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Luz Renteria Gomez

December 5, 2014
MT 243 Portfolio
Content Standards:
Standard 9: Knowledge of Number and Operation
Candidates demonstrate computational proficiency, including a conceptual understanding
of numbers, ways of representing number, relationships among number and number
systems, and the meanings of operations
Indicators:
9.1 Develop the meaning of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and
provide multiple models for whole number operations and their applications.
9.2 Recognize the meaning and use of place value in representing whole numbers
and finite decimals, comparing and ordering numbers, and understanding the
relative magnitude of numbers.
9.3 Demonstrate proficiency in multi-digit computation using algorithms, mental
mathematics, and computational estimation.
9.4 Analyze integers and rational numbers, their relative size, and how operations
with whole numbers extend to integers and rational numbers
Standard 10: Knowledge of Different Perspectives on Algebra
Candidates emphasize relationships among quantities including functions, ways of
representing mathematical relationships, and the analysis of change.
Indicators:
10.1 Explore and analyze patterns, relations, and functions.
10.2 Recognize and analyze mathematical structures.
10.3 Investigate equality and equations.
10.4a Use mathematical models to represent quantitative relationships.
10.5 Analyze change in various contexts.
Pedagogy Standards:

Luz Renteria Gomez


Standard 8: Knowledge of Mathematics Pedagogy
Candidates posses a deep understanding of how students learn mathematics and of the
pedagogical knowledge specific to mathematics teaching and learning
Indicators:
8.2 Selects and uses appropriate concrete materials for learning mathematics.
8.3 Uses multiple strategies, including listening to and understanding the ways
students think about mathematics, to assess students mathematical knowledge.
8.5 Participates in professional mathematics organizations and uses their print and
on-line resources.
8.6 Demonstrates knowledge of research results in the teaching and learning of
mathematics.
Process Standards:
Standard 1: Knowledge of Mathematical Problem Solving
Candidates know, understand, and apply the process of mathematical problem solving.
Indicators:
1.1 Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.
1.2 Solve problems that arise in mathematics and those involving mathematics in
other contexts.
1.3 Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.
1.4 Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving.
Standard 3: Knowledge of Mathematical Communication
Candidates communicate their mathematical thinking orally and in writing to peers,
faculty, and others.
Indicators:
3.1 Communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers,
faculty, and others
3.2 Use the language of mathematics to express ideas precisely.
3.3 Organize mathematical thinking through communication.

Luz Renteria Gomez


3.4 Analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others.
Standard 5: Knowledge of Mathematical Representation
Candidates use varied representations of mathematical ideas to support and deepen
students mathematical understanding
Indicators:
5.1 Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical
phenomena.
5.2 Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate
mathematical ideas.
5.3 Select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve
problems.

Luz Renteria Gomez

Content Standards:
Standard 9: Knowledge of Number and Operation
Candidates demonstrate computational proficiency, including a conceptual understanding of
numbers, ways of representing number, relationships among number and number systems, and
the meanings of operations
Indicators:
9.1 Develop the meaning of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and provide
multiple models for whole number operations and their applications.

In this picture, I am demonstrating one of the many ways which I used to model whole number
operations (definitely for a smaller scale of numbers). I was able to use the number line model to
demonstrate addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Aside from that model, I used
many others to demonstrate different ways of looking at each kind of number operation.

Luz Renteria Gomez


9.2 Recognize the meaning and use of place value in representing whole numbers and finite
decimals, comparing and ordering numbers, and understanding the relative magnitude of
numbers.

This picture is just an example of some of my notes and work that I did with decimals in
ordering, comparing, adding, and trying to understand the meaning and use of the place values as
it had to do with the decimals and whole numbers. I would like to point out the boxes on top
because those were the most helpful in my understanding of what the place values were and
where the decimals fit into them.

Luz Renteria Gomez


9.3 Demonstrate proficiency in multi-digit computation using algorithms, mental
mathematics, and computational estimation.

This picture is from number 3 of my first take home assessment this semester and it shows my
doing different algorithms to show my use of mental math and computational estimation. This
includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems. There is trading, expanded
form, the long division, equal additions, and other forms of computation.

Luz Renteria Gomez


9.4 Analyze integers and rational numbers, their relative size, and how operations with
whole numbers extend to integers and rational numbers

This is one of the examples that I found that would best show my understanding of this content
standard. This is an example of how operations with whole numbers extend to rational numbers
and integers. In this type of mathematical computation, I have to connect the integers and
rational numbers to show that repeating decimals are rational numbers. `
Standard 10: Knowledge of Different Perspectives on Algebra
Candidates emphasize relationships among quantities including functions, ways of representing
mathematical relationships, and the analysis of change.
Indicators:

Luz Renteria Gomez


10.1 Explore and analyze patterns, relations, and functions.

This picture illustrates just one of my explorations of functions. Functionssince they follow a
simple step by step process are fairly simple for me to do; whereas with patterns and relations
which have to do more with their connections to one another, I had a harder time with them, but I
did get much practice with all of them. Specifically with relations, the reflexive, symmetric and
transitive properties were interesting to try to figure out.

Luz Renteria Gomez


10.2 Recognize and analyze mathematical structures.

This picture is just one example of one of the many mathematical structures that we were able to
analyze together and then that I was able to recognize in my other work later on. It was helpful to
see what this kind of exponent really means in terms of the numbers.

Luz Renteria Gomez


10.3 Investigate equality and equations.

This is a screenshot of one of our quiz questions that I thought would illustrate my use of this
standard. In this screenshot, I explain (though not very thoroughly, I admit) that the student is
using the = as a way of writing what the computation equals, but it also shows it as meaning
that all of those numbers have the same value. Though doing this in one instance is no big deal,
continuing to make this mistake and not making the distinction between how to use the = will
cause her problems in the future when she is doing algebra.

Luz Renteria Gomez


10.4a Use mathematical models to represent quantitative relationships.

These are some of the types of models that I use to represent different kinds of quantitative
relationships. When they are more complicated relationships of course I will be using different
kinds of area and set models to explain the thinking behind the relationship, but generally, these
models are helpful in showing the way that different numbers relate to one another.

Luz Renteria Gomez


10.5 Analyze change in various contexts.

Honestly, the only way that I can think to show this standard is through change of numbers and
showing the way that they can be shown as fractions, decimals, and percentages. This picture is
showing just one example of some of the ways that the numbers can be shown in their different
forms. Even then, they can still be represented in many different ways.

Luz Renteria Gomez

Pedagogy Standards:
Standard 8: Knowledge of Mathematics Pedagogy
Candidates posses a deep understanding of how students learn mathematics and of the
pedagogical knowledge specific to mathematics teaching and learning
Indicators:
8.2 Selects and uses appropriate concrete materials for learning mathematics.

This is one of my lesson plans that I have done for this class. In this specific lesson, the students
are learning about using standard and non standard units of length. In order for them to be able to
understand this lesson and perform easily during the activities, the materials that have to be
prepared are listed above. The idea is that the students will all have different forms of
measurement to use to find the perimeters of things with. This will help to create a concrete
conceptual understanding of the fact that non standard units of length can be as effective as
standard units of length if used correctly.

8.3 Uses multiple strategies, including listening to and understanding the ways students
think about mathematics, to assess students mathematical knowledge.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is one of my responses from my first take home assessment (question 7) on giving students
feedback on their incorrect math problems. In order to be able to give the feedback and make it
beneficial and relevant to the student, I as the teacher needed to think about how the student
would be thinking about the problem and where they would have gotten their answer. This was a
good example of my understanding of the way students think about math and how I would be
able to asses his/her mathematical knowledge through this type of problem.
8.5 Participates in professional mathematics organizations and uses their print and on-line
resources.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is the title of one of the NCTM publications that I read. I read one of these magazines and I
was able to see the kinds of professional development articles that there are in there as well as
online through their site. Not only that, but of course they had great lesson ideas. This kind of
resource is extremely valuable especially for me as a teacher who is not very specifically math
inclined, but that will be teaching math in the classroom.

8.6 Demonstrates knowledge of research results in the teaching and learning of


mathematics.

This is problem number 8 from my second take home assessment. This was one instance when I
had to research a little bit in order to get a better understanding of a concept before I could
answer a problem. More specifically, I had to write a story problem about LCM, but I did not
understand it as well as I thought I did. So I went back and did some research in my text book
and online to find examples. This is something that as a teacher who is not very mathematically
savvy, I know I will be doing quite a bit in order to provide my students with correct answers and
processes.

Process Standards:

Luz Renteria Gomez


Standard 1: Knowledge of Mathematical Problem Solving
Candidates know, understand, and apply the process of mathematical problem solving.
Indicators:
1.1 Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.

This is once again problem number 7 from my first take home assessment. This is one really
good example of the many ways that I am able to apply different strategies depending on the
different problem that is being worked on. This standardeven though I cannot prove itwas
one that I was able to demonstrate in real life as well as on paper. During my time working with
kids at an after school program, I was able to think back to these different strategies (specifically
the trading and equal addition) and use them to help students understand their homework.
1.2 Solve problems that arise in mathematics and those involving mathematics in other
contexts.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is the answer to problem number 8 on my second take home assessment. The prompt was to
write a story problem that required the solver to find the LCM of 124 and 448. This is a really
good example of one time that I had a problem come up while I was trying to do a problem in
both the mathematical context and in the actual just problem solving context.
When I was first trying to figure out the problem, I found out that I did not understand LCM as
well as I had originally thought. After doing a little bit of research in my textbook as well as
online for examples, I felt confident enough on LCM to attempt writing the story problem.
However, when I finally got to coming up with a concept for the problem, all of the variables
that I wanted to use would not have made sense in a real world situation. It took me a very long
time before I could come up with the idea of using days instead of things like flowers and candy.
In the end, this was a good problem that shows how I used my problem solving skills to first of
all learn more about the mathematical context and then also to solve a problem outside of the
mathematical aspect of it.
1.3 Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is problem number 18 from my second take home assessment. In this problem, we were
supposed to read the story problem and try to figure out the answer using a diagram. This is a
good example of one time (out of many) when while I was doing a problem and trying to solve
for the answer, by using a diagram or a different kind of algorithm, I found new understanding of
the concept. For example, in this problem, by drawing out the diagram for the amount of ribbon
that was available and while trying to figure out how many kids would get the amount of ribbon
specified, I found a new way to solve the problem in a way that would be easy for students just
starting out with fractions to understand.

1.4 Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is problem number 8 from my first take home assessment. In this problem, we were given a
problem that was already solved using a subtraction algorithm and we had to figure out what the
algorithm was so that we could solve the following two problems. In order to do this, I had to
reflect on the process that the student had gone through to get to the solution in their algorithm.
Then, I was able to do the problem myself.

Standard 3: Knowledge of Mathematical Communication

Luz Renteria Gomez


Candidates communicate their mathematical thinking orally and in writing to peers, faculty, and
others.
Indicators:
3.1 Communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, faculty, and
others

My lesson plans are one way through which I am able to communicate my mathematical
thinking to peer, faculty and others. This is one instance where I am expressing my knowledge of
the lesson and the different aspects of the lesson. Another way in which I communicate this
thinking is in my assessments, and also in my presentation of this specific lesson to the class as
well.

3.2 Use the language of mathematics to express ideas precisely.

Luz Renteria Gomez

These are the answers I have given to problems 1 and 2 of my third take home assessment. This
is one example of a time when I have had to use my mathematical language to express an idea I
had about what to teach. Mostly, this kind of language is done in these assessments or in my
lesson plans/while teaching of course. However, it can be shown at any time while we are in
class or doing homework.

3.3 Organize mathematical thinking through communication.

Luz Renteria Gomez

These are just some of my notes from class and that I tend to add on to while I am doing my
homework or when we go over questions in class. My notebook itself is full of notes and post its
with new ideas and examples that we talk about in class while we go over the confusing math
problems. I believe that this is a good example of organized mathematical thinking through
communication. B y organizing my notes this way during class and then adding on to it later on,
I am able to soak in the information first hand and then also look back on it when I need to.

3.4 Analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is problem number 8 from my first take home assessment. In this problem, we were given a
problem that was already solved using a subtraction algorithm and we had to figure out what the
algorithm was so that we could solve the following two problems. In order to do this, I had to
analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking that the student would have done while doing
this problem. Once I knew what the student was thinking when they were doing the problem,
then it becomes easier to figure out the algorithm itself and apply it to the other two problems.

Standard 5: Knowledge of Mathematical Representation

Luz Renteria Gomez


Candidates use varied representations of mathematical ideas to support and deepen students
mathematical understanding
Indicators:
5.1 Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical
phenomena.

Luz Renteria Gomez

Luz Renteria Gomez

Pattern blocks and fraction tiles are two good representations that we have used in class to model
and interpret physical and mathematical phenomena. These were some of the manipulatives that
can be used in lessons as well when teaching about fractions or other mathematical concepts. As
for the social aspect, these could technically also be connected to a social aspect of mathematics
if there were a story problem involved.

5.2 Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical
ideas.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is one example of a way to use a class list to organize and record when students are doing
and understanding mathematical ideas. This is the template that I used in one of my lessons for
jotting down when students had turned in their worksheets as well as when I got to go around
and check in with each one of them personally to see if they had done the assignment correctly.

5.3 Select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve problems.

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is problem number 3 from my first take home assessment. In this problem, the prompt was
to perform each of the operations using at least two different algorithms. TO do this, I had to
choose the two best algorithms for the problem. That meant looking at the operation that needed
to be done, selecting and applying a certain kind of algorithm, and them translating it so that it fit
the problem. If in some cases it did not translate, then I would select and apply another
mathematical representation to solve the problem.

Bulletin Board

Luz Renteria Gomez

This is a picture of Lisa Westfalls and my bulletin board that we did for the class assignment.
For out bulletin board, we chose to do a third grade mental addition board. The theme was
obviously Fishin for Addition. The idea was that the students would be able to quickly move
the fish with the different number problems on them and put them into th baggies with the
correct solution on them. On the little bubbles on the side, it has a sort of challenge for the
studentstry to do one of the problems in less than 10 seconds! The sheet that was connected to
the bulletin board included different ways to do the addition problems and what we were
expecting from the students who interacted with the board. It was a simple board to make, but I
think it would be very beneficial to students because it forces them to try to do different kinds of
mental addition strategies outside of their desks in a fun and interactive way.