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FLINDERS UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Introduction to Outdoor Education


HLPE 3532

Student Handbook
Semester 2, 2015

HLPE3532 INTRO to OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE


SEMESTER 2, 2015
Week
1

Week
Beginning
27 July

Wed 11.30-1.30 Sturt Theatre N335

Fri 11-1 Sturt S210

Introduction & Topic Outline


Assignments and Logistics

Outdoor Education Philosophy

Notes (bold = compulsory)

Sign up to tutorials
2

3 August

Navigation theory

Minimal Impact Camping 1

Assessment A. Tutorial Presentation

Minimal Impact Camping 2


3

10 August

Risks and their management

Tents
Managing minor emergencies

17 August

Planning Model for Leadership

Hazards fires, wild fires


Hazards lightning and floods

24 August

31 August

7 September
14 September

Day walk Monday 10th or Tuesday 18th August


(choose 1 of 2)

Equipment tutorial City Outdoor Store - Thu


13th or Thu 20th August, 5.30-7.30pm (tbc)

School Outdoor Education Teaching


and Learning Implications (OE
Program Planning)

Quest Orientation (tbc )

Use of trangia stoves

Weather and Outdoor Leadership

Bushwalk planning

Day walk Monday 10th or Tuesday 18th August


(choose 1 of 2)
Equipment tutorial City Outdoor Store Thurs13th or Thurs 20th August, 5.30-7.30pm
(tbc

School Outdoor Education Teaching


and Learning Implications (Camping
Planning, organisation & safety
guidelines)

Packing for bushwalking


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- due weeks 2-9

Introduction to Rock Climbing (optional)


-Mon Aug 31,Tues Sept 1 (choose 1of 2)
Cost $30

Bushwalk planning

Introduction to Mountain Biking (optional)


Sept 9 or 11(tbc)

Hypothermia
Heat stroke/exhaustion

Bushwalk equipment distribution


Wed 16th Sept

Bushwalk equipment distribution


MSB

21 September

Wks

2 October

Teaching break (2 weeks)

Assessment B. Basic Bushwalking Skills:


Bushwalk Camp Deep Creek C.P.
Monday21s t to Wednesday 23rd Sept.
(WO,DR,DC = 1:12)
DECS basic (BELS) or Senior First Aid including
DECS basic (BELS) - tbc.

1&2

5 October

Bushwalk review (WO&DR)


Outdoor Education portfolio
assignment review

Legal Issues (DR)

Quest 1: October 10-23 (WO)

Logistics(Quest camps)

Note: attend Quest 1, 2 or 3.


Quest 1: October 10-23

10

12 October

No classes this week - Quest 1

No classes this week - Quest 1

11

19 October

No classes this week - Quest 1

No classes this week - Quest 1

12

26 October

No classes this week - Quest 2

No classes this week - Quest 2

Quest 1: October 10-23


Quest 2: October 24- November 6 (DR)
Outdoor Education portfolio assgt due, Mon
October 26, 9am
Quest 2: October 24- November 6
D: Quest group 1 submit camp report Fri
October 30th

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2 November

No classes this week - Quest 2

No classes this week - Quest 2

Quest 2: October 24- November 6


Quest 3: November 7-20 (WO)

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9 November

No classes this week Quest 3

No classes this week Quest 3

Quest 3: November 7-20


D: Quest group 2 submit camp report Fri Nov
13th

EW 1

16 November

No classes this week Quest 3

No classes this week Quest 3

Quest 3: November 7-20

EW 2

23 November

Quest review & Topic evaluation


Thurs Nov 27, 9-11am (final class), in
the Computer Lab Educ 3.17.
(WO,DR&RB)

No class today.

D: Quest group 3 submit camp report Fri Nov


27th

RB/WO:rb/ 16:6:14 OE Outline & Program 2014

2. ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCES: GENERAL INFORMATION


In addition to classes, this course requires you to attend the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.

An equipment tutorial at Paddy Pallins, Adelaide CBD


A day walk in the Adelaide Hills: Kuitpo Forest
A 2 night/ 3 day walk: Deep Creek C.P.
A 14 day field experience as a mentor with Woodcroft College in the Grampians,
Victoria.
It is also strongly recommended that you consider the following additional experiences:
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

A self-directed canoeing session


A senior first aid course with DECS approved BELS included;
A Mountain bike Intro session or a self-directed mountain bike ride
A 5 hour introduction to Rock climbing at Morialta Gorge(tbc); COST ~$30
A regular fitness/ cardio vascular session incorporating the carrying of a heavy
backpack (approx. 15 to 20 kg)

2.1. EQUIPMENT TUTORIAL


This tutorial is designed to assist you with information regarding minimum recommended
standards for equipment for novices. Information regarding equipment beyond the minimum
standard will also be provided.
The tutorial takes place at a local reputable outdoor equipment retailer, of which Adelaide is
blessed with many.
The tutorial has been provided free of charge by the retailer, with the retailer paying salaried
staff to conduct the tutorial. The tutor is likely to be a highly experienced outdoor expeditioner,
but may not be a professional outdoor educator.
Please:
Be on time allow at least 5 minutes prior to the start time
Be courteous
Take notes
Ask questions
Note: Tents and Stoves are tutorial topics, and will not be covered in any detail on the
equipment tutorial evening.
Topics include:
1.

Footwear for bushwalking:

Shoes versus boots; synthetic versus leather; lightweight versus heavy weight; cost versus
durability; low cost options for novices.
2.

Outer layer/shell clothing for bushwalking:

Bushwalking design versus specialist mountaineering or fashion; breathable versus nonbreathable fabrics; cost versus durability; lightweight versus durability; Waterproof and
windproof versus water resistant and wind resistant; low cost options for novices and cost
effective options for group hire.
3.

Outer layer clothing:

Properties of fleece fabrics versus wool, including thermal properties, weight, bulk, fire
retarding ability, cost, durability, warmth when wet; wind proofing, cost and flexibility. Properties
of nylons versus cotton, including properties when wet, UV resistance, cooling in hot weather,
durability and cost.
4.

Inner layer clothing:

Properties of polypropylene and other synthetics versus wool.


5.

Additional accessories:

Gloves, beanies, socks, sunglasses


6.

Clothing for kayaking and canoeing:

Paddling jackets, aquatic footwear, etc.


4

7.

Sleeping Bags:

Thermal properties for different conditions; down versus synthetic; high quality down versus
high feather content; cost versus weight and bulk; cost versus durability; care of sleeping bags;
thermal properties when wet; compression bags; minimum standards for novices in Adelaide
surrounds and lower Flinders ranges.
8.

Bushwalking rucsac:

Bushwalking rucsac versus travel rucsac; fitting a rucsac correctly; cost versus features;
weight; durability; waterproof ability; use of waterproof liners; male versus female rucsacs.
9.

Water proof bags:

Cost versus durability.


10.

Sleeping mats:

Closed cell foam versus self inflating foam filled mattresses; cost versus durability; weight and
size versus insulation.
11.

Accessories:

For consideration: eg torches; KFS sets; compass; maps; map case; gaiters; stuff bags; pocket
knives; GPS.
The Equipment Tutorials for 2015 will take place at:
Paddy Pallins
228 Rundle St. Adelaide 5.30 7.30 pm
Dates: Thursday 13th and 20th August

2.2. DAYWALK IN ADELAIDE HILLS


Assessment:
As part of your Outdoor Education portfolio, you will be required to produce a detailed
route plan.
This session is included within the course to achieve the following objectives:
Introduction to walking for longer distances;
Introduction to group management;
Navigation skill development, including introduction to Orienteering;
Introduction to planning and preparation for outdoor experiences;
Introduction to Environmental interpretation;
Introduction to emergency response;
Prepare for expedition and Basic Bushwalking Skills Assessment.
The daywalk will take place on the Monday 10th or Tuesday 18th August (Choice 1of 2),
Meeting at the Kuitpo Forest HQ carpark, Brookman Rd Kuitpo at 8.45am.
Personal Equipment for Daywalk:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Daypack with lunch, snacks and 2L water


Raincoat
Comfortable walking shoes or boots
Sunhat and warm hat
Fleece or woollen jumper
Sunscreen
Pen and paper
Personal medications such as asthma puffer

The leaders will bring:


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Maps and compasses


First Aid Kit
Mobile phone
Copy of your medical details
Emergency shelter/Tarp

The class may be split into smaller groups, each walking with a staff member.

2.3. THREE DAY/ TWO NIGHT WALK DEEP CREEK


An introduction to expeditioning in an outdoor education context. During this time you will be
carrying your own food, cooking equipment, tent and sleeping equipment for 2 nights and 3
days.
During this time you will receive further instruction in Navigation, camp-craft, group
management, emergency response and environmental education methodology.
You will be given an opportunity to lead in pairs under staff supervision for sections of the walk,
allowing you to practice group management strategies with your peers in preparation for group
leadership roles with dependants.
To promote greater learning about the natural environment you will be asked to present a
micro-tutorial, whereby each student researches an aspect of the natural environment and
throughout the walk attempts to engage the rest of the group in learning about this topic.
Each night there will be a debrief about what was learned about bushwalking, leadership,
camp skills and the environment.
The experience is intended to prepare you for your mentor role with the 14-day quest
experience.
Pre- Trip Organisation
Prior to your expedition, there are a number of tasks that need to be completed. These tasks
will be completed during the lecture and tutorial times immediately prior to the expedition.
These tasks are:

Clarify the list of participants

Create a list of phone numbers and email addresses to facilitate communication

Find out each others background and experience in outdoor field trips

Allocate roles as described

Allocate micro-tutorial topics

Allocate tent pairs or threes for meal plans and tent sharing

Route Card

Trip Intentions

Medical forms and summary sheet

Field Trip Pro-forma

Final menu plans

Clarify equipment needs etc.

Expedition Day 1
The following is a summarised guide to expedition timing, but there may be individual
differences for each trip.
The actual expeditions are for three days/two nights.
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Arrangements for collection of expedition equipment will be finalized prior to the date of the
camp.
On the day of departure, we meet at Flinders University, outside G building.
8.00 am:

Staff arrives.

8.30 am.

Students arrive. Loading gear, checking group, meeting leaders

9.00 am:

Checking and briefing by leaders

9.00-9.30:

Departure

Expedition Day 3
Return Time:
Approximately 4.00: Return to Flinders University. Return and clean personal and group
equipment. Vehicles cleaned.
4.15: Final debrief with leaders
4.30: Dismissal
Please note that this timetable is not guaranteed. A range of factors may impact on these
times (group overdue, vehicle breakdown, traffic, etc.) Please do not make plans that rely on
these return times.
Your group:
You will be in smaller groups of around 10 - 12, each with a different staff member.
Your role:
Whilst on the expedition, you will be camping in tents, and moving campsites each night. You
will take it in turns leading the group under supervision of the field supervisor who will
intervene as required to maximise student learning and to ensure safety of the group. You will
provide and cook your own meals.
The group will always travel only as fast as the slowest member, and routes will be changed to
accommodate individual group members should this be required.
Your Leader/Field Supervisors Role:
All Field Trip Supervisors have completed a Bachelor degree (most with education degrees),
have a minimum of Bushwalking Leadership Certificate (most with advanced certificate) and
will carry a mobile phone and group first aid kit.
Where possible they will meet with your group prior to expedition. At 8.30 am leaders will meet
their groups, checks plans and that all safety equipment is taken by students. The field trip
supervisor will outline expectations and clarify any organisational tasks that need to be done,
including leadership roles. The field trip supervisor will give feedback at the end of each day in
a debriefing session to leaders and group members, and will provide marks for group members
at the end of the expedition, based on the criteria in the appendix.

Emergency Contact:
During the expedition, students are asked not to turn on their mobile phones, and preferably to
leave them behind. Should there be an emergency, all details and emergency contact
information will be recorded in the Field Trip Pro-forma, that will be left with Campus Security
who can be contacted 24hours a day, as well as a nominated contact person ie: John
MacFarlane
Water:
6 litres of water should be carried.
Assessment:
As part of your Outdoor Education portfolio, you will be required to write a diary of the
expedition, including a route plan and route map, (approx 500 words). Students will also
receive verbal feedback during the course of the day.
The assessment is also based on skills and knowledge needed to be an effective assistant
leader on an outdoor education bushwalking expedition. In addition, students have the
opportunity to be assessed at Basic Bushwalking Skills level. This award, issued by
Bushwalking Leadership SA, can be obtained following submission of the appropriate
paperwork to BLSA. (Cost $10)
The assessment guidelines can be found in the topic outline.

Expedition Organisational Roles


The expeditions are planned by your group with advice and support from staff. You are
expected to take on at least one of these roles for the expedition.
Organisational Role

Details

1. Co-ordinators

Ensure all other roles are completed.

(2 people)

Ensure Expedition pro-forma is filled out and returned to course


coordinator.
Introduce supervisor and group if needed
Ensure Fieldwork & Safety Checklist is complete
Ensure all clean up tasks are completed

2. Transport

Prior to departure:

(Assist drivers with

Check oil, coolant, tyres, trailer lights & connections

Navigation etc)

Ensure each vehicle has vehicle first aid kit and tool kit.
Ensure all equipment is loaded and secured.
Fill vehicle at fuel stops and wash windscreen as needed.
Ensure head count correct at each stop.
Obtain travel map for the route taken and distribute to rest of
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group
Supervise vehicle cleaning at end of trip
3. Medicals and
Finance

Download medical form and distribute copies to all group


members
Collect medicals and collate information on field trip pro-forma
Attach completed medical sheets to field trip pro-forma
Check any payments required and ensure receipt number and
date paid are recorded in field trip pro-forma

4. Route Plan

Establish route for expedition.

(2 people)

Establish emergency exits for area.


Complete route card in field trip pro-forma

5. Emergency
procedures

Establish potential emergency exits. and emergency services


(eg phone)
Establish emergency plan(s) for the areas
Establish & check phone numbers and location of local
emergency services
Collate information in field trip proforma

6. Trip Intentions

Complete National Parks trip intentions form and attach to field


trip proforma

7. Equipment

Ensure group equipment collected and issued, including trowel,


maps, compasses, tool kit and first aid kits.
Ensure a First Aid Kit and appropriate phone are carried.
Assist with distribution and return of personal equipment as
required

8. Ecological footprint Assist with reducing ecological footprint by encouraging minimal


packaging, facilitating recycling, and collecting any recyclables
upon return to Flinders University.

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Micro-tutorials
As part of the practicum assessment on each field trip you are asked to present a micro-tutorial
to the rest of your expedition group.
Guidelines for micro-tutorial presentations:

independently research one aspect of the environment visited

prepare a summary sheet of approximately 500 words, plus references

Give a copy of this to your expedition tutor on the first day of the expedition

Send a copy of the summary sheet to each expedition member prior to the trip. Do
this electronically.

During the expedition, present a small tutorial on your topic. It is suggested that you choose
the teaching moment where possible. Your topic will have more relevance if presented when
there is an example of your topic to be seen. Be as creative as you like to engage other
members of the group in your topic!

Deep Creek Conservation Park


Astronomy
Aboriginal inhabitants before settlement
Aboriginal culture of area
Geology of the area
5 birds of the area
Tourism
Settlement history
5 Animals native to the area
Mining history of the area
Native plants of the area
Ferals; foxes, rabbits, cats, dogs ,etc
Camp Fire Games

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2.4 Optional Field Experiences


INTRODUCTION TO ROCKCLIMBING
Dates: 31st August and 1st September COST: $30.00 Instructor and equipment hire
This experience is to assist you with your mentor role at Quest.
The day will consist of an introduction to safe practice, safe belaying, rock climbing,
supervision of rock climbing, and an introduction to abseiling.
.Arrangements:
Students will need to meet at the top gate, Norton Summit Rd, Woodforde at 9.00am. There is
a bus up Magill Rd from the city contact Transport SA for stops and times.
You will need:

A day pack with the following:


Lunch and snacks
2L of water
Clothes suitable for physical activity for the conditions on the day
Sneakers or other sturdy footwear (non sandals)
Raincoat
Notepaper and pen
Personal medications
Small First Aid Kit

2.5. BASIC SKILLS MOUNTAIN BIKING Session


An introduction to Mountain Biking, covering riding in a group, safe handling, parts, use of
gears, basic repairs and negotiating challenging terrain.
When: 9th and 11th September
Time:

2.00 pm

Where: Woodcroft College, 143 -147 Bains Rd., Morphett Vale

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2.6. 14 DAY GRAMPIANS EXPEDITION


This unique experience places you in the role of a student mentor for the duration of
Woodcroft Colleges Year 9 Quest program.
More details about the program will be provided during the course, but the program includes
camping, orienteering, mountain biking, rock climbing, environmental learning and
bushwalking. It takes place in the Grampians, Victoria.
The dates of the expeditions are either:
Quest 1: Saturday 10 Friday 23 October
Quest 2: Saturday 24 October Friday 06 November
Quest 3: Saturday 07 Friday 20 November

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2.7. FIRST AID


It is highly recommended that you have a Senior First Aid Certificate, or at least the DECS
recognized Basic Emergency Life Support (BELS) First Aid.
On Quest, there will always be someone with Senior First Aid accessible, so it is not a
requirement, but is a recommendation for your future professional role that you have this.
The cost will be approx $140 if there are 12 or more students. The cost would be lower if there
were more than 12 students, coming to as low as $90 for 20 students. Be aware that you will
need to attend each of the 3 days from 9-4. See John MacFarlane for more information.

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3. Assessment Items
3.1. TUTORIAL PRESENTATION 10%
Guidelines
These topics are designed to prepare you for your expedition, as well as assist you with future leadership roles.
The tutorials will normally last 30-40 minutes, but must not exceed 50 minutes.
What to do:
1. Research your topic.
a. Refer to the textbook: Froude, C and Polley, S (2008) Outdoor Education: Foundations for Tertiary
and Secondary Education, Impact, Perth. This will have most of the essential body of knowledge.
b. Further places to research include
i. Victorian Bushwalking Leadership and Mountaincraft Training Advisory Board 2000,
Bushwalking and Ski Touring Leadership Handbook, Department of Sport and Recreation,
Victoria. (The previous edition Bushwalking and Mountaincraft Leadership Handbook (1978)
is quite adequate.)
ii. The outdoor education subject resource available on UniSAs library home page or on the
link http://www.library.unisa.edu.au/resources/subject/outdoor.asp may have additional
information
iii. The Flinders University library catalogue
iv. Journals and magazines such as Outdoor News; Journeys, Backpacker can prove useful
2. Consider the leadership and group management implications of your topic.
a. Discuss with each other based on your own prior experiences
b. Discuss with any teachers, leaders or experienced outdoor travellers that you might have contact with
c. Discuss with your tutor at least one week prior to your presentation
3. Prepare a session plan for your topic. This would normally include:
a. An outline of the topic
b. A list of the key learning outcomes for other students
c. An outline of the flow of the session from introduction, to development , to conclusion. There should
also be an evaluation of student learning such as an observation check list, quiz, mini-test or other.
Allocate the amount of time you will spend and who will be the principal presenter for each
component.
d. A list of any equipment that you need, and any bookings or checks that need to be done.
4. Prepare a summary sheet for your classmates. This would normally include:
a. A summary of the key aspects of the topic
b. A summary of the leadership and group management implications whilst in the field
c. Any diagrams that may be relevant
d. References.
e. A reference list for further information
5. One week (or more) prior to your presentation.
a. Meet with your tutor to discuss your presentation. Special note for Tent and Cooking tutorials:
You will need to meet with Wally at least one week prior to your presentation at a convenient
time to help you prepare for this tutorial
b. Check that any equipment that you need such as laptops, projectors, teaching aids, equipment, etc
are booked and available
c. Rehearse your presentation as a group
d. Finalise your tutorial session plan
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e. Finalise any notes, presentations or other tools that will assist you with your presentation
f. Arrange for copies of your tutorial plan for your tutor, and copies of your summary sheet for
your tutor and class mates
6. Immediately prior to your presentation
a. Collect any equipment that you have booked. Arrangements will be confirmed in the first week of the
course.
b. Arrange the class room or other area to allow full attention to your topic
c. Hand out a copy of your summary sheet to each person in the class and the tutor
d. Hand up a copy of your session plan to your tutor
7. Immediately following your presentation
a. Pack up your equipment and area
b. Meet briefly with your tutor to receive any immediate feedback on your presentation, and a guide to
your grading. Your final grade may well be moderated.

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Tutorial Topics
(Commences) Week 2:
Group A:

Minimal Impact Camping 1

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of minimal impact camping:

Toileting: appropriate procedures;

Menstruation: advice for menstruating women;

Hygiene: appropriate procedures for individuals and groups;

Cooking: minimal impact practices.

Possible teaching aids:


Video: Walk Softly
Video: Preparing for an Expedition

Group B:

Minimal Impact Camping 2

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of minimal impact camping:

Walking: minimising erosion;

Camping: minimising erosion and damage to flora and fauna;

Water: how to treat if contaminated

Sustainability issues: minimising use of non renewable resources such as plastic packaging;

Rubbish: accepted practices for disposal.

Possible teaching aids:


Video: Walk Safely
Video: Preparing for an Expedition

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Tutorial Topics (cont)

Week 3:
Group A:

Tents

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of the use of lightweight shelters.

Types: 2 season, 3 season and 4 season

Emergency shelters such as tent fly and tarp;

Applications: what each are suitable for;

Care: storage, field repairs;

Tent site: positioning of tents in relation to wind, trees, creeks, fires, etc;

Basic tent erection considerations, including peg placement, pole connection, fly tightness, use of
groundsheet

Possible teaching aids:


Video: Expedition Skills
Equipment to be collected prior to tutorial:
10 tents, including an example of each type of tent.
10 groundsheets.
1 x pole sleeve.
1 x roll of duct tape

Group B:

First Aid in the bush snake bite, insect bite and blisters

Learning outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of first aid response to snake bite, insect bite and blisters:

Snake bite how to prevent snake bite from occurring with a group in the bush

Snake bite treatment in the bush

Insect bite treatment in the bush

Blisters how to prevent blisters when bushwalking

Blisters how to treat blisters in the bush

Possible teaching aids:


Video: Expedition Skills.
Equipment to be collected prior to tutorial:
First aid kit
Roller bandages
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Tutorial Topics (cont)

Week 4:
Group A:

Hypothermia

Learning outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of prevention and care of a hypothermic victim on a field trip:

Body Temp: basic body temperature regulation information;

Mild Hypothermia: signs and symptoms;

Severe: signs and symptoms; Environment: situations likely to contribute to hypothermia; People: factors
contributing to hypothermia;

Emergency response for someone that is early stages of hypothermia;

Emergency response for someone that is advance stages of hypothermia.

Equipment to be collected prior to tutorial:


Sleeping bag
Tent
Groundsheet
Possible Teaching Aids:
Video Shiver
Video Expedition skills

Group B:

Hyperthermia/ Heat Stroke/ Heat Exhaustion

Learning outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of prevention and care of a hyperthermic victim on a field trip:

Body Temp: basic body temperature regulation;

Mild: signs and symptoms:

Severe: signs and symptoms;

Environment: situations likely to contribute to hyperthermia;

People: factors contributing to hyperthermia;

Management: group management considerations to prevent and treat hyperthermia.

Possible Teaching Aid:


Video Care and Prevention of Heat Injury

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Week 5:
Group A:

Cooking and Stoves (Note: No fires or stoves to be lit inside buildings)

A useful Resource: Henwood G 1999, Fuel stoves and their dangers, Outdoor News, Outdoor Educators'
Association South Australia Journal vol 3, 18, p.5.
Learning outcomes:

At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of
the following aspects of cooking with trangia stoves and fires on a field trip.
Stoves:
group safety and general considerations of Trangia stove;
Cooking fires: group safety and environmental considerations

Menus: food suggestions and menu planning

Equipment to be collected prior to tutorial:


6 Trangia stoves and 2 fuel bottles, matches
Fire blanket
Cleaning equipment
Students to supply:
Any examples of food to be cooked (eg 2 minute noodles or soup)
Possible teaching aids:
Video: Expedition skills

Group B:

Packing for Bushwalking

Learning outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of packing for a bushwalking expedition.

Types of backpacks and suggestions for groups.;

Packing principles for weight distribution, access and waterproofing;

Leaders additional items, such as first aid kit, communication, spares;

Ways of minimising weight;

Weight carrying capacity of young people, women and men.

Equipment to be collected prior to tutorial:


2 x Backpacks with sleeping bag, roll mat, rainjacket in each. In addition, tent, stove and fuel bottle to be divided
between the two.
Students to supply: Garbage bags, clothing, food for expedition, torch, etc as per recommended equipment list
Possible Teaching Aids:
Video Preparing for Expedition

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Tutorial Topics (cont)

Week 7:
Group A:

Hazards- Fires

Additional resource: http://www.cfs.org.au/


Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following aspects of the safe use of camp fires with a group, as well as the prevention of wildfire injury:

Fire uses: cooking, warmth, signal;

Lighting: in difficult conditions such as rain, snow;

Management: of dependants near fires;

Wildfires- conditions likely for a wildfire, physiological tolerances, basic first aid for burns;

Wildfire group management: what to do to prevent getting caught, what to do if caught.

Possible teaching aids:


Video Walk Safely

Group B:

Hazards- Lightning and River Crossings

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this tutorial students should be able to describe the leadership and management implications of the
following environmental hazards:
Lightning:

Environment: outline of conditions that cause lightning;

Impact of strike on environment and people;

Management: outline management of group in lightning storm.

River Crossings:

Environment: basic river hydrology;

Techniques: river crossing techniques singly and in groups;

Management: decision making whether to cross or not, management of group across river.

Possible teaching aids:


Video Expedition skills.
Video Rob Gells Weather
Video Kayak River Safety
Video Walk Safely

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Flinders University

Assessment feedback sheet

Outdoor Education

Key components of this assignment

Component
Mark / Grade

PLANNING- Lesson plan presented at start


Aims and outcomes clearly stated

10%

Methods of delivery outlined


Sequence and timing indicated
SYNOPSIS (500 words)
Presentation; spelling, grammar and formatting
Research

40%

Body of Knowledge
Diagrams (if appropriate)
Referencing within the text
Sources cited
PREPARATION
Organization of teaching area

10%

Use of props, eg, stoves, tents, etc if appropriate


Use of effective media
ORAL PRESENTATION
Positioning of presenters
Clear introduction

40%

Voice projection
Engagement of the audience
Use of innovation
Opportunities for questions/practice
Clear conclusion to the presentation
Summary comment

Assignment grade/mark

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Comment

3.2 Assessment Items Basic Bushwalking Skills 20%


The aim of this assessment is to:
Provide feedback on your expedition field skills;
Provide a framework for development of expedition skills;
Students may wish to apply for external recognition of their skills through the Basic Skills
Bushwalking certificate ($10 fee).

23

Flinders University
Outdoor Education

Assessment feedback

PRACTICAL EXPEDITION SKILLS:


STUDENTS NAME: DATE OF BIRTH: .
ADDRESS: . Post Code:
ASSESSOR: .. LOCATION: DATE:
Key components of this assignment

Component
Mark / Grade

Equipment for the activity; appropriate, properly


packed and waterproofed

10%

Basic Navigation; orient map, identify key


features on map and in the field, grid references

20%

Basic Emergency Response; immediate first aid,


ongoing care, evacuation/assistance plans
Walking competence
Basic Safety Knowledge; snake/spider bites,
avoiding hypo/hyperthermia, getting lost/separated
Minimal Impact Practice; litter, protection of
flora/fauna, protection of water quality, toileting,
washing and cleaning

10%

Catering; food selection, packing and preparation

10%

Camp-craft Skills; site selection, setting up a tent,


cooking, cleaning up, packing

10%

Organisational Roles: (Group Mark)

10%

See course handbook for details of roles


Group Behaviours; participation, support,
communication, peer assistance, group roles,
maintenance roles
Micro Tutorial; presentation at appropriate time
and place, group formation, quality of information

20%

Leadership Behaviours; goal setting, briefings,


delegation, communication, monitoring group,
monitoring environment, appropriate styles.

10%

Summary comment

Assignment grade/mark

24

Comment

PLANNING SHEET: Deep Creek C.P.


Destination
Course
Departure date
Staff supervisor

Activity
Course Coordinator
Return date
Staff supervisor phone

GROUP LIST
(FULL) NAME

Email

Phone

Org. Role
Staff member
Coordinator

Micro-tute

Student Coordinators
Complete group table above
Ensure that Medical forms completed by all and attached to Field Trip Proforma
Field Trip Proforma completed and copied three times
Route card for each day including evacuation procedure
Photocopy of map with campsites and route highlighted
Risk assessment completed
National Parks and Wildlife (DENR) trip Intentions form completed
Retain 1 copy of the proforma and submit 1 copy each to the course coordinator and trip supervisor

Name:____________________Signed:___________________Date:_________

Course coordinator
Checked field trip Proforma
Land managers contacted
Field trip supervisor contacted and briefed

Name:____________________Signed:___________________Date:_________

25

Field Trip Supervisor


Re-check Proforma
Check medicals and medication needs
Checked leaders kit (first aid, compasses, maps, trowel)
Check vehicle kit (first aid, toolkit, cargo net if required)
Checked student safety items (raincoat, suncare, warm clothes, water, etc.)
Issued individual equipment items as requested
Checked communication and return arrangements
Mark sheets obtained (if applicable)

Name:____________________Signed:___________________Date:_________
**** ONE COPY OF PROFORMA GIVEN TO SECURITY OFFICE and/or UNIVERSITY CONTACT PRIOR TO
DEPARTURE
**** SECOND COPY, WITH THIS PLANNING SHEET AND MEDICAL FORMS GIVEN TO FIELD TRIP
SUPERVISOR, BUSHWALK LEADER

26

3.3

Assessment Items - Outdoor Education Portfolio 20%

The aim of this portfolio is to:


Develop an Outdoor Education resource to support future teaching;
Provide evidence of skill and knowledge development in outdoor education;
Assessment is based on presentation, organisation, research, referencing, feedback and
innovation.
The Portfolio is a collection of all of the assessments and resources for the course. Required
contents of the portfolio are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Tutorial personal
Other tutorial presentation notes
Route plans: Day walk and Deep Creek bush walk
Day walk evaluation
Bushwalk evaluation
Lecture notes and Readings (including catch up notes for missed sessions)
Micro tutorial Deep Creek bush walk
Additional resources
Soap Note

Grade

High
Distinction

Number of the 9 Journal


requirements included in the
folder.
9

Descriptors

All required contents


Productive and discerning approach to accessing and
organising information about Outdoor Education.

Distinction

Credit

7-8

High degree of initiative shown in collection of


extensive resources
All required contents
Systematic and considered approach to accessing and
organising information about Outdoor Education
Most required contents
Considered approach to accessing and organising
information about Outdoor Education

P1

5-6

Some required contents


Generally organised approach to accessing and
organising information about Outdoor Education.

P2

4-5

Bare minimum of required contents


Limited approach to accessing and organising
information about Outdoor Education.

27

Fail

Below 4

Insufficient level of required contents


Incomplete
Isolated attempt to access and organise information
about Outdoor Education.

3.4

Assessment Items Quest performance and Camp Evaluation

Your performance will be assessed, using a combination of a self and


academic assessment. This will be a subjective grade based upon your
efforts during Quest. (30% of the final grade)
It will include written examples of feedback from Woodcroft staff and
students, about your performance.
This grade will reflect upon your performance in a number of areas:
Leadership / Role modelling
Punctuality/ Organisation-Self/Group
Navigation
Maintaining discipline / appropriate relations with staff, students and fellow mentors
Debriefings
Community Spirit (contributing to the wellbeing of the entire camp, assisting staff, students and other mentors)

Camp Evaluation: (2000 words max) 20%


This component focuses on the purpose, programming, learning outcomes and teaching methodology
used on the Quest program
The aim is to evaluate these aspects, some possible questions to consider:
What are the key philosophical principles of the camp, did the camp reinforce these principles?
Did the program support the stated learning outcomes?
Did teaching methods used by staff support the stated learning outcomes?
Are there alternatives?
What aspects of the camp worked well and what aspects did not?
Evaluate the camp from safety, efficiency and hygiene perspectives?

28

29

SOAP NOTE INCIDENT FORM


(YOU MUST FILL IN THIS FORM FOR AN ACCIDENT THAT HAS CAUSED INJURY OR WHERE CONDITIONS REQUIRE MEDICATION OR
ONGOING TREATMENT)

NAME DATE
SUMMARY- Emergency Services Contact Information
We require an ambulance. My name is We are a school
group. Our location is....................................... ( grid reference)
.
(description of location e.g. road name,near etc.)
We have a casualty who is a ..year old male/female whose Chief Compliant is:
.
.
(symptom)
The patient states/witnesses state: (Mechanism of injury/History of present illness) O,P,Q,R,S,T
.
.
.
OBSERVATIONS patient found (describe position). Patient exam reveals (describe injury). Vital Signs at (time). SAMPLE
Patient Exam
...................
.................................................................................................................................................................
.
Vital Signs
NORMAL
1
2
3
4
5
TIME
AOX4
LOC
50-100bpm
HR
12-20
RR
PINK/WARM/DRY
SCTM
37 deg
TEMP
HISTORY
Symptoms
Allergies
Medications..
Pertinent medical history
Last intake/output
Events
ASSESSMENT (Problem list)

PLAN (Plan for each problem on assessment sheet).

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS.
30

HLPE 3532 Outdoor Education


Portfolio: Due October 26th. (20% of final grade)
Name ....................................
Portfolio Component
+/
-

Presentation/Organizatio
n

20
%

Lecture Notes/Readings

10
%

Tutorials(1000words)

10
%

Day Walk/Route plans

10
%

Reflection(250words)

Deep Creek/Trip Proforma


Route Plan & Map
Menu Plans
Micro Tutorial(500 words)
Reflection(500 words)

Comment

20
%

Soap Note

5%

Deep Creek/ Practical assessment

20
%

Additional Resources

5%

Total
31

Tutorials and the Deep Creek Bush walk performance are assessed
as part of your overall mark and as a component of the portfolio.

32

HLPE 3532 Introduction to Outdoor Education: Final Assessment


Portfolio Final Report 20% Quest Performance30% and Evaluation 20%

Name ....................................
Assessment Component A,B,C,D,E

Mark

Tutorial Presentation (1000 words)

=10% of total
grade

Day walk: Route plan& Map

10% of
Portfolio

Reflection(250 words)

Bushwalking Performance
Deep Creek including Micro tutorial presentation

=20% of total
grade

Deep Creek: Trip Performa

20% of
Portfolio

Reflection (500 words)


Route plan & Map
Menu Plan
Micro tutorial handout & info page (500 words)

C
C

10% of
Portfolio

Additional Resources, debriefing tools, games


,equipment manuals, etc
Lecture Notes/Readings/Tutorial presentations

20% of
Portfolio

(including catch up notes for missed


sessions)
C

SOAP Note

10% of
Portfolio

Presentation/Organization of Portfolio

30% of
Portfolio

Final Result O.E. Portfolio

=20% of Total
Grade

Quest Performance evaluation of student

=30% of total
grade

performance/includes staff and self-assessment


D

Quest Journal, Final journey route plan

NGP

Quest Feedback (examples included)

NGP

Quest Camp Report (2000 words max)

=20% of total
grade

Final Grade

= 100%

Tutorials, Bushwalks, Portfolio, Quest performance


and evaluation

33

Comments

PROFORMA
OUTDOOR EDUCATION FIELD TRIPS:
This form must be completed for all multi-day Outdoor Education field trips. The form is to be by reviewed by the
Field Trip Supervisor and a copy lodged with John MacFarlane/ Russell Brown prior to trip departure.

Destination: Deep Creek Cons. Park

Activity: Bushwalking/Overnight camping

Departure Date: 21st Sept 2015

Return Date: 23rd Sept 2015

Departure Time: 8.45 am

Return Time: 4.00pm

Course Coordinator: Russell Brown

Course: HLPE 3532

Student Coordinator
Field Trip Supervisor: Walter Olenich/Dave Rawson/Dan Coletti
Description of Field Trip

PARTICIPANT INFORMATION
List all participants, including staff and visitors
Name
*Relevant medical
information

Emergency contact
person/next of kin

*confidential medical information: please advise course coordinator directly.

CONTACT PERSON: to be notified after safe return, or in emergency situations.

Name

Number
34

Phone number

EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTACTS


In the case of an emergency, list possible field contacts:
FACILITY
LOCATION
Hospital
Police
National Parks/Forest
HQ
School contact
Sturt Gymnasium
John MacFarlane
Other

CONTACT (phone)

82013392

Other

OVERNIGHT LOCATIONS AND DATES: Map used: ______________


Location description

Grid
Reference

Date

Start at:
Camp site night 1
Camp site night 2
Camp site night 3
Finish at:

COMMUNICATION DETAILS
Group
Group 1

Role
Field Trip Supervisor

Name

Mobile Number

Other
Group 2

Field Trip Supervisor


Other

Group 3

Field Trip Supervisor


Other

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Field trip supervisor to turn phone on from 8pm-9pm whilst in camp


Field trip supervisor to turn phone on from 12.00 pm on the last day
Other (student) phones not to be used unless emergency
No contact to be made unless emergency
Mobile phones not to be relied upon
Notification of any incidents to school contact (as per page 2) to be done as soon as practical
following management of event.

35

Route Planning Sheet (Route Card):


Group:

1 sheet for each day

Area:

Dates:

Day:

Activity

_______

Field trip supervisor: ________________________Student coordinator:________________


Prepared by:_______________________________________________________________
Map [s]:

_________________________________________

Stage

Objective

Bearing

(describe)

(grid ref)

(initial)

km

height
+ or -

time for
stage

E. T. A

Terrain/Remarks

Start

+
totals

Evacuation and phone range routes:


1.

2.

3.

Time Calculations (Naismiths Rule): For novices: 3-4km/hr for easy terrain; 2-3 km/hr for light scrub; 1-2 km/hr for
heavy scrub, scrambling. Add 1 hour for every + 500m, 1 hour for every - 1000m.
36

Equipment List for 3 Day Expedition


Items for both canoeing and bushwalking; personal
sleeping bag with hood rated at least 0 degrees
2 shirts with collars and long sleeves
underwear and socks
2 wool or fleece jumpers
1 pair long pants recommend thermals
woollen or fleece beanie
legionnaires hat or broad brimmed hat with
cord
sunglasses with strap
sunscreen and lip screen
sleeping mat
japara or similar raincoat
torch with spare batteries
water bottles for at least 2L
wine cask [s] for extra water
personal first aid and medications
pencil and notebook
toiletries toothbrush, paste, comb
pocket knife, spoon, fork
bowl, cup
small amount of money
thermal top
Items suitable for bushwalking- per pair/3
tent/ flysheet
groundsheet
stove
fuel bottle
tea towel, small detergent, scourer
map photocopy
compass will be supplied on the expedition
cord 10m
repair tape
toilet trowel and paper
matches and lighter

OK

Whistle
Items suitable for bushwalking expedition
rucsac
walking boots or sturdy sandshoes
leg gaiters (optional
water 4L for Deep Creek,
Optional items
spare pair track shoes
woollen or fleece gloves
waterproof pants
camera
cards
thermal bottom
small radio for weather
candle
vhf/uhf radio or mobile phone
book to read
wine cask for collecting water at camp
small sewing kit
GPS
Things to leave behind
cigarettes
non prescription drugs
electronic games
inflated egos
alcohol
mobile phone (1 per gp for emergencies only)
Walkman/ipod

37

OK

Menu Plan
Day One
Breakfast

Day Two

Day Three

At Home

Lunch

Dinner

At Home

Snacks

Drinks

Suggestions:
Breakfasts: Cereals, muesli with powdered milk, porridge, muffins with spreads such as jam, peanut butter, fresh
fruit.
Lunch: Pitta bread, crackers, rice slices topped with cream cheese, cheese, sliced meat, metwurst, tuna, tomato,
lettuce, alfalfa, capsicum, spreads, and fresh fruit
Dinners: Pasta, Rice or Noodle dishes. Enhanced with dehydrated vegetables and fresh vegetables, saveloys,
spices, sauces. Deserts of cheesecake, jelly, rice pudding, chocolate mousse, cookies. Can be supplemented
with cup a soups or two minute noodles.
Snacks: dried fruit, fruit cake, scroggin/gorp(- a mixture of dried fruit, nuts, seeds, lollies, chocolate)
Drinks: Chocolait, Milo, drinking chocolate, tea, coffee, cup a soup, Tang

38

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REGISTER: HLPE 3532


Student: _____________________________________________________
Student Id: ___________________________________________________
Use numbers to indicate your preference. (1=first preference, 2= next preference, etc)
Please place a number in all the boxes provided. All efforts will be made to give you your first preference, but
logistics may prevent doing so in some cases.

Equipment Tutorial Paddy Pallins 5.30-7.30pm (Compulsory) choose 1 of 2


Thurs 13th August
Thurs 20st August

Day walk August (Compulsory) choose 1 of 2


Mon 10th August
Tues 18th August

Mountain biking (optional)


9th September
11th September

Expedition (Bushwalking Camp Deep Creek - Compulsory)


Monday 21st to Wednesday 23rd September

Sept First Aid Course TBA September including BELS (optional)


Optional (self-directed)

Introduction to Rock-climbing Sept (optional) COST $30 choose 1 of 2


Mon 31st August
Tues 1st September

Quest Options
#1, Saturday 10th Friday 23rd October
#2, Saturday 24th October Friday 6th November
#3, Saturday 7th November Friday 20th November

39

FLINDERS UNIVERSITY - PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDIES

OUTDOOR EDUCATION STUDENT CONSENT FORM


The information requested on the student consent form and health information sheets will be considered
confidential by the University and will be treated accordingly. The information is sought in order to protect and
assist the student so that the activity may be a safe and enjoyable experience. Please attach extra sheets if
required and contact the Topic Coordinator to discuss any student health problems.
Any information given will not prevent students from taking part in outdoor education activities unless further
medical advice warrants exclusion.

CONSENT:
I agree to delegate authority to the Outdoor Education staff and instructors and to take whatever action they deem
necessary to ensure the safety, well-being and successful conduct of the students as a group, or individually in
any of the activities associated with this topic; realising that there are degrees of risk of personal injury associated
with most outdoor activities.
I also authorise the staff and instructors to obtain medical assistance which they deem necessary should an
accident occur and agree to pay all medical and dental expenses incurred.
I have attached the health information sheet and include details of limitations which I have for the activities
concerned. I further legally authorise qualified medical practitioners to administer an anaesthetic or carry out
necessary surgical procedures if such an eventuality arises. I give my consent for my local doctor or medical
specialist to be contacted in an emergency.
The information given is accurate to the best of my knowledge.
(PLEASE WRITE ALL INFORMATION CLEARLY & LEGIABLY PARTICULARLY EMERGENCY CONTACT
NUMBERS)
Date: _____________ Signed: _____________________________
Student

Contact No: ____________________________

EMERGENCY CONTACTS:

PARENT OR GUARDIAN
Address
Home Telephone No.

Work Telephone No.

Alternative No.

Work Telephone No.

Alternative No.

Work Telephone No.

Alternative No.

FAMILY DOCTOR OR MEDICAL CLINIC


Address
Home Telephone No.

MEDICAL SPECIALIST (if relevant)


Address
Home Telephone No.

40

OTHER INFORMATION:

Can you confidently swim 100m?

Y/N;

If Y evidence of capacity:

Passed Flinders University S&W/S Survival Swim test? . Y / N, or

Other evidence

Do you have dietary requirements? Y / N

If yes, what are they?:


______________________________________________________________________________
List any sport, recreation or outdoor education qualifications and/or skills you have:
___________________________________________________________________________

41

FLINDERS UNIVERSITY - PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDIES

GIVEN NAMES:

SURNAME:
STUDENT HEALTH INFORMATION

MEDICAL CONDITIONS
Does the student have any medical conditions or health problems?
NO
[ ]
If you have answered YES, please provide details:

YES

YES

DETAILS:

Are you aware of any medical emergency which could occur?


NO
[ ]
If you have answered YES, please give details:
Precautions to avoid
emergency
How to recognise
emergency
Emergency treatment
required

MEDICATION
Does the student take any prescribed medication (including inhalers)?
[ ]
If you have answered YES, please give details:
Medication Name

Dose

When taken

How taken

YES

Any side effects

Has the student received a complete course of Tetanus Toxoid


immunisation?
YES
[ ]
NO
[ ]
Check details with you doctor if uncertain. Date of last booster .............

MEDICARE/HEALTH FUND
If the student is a member of any private medical benefit fund, give details:
Fund Name

Benefit Tables

Membership No.

If the student is covered by an ambulance subscription, give family subscription number.

42

NO

RB:jh/23 July 2012


Outdoor Education Student Consent & Health Information Forms

43

Indemnity/Information Regarding Risk in this Course:

Name:__________________________________________ Date of Birth_________________


For the following activity: HLPE 3532 INTRO to OUTDOOR EDUCATION on dates: JULY 2015 until DECEMBER
2015
I[name] _____________________________understand that although all possible care is taken, Flinders
University cannot accept responsibility for cancellations, loss or damage of equipment, accidents that may occur
as a result of the field trip[s]. I accept responsibility for my own actions and decision to take part in this activity. I
have completed pre-exercise screening or have gained clearance from my doctor to participate in physical activity
or I acknowledge that I have chosen to forego pre-exercise screening against the advice of the School of
Education. I understand that the activities involved have an element of risk to person and property, and although
every effort is taken to minimise this risk I accept that there is a possibility of harm occurring.

Signed: _____________________________________date:_____________________

44

Participant Safety on Field Trips


To be completed by the supervisor/leader and all other participants
As a participant on a field trip you are asked to READ, UNDERSTAND, SIGN and RETURN the bottom part of
this form (in accordance with requirements of the OHS &W Act, 1986). Whilst participating in the field trip you
must carry your personal ID, hat, sunscreen, medications, insect repellent and take food and drink
provisions as required.
The following guidelines are for your personal safety. Failure to comply with reasonable instructions may result in
you not being permitted to participate in the remainder of the field trip.
1. Obey all reasonable directions from field trip leader. All boating operations require that you heed instruction
and direction of the boat operator, and all diving instructions from the dive leader.
2. Wear appropriate clothing for prevailing weather conditions (sturdy, enclosed footwear is required).
3. Stay clear of hazardous areas or dangerous locations (eg cliff edges, mine shafts, quarry faces and open slopes).
4. Behave in an orderly manner at all times.
5. Respect the property of others at all times such as that of landowners and places where you are accommodated.
6. Do not leave your group without notifying the field trip leader of your intended movements in time and place.
7. The consumption of alcohol or other drugs is forbidden in all formal University activities.
8. Firearms, spring or gas powered spears, unauthorised explosives and other weapons are not permitted on
any field trip.
9. All participants are expected to assist in housekeeping duties as directed by the field trip supervisor.
10. University insurance , see http://ehlt.flinders.edu.au/archaeology/department/facilities/Field-Trips/EHLTFieldTrip_FlindersGuidelines.doc
-------------------Tear along here and return the completed form to the Field Trip leader --------------------I have read, understood and agree to the conditions of this field trip. I agree that I will not intentionally cause
any concern regarding my own health and safety or that of others on the field trip.
I hereby give permission for medical treatment to be administered to me in the event of an emergency.
Name: (BLOCK CAPITALS):
Sign:

Mobile

Date:

If you are under 18 years old, your care-giver also needs to sign the form, below.
Sign:

Date:

Medical condition: Please advise if you suffer from any known medical conditions, including allergies which may
affect your health or safety on any field exercise, and if you will be taking any medications during any activities, as
follows:
Medication:
In the event of any emergency please contact the following person: (Next of kin)
Name:

Contact No:

This is a confidential form.


For the duration of the field trip/s this document will be held by the nominated contact person in the University.
Valid from: JULY 2014

To: DECEMBER 2014

45