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Recognize, interpret,
and validate that the
creative process builds
on the development of
ideas through a
process of inquiry,
discovery, and research

Visual arts
learning involves
analyzing the
formal and
sensory qualities
of art

We taught formal qualities of foreground, middle ground,
background, and light direction for the painting lesson. We
also taught form in the sculpture lesson. Additionally, we
talked a lot about functionality in their designed world. For
instance, what do humans need to survive? We had the
students come up with required functional components that
had to be shown in their final paintings, and their
transportation sculptures had to be functional in that
environment.

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Critique personal work
and the work of others
with informed criteria

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Specific methods
of planning
support the
development of
intended
meaning

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Create works of art that
articulate more
sophisticated ideas,
feelings, emotions, and
points of view about art
and design through an
expanded use of media
and technologies

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Explain, demonstrate,
and interpret a range of
purposes of art and
design, recognizing that
the making and study of
art and design can be
approached from a
variety of viewpoints,
intelligences, and
perspectives

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Use artistic
media and
expression to
communicate
personal and
objective points
of view

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Viewers and
patrons make
personal
meaning and
infer artistic intent

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We addressed the reflection in planning by leading the
students through many steps of ideation. They began by
listing of roughly sketching anything that came to mind for
designing a new habitable world. After that, they explored
multiple views of their world from different levels of distance,
and finally created a full color rough draft of their final painting
composition. They remained fully engaged and excited
throughout this entire process. Furthermore, we had a quick
in-progress self-critique and led a detailed final critique in
which the students wrote answers to several worksheet
questions about their work, then answered four of these or a
video interview conducted by a peer partner. We have
discussed the quality of artist examples shown, and plan to
critique the work of other students for the final sculpture
product.

Our subject matter focused on designing a unique, habitable
world, as well as showing its food, water, atmosphere, and
shelter in the painting and creating a new form of
transportation for it in the sculpture lesson. All of these
considerations pushed students to communicate their own
personal points of view about what makes a planet enjoyable
and interesting to live in. They also enhanced their
sophistication and awareness of different artistic points of view
through seeing and discussing the wide range of variety in
their peers’ work. They developed an understanding that
artistic intent and decisions are impacted by everyone’s
unique background, values and perspective.
Our consideration of function in this unit is a universal and
transferable understanding. Students built on their ability to
consider problem-solving in hypothetical and real situations
with their paintings and sculptures respectively. They also
engaged and persisted by creating ideation for their paintings
for three class periods and working on their final paintings for
another three classes. Additionally, students created their own
personal meaning by applying their interests and values to
making decisions about what to include in their own ideal
habitable world. We helped them practice inferring artistic
intent by asking about the artists’ intent in the examples we
showed. They gained a solid universal understanding that
artists gravitate towards making art about what they like, as
well as about the things that they know well or have
experience with.