact
Historical document

The teacher will place these items in front of


the students for them to see. The teacher will
write, how we learn about the past on the
board. Ask the students what kinds of things
that the teacher brought in. Have them give as
much detail about these pictures as possible.

Chalk/ wipe board


Magnets to hang up
artifacts on the board.

After going through each item tell them that


they have been acting like historians and
studying the past from the artifacts and
historical records in front of them.
Modeling:
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On the board, recreate the chart on


Attachment A How We Learn About the Past
Board.
Pick up the picture that you brought and tell a
short story about what is in the picture. Explain
that a picture can tell you a lot about that place
and we study pictures to see what they were
like in the past. Place the picture in the
photographs column.

Attachment A How We
Learn About the Past
Board

Chalk/wipe board

Attachment B Civil War


Family Photo
Washington, District of
Columbia. Tent life of the
31st Penn. Inf. (later, 82d
Penn. Inf.) at
Queen's farm, vicinity of
Fort Slocum. (n.d.).
Retrieved March 29,
2015, from
http://loc.gov/pictures/res
ource/cwpb.01663

Pick up the picture of a person. Tell a short story


about that person. Explain that we study people
and what they did in history. Write the persons
name on the board under the people column.
Pick up the item you brought in as your artifact.
Tell story it and why it is important. Explain that
we study artifacts like this to see what
happened in the past. Write what the item is
called in the artifacts column.
Pick up the item that was brought as a historical
document. Tell a story about that and explain
that historical documents are also studied to
find out what happened in the past.
Guided Practice:
Display the photograph that is on Attachment
B Civil War Family Photo so that the whole
class can see it.
Ask the students to name ten things that they
notice about the picture. List their observations
on the board.
Once there are at least ten observations ask the
students for ten questions that they have about
the photo like where is it? Who are they? Write
these questions on the board too.
Explain that the students are thinking like
historians. They are looking at the picture and
studying it. They also can go look up or find out
the answers to the questions they have.
Optional: Look up information about the picture
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Section 02

to answer the students questions. Go to the


Library of Congress.com to get more
information about this picture.
Independent practice
The students will bring in their own artifacts
that people can study about them.
They should include a picture, a picture of a
person, an artifact, and a historical record
about themselves.

Attachment C Parent
Letter
Students artifacts

Attachment C Parent Letter is a note to send


home to the parents about brining in these
artifacts.
Checking for Understanding
The student will present each of their artifacts.
The students will show each item and will tell a
little bit about each item to the class.
The class will be able to study the student by
the items they bring in.
Instructional strategies/Social constructs:
How will they work?
Artifacts
Thinking Maps
10x10
Assessment ideas
Each student gets Attachment D Thinking Like A Historian worksheet. On this
worksheet the students will look at the pictures of artifacts. They will draw that
they think the items in the pictures were used for in the past. They will then
verbally explain to the teacher why they thought people in the past used the
artifacts the way they do in the picture they drew.
Rubric For Thinking Like a Historian
Complete
d
correctly.
(2 points)

Not
completed
or does
not
pertain to
subject
(0 points)

Criteria

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The worksheet is complete


There is a picture for each box
The pictures are drawn neatly and as clear as
possible
The student provides a reason for their 1st picture
The student provides a reason for their 2nd picture
The student provides a reason for their 3rd picture.

Attachment A
How We Learn About the Past Board

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Section 02

Attachment B
Civil War Family Photo
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Section 02

Attachment C
Parent Letter

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Section 02

Hello Parents,
In Social Studies, the students and I are studying how we can
think like historians. Right now we are discussing that historians
use pictures, people, artifacts, and historical records to learn
about life in the past.
This week I bringing in some items that the students could use
to study about my past. I am bringing in (list items that the
teacher brings) Each one of these items tells a story about my past.
Now, I am asking the students to do the same thing I did to study
their past.
Please help your child find items that tells a story about their
past. Talk with them about why it is an important item.
They should bring in:
A picture that shows an important place they have been to. For
example: a vacation spot, house, or restaurant.
A picture of an important person to them. For example: Their
Parents, Grandparents, friends, or cousins.
An important Artifact, something that was important to them when
they were younger. For example: a toy, brush, and piece of
clothing.
Historical document or a picture of a historical document about
them. For example: a picture they drew when they were younger,
homework from kindergarten or a birth announcement.

Please bring these items in by _______________________


I am looking forward to what your child has to share with the class.
I greatly appreciate your help in your childs learning process!

Thank you for your involvement!

Attachment D
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Section 02

Thinking Like a Historian


Your Job: Look at the pictures of some things people study to know
about the past. In the box next to it draw a picture of what you think it
was used for.

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KUD 4
GLCE (coding and
wording); Verb(s)
underlined; type of
learning:
Knowledge, Skill,
Reasoning, Product

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in the past using criteria of fami
jobs, or communication.
Level of learning: Reasoning

Knowledge (K)

Understand (U)

DO:
Demonstration of
Learning (DOL)

Vocabulary

IC

Compare means to
note the similarities
or differences
between things.
Jobs are tasks that are
the workers are paid
for.
Communication is a
way to exchange
information between
people.
Transportation is the
way of traveling from
one place to another.

The students will


understand that
schools, families,
jobs, and
communication were
similar and different
in the past and
present time.

Students will be given


pictures of a family,
school, job, and
communication in the
past and present. The
students will then
each compare the
pictures of the past
and of the ones in the
present to the
teacher.

Compare
Jobs
Communication
Transportation

Lesson 4 Life Today Vs. Life in the Past


42

Ic
ho
diff
sim
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Lessons: How will you take them where they


need to go?
Instructional strategies/Social constructs: How
will they work?

Section 02
Resources needed: What
materials and resources
will they need?

Anticipatory Set:

Read the book If You Lived 100 Years Ago by Ann


McGovern aloud to the class. The book is about how New
York City was 100 years ago.
Ask the students the following questions after the book:
1. How did people dress 100 years ago? What makes
that different from how people dressed today?
2. How did people travel back then? What makes that
different from today?
3. What did people do for fun back then? What makes
that different than what we do for fun today?

If You Lived 100 Years


Ago
McGovern, A., & DiVito, A.
(1999). --if you lived 100 years
ago. New York: Scholastic.

Modeling:
Show the class the following video:
School: Then and Now Talking With Ruby
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4lFPv82M_s
The video is about a woman in Gaylord, Michigan talking
about how school was for her in the past and comparing to
what it is now.
After the video, ask the students the following questions.
1. What did you notice about what the school looks
like? How is that different than our classroom?
2. How did the students write? How do you wright now?
3. How did the students get to school? How do we get
to school now?
4. What other differences have you noticed?

Video
School: Then and now talking
with Ruby. (n.d.). Retrieved
April 19, 2015, from
https://www.youtube.com/watc
h?v=n4lFPv82M_s

Guided Practice:
Explain to students that our ways of communication has
changed over time. Communication is a way to exchange
information between people.
Write communication in the middle of the board. Ask the
students how people today exchange information and
communicate. Write all of their examples on the board
around the word communication.
Tell the students that they will be competing in a
communication race.
The students will break up into small groups. Each group
will have a different way of communication that will take
their turn to transfer a message among all the group
members. The different groups will come to the front of the

A toy pony
2 walkie-talkies
Bag for newspapers
2 computers/laptops
Remote control racecar
Paper and writing utensil
to write messages on

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Section 02

classroom and present their mean of communication. The


different groups could be:
The pony express: Have the different members of
the group have one person write a message, one
person ride the horse and another has to read the
message
Walkie-talkies: Have one student say the message
to another student over the walkie-talkies
The printing press/newspaper: Have a student write
something down while another person has to deliver
it to another member of the group
E-mail: Have the different students at two different
computers and have one student e-mail the other
student a message
Homing pidgins: Use a remote control car and have
one student write a message, another drive the car,
and another read the message.
After each group presents, ask the students the following
questions:
1. Which was the fastest way to communicate?
2. What is the most reliable?
3. What is the easiest way?
Adapted from: Sample Lessons. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19,
2015, from http://jessiejohncock.weebly.com/samplelessons.html
Independent practice:

Explain to students that transportation is the way of


traveling from one place to another. Ask the students ways
that we travel from one place to another. Write all of these
on the board for the kids to see.

3 pieces of white paper


per student
Crayons or colored
pencils
Transportation Then and
Now
Nelson, R. (2003).
Transportation Then and
Now. Minneapolis:
Lerner Publications.

Read the book Transportation Then and Now by Robin


Nelson.
Give the students three pieces of white paper.
Have students draw a picture of one of the types of
transportation in the past. Then have them draw a picture
of that same type of transportation now. Then have
students draw a picture of that type of transportation and
what it might look like in the future.
Checking for Understanding:
Have the each student present each of his or her
transportation pictures. Each child should explain what

Attachment A How Has


Life Changed?
Pictures from:

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changes in their transportation through out the past,


present, and future pictures.

Section 02
The Evolution of Classroom
Technology. (n.d.). Retrieved
April 19, 2015, from
http://www.edudemic.com/clas
sroom-technology/

Assessment ideas:
Give every student Attachment A How has Life Changed and a blank piece of paper. Tell
students that they will pick two items. The student will draw a picture of the item with what
it looks like in current day. They also must draw how people use the item today. They will do
this for both of the items they pick.
Rubric:

Completed
correctly.
(2 points)

Not
complete
d or does
not
pertain to
subject
(0 points)

Criteria

The student drew two pictures


The first picture accurately shows that the item
has changed
The second picture accurately shows that the item
has changed
The first picture accurately shows how the item is
used today
The second picture accurately shows how the item
is used today

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Attachment A

SST 309

Section 02

How Has Life Changed?

Your Job: Pick two pictures below. Think about how those two items have
changed as time as gone by. On your blank piece of paper draw a picture of what
it looks like what is it used now.

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References
Marzano, R. and Pickering, D. (2005), Building Academic Vocabulary: Teachers Manual.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
Museum Collections. (n.d.). Retrieved April 1, 2015, from
http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibits/category/about/56/table/paged/title
Nelson, R. (2003). Transportation Then and Now. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications.
Past, Present and Future. (2011, March 24). Retrieved April 18, 2015, from
https://dbsenk.wordpress.com/2011/03/24/past-present-and-future/
Sample Lessons. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19, 2015, from
http://jessiejohncock.weebly.com/sample-lessons.html
School: Then and now talking with Ruby. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19, 2015, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4lFPv82M_s
Shannon, D. (1998). No, David! New York: Blue Sky Press.
Shannon, D. (1999). David goes to school. New York, New York: Blue Sky Press.
Silverstein, S., Silverstein, S., & Row, P. (1964). The giving tree. New York: Harper & Row
Story sequence. (n.d.). Retrieved April 18, 2015, from
http://www.greatschools.org/worksheets-activities/5316-story-sequence.gs
The Evolution of Classroom Technology. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19, 2015, from
http://www.edudemic.com/classroom-technology/
Washington, District of Columbia. Tent life of the 31st Penn. Inf. (later, 82d
Penn. Inf.)
at Queen's farm, vicinity of Fort Slocum. (n.d.). Retrieved March 29, 2015, from
http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cwpb.01663
Zike, Dinah (2000) Foldables. New York, NY: Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

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