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Program of Studies 2010-11

Program of Studies 2010-11

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INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................................................. 1 DISCRIMINATION/HARASSMENT (Chapter 76S.5) ..................................................................................................... 1 MISSION STATEMENT.................................................................................................................................................... 1 FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING ............................................................. 2 ACCREDITATION............................................................................................................................................................. 2 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM ......................................................................................................................... 3 ADVANCEMENT .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 COURSE SELECTION GUIDELINES .............................................................................................................................. 4 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (AMENDED STARTING DURING THE 2009-2010 YEAR)................................ 5 GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) CALCULATION...................................................................................................... 5 GUIDANCE SERVICES .................................................................................................................................................... 7 HIGHER EDUCATION ADMISSIONS STANDARDS: COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS...................... 7 HOMEWORK ..................................................................................................................................................................... 7 HONOR ROLL ................................................................................................................................................................... 7 INDEPENDENT STUDY ................................................................................................................................................... 8 TECHNOLOGY & WRITING CENTER ........................................................................................................................... 8 MARKING SYSTEM ......................................................................................................................................................... 8 ON-LINE ACCESS TO GRADES...................................................................................................................................... 9 PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................................................. 9 POLICY ON ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES...................................................................................................... 9 REPORT CARDS ............................................................................................................................................................. 10 SUMMER SCHOOL......................................................................................................................................................... 10 TESTING PROGRAMS—COLLEGE ............................................................................................................................. 10 2010-2011 COLLEGE BOARD and ACT TEST DATES:............................................................................................... 11 COURSE OF STUDY LISTINGS ...................................................................................................................................... 11 COURSE OF STUDY: COLLEGE BOUND SUGGESTED SEQUENCE...................................................................... 17 COURSE OF STUDY: CAREER BOUND SUGGESTED SEQUENCE ........................................................................ 17 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 18 ART DEPARTMENT ....................................................................................................................................................... 18 THEATRE DEPARTMENT ............................................................................................................................................. 26 BUSINESS DEPARTMENT ............................................................................................................................................ 27 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT .............................................................................................................................................. 30 FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE ......................................................................................................................... 34 FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT....................................................................................................................... 35 MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT .................................................................................................................................. 42 MUSIC PROGRAM.......................................................................................................................................................... 51 PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH PROMOTION DEPARTMENT................................................................. 56 SCIENCE DEPARTMENT............................................................................................................................................... 58 SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT................................................................................................................................ 65 FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL ONLINE COURSES ........................................................................................................ 69 SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT....................................................................................................................... 71 FRANKLIN ARTS ACADEMY....................................................................................................................................... 73 SENIOR PROJECT........................................................................................................................................................... 75 COURSE OF STUDY: GRADES 9-12 SELECTION CHECKLIST ............................................................................... 75 THE EARLY ENROLLMENT PROGRAM .................................................................................................................... 75 QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING YOUR SCHEDULE .................................................................... 76

Franklin High School Program of Studies

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INTRODUCTION
FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL 218 Oak Street Franklin, Massachusetts 02038-1895 (508) 541-2100 Fax (508) 541-2107 SCHOOL COMMITTEE Mr. Jeffrey N. Roy, Chairman Ms. Paula Mullen, Vice Chair Mr. Ed Cafasso Ms. Cynthia Douglas Mr. William Glynn Ms. Sue Rohrbach Ms. Roberta Trahan

DISCRIMINATION/HARASSMENT (Chapter 76S.5) The Franklin Public School Department is committed to equal educational opportunity for all students and members of the school community without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or handicap in all aspects of employment and education, and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or handicap in admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities. The members of the school community include the School Committee, administration, staff, students, and volunteers working in the schools while they work and study subject to school authorities. The Franklin Public School Department is also committed to maintaining a school environment free of harassment based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, or handicap. The Franklin Public School Department expects all members of the school community to conduct themselves in an appropriate and professional manner with concern for the students. Harassment on the basis of sex, color, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, and handicap in any form will not be tolerated. Such harassment includes unsolicited remarks, gestures or physical contact, display or circulation of written materials or pictures derogatory to either gender or to racial, ethnic, religious, age, sexual orientation or handicapped individuals or groups. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Sally Winslow, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Franklin Public Schools, 355 East Central Street, Franklin, MA 02038. Telephone: (508) 541-5243. Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, J.W. McCormack Building, Rm. 222, Boston, MA 02109-4557.

MISSION STATEMENT Franklin High School exists as a covenant among students, parents, staff, and community. This collaboration promotes a rigorous, safe, and nurturing environment in which students are responsible and passionate learners. In an atmosphere of equality, acceptance, and respect, students prepare to contribute to our democratic society and an interdependent world.

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FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING ACADEMIC: In order for Franklin High School students to become responsible and passionate learners, we expect them to be able to: 1. Communicate effectively through a. Listening b. Speaking c. Writing d. A variety of media and techniques e. Creating and performing Read critically with understanding Analyze and solve problems effectively by a. Identifying, clarifying and describing issues/problems b. Locating, organizing and processing information from various sources c. Utilizing thinking skills and reasoning strategies d. Creating, testing and justifying solutions and conclusions Make interdisciplinary connections through a. Observing and understanding connections within and between disciplines b. Articulating and demonstrating these connections

2. 3.

4.

5. Demonstrate knowledge and skills to promote the health, safety and well-being of oneself and others SOCIAL AND CIVIC: In order to help prepare our students to be contributors to our democratic society and an interdependent world, we expect them to: 1. Have respect for themselves and others 2. Be open-minded and compassionate 3. Make informed decisions and accept responsibility for them 4. Be involved in school and community activities 5. Develop and cultivate knowledge of their physical, emotional, and social well-being 6. Utilize effective problem solving strategies to resolve social and emotional issues 7. Be responsible citizens 8. Be ambassadors of the school and community To ensure that all students meet the school-wide expectations for student learning, each academic department at Franklin High School has identified those expectations most closely aligned with its curriculum and has taken primary responsibility or supporting focus for those expectations. Each department in which every student is enrolled takes primary responsibility for two or more expectations. Elective departments that do not service all students have identified certain expectations as focus areas. In some cases, more than one department has responsibility for a given expectation. For each academic expectation listed here, the departments with primary responsibility or supporting focus are identified. ACCREDITATION Franklin High School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of instructional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every
February 18, 2010 Page 2 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution. Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the administrative staff of the school.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM The Advanced Placement (AP) program, which is administered by the College Board, consists of college-level courses and exams for high school students. AP exams are scored on a range from 1 to 5. Scores of 3 or higher often qualify the student for college credit or advanced courses. Since its inception in 1955, the AP Program has been remarkably successful, and many students have earned college credit or placement in advanced courses. The AP Program at Franklin High School includes the following courses: English Literature and Composition, Spanish Language, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Calculus, Statistics, U.S. History, European History, Economics, Studio Art, Music Theory, Government and Politics. Franklin students have also taken the AP Psychology exam. All students who elect an Advanced Placement course are required to take the AP exam or a teacher-developed final exam of equal rigor in May. The cost of the exam is approximately $90. Examination fees are waived for students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.

ADVANCEMENT Grade placement is based upon the number of previously earned credits. To be promoted at the end of the school year, a student must have earned the following number of credits for the grade and school year:

INFORMATION ON CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR CLASSES OF 2011, 2012, 2013 & 2014 Due to changes in the school’s graduation requirements implemented during the 2009-2010 school year, students entering grades 10-12 will be required to meet the following amended credit requirements for graduation:

Class of 2011

Graduation Credits 115 Credits

Grade

Credits Taken

Cumulative Credits

Required for Promotion

9 10 11 12 Class of 2012, 2013, 2014 114 Credits

35 35 34-36 33-36

35 70 104-106 137-142

25 50 85 118

9 10 11 12

35 34-36 34-36 33-36

35 69-71 103-107 134-143

25 49 87 120

Due to changes in health and physical education requirements, not all students are required to carry the maximum credit load (36) per year. As such, a range of credit requirements is published as a general reference.

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COURSE SELECTION GUIDELINES Courses are offered according to four criteria: instructional pace, content, classroom activities, and assignments outside the classroom. These criteria must be considered when courses are selected: Advanced Placement (AP) These courses are formally recognized as Advanced Placement (AP) courses by the College Board. AP courses are collegelevel courses with standardized exams. These courses provide opportunities for students to earn advanced placement and/ or credit at college. Honors (H) These courses offer highly challenging content, presented at an accelerated and more intensive pace than the typical college preparatory courses taken by a majority of four-year college-bound students. They require advanced reading, writing, verbal, conceptual, and mathematical ability, as well as extensive outside preparation. Open Honors (OH) The Open Honors designation indicates that the class is grouped heterogeneously and that all students, through an individual contract with the teacher and based upon their level of performance in the course, have the opportunity to earn “Honors” credit in the course. Students enter into the contract with the teacher at the beginning of the year. Students who successfully complete the “Honors” requirements of the course will earn “Honors” credit. Students who either do not enter into an “Honors” contract or do not meet the requirements for “Honors” credit will receive “College Preparatory” credit toward their grade point average. College Preparatory (CP) These courses include courses designed to prepare students to continue their education. They may require well-developed reading, writing, verbal, conceptual, mathematical, and study abilities, as well as substantial outside preparation. • • • • A FINAL GRADE OF “C” MUST BE EARNED TO REMAIN IN AN HONORS COURSE. A FINAL GRADE OF “B+” MUST BE EARNED TO ADVANCE FROM A COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE TO AN HONORS COURSE. A STUDENT NOT MEETING THESE REQUIREMENTS MAY REQUEST CONSIDERATION BASED ON ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SUCH AS END OF YEAR GRADES. A FINAL GRADE OF “B+” MUST BE EARNED TO ADVANCE FROM AN HONORS COURSE TO AN ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE. THE CURRENT TEACHER’S RECOMMENDATION IS ALSO REQUIRED.

The best course of study for an individual student is one that is within reach, yet stretches the student’s abilities to the fullest, satisfies the student’s needs and interests, and meets the objectives of a long-range educational or vocational plan. The course of study selected for each student must be approved by parents and the guidance counselor. It is important to make the best possible choice of subjects at this time, as changes are difficult to make once the scheduling process has been finalized. Special Note to All Students and Parents: Every attempt will be made to satisfy student requests for courses. However, budgetary constraints, staffing, availability, course enrollment, and master schedule flexibility are factors in the scheduling process. A student’s final course selections may have to be altered after final grades are issued in June.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (AMENDED STARTING DURING THE 2009-2010 YEAR) (SUBJECT TO CHANGE, DEPENDENT UPON FUNDING AND SCHEDULE DEVELOPMENT) Required Subjects and Credits: English Mathematics (not to include Computer Programming) Science (6 credits, Biology; 18 credits, other sciences) Social Studies (6 credits World History Grade 9, 6 credits US History I Grade 10, 6 credits US History II Grade 11) Sequence: Foreign Language, Business, Fine Arts, Home Economics or Industrial Arts Health Education Electives

24 credits 24 credits* 24 credits* 18 credits

10 credits 100 credits 3.0 credits 17.5 credits 120 credits

*Denotes credit requirements beginning with the Class of 2011. The Class of 2010 requirements are 18 credits each of Math and Science. Notes: 1. All graduation credits must be earned in grades 9-12. 2. Partial credit will not be given for courses that are not completed. 3. Determination and acceptance of transfer credits is at the discretion of the principal. Transfer credits must have been earned at accredited schools.

CREDIT HOURS PER COURSE Beginning with the 2009-2010 school year, credits will be awarded for courses based on the following: 6.0 Credits: 5.0 Credits: 3.0 Credits: 2.5 Credits: .5 Credits: Full Year Courses that meet 6 days in a six day cycle (167 hours) Full Year Courses that meet 5 days in a six day cycle (139 hours) Semester Courses that meet 6 days in a six cycle day (83.5 hours) Semester Courses that meet 5 days in a six day cycle (69.5 hours) Semester Courses t hat meet 1 day in a six day cycle (14 hours)

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) CALCULATION

Beginning in the 2009-10 School Year, Grade Point Average (GPA) is tabulated according to utilization of a 5 point weighting system. This system is consistent with the requirements of colleges and universities for the method of reporting student GPA for the application process and is in compliance with the Massachusetts Board of Regents guidelines for computing weighted grade point average. Courses at Franklin High School are grouped in four levels and will be given differing weights in the computation of grade point average according to the chart below. The previously used

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GPA table is presented first for the purposes of comparison and conversion of Grade Point Averages. Table 1 shows previously used GPA calculations and Table 2 shows the NEW system.
Table 1. PREVIOUS GPA TABLE (PRIOR TO 09-10) AP H CP S A+ 17.50 16.00 13.00 10.00 A 16.50 16.00 12.00 9.00 A15.50 14.00 11.00 8.00 B+ 14.50 13.00 10.00 7.00 B 13.50 12.00 9.00 6.00 B13.00 11.00 8.00 6.00 C+ 11.50 10.00 7.00 4.00 C 10.50 9.00 6.00 3.00 C9.50 8.00 6.00 2.00 D+ 8.50 7.00 4.00 1.00 D 8.50 7.00 4.00 1.00 D8.50 7.00 4.00 1.00 F 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Table 2. CURRENT GPA TABLE (EFFECTIVE 09-10) AP H CP S A+ 6.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 A 6.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 A4.67 4.17 3.67 3.17 B+ 4.33 3.83 3.33 2.83 B 4.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 B3.67 3.17 2.67 2.17 C+ 3.33 2.83 2.33 1.83 C 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.50 C2.67 2.17 1.67 1.17 D+ 2.33 1.83 1.33 0.83 D 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 D1.67 1.17 0.67 0.17 F 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Weighted Grade Point Average (GPA) is determined by the weighting of marks received in each subject according to the degree of difficulty of the subject. Academic subjects are designated as Advanced Placement (AP), Honors (H), College Preparatory (CP), and Standard (S). Rank in class is based on courses in Grades 9-12 only. Rank in class is calculated using the following formula: GPA = course credits X weighted grade = weighted score in each course. The sum of the weighted scores for all courses is then divided the total number of credits earned during the student’s career. NOTE 1. All scheduled classes with a curriculum will be applied to GPA. 2. Two semester courses will be combined to equal one year-long class. 3. Independent study will not be applied to class rank. REPORTING OF STUDENT GRADE DISTRIBUTION: 1. 2. 3. A weighted GPA will be computed and will include all courses with a prepared curriculum. A student distribution by decile will be developed, based on six semesters of grades. It will be distributed with the student’s transcript and school profile. Valedictorian and Salutatorian determination will be based on Weighted GPA.

TRANSFER STUDENTS/RANK IN CLASS 1. Only courses designated as honors or the equivalent thereof at the student’s former school will be classified as honors courses for class rank at Franklin High School. The high school administration will interpret the appropriateness of a course designation. 2. To receive credit toward class rank at Franklin High School equaling that of the student’s former school, the course at the student’s former school must have equivalent hours and designation. 3. Only courses credited in the curricula at Franklin High School will be considered in class rank. 4. Students must complete two full years at Franklin High School to be considered in class rank. 5. In fairness to transfer students completing less than two years at Franklin High School, an approximation of class rank will be sent to colleges, and a letter from the student’s guidance counselor will accompany the transcript for explanation.

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GUIDANCE SERVICES Students have a primary role in determining what type of education they will seek. Students are expected to discuss their course selections with parents and teachers. In making their course selection, students will also consult with their guidance counselors. Counselors will help students assess their strengths, weaknesses, and goals and will explain course alternatives to students. With the help of parents, teachers, and counselors, students are responsible for their course selections. In addition to helping students with their course selections, counselors also help them make personal choices and decisions about careers and post secondary education. The Guidance Department offers group programs on College Board tests, college and career planning, and financial aid. Special evening programs on these topics are offered to parents as well. A high school orientation series is offered to freshmen.

HIGHER EDUCATION ADMISSIONS STANDARDS: COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS The Massachusetts State Colleges and University of Massachusetts campuses have adopted the following standards for admission. Course Requirements: The 16 required college preparatory courses are: English: 4 years Foreign Language: 2 years of a single language Mathematics: 3 years (Algebra I & II, Geometry) Sciences: 3 years (2 years with laboratory) Social Science: 3 years (2 years of U.S. History) Electives: 2 years (from subjects listed above or from Arts and Humanities and/or Computer Sciences) Grade Point Requirements: A minimum grade point average (GPA) required in college preparatory courses is: State Colleges – 3.0 State Universities – 3.33 Grade point averages are calculated based on grades earned in college preparatory courses. Each state college or University of Massachusetts campus to which a student applies will calculate his/her GPA for purposes of applying the admissions standards. If an applicant's GPA falls below the required minimum GPA, a sliding scale will apply. See your guidance counselor for more information. Test Requirements: Either Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Test (ACT) is required.

HOMEWORK Homework is an essential element of a student’s educational progress. Homework develops mastery of skills and material covered in class and effectively promotes independence, creativity, and self-discipline. Student achievement rises significantly when teachers consistently assign homework and students conscientiously apply themselves to its completion. Teachers regularly assign homework activities that are directly related to classroom work. Parents help the educational progress of their children when they provide a suitable atmosphere for doing homework in the home, check each day to see that it is done, and provide assistance and advice as needed. HONOR ROLL The honor roll is published four times a year shortly after the conclusion of each of the four marking periods. Honors classifications are: High Honors – No grade below A Honors – No grade below B-

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INDEPENDENT STUDY The administration and faculty believe that the curriculum offered is of sufficient depth and variety that independent study by individual students is rarely necessary. However, in those few cases where independent study is necessary, the following rules will apply: 1. Student must present his/her reasons for the need of an independent study course to the guidance counselor. 2. After the need has been documented, the student will be referred to the respective department director or administrator, who will determine if the department has the curricular capabilities for that independent study. 3. The student will apply to an appropriate staff member* to assume the responsibilities of the independent study. 4. Final approval of the independent study is reserved for the principal. *No teacher is required to teach an independent study. Requirements for Accreditation of Independent Study: 1. The independent study must follow the course of study as outlined by the independent study teacher with the approval of the department director or administrator. 2. It is expected that students will meet with the independent study teacher no less than twice weekly; one meeting will be a full class period. 3. A course outline must be submitted to the department director or administrator. 4. Copies of all projects and reports will be kept on file with the department director or administrator. 5. Independent study will not be applied to class rank or GPA. TECHNOLOGY & WRITING CENTER The Technology & Writing Center has a significant collection of approximately 29,000 items. This collection provides the personal, informational, instructional, cultural, and recreational needs of both students and teachers. In addition to books, the Technology & Writing Center has a collection of audio books, DVDs, videocassettes, CD-ROM programs, periodicals and three daily newspapers. The equipment that students may borrow includes 200 Netbook computers, digital cameras, two digital video cameras, four LCD projectors, and a computer laptop. The library also provides access to a variety of different databases available online from the Metrowest Regional Library System of which the high school library is a member. There are 30 student computers, which are used for research and two stand-alone lookup stations, from which students can access the library’s online catalog. The Technology & Writing Center is open before and after school for study and the Technology & Writing Center staff is available to answer questions and help in finding what is needed. The Technology & Writing Center’s web page has a reference question page that is available 24/7 for anyone needing answers to questions about school projects. Return emails can be expected in 24 hours, excluding holidays and weekends. Students are given an orientation to the Technology & Writing Center services during their freshman year. At the teacher’s request, research skills are taught when a project is assigned. This approach gives students information they can use immediately and retain. Research skills are useful in all subject areas and this method works best for students. Netbook computers are loaned for one school day and may be borrowed for overnight usage. Most books are loaned for a three week period and may be renewed once as long as no one has reserved them. Back issues of magazines may be borrowed for one week. Reference books, including encyclopedias, may be borrowed overnight and are due the next school day before the first period begins. If a book is not returned after the third overdue notice, sign-out privileges may be revoked until the book is returned, or paid for. Technology Center Hours: 6:45a.m. – 4:45p.m. MARKING SYSTEM Marks are the fundamental way we communicate with students and parents about students’ progress in reaching their educational goals. It is imperative that, as a school community, we have a common understanding about our marking system. Marks are a measure of the level of mastery that a student has achieved in a subject. Within the policies and guidelines of the school system and the school, teachers are charged with the responsibility of grading students. Marks must

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be fair and accurate and based upon a school-wide set of criteria. Marks must include but are not limited to the following data: a. Classroom participation b. Homework c. Special projects and reports d. Tests and quizzes e. Portfolios, journals, exhibitions f. Special requirements in departments such as physical education, art, and music Teachers decide what proportion of the mark each component of the marking system will have. It is very important that teachers communicate their marking system to students and thus to the parents at the beginning of the marking term so there will be no misunderstanding about the expectations of the teacher in the course. The following are school-wide aspects of marking that are part of every teacher’s marking system: a. Marks measure mastery of subject matter in a course and not just a good faith attempt to achieve that mastery. b. Students must pass at least two quarters to be eligible for summer school. ON-LINE ACCESS TO GRADES Parents and students will receive activation codes which provide on-line access to grades. This information is updated weekly and families are encouraged to check progress regularly. PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS Franklin High School recognizes that regular physical activity is important for all students. As such and consistent with Massachusetts General Laws, the school requires four years of physical education for all students in grades 9-12. Franklin High School has developed three pathways by which students may meet the physical education requirement: 1. 2. 3. Through participation in the school physical education classes once per cycle for two semesters per year. Through participation on one of the school’s athletic teams (SUBJECT TO ELIGIBILITY POLICIES). Through participation in an outside of school organized physical activity or activities totaling more than 30 hours in a school year, including those listed in the Pathways description or other activities that may be proposed by students, that receive prior administrative approval. In order to meet the requirements for approval, the proposed program must have a strong instructional component.

Students will select a pathway as part of the course selection process. Students who select Pathway 2 or 3 must complete and return the Pathways selection form along with a detailed description of the activity on the first day of school in order to gain final approval. Any student who fails to return the completed form will be enrolled in Pathway 1. Students electing option 1 will be scheduled into a physical education class once per cycle opposite a five (5) credit course. Students electing options 2 or 3 may either participate in a directed study opposite a five (5) credit course, or elect additional six (6) credit courses. If a student elects to participate in the school’s physical education pathway, the student must have elected at least one five (5) credit course.

POLICY ON ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES Students are discouraged from changing courses at any time. Only under extenuating circumstances should any request be made. If a student is granted permission for a course change, the following actions will be enforced: 1. The course will be deleted from the student’s record if that change occurs prior to the mid-term of the first quarter of the course. 2. A course that is dropped after the mid-term of the first quarter of the course will be recorded as either Withdrawn/Pass (WP) or Withdrawn/Fail (WF), depending upon the student’s current academic status for that course. 3. Any student who adds a course will be responsible for all work assigned prior to the schedule change. 4. The date for adding or dropping courses is the 21st school day, or on the 21st day of the second semester for courses that only meet during that semester.

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REPORT CARDS Report cards are issued four times during the school year. They are the official record of students’ achievement and attendance. The symbols used on the card are as follows: A B C D F I WP WF M Excellent Very Good Fair Poor Failing Incomplete Withdrawn/Pass – No Credit Withdrawn/Fail – No Credit Medical Excuse from Physical Education – No Credit

Grades are issued in alphabetical form. The numeric conversion is as follows: A+ 97-100 C 73-76 A 93-96 C70-72 A90-92 D+ 67-69 B+ 87-89 D 63-66 B 83-86 D60-62 B80-82 F Below 60 C+ 77-79 Attendance: The number of absences each term in each class appears on the report card in the column marked QTRAB. This includes all excused and unexcused absences. Consistent attendance is essential for success in all academic endeavors. (Refer to Student Handbook for School Attendance Policy.)

SUMMER SCHOOL Franklin students may earn credit during summer school provided that: in a year course, the student has passed two quarters and has a final average of 50 or higher; in a semester course, the student has passed one quarter. In special circumstances a student may appeal this policy with the principal. A summer school course taken for make-up credit is treated as a fifth term in determining the final grade for the course. A withdrawal from any course during the academic year will disqualify the student from earning credit in summer school. The administration reserves the right to waive these requirements upon consideration of extenuating circumstances. Students may take a course in summer school to improve their grade provided the course is taught at the same level. There are no honors courses offered in summer school. Summer school credits for courses that were passed but are being repeated for a better grade do not constitute additional credit toward the diploma or toward athletic eligibility requirements. TESTING PROGRAMS—COLLEGE Booklets describing the following testing programs are available in the guidance office: • PSAT/NMSQT—Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. • ATP—Admission Testing Program includes the SAT I: Reasoning Test and SAT II: Subject Tests. The SAT I is a measure of general developed aptitude. SAT II measures how much a student has learned in a particular subject. • AP Exams—Advanced Placement Examinations. Depending on scores, colleges may exempt a student from courses. Courses that are exempted may also count as credit toward a degree. • ACT—American College Testing Program is widely used west of the Mississippi. Some colleges require it, and others will accept either it or the SAT I and II.

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Junior Year The PSAT/NMSQT is administered in October. Though it can be taken by sophomores for practice, it is primarily for juniors. Because it predicts with some accuracy what score a student is likely to have later in the SATs, the PSAT helps the student, the counselor, and the parents select an appropriate group of colleges to which the student could apply in his/her senior year. Juniors who have sufficiently high scores on the PSAT become semi-finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program. The Franklin High School Guidance Department recommends that students take the SAT I in either May or June of their junior year. If a student is planning to apply to a college in the fall of the senior year under the Early Decision or Early Action Program, he/she should consider taking one SAT II by the end of the junior year. The SAT II that is most commonly taken by juniors is US History. Students are encouraged to discuss these exams with their guidance counselor. Senior Year Seniors are encouraged to take the SAT I in November for the second time. If required by colleges, the SAT II can be taken in December or January. AP tests may be taken in May. 2010-2011 COLLEGE BOARD and ACT TEST DATES: October 9, 2010 October 16, 2010 October 23, 2010 November 6, 2010 December 4, 2010 January 22, 2011 March 12, 2011 May 7, 2011 June 4, 2011 June 11, 2011 SAT I, SAT II PSAT ACT SAT I, SAT II SAT I, SAT II SAT I, SAT II SAT I, SAT II SAT I, SAT II SAT I, SAT II ACT

COURSE OF STUDY LISTINGS
COURSE OF STUDY LISTINGS 9-12 ART Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12
Franklin High School Program of Studies

Course Intro. To Art Intro. To Art – Part II Drawing Painting & Printmaking Ceramics Sculpture Advanced 3D Art Graphic Design I Graphic Design II Digital Photography Mural Making Art History Arts Studio Art in the Community

Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Credits 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5

Level H, CP H, CP H, CP H, CP H, CP H, CP H H/CP H H H, CP H Open H CP
February 18, 2010 Page 11 of 76.

11, 12 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12

Portfolio Preparation Studio Art/AP Intro. To CAD Architectural Drafting Engineering Drawing Computer Aided Drafting Video Production I Video Production II Film Production

6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

6 6 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5

H AP CP CP CP CP CP CP CP

THEATRE Grade 9, 10, 11 10 ,11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 Course Theatre Arts I Theatre Arts II Theatre Arts III Technical Theatre Arts Management Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 5 Credits 2.5 5 5 5 5 Level CP CP CP CP CP

BUSINESS Grade 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11 12 11, 12 Course Desktop Publishing Web Page Design I Web Page Design II Accounting I Accounting II Business Management Economics Entrepreneurship Marketing Education I Marketing Education II Yearbook/School Publication Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Credits 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Level CP CP CP H/CP H CP CP CP CP CP H

ENGLISH Grade 9 10 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
February 18, 2010 Page 12 of 76

Course English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12 AP English 12 Essential Writing & Literacy Skills for College Art of the Film Developing College Research Skills Folk & Fairytale Literature The Gothic Tradition Psychological Literature Sports & Popular Culture

Periods per cycle 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Credit 6 6 6 6 3 6 3 6 3 3 3 3

Level H/CP H/CP H/CP AP H/CP CP OH OH OH OH OH OH
Franklin High School Program of Studies

10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12

Creative Writing Journalism Public Speaking

6 6 6

3 3 3

OH OH OH

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE Grade 9, 10, 11 10, 11, 12 12 11, 12 Course Child Development I Child Development II Independent Living Intro. to Developmental Disabilities Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 Credit 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Level CP CP CP CP

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 12 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 12 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 Course French I French II French III French IV/AP Language French IV French V/AP Language French V Spanish I Spanish II Spanish III Spanish IV/AP Language Spanish IV Spanish V/AP Language Spanish V Latin I Latin II Latin III Latin IV Latin V Bailes y Música de Paises Hispanos Word Etymology Greek and Roman Mythology Periods per cycle 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Credit 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 3 3 Level CP H/CP H/CP AP H/CP AP H/CP CP H/CP H/CP AP H/CP AP H/CP CP H/CP H/CP H/CP H CP CP CP

MATHEMATICS Grade 10 9 11, 12 12 12 Course Concepts in Algebra and Geometry Algebra I Algebra IIA Algebra IIB Mathematical Modeling with Applications Periods per cycle 6 6 6 6 6 Credit 6 6 6 6 6 Level CP H/CP CP CP CP

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 13 of 76.

9, 10, 11 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12

Geometry Algebra II Pre-Calculus Calculus AB Calculus BC Calculus Discrete Mathematics CP Applied Mathematics Statistics Statistics Computer Science I Computer Science II Computer Science AP Geometry in Art and Architecture Linear Algebra History of Mathematics Trigonometry Game Development in Java

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 6 6 3 3 6 3 6 3 3 3

H/CP H/CP H/CP AP AP H/CP CP CP AP H/CP H H AP CP H CP CP H

MUSIC PROGRAM Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9 9 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Chorus Chamber Choir Concert Band Wind Ensemble Jazz Band Jazz Ensemble II String Orchestra Full Orchestra Music Theory AP Music Theory I Jazz Improvisation Music Theater Workshop American Popular Music & Society Recording Techniques I Recording Techniques II Freshman Band Honors Freshman Band College Prep Pop Idol Workshop Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Credit 5 5 5 5 2 2 5 1 6 5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 5 5 2.5 Level H/CP H H/CP H H CP H/CP H/CP AP CP CP CP CP CP CP H CP CP

PHYSICAL/HEALTH EDUCATION Grade 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 9 11, 12
February 18, 2010 Page 14 of 76

Course Team Sports I and II Speed and Strength Lifetime Activities Group Exercise Health Promotion Leadership and Wellness

Periods per cycle 5 5 5 5 5 5

Credit 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5

Level

Franklin High School Program of Studies

11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12

Enhancing Sport and Athletic Performance Food and Fitness Leadership in Action

5 5 5

2.5 2.5 2.5

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Grade Course Periods per cycle 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Credit Level

9 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 12 11, 12

Biology Geology Oceanography Meteorology Astronomy History of the Universe Ecology Land Use Pollution: Sources, Treatment and Prevention Alternative Energy & Conservation Chemistry Chemistry in the Community I Chemistry in the Community II Introduction to Forensic Science Physics Wave Physics Electricity and Magnetism Comparative Anatomy & Physiology Human Anatomy & Physiology Behavioral Science Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics AP Environmental Science AP

6 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 6 3 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

H/CP CP CP CP CP H CP CP CP CP H/CP CP CP CP H/CP CP CP H CP CP AP AP AP AP

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT Grade 9 11 11, 12 11, 12 10 11 11, 12 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12
Franklin High School Program of Studies

Course World History II United States History II American Society through Film Psychology II United States History I United States History/AP Psychology I Economics/AP European History/AP Contemporary Issues Sociology

Periods per cycle

Credits 6 6 3 6 6 6 3 6 6 3 3

Level H/CP H/CP Open H H H/CP AP Open Honors AP AP H/CP Open Honors
February 18, 2010 Page 15 of 76.

10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 12

U.S. Government and Politics Street Law America’s Longest War AP Psychology

6 3 3 6

AP CP CP AP

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL ONLINE COURSES

Grade 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12

Course Journalism Graphic Design II Spanish I Introduction to Forensic Science Astronomy Cult of Personality Game Development in Java Geometry in Art and Architecture

Periods per cycle

Credits 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3

Level CP H CP CP CP CP H CP

FRANKLIN ARTS ACADEMY

Grade 10-12 11 11

Course Creative Literacy Humanities (English 11 and History 11) Mathematics and Science III

Periods per cycle

Credits 6 12 12

Level Open Honors Open Honors Open Honors

SENIOR PROJECT

Grade 12 12

Course Senior Project Externship Senior Project Seminar

Periods per cycle 6 5

Credits 9 1.25

Level CP CP

February 18, 2010 Page 16 of 76

Franklin High School Program of Studies

COURSE OF STUDY: COLLEGE BOUND SUGGESTED SEQUENCE

GRADE 9 Course: 1. English 9 2. Foreign Language 3. Mathematics 4. Biology 5. World History 6. Elective* 7. Health Education and Physical Education GRADE 11 Course: 1. English 11 2. Foreign Language 3. Mathematics 4. Science 5. US History II 6. Elective* 7. Physical Education or Pathway

Level: H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP

GRADE 10 Course: 1. English 10 2. Foreign Language 3. Mathematics 4. Science 5. US History I 6. Elective* 7. Physical Education or Pathway

Level: H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP H or CP

Level: H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP H or CP

GRADE 12 Course: 1. English 12/Elective 2. Foreign Language 3. Mathematics 4. Science 5. Social Studies 6. Elective* 7. Physical Education or Pathway

Level: AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP AP, H or CP

*An elective can be a course offered in any department. It is usually selected primarily out of student interest.

COURSE OF STUDY: CAREER BOUND SUGGESTED SEQUENCE

GRADE 9 Level: Course: 1. English 9 CP 2. Foreign Language CP 3. Mathematics CP 4. Biology CP 5. World History CP 6. Elective* CP 7. Physical Education or Pathway GRADE 11 Level: Course: 1. English 11 CP 2. Mathematics CP 3. Science CP 4. US History II CP 5. Elective* CP 6. Elective* CP 7. Physical Education or Pathway

GRADE 10 Course: Level: 1. English 10 CP 2. Foreign Language CP 3. Mathematics CP 4. Biology CP 5. US History I CP 6. Elective* CP 7. Physical Education or Pathway GRADE 12 Course: Level: 1. English 12/Elective CP 2. Mathematics CP 3. Science CP 4. Social Studies CP 5. Elective* CP 6. Elective* CP 7. Physical Education or Pathway

*An elective can be a course offered in any department. It is usually selected primarily out of student interest.

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 17 of 76.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Students can select from a variety of courses at Franklin High school. The following is a listing of every course offered, as well as a listing of prerequisites that may be required prior to enrolling in a course.

ART DEPARTMENT The Art Department offers a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional courses at three academic levels — College Preparatory (CP), Honors (H), and Advanced Placement (AP). These courses support students’ skill development and encourage their exploration of new ways to solve visual problems. In addition, by providing positive experiences with art materials and processes, the art courses help students build self-confidence and a sense of personal identity. Emphasis on the observational, analytical, and interpretive skills necessary for creating art helps students to look at their own work with a critical eye and gain understanding of the function of art in our culture and throughout history. This approach connects with the Massachusetts Art Frameworks. Introduction to Art I: 1701 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Exploration of Visual Ideas & Media Semester 2.5 Credits Introduction to Art: Exploration of Visual Ideas & Media is a semester course that introduces students to a variety of media. Students will explore many diverse art techniques and approaches as ways of communicating their ideas. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include all of the elements and principles of art; formalism, realism and abstraction; aesthetics and color theory. Projects will include drawing, painting, collage, sculpture, and mixed-media, with emphasis on critical thinking, craftsmanship, and presentation of artwork. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook and study specific artists, cultures, and art historical movements. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all the assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists, and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. This semester course serves as a prerequisite for all other art courses. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Introduction to Art I: 1702 Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Exploration of Visual Ideas & Media Semester 2.5 Credits This course is for more advanced art students who are beginning their high school studies, yet have excelled in art prior to this introductory level course. In addition to the above information, students taking Introduction to Art at the honors level will also be required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual/group projects and presentations). Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of homework assignments, and a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists, and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Introduction to Art Part II is a course geared for students who wish to continue using a wide variety of art media. As in Introduction to Art, students will explore many diverse art techniques and approaches to communicate their ideas. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include all of the elements and principles of art; formalism, realism and abstraction; aesthetics and color theory. With an emphasis on work in series, projects will include drawing, painting, collage, sculpture, and mixed-media, with emphasis on critical thinking, craftsmanship, and presentation of artwork. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook and study specific artists, cultures, and art historical movements. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for
February 18, 2010 Page 18 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Introduction to Art – Part II

1703

all the assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art Please Note: It is not required that students take this course immediately following Introduction to Art. This course may be taken at any point beyond the Introduction to Art prerequisite. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Introduction to Art –Part II Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits In addition to the above information, students taking Introduction to Art Part II at the honors level will also be required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual/group projects and presentations). This course is for more advanced art students who are beginning their high school studies, yet have excelled in the prerequisite Introduction to Art course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of homework assignments, and a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists, and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art Please Note: It is not required that students take this course immediately following Introduction to Art. This course may be taken at any point beyond the Introduction to Art prerequisite. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Drawing is a semester course in which students will explore a broad range of approaches to art through sketching and formal drawing techniques. Students will learn to draw from both observation and imagination. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include contour drawings, black and white value studies, color theory, still life, portraits, figure drawing, plus alternative approaches which encourage the constant creative process of art making. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook and study specific artists, cultures, and art historical movements. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 credits In addition to the above information, students taking Drawing at the honors level will also be required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual/group projects and presentations). Students will also complete a series of finished drawings that share a common theme. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of homework assignments, and a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art. See the first few pages of this document for standards related to honors courses. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Drawing: Exploration of Two Dimensional Media 1712 Drawing: Exploration of Two Dimensional Media 1711 1704

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 19 of 76.

Painting & Printmaking

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Painting and Printmaking is a semester course in which students will explore diverse techniques and approaches to art through paints, monoprints, collographs, linoleum block prints, dry point, and many other methods. Students will work in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, learning how paintings and prints can have both textural and sculptural qualities that extend beyond the flat page or canvas. The development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary is emphasized as students create artwork which begins in the sketching and drawing stages, then progress into final paintings and prints, presentation of prints and bookmaking. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook and study specific artists, cultures, and art historical movements. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art & Drawing This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits In addition to the above information, students taking Painting & Printmaking at the honors level will also be required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual/group projects and presentations). Students will also complete a series of finished paintings and/or prints that share a common theme. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of weekly homework assignments, and keeping a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art & Drawing This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Painting & Printmaking 1714

1713

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Ceramics is a semester course in which students will explore a broad range of techniques and approaches to art through hand built and wheel thrown clay. Students will learn to approach ceramic artworks as both functional and decorative sculptural objects. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include scoring, slipping, hand building (slab, coil and pinch techniques), wheelthrowing, tiles, bisque firing, painting, underglazing and glazing, plus the endless alternative possibilities involved with clay. Students are also required to keep a personal sketchbook and study specific artists, cultures, and art historical movements. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D

Ceramics

1715

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits In addition to the above information, students taking Ceramics at the honors level are also required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual projects and presentations). Students will also complete a series of ceramic pieces that share a common theme. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of weekly homework assignments, and keeping a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the required criteria given for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the work of other artists and
February 18, 2010 Page 20 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Ceramics

1716

approach each art process with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Sculpture is an intermediate course for students who enjoy working with clay, plaster, wood, wire, and mixed media. The course concentrates on developing technical skills and artistic appreciation of successful three-dimensional artwork. Studio projects will be tied to discussion of art historical topics and/or uses of art in modern societies. Lessons will include studio work and class discussions in which students are required to participate. They are also required to write about their work and to do homework. Students should bring with them some understanding of the elements and principles of art and other concepts fundamental to art-making, which will be further developed. Students will use a variety of methods, including assemblage, casting, carving, and modeling. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits In addition to the above information, students taking Sculpture at the honors level will also be required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual/group projects and presentations). Students will also complete a series of 3-dimensional pieces that share a common theme. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of weekly homework assignments, and keeping a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Advanced 3D is designed for highly motivated students who are committed to continuing their 3-dimensional artistic pursuits. In addition to the above information, students taking advanced sculpture will develop a concentration, a thematic body of work, while expanding their knowledge of materials and process. Students will work independently, relying on critical thinking, problem solving, and exploration to create their own expressive work. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of weekly homework assignments, and a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art, plus Ceramics CP/H or Sculpture CP/H This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1E, 1D, 3C, 3D Honors/College Prep Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Graphic Design is a semester course in which students will focus on the elements and principles of design to create various graphic artworks. Use of The Adobe Creative Suite will be central in the design of all assignments. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 21 of 76.

Sculpture

1717

Sculpture

1718

Advanced 3D Art

1724

Graphic Design I

1732

positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3E Honors Grade 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Photography is essentially the study of light. In this honors level art course, students will learn to use the camera as an art tool. They will learn what it takes to make a good photograph not just a simple snapshot. They will think about what they see, and they will learn to design strong photographs. Communication of ideas and expression of feelings through photographic images will be covered. Students will learn about famous photographers and analyze the work they see as well as create written reflections on their own photographs. Students will use digital cameras as well as experiment with alternative processes of making art with photographs. Students will learn and use Adobe Photoshop to create and manipulate digital images. Students are required to participate in class discussions, work collaboratively, and spend a substantial amount of time working on out-of-school projects. Students are also required to be able to manage many different projects at the same time. Creativity, strong design, critical thinking, good craftsmanship, and conveying meaning through art are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Art and one other class This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3E College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Mural Making is an advanced class designed for students who wish to improve their art skills and leave their mark on Franklin High School. Students do concentrated work in drawing and painting as well as work in teams to design and create murals for the school. They will learn how to develop their ideas into public art as they improve technical skills and teamwork. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. A consistent willingness to work collaboratively is especially important in this course. Students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Painting & Printmaking This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3C Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits In addition to the above information, students taking Mural Making at the honors level are also required to complete weekly homework assignments and pursue all materials and processes with greater depth and focus (including research, technology, individual projects and presentations). Students will also complete a series of ceramic pieces that share a common theme. This course is for more advanced art students who have excelled in art prior to this course. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, completion of weekly homework assignments, and keeping a personal sketchbook are all included in the grading process. A consistent willingness to work collaboratively is especially important in this course. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and keep a personal sketchbook. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Painting & Printmaking This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3C Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Art History is open to students interested in learning about the integral role art has played throughout the history of our world. Books, slides, digital images, and prints of master artworks will be shared with students so that they may develop a stronger understanding of the visual history of our world. Students will be required to read and write with clarity. No previous art experience is required, although this course will emphasize art media covered through other art department
February 18, 2010 Page 22 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Digital Photography

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Mural Making

1720

Mural Making

1721

Art History

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courses in order to help students make deeper connections between art-making and art analysis. Connections to other art courses may include animation, ceramics, community arts, design, digital art, drawing, mural-making, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. Students will create at least one hands-on assignment in this course. Creativity, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and weekly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. A consistent willingness to work collaboratively is especially important in this course and some projects may require time beyond the regular school day. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 3B, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 2, 3C, 3D Open Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits The Open Arts Studio is a semester based course designed to give the visual art, music, architecture, theater, and video student an opportunity to work interdependently and independently on skills and projects of their own design. Each student will be assessed at the beginning of the course to see where his/her strengths and needs lie, as well as what his/her future goals are. An Individual Arts Education Plan will be created for each student to help further his/her personal artistic goals. Students will be required to submit monthly progress reports in the form of a portfolio to be critiqued by the instructor. There will also be a final exhibition serving as a cultural production for the community. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, and completion of weekly homework assignments are included in the grading process. In order to succeed in the class, students must meet the expected criteria for all assignments, be prepared to question and critique their own work, make necessary revisions, and approach each art process with an open mind and a positive attitude. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Art in the Community is for students interested in learning about the integral role art plays in their school and community. Students will explore and research how businesses and service organizations use art and the careers available to artists through contact with local companies, community groups, and artists. Students will create projects for our school and community through collaborations with FHS clubs and Franklin community groups outside of the school itself. As a culminating project, students are required to initiate their own art-based community service activities which might include teaching younger children or senior citizens, creating art works for a school or community based fund raiser, or designing informational materials such as logos, pamphlets, and/or posters for a local organization. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. A consistent willingness to work collaboratively is especially important in this course and some projects may require time beyond the regular school day. Prerequisite: Successful completion with a grade of C or better in 3 semester art courses This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1E, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3C, 3D, 4A Creative Literacy Open Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This 10th-12th grade integrated studio course is designed to build skills in each of the five arts areas (Music Production, Theatre, Video Production, Visual Arts, and Architecture). Students will also be developing problem-solving and risktaking abilities. In this full-year class, students will work in each of the arts areas building their arts skills. In the final six weeks of the year, students will have the ability to specialize in a major field and pursue projects and studies in that field, taught and mentored by a teacher/advisor. Students will be expected to work individually, and in small and large groups. Class work and projects will be linked to real-world, social and business challenges. Students may take this course for CP or Honors credit with additional requirements to be met for Honors-level work. In-class work and the finished products will be collected in individual student portfolios, and preparation will be given for year end review assessment by FAA faculty in late spring. Prerequisites: Students must have completed two of the following courses with a “C” or better: Intro. to Art I, Drawing, Intro. to CAD, American Popular Music, Video Production I, or Theater I. Consideration will be given to other semester courses in the Music and Visual Arts Departments as well as art courses taken outside of FHS. This course supports the following academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3C, 3D Art in the Community 1723 Arts Studio 1750

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February 18, 2010 Page 23 of 76.

Portfolio Preparation

Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Portfolio Preparation is designed for students who want to continue their artistic efforts at a more advanced level and/or intend to further their education at an art school, college, or university. Students work in all areas of art with particular emphasis on drawing, painting, and two-dimensional design. Other projects include three-dimensional design, art history, and various strategies for looking at, discussing, and writing about their artwork and the artwork of others. Through a variety of projects students are encouraged to look at and respond to themselves in terms of the aesthetic world around them. Students will be given many opportunities to explore varied media, art styles, and subjects. Presentations from art schools through videos and slide presentations are also an important part of this course. To be successful in Portfolio Preparation, students are required to complete homework on a weekly basis and keep a thorough personal sketchbook. Students must also prepare a portfolio of their best work for a group presentation and exhibition in the spring. Prerequisite: Successful completion of three semester art courses (one must be Drawing) This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3C, 3D

1751

Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This Advanced Placement Studio Art course is designed for highly motivated students who are committed to the creation and study of art. Using guidelines established by the Advanced Placement College Board, students must prepare a portfolio of their best work to be submitted for discussion and evaluation at the end of the school year. Students will work in both 2dimensional and 3-dimensional media, including a 20-piece concentration that focuses on a theme of personal interest to each student. To be successful in this course many of the art projects must be done outside of class. Students must have their portfolio reviewed and the approval of the department head to enroll in Studio Art/AP. Students completing this course may submit the Advanced Placement Portfolio for college credit and/or advanced placement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Portfolio Preparation or approval by Art Director. See the first few pages of this document for standards related to Advanced Placement courses. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3C, 3D

Studio Art/AP

1752

College Preparatory Grades 9,10,11,12 Semester 2.5 Credits Technical Drawing I is an introductory course in which students will become familiar with basic drafting procedures. Students will learn to use drafting equipment to draw multi-view drawings, pictorial view drawings (isometric, oblique, and perspectives), section views and developments. Students will also learn lettering and dimensioning techniques and experience a brief introduction to CAD. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 4A, 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):1A, 1D, 1E, 3C Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Students selecting Architectural Drafting will develop a basic and practical knowledge of building construction and architectural drafting. Students will learn basic drafting tools and skills, principle of architectural design, draw floor plans, wall sections, elevations, and detail drawings. Each student will design and draw plans for a small residence. Students will be exposed to CAD systems as they relate to architectural drawing. Prerequisite: Intro. to CAD This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 3D, 4B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):1E, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4A Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Engineering Drawing is designed to meet the needs of students planning to enter a technical or engineering program. Students will review multi-view projection, pictorial drawings, and then move on to study advanced drafting applications. Students will learn to draw secondary auxiliary views, intersections, revolutions, perspectives, and cams and gears as they
February 18, 2010 Page 24 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Introduction to CAD

1760

Architectural Drafting

1762

Engineering Drawing

1763

complete over forty drawings and two problem-solving projects. Experiences using CAD will be provided in this course. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Drafting This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3A, 3B, 3C Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Students will use computer-aided drafting (CAD) and drawing board theory to develop a working knowledge of the following topics: multi-view drawing, pictorial-view drawing, dimensioning, sectioning, auxiliary views development, and descriptive geometry. Students will draft five to six computer drawings for each of these topics. This course is appropriate for students who are interested in careers in engineering or architecture as well as students who plan to enter the workforce directly from high school. Through formal articulation agreements with Mass Bay Community College, students enrolled in Computer Aided Drafting with a grade of “B” or better are eligible for college credits at this community college. Prerequisite: Intro. to CAD This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 3A, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, 1E, 3C College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 credits This course is an introduction into the world of video production and all that it encompasses. Students will learn to shoot and edit commercials, news stories, and short films as well as other useful production techniques that are used by professionals. The course will cover planning a small video production, then move onto the functions of today's' modern cameras using the Mini-DV format. Finally students will learn how to use computer editing programs to assemble the final product. In addition, students will be asked to incorporate graphics and music into their videos to complete their projects. The majority of the class will be a hands-on learning experience where the student will be able to break into the world of video production. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1A, 1B, 2, 3B, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3A, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Build upon the skills obtained in Video Production I and prepare yourself for a possible career in the world of television and film. Students will use professional grade cameras and industry standard editing programs to create a variety of projects for their "clients." Topics covered in the course will include proper camera techniques, how to record sound properly and different methods used to make a video "visually appealing." Students will also be encouraged to engage in projects that will be beneficial to FHS and the Town of Franklin. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Video Production I This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 2, 3B, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3A, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Explore of the world of Filmmaking in a class designed to take a student’s idea from a concept and turn it into a completed film. Students will spend half of the semester writing and perfecting their scripts and then spend the second half producing their short films. At the end of the semester all completed films will be shown at Franklin High’s Film Festival. Students should have an interest in both writing and film production as each student will be writing their own script and directing their own movie. This course in intended for students who have taken Video Production I and have excelled in that class. Success in Film Production will rely on a student’s ability to work both independently and in groups. Prerequisites: B- average in Video Production I This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1A, 1B, 2, 3B, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3A Graphic Design II (online only) Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Graphic Design II is a semester course in which students will further their understanding of graphic design. Students will create advanced graphic artworks and designs using Adobe Creative Suite. This course is geared towards those students
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Computer Aided Drafting

1761

Video Production I

1741

Video Production II

1742

Film Production

1743

1735

who have an interest in declaring graphic design as their major in college. This course is designed to simulate the workings of a professional graphic design studio, and students will be given “jobs” with very specific parameters, including deadlines. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Note: This course is an online course using Franklin High School’s CMS system. The class will meet during the semester a few times. Students must be able to work independently, manage their time and workload accordingly. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design I This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3E

THEATRE DEPARTMENT College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 2.5 Credits Theatre Arts I, a semester course, is an introduction to the nature of drama, including theatre, literature, and life situations through improvisation. The course includes development of the use of body and speech, particularly in group work related to a thematic approach. Students will also learn general directing, stage designing, make-up, and costuming skills. Students are required to crew for at least one production per semester. This course does not fulfill the four-year (20 credit) requirement for English. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1E, 3A College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Theatre Arts II is for students who have completed Theatre Arts I or auditioned for the class. This course provides an indepth study of movement, voice, and staging techniques focusing on scene study. Students are responsible for producing and directing a series of one-act plays throughout the year. They are also required to act in or crew for each high school production including “Dramafest.” This course does not fulfill the four-year (20 credit) requirement for English. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1E, 3A College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Students will be selected for this class on an audition basis only. The class will resemble a theatre company producing oneact plays throughout the school year. Each piece, starring each class member, will be performed at different venues, depending upon the play’s focus. Students will work cooperatively and creatively with other theatre company members in the play selection process, developing production content, and performing for a variety of audiences. Students are also required to act in or crew for each high school production including “Dramafest.” Course content will include drama and other literature, library research, and original student-written material. This course does not fulfill the four-year (20 credit) requirement for English. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1E, 3A College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits This is a survey course in technical theatre designed to offer students a strong foundation for working on theatre productions. Students will immerse themselves in theater safety, etiquette, set design, set construction, lighting, properties management, sound, costuming, and stage management. They will learn design theory and build practical experience by working on school theatre and musical productions outside of the classroom setting. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 3A, 3E Technical Theatre 1863 Theatre Arts III 1862 Theatre Arts II 1861 Theatre Arts I 1860

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

Arts Management

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 credits This course will prepare students to work with artists and art institutes to promote art, raise funds, manage finances, and develop strategic plans to implement arts-specific management to administrative skills. Prerequisites will be listed with the guidance department. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1E

1864

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT The Business/Computer Technology Department provides a curriculum that meets the needs of students who plan to enter college or who plan to enter the world of work immediately upon graduation from high school. Students will learn about several business areas that will provide lifelong consumer needs as well as basic business principles as preparation for study at the collegiate level. As information managers of the 21st century, our students will need to be able to think critically, solve problems, make informed decisions, and form value judgments. Basic life skills include the ability to work collaboratively, to communicate effectively, and to use technology competently. Students will collaborate to produce projects and assignments utilizing interactive multimedia resources and curriculum related courseware. As members of an international global community, students will communicate with their peers via telecommunications, video, and computer technology. Expansion of computers into business and personal use demands computer proficiency. 21st Century Skills

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Quarter 1.25 Credits To be successful in the 21st century work environment, students must expand their critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration skill sets. This course will provide students with the skills necessary to navigate their complex lives and work environments in the globally competitive information age. Topics of discussion will include: • Communication skills – face to face, nonverbal, active listening, writing and presentation skills • Interpersonal skills – self awareness, social awareness, relationship management, conflict management, and diversity • Collaboration skills – teamwork, problem solving, negotiations, empowerment, change management This course supports the following Academic Expectations: 1A, 1B, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectations: 1B, 3B, 3D College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Quarter 1.25 Credits Take charge of your life! An entrepreneur is someone who starts and operates his/her own business. There has been a tremendous surge of interest in this field. This course is designed to allow students to investigate specific career/entrepreneurship areas. Using computers and the Internet, students will learn how to create a business plan, how to apply for a loan, and how to obtain the necessary licensing. They will learn how to market their businesses through the use of advertising, both in print and on the Internet. Some outside research will be required, and a basic calculator is recommended. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1D, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 1E, 3A College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Quarter 1.25 Credits This one-term course will give students the hands-on knowledge they require to make informed decisions concerning control of their finances. To be financially literate one must be able to confidently read, analyze, and manage their personal finances to lead more secure and satisfying lives. Areas to be covered include banking (managing checking and savings accounts and using debit cards), budgeting, implementing financial goals, borrowing, insurance, understanding of employment benefits, taxes, building and maintaining good credit, and the pros and cons of using credit cards. Completion of this course will prepare the student for successful transition into the financial world of adulthood. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D Personal Financial Literacy 1552 Entrepreneurship 1551

1550

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February 18, 2010 Page 27 of 76.

Everyday Law for Young Adults

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Quarter 1.25 Credits Learn what you need to know about laws affecting you as you move on to college and out on your own. This course is designed to help you avoid everyday legal obstacles. Topics covered include: what you need to know about renting and tenant rights, basics of insurance, employment rights and duties, discrimination in the workplace, job safety and handling work-related injuries, consumer protection law, the marriage contract, and secured and unsecured credit transactions. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B, 3C An Exploration of Business Ethics and 1554 College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Quarter 1.25 Credits Technological Literacy for the 21st Century Through hands-on classroom activities and case studies, this class will foster students’ ethical decision-making as they prepare to enter the workforce and take part in the global marketplace. In addition, students will recognize and analyze concepts, theory, apply skills and evaluate ethical decision-making, which will enhance technological and business literacy. Through the use of technology students will access information efficiently and effectively while evaluating information critically. Students will investigate what technologies best serve their needs and demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3B, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Design high-quality documents with ease using Adobe InDesign, a premier desktop publishing program used by designers, desktop publishers, and pre-press professionals. Create compelling visual communications with InDesign’s exceptional design and layout capabilities, typographic controls, and numerous customization options. InDesign is so versatile that students can produce sophisticated publications including newsletters, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, magazines, and even books! Project work will be stressed and interdisciplinary projects will be encouraged. Students who successfully complete this class will be given the opportunity to be selected to work on yearbook layout. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3B, 3 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Become part of the exciting field of web page design. Join millions of businesses, schools, organizations and people who communicate through the web. Develop dynamic, interactive web sites using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), JavaScript and animations. Legal and ethical issues of web page development will be explored. Be prepared for the future of e-commerce with web pages you have created. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 2, 3A, 3B College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Students will build upon knowledge gained in Web Page I. They will increase their knowledge of JavaScript and be exposed to popular web page software such as Dreamweaver, Flash and others. Students will be required to create several projects to be used within other curriculum areas. Students will also explore how businesses are using web pages and trends in e-commerce. Through research and exploration, students will discover how the World Wide Web has created a global economy and has impacted lifestyles, business trends and work for millions of people. Prerequisite: Students must have a grade of C or better in Web Page I to enroll in this course. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 2, 3A, 3B Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Students will receive instruction in establishing and maintaining a set of accounting records for a sole proprietorship as well as a merchandising business. Special journals, general ledger, accounts receivable ledger, accounts payable ledger, worksheets, and financial statements will be introduced. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of
February 18, 2010 Page 28 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

1553

Desktop Publishing

1511

Web Page Design I

1501

Web Page Design II

1502

Accounting I

1523

accounting by completing a business simulation. Students will also have the opportunity to use Automated Accounting 8.1 as well as Peachtree Accounting Software. This course is open to students with no accounting experience. Grades are based on tests, quizzes, projects and homework (30 minutes/night). This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):3B, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Accounting I includes instruction in establishing and maintaining a set of accounting records for a merchandise business including special journals, general ledger, accounts receivable ledger, accounts payable ledger, worksheet, income statement, balance sheet, and capital statement. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of accounting by completing a simulation and by applying principles of accounting on computers using Automated Accounting 7.0. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 3B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A, 3C Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits This is an advanced course in double entry accounting where the material covered in Accounting I is reviewed and expanded. Instruction will include special journals, valuation of accounts, taxes, corporate and partnership accounting, cost accounting, and economic problems. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding by completing a simulation, and by using Peachtree accounting software. Grades are based on tests, quizzes, reports and homework (30 minutes/night). Prerequisite: Students must have a grade of C or better in Accounting I (Honors) to enroll in this course. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B, 3 Accounting II 1533 Accounting I 1522

Business Management

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Business Management students will develop an understanding of current business problems and issues. Analytical skills are developed through the use of the case study approach for solving business problems and making effective business decisions. Speakers from the business community are invited to discuss with the students the various issues encountered in the world of work such as the establishment of small businesses, the work ethic, the economy and its effect on business. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, 1E, 3A College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits This introductory economics course will include instruction in consumer economics, investing, and microeconomic principles including supply and demand, the role of the consumer, personal debt, saving and investing, and competition and monopolies. Macroeconomic principles included will be measuring the economy’s performance, money and banking, Federal Reserve policy, economic stabilization, international trade, economic growth of developing nations, and the global economy. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D College Preparatory Grade 11 Full Year 5.0 Credits Marketing/Distributive Education I is designed to introduce the field of marketing and distribution to those juniors who are interested in retailing, wholesaling, business management, salesmanship, and service occupations. Students will participate in DECA activities that include researching a business problem, and designing strategies and solutions. Students are expected to attend DECA conferences and participate in competitive marketing events. Students are also expected to participate in the DECA store activities. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 1E, 3 Marketing Education I 1520 Economics 1524

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College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Marketing II has as a major focus the application of business/marketing skills learned in the first year of the program. Students will demonstrate these skills in the operation of the school store, through the research and the creation of a marketing plan, and through the presentation of the marketing plan. Topics discussed include the components of advertising and its function within the total marketing function, buyer behavior, channels of distribution, promotion, pricing and social issues in marketing. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1D, 2, 3B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 1E, 3A Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Students in this class will be responsible for designing, editing, and producing the annual OSKEY Yearbook on computer with desktop publishing software. This includes page design, copywriting, proofreading, and photography. A commitment by all students will be required to participate in certain after-school/ evening functions. Students will perfect their computer skills and learn new ones. Students will also be involved in producing publications, flyers, and brochures for other school clubs and organizations. Students who elect this course are expected to know desktop publishing. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Desktop Publishing This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 1D, 1E Yearbook/ School Publications 1534

Marketing Education II

1521

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

The English curriculum is based on the Massachusetts English Language Arts Frameworks. Students read a variety of literature from classical to contemporary and learn to write clearly, logically, and analytically, recognizing that writing is a means of developing their own thoughts as well as communicating with others. Students follow stages of the writing process and rules for standard written English. All courses provide opportunities to develop speaking and listening skills, and all require a half-hour to an hour of homework per night. English 9 Honors Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 9 Honors covers the literary genres of the short story, novel, essay, and poem through a chronological study of American literature (Colonial to present). This course is for students who are self-motivated and who have mastered basic grammatical skills and the five-paragraph essay. In addition to completing extensive assignments in the literature anthology, students will read four novels for classroom oral and written analysis. The focus of instruction in writing is the thesis paper, incorporating textual support. A 3-4 page thesis paper based on two novels read independently is required. Grammar and vocabulary instruction are integrated weekly. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):1C, 2 College Preparatory Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 9 CP establishes and reinforces critical reading and skills in reading, writing, grammar, spelling, and speaking. Students read several novels, one Shakespearean drama, and a selection of short stories and poems. All students must master the five-paragraph essay and are required to write five-paragraph thesis papers on assigned and independent texts. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):1C, 2 Honors Grade 10 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 10 Honors, a follow-up to English 9 Honors, is a chronological study of English literature and its relationship to the historical periods that produced it. Students will study plays by Sophocles and Shakespeare, as well as two Victorian novels and a variety of poems, essays, and short stories. Critical reading and analysis are emphasized this year as we continue to foster higher level thinking skills. Students will also read three additional novels independently and write
February 18, 2010 Page 30 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

1002

English 9

1001

English 10

1012

formal analytical papers based on those outside readings in addition to literature studied in class. Grammar and vocabulary are regular components of this course. The prerequisite for this course is a C in English 9 Honors or a B+ in English 9 CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 College Preparatory Grade 10 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 10 CP includes the study of tragedy (Greek, Shakespearean, modern), as well as short stories, poetry, the novel, and short essays. Students will be assessed on vocabulary and grammar instruction and speaking skills. Two thesis essays and a 3-4 page literary analysis with secondary sources are major writing requirements. Students are also responsible for a variety of other writing assignments. In addition to literature assigned for class, students will be required to read two selections from an independent reading list. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 Honors Grade 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 11 Honors is intended as a follow-up for students who have already taken honors-level 10th grade English. Students are expected to master advanced grammar, vocabulary, speaking, listening, and writing skills. An eight-page formal paper is required. The course also includes College Board preparation and literary analysis of selections from the epic, short story, drama, novel, and poetry from American and European literature. Lengthy reading assignments are a part of the curriculum. They include Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Great Gatsby, and Hamlet, as well as works read independently for the research paper. The prerequisite for this course is a C in English 10 Honors or a B+ in English 10 CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3A, 3B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 College Preparatory Grade 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 11 CP focuses on early twentieth century American literature. Students will demonstrate proficiency in descriptive, persuasive, narrative, and literary analysis writing. Reading comprehension, critical thinking, and both literary and media analysis skills will be applied to The Sun Also Rises, The Great Gatsby, Inherit the Wind, Death of a Salesman, and Catcher in the Rye, as well as to short stories and poems. Students are expected to use all conventions of standard English to edit their writing. Vocabulary study and College Board preparation are also emphasized. Several short formal papers are required, in addition to a 6-8 page research paper. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3A, 3B, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 English 11 1021 English 11 1022 English 10 1011

Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits English 12 AP is designed for students who are willing and able to do college level work. Teacher recommendation and a prerequisite of B+ in English 11 Honors are required for enrollment. Sophisticated oral and written analyses of several novels, plays, short stories and poems are required. Those completing this course take the Advanced Placement Exam in Literature for college credit and/or advanced placement. Mastery of all grammatical skills is expected of students when they enter the course. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits English 12 Honors is designed for students who have taken previous honors-level English courses. It is a rigorous course focusing thematically on literature of the Western world. A formal ten-page research paper is required, as well as written analyses of works studied and independent reading assignments. Continuing emphasis is placed on oral presentations, English 12 1042

English 12 AP

1043

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 31 of 76.

vocabulary study, and College Board review. Students are expected to use all conventions of standard English to edit their writing. The prerequisite for this course is a C in English 11 Honors or a B+ in English 11 CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):1A, 2 English 12 College Preparatory Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits English 12 CP focuses on American and European literature. An eight-page, literary research paper is required. Skills of reading comprehension, analytical writing, speaking, vocabulary, and College Board review are emphasized. Students are expected to use all conventions of standard English to edit their writing, which will include analysis of works by some of the following authors: Bronte, Shakespeare, Potok, and Williams. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is designed to develop students’ literacy skills and thus prepare high school seniors to venture out into an increasingly complex world. Essential Literacy Skills focuses on the vital competencies of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. As such, grammar application and vocabulary-building skills are integrated into the course. Students will study 20th century American and European literature, and they will complete a required research project. The course also implements school-to-career activities to assist in personal career development and to connect school knowledge and skills to future vocations and educational endeavors. The prerequisite for this course is a recommendation from the student’s English 11 CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits With technology, the role of visual communication has moved to the center of how society communicates and disperses ideas. The advent of film transformed how we understood reality and ourselves. Today, movies are a part of our social and cultural fabric. This course will explore the earliest forms of film. We will explore the films and directors who invented a new visual vocabulary and created the foundation of how we use moving images today. We will begin examining the silent films of Griffith, Eisenstein, and Murnau and then move to an in depth examination of four of the most influential filmmakers in the world: Kurusawa, Bergman, Fellini, and Kubrick. This course will examine films from both their technical aspects and their historical context and influence. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 4A, 4B Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits With the ever-increasing flood of information arriving daily on the internet, it is a necessity for students to be able to select, analyze, evaluate, and present information that is accurate and relevant. This hands-on course will evaluate web content based on established criteria for use and relevance and focus on expanding student knowledge of research strategies. It will help college-bound seniors understand the effective use of digital material as well as the digital tools that are available which include, but are not limited to, Delicious, RSS feeds, Google Documents, Zotero, iGoogle, Diigo, and setting alerts. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits With the idea that folk and fairy tales are the basis for all modern literary study, students will compare current with older versions of classic folk and fairy tales from five different categories: the loss of innocence, sleeping beauties, damsels in distress, the child hero, and villains. Students will discover and evaluate the standard conventions and themes found in children’s literature. We will establish what it means to be a “child” and examine the tales in their larger historical and social contexts, specifically assessing morals, values, gender roles, and class order.
February 18, 2010 Page 32 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

1041

Essential Literacy & Writing Skills for College

1040

Art of the Film

1057

Developing College Research Skills

1056

Folk & Fairytale Literature

1050

This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 4A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2 Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits The emergence of Gothic fiction in the early 1800s was a direct response to the changes in society brought on by the Industrial Revolution. Suddenly, social categories of race, class, and gender became fluid, resulting in the social anxiety expressed in the Victorian period. Gothic fiction arose as a direct response to these social anxieties. The novels normally categorized under this genre explored the boundaries of personal and social identity often turning monsters out of these social anxieties. However, these monsters in time became modern myths that still inform and shape our culture today. This course will explore the major novels of the Gothic tradition: Stoker’s Dracula, Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. In addition, we will examine the short story form, examining work by Hoffman, Poe, and Lovecraft. We will analyze the historical contexts that gave birth to these works and track their influence to more modern manifestations of the genre in fiction and film. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 2 Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course will help students understand the connection between psychology and literature and will allow students the opportunity to explore character motivation and behavior as they try to understand themselves and the human condition as a whole. Students will be introduced to psychological profiles as a lens through which they can broaden their horizons of literature exploring such topics as sexuality, family dynamics, suicide, conformity, power struggle, and mental illness. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 4B Open Honors Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits The objective of this course is to examine critically the changing relationship between sports and popular culture by connecting the “fun” of sports to understanding how meanings of who we are become constructed and distributed in society. This course will expose students to the influence and power of sports in contemporary American popular culture, including economic dimensions of sports media such as production, marketing, and consumerization of youth sports, labor issues, and athletes’ rights. We will draw upon television, radio, internet, film, and other media sources to examine the politics of “identities,” including popular icons such as children’s toys; national identities and globalization; sports subcultures and “lifestyle sports;” the representation of gender, race, and ethnicity within sports media; and depictions of sports and athletes. Throughout, we will explore the social, cultural, and political meanings of the sporting “spectacle” as well as the impact of technologies (both old and new) on sports performance and spectatorship. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 2 College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course is a semester-length class devoted to writing and the analysis of it. Students will read and analyze literary forms: poetry, drama, fiction, non-fiction, and write in a variety of these genres. Students will write on a daily basis and will be assessed through a process involving peer and teacher evaluation. Dedication to the writing process and sincerity of effort will be factors when assigning a grade to a student’s creative work and to the final portfolio. This course does not fulfill the four-year requirement for English. A student who wishes to take Creative Writing for a second semester must obtain approval of the instructor. Approval will be based on an observed commitment to the standards and expectations of the course. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1A, 1B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This semester-long class provides an overview of the essential skills necessary for effective oral communication. Students will be given opportunities to build self-confidence and engage in both formal and informal speaking situations. Areas of
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 33 of 76.

The Gothic Tradition

1051

Psychological Literature

1052

Sports & Popular Culture

1053

Creative Writing

1070

Public Speaking

1060

study will include the following: participating in and facilitating group discussions, informative, persuasive and impromptu speaking, interviewing techniques, and an overview of debate techniques. Students will also improve the speaking skills that accompany Power-Point presentations. Students will be expected to speak in front of the class, as this will be part of the grading process. In addition, students will be expected to engage in both print and electronic research as they prepare their speeches. This course does not fulfill the four-year requirement for English. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1D, This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This semester-long course is dedicated to teaching students the skills needed to communicate in print and web based media. Although the emphasis is on writing skills, the course will also include the following activities: interviewing, researching, observing, reporting, reacting, synthesizing, and designing layout. Students will also learn to become knowledgeable consumers of media information. They will learn to improve editing skills as they work with their own articles and participate in peer editing sessions. Student work will be published on the high school web site after it has been approved by the course instructor/s. An important goal of the course will be to raise awareness in journalism as a career. This course does not fulfill the four-year requirement for English. It will be piloted mostly in online format, with a few required inclass sessions. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 2 Media Literacy Course: 1062 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Do You Know What Messages You’re Buying? Semester 3.0 Credits This course will examine and explore the meaning of media images and messages within our culture. Students will analyze and deconstruct the visual texts in magazines, television, movies, music, games and newspapers to understand why media messages are produced, by whom, and the effects on the consumer. The learning outcomes for this course will build critical thinking skills, develop an understanding of the key concepts of media literacy, promote greater awareness of the role of media, and develop an awareness and knowledge of media messages. This course supports the following Academic Expectations: 1A, 1B, 1E, 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectations: 1C, 1D, 2 Journalism (online) 1059

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

The Family and Consumer Sciences Department provides the life skills essential for all students in today’s changing world. This program is directed toward preparing students for successful lives in their homes and communities. Time is provided for students to explore related career opportunities. The Family and Consumer Sciences program is one that has the flexibility to meet the needs, capabilities and interests of all students. Homework and projects are given daily. College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 2.5 Credits Child Development will examine the growth and development of the child from conception until age one. The class will explore how attitudes and values acquired as a child influence your life. Students will learn effective parenting methods necessary to raising responsible, independent children. Emphasis is placed on pregnancy and prenatal care. This is a great opportunity for future teachers, social workers, and parents to begin their study of children. We will use many hands-on activities such as the empathy belly and Baby Think It Over. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 5 College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Child Development II emphasizes the study of a child’s behavioral and developmental patterns from age 1 through school age. The students will have an opportunity to develop and present a lesson to school age children. An introduction to developmental theories and discipline strategies will be included. The course will also include a look at crisis situations such as child abuse, neglect, and family crisis.
February 18, 2010 Page 34 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Child Development I

1630

Child Development II

1631

This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 1E, 2 Independent Living 1632 College Preparatory Grade 12 (formerly Family and Futures) Semester 2.5 Credits This course is designed to prepare students for the real world. The goal is to help students become successful members of society through goal setting and sound decision-making. As students graduate from high school, they will find themselves living on their own at college, in the military, or on the job. To meet these challenges, the class offers a means of approaching these problems head on. Students will explore a wide range of topics, such as career choices, relationships, preparing nutritionally balanced meals, housing options, finances, and handling family crisis. Students will cook on a weekly basis. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 5 Introduction to Developmental 1636 College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Disabilities Semester 2.5 Credits This course provides a hands-on approach to education and working with students who have a disability. We will use our classroom knowledge to develop on-to-one activities for students in a special needs program. Some of the requirements will be to learn about the laws for disabilities, to plan lessons and games for the students, and to participate in various integrated learning activities. This class is a must for anyone seeking a future in education or special education but can be valuable to all. It will be educational and fun. Projects and reports are part of this course. Prerequisite: C or above in Child Development I or approval of teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 5

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT The Foreign Language Department offers a four or five-year sequential curriculum in French, Latin and Spanish. Students who have successfully completed the middle school Spanish or Latin curriculum should enter the Year II sequence of their chosen language. Foreign language programs are structured to develop the standards of the Foreign Languages Curriculum Frameworks as promulgated by the Massachusetts Department of Education and the American Classical League’s Standards for Classical Language Learning: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons and Communities. The study of a foreign language is a cumulative task, demanding daily oral practice and memorization and a constant review of vocabulary and verb forms. Because of the need for consistent review and practice, instructors assign homework daily. Most colleges recommend at least two years of credit within one foreign language, but more selective universities prefer three to five years of sequential foreign language study.

French I

College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course introduces students (who have little or no knowledge of the language) to the basic patterns and grammatical constructions of French. Students apply basic vocabulary and grammatical structures to real-life situations through listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Instructors provide an overview of French-speaking countries and communities such as France, Quebec, Abidjan, and Martinique. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, short writing assignments, skits, videos, small projects and class participation. Homework (15-20 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B French II Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits French II Honors is an intensive course for the self-motivated student who has been especially successful in French I. The curriculum is broader, more in-depth, and more demanding than the college preparatory course; students learn additional vocabulary and complex grammatical structures. While all communicative skills are expanded, more emphasis is placed upon creative oral exercises, written reports, and the reading of short passages. Assessment includes quizzes, tests, skits, oral exercises, short essays, and research projects. Homework (20-30 minutes) is assigned daily.
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 35 of 76.

1101

1104

This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B

French II

College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits French II is the normal sequence for students who have successfully completed the French I course at the high school. The course integrates and recycles Year I material while introducing new and more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Instructors expand upon all communicative skills with increased emphasis on spontaneous speaking and structured writing exercises. Students gain cultural awareness of the French speaking world though the completion of current events assignments and oral and written reports. Assessment includes quizzes, tests, skits, oral presentations, reports, class participation, and student-generated videos/slide shows. Homework (15-30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B French III Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits French III Honors is a rigorous, grammar-rich course that is designed for self-motivated learners. Students continue to develop communicative skills in the context of culturally authentic situations. Students will read from primary and secondary sources and write short essays based on their reading of literature and their study of the French speaking world. Instructors assess student progress based on quizzes, tests, essays, class discussions, and special projects. Students should have a French-English dictionary for this course. Homework is assigned daily, and will often include reading and writing in preparation for classroom discussions (30 minutes or more). This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B 1105 1106

1103

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This grammar-rich course introduces more complex forms of French expressions while allowing students to develop grammatical concepts that were covered in French II. Instructors introduce vocabulary in a communicative context to which students respond in oral and written form. Common activities include: role-playing; written exercises; and thematic compositions. Much of the class is conducted in French. All language skills are assessed through quizzes, tests, reports, skits, and listening comprehension exercises. Students benefit from owning a French-English dictionary. Homework (30 minutes estimated) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment and staffing permits. Students who enroll in this course should already have a strong understanding of previously-learned grammatical forms. This course is part of a two-year cycle that emphasizes authentic language use at the Advanced Placement level. It is, therefore, designed for the most motivated of students. Students will accurately/fluently express themselves through speaking and writing in various contexts. Students will read and analyze French language articles and literary texts, including classic and contemporary plays, novels, and poetry. Students will study Francophone current events, history, and culture. At the end of a two-year cycle, students will be prepared to take the AP French Language Examination. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, essays, skits, listening and reading comprehension and oral reports. Homework assignments (30-40 minutes) are given daily. Prerequisite: B+ in previous course and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B French IV Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment and staffing permits. French IV Honors is conducted almost totally in French; this is an accelerated course for the self-motivated student. This course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students should come into French IV Honors having a solid understanding of
February 18, 2010 Page 36 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

French III

French IV/AP Language

1109

1108

previously-learned grammatical forms. Participants will read adapted texts, short stories, and fables of Francophile authors to encourage oral and written analysis. Assessment includes quizzes, tests, written compositions, oral exercises and reports, role-playing, reading comprehension exercises, and class participation. Homework assignments are given daily (30 minutes or more). Prerequisite: Appropriate grade in previous course (see course selection guidelines) and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment and staffing permits. Though the focus is on spoken French, students will also develop listening, reading, and writing skills. Students are given the tools to communicate about everyday life situations, such as shopping, travel, and running errands. Instructors emphasize speaking by assigning skits and oral reports. Students will also improve their writing skills through the completion of creative essays and thematic compositions. Cultural content includes short stories, music, and films related to the francophone world, to which students respond orally and through writing. Instruction and student work is mostly in French. Much work is done in pairs and small groups. Assessment includes tests and quizzes, oral and written reports, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (2030 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B French V/AP Language Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment/staffing permits. This second year of the two-part cycle builds on and expands the skills developed in French IV/AP Language with different themes, readings and grammar exercises. The focus continues to be on understanding spoken French in various contexts, reading and analyzing magazine articles and literary texts, and expressing oneself with reasonable fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken French. At the end of the two-year cycle, students will be prepared to take the AP French Language Exam. Assessment will include tests, quizzes, essays, skits, listening and reading comprehension, and short oral reports. Assignments (30-40 minutes) are given daily. Prerequisite: B+ in previous course and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B 1111 1112 French IV 1107

Honors Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment/staffing permits. This course is the second of a two-part syllabus, which builds on and expands the skills developed in French IV Honors. A different series of readings is the basis for enhancing communication skills and further developing fluency and accuracy in the language. Classes are conducted almost totally in French. Assessment is accomplished through quizzes, tests, written compositions, oral exercises and reports, role-playing, reading comprehension and class participation. Homework assignments are given daily (30 minutes or more). Prerequisite: Appropriate grade in previous course (see course selection guidelines) and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment/staffing permits. This course is the second year of a two-part syllabus, which builds on and expands the skills developed in French IV. The second cycle of themes, readings, grammar review, short stories, and films is distinct from the fourth program, while the basic premise of the course, enhanced communication, remains the same. Classes are conducted almost totally in French. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, oral and written reports, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (20-30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Spanish I 1121 College Preparatory Full Year Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 6.0 Credits
February 18, 2010 Page 37 of 76.

French V

French V

1110

Franklin High School Program of Studies

This course introduces students (who have little or no knowledge of the language) to the basic patterns and grammatical constructions of Spanish. Students will apply basic vocabulary and grammatical structures to real-life situations in order to communicate on a basic level through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Instructors provide an overview of Hispanic countries and communities such as: Spain; Puerto Rico; Costa Rica; Mexico; Chile, and Argentina. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, short writing assignments, skits, videos, small projects, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (15-20 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Spanish II Honors is the normal sequence for students who have been especially successful in the three-year middle school program or the Spanish I course at the high school. The course integrates and recycles Year I material while introducing new and more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Instructors expand upon all communicative skills with increased emphasis on spontaneous speaking, communicative activities, structured writing exercises, and the reading of short passages. The curriculum is broader, more in-depth, and more demanding than the college preparatory course; students learn additional vocabulary and complex grammatical structures at a fast pace. Cultural units include Andalucía, Mexico, Texas, the Caribbean, the Andes, California, and more. Assessment includes quizzes, tests, writing assignments, skits, projects, and slideshow/video presentations. Homework (20-30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Spanish II CP is the normal sequence for students who have successfully completed the three-year middle school program or the Year I course at the high school. The course integrates and recycles Year I material while introducing new and more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Instructors expand upon all communicative skills with increased emphasis on spontaneous speaking, communicative activities, structured writing exercises, and the reading of short passages. Cultural units include Andalucía, Mexico, Texas, the Caribbean, the Andes, California, and more. Assessment includes quizzes, tests, writing assignments, skits, projects, and slideshow/video presentations. Homework (15-30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Students in this class are being prepared to go into the AP program. Instructors emphasize reading comprehension through a variety of short stories from the classical, Hispanic repertoire and the study of indigenous peoples. Students respond to these readings through oral and written reports. Much of the class is conducted in Spanish. Students are expected to own a Spanish-English dictionary. Daily assignments include reading and writing in preparation for classroom discussions (30 minutes or more). This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This intermediate level course introduces more complex forms of Spanish expression while reviewing and further developing grammatical concepts covered in Spanish II. Instructors introduce vocabulary in a communicative context to which students respond in oral and written form. Common activities include, but are not limited to: role-playing; written exercises; and thematic compositions. Much of the class is conducted in Spanish. All language skills are assessed through quizzes, tests, reports, skits, and listening comprehension exercises. Students benefit from owning a Spanish-English dictionary. Homework (approximately 30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Spanish IV/AP Language
February 18, 2010 Page 38 of 76

Spanish II

1124

Spanish II

1123

Spanish III

1126

Spanish III

1125

1129

Advanced Placement

Grade 11
Franklin High School Program of Studies

Full Year 6.0 Credits Spanish IV AP is the first of a two-year cycle that prepares students at an advanced level in Spanish language. This is a college-level course (taught almost exclusively in Spanish) that seeks to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Instructors emphasize language acquisition through literary analysis and critique. Students improve and refine their Spanish communication skills through listening comprehension exercises and an intensive review of grammar. Participants must maintain a comprehensive notebook and have a Spanish-English dictionary. Assessment is based on oral participation, quizzes, analyses, essays, skits, presentations, and projects. Daily assignments may include research, readings, resumes, essays and grammar exercises (30-60 minutes). Students must complete summer reading assignments and subsequent assessment in the fall. Students must have teacher recommendation to enroll in this course. Note: Students have the option of taking this course for college credit (3 credits). Prerequisite: B+ in previous course and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Spanish IV Honors is an accelerated course, taught mostly in Spanish, which is intended for the self-motivated student. In addition to the development of grammatical structures and acquisition of complex vocabulary, there is intense emphasis on the improvement of reading and writing skills. Students achieve this through the study of stories, essays and short classical selections from major Hispanic and Spanish authors. Student work, including discussions reports, will be completed in Spanish. Assessment includes tests and quizzes, short essays, skits, written and oral reports, and class participation. Daily homework (30-40 minutes) includes reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Appropriate grade in previous course (see course selection guidelines) and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The content of this course, which is taught mostly in Spanish, develops the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are given the tools to communicate about everyday life situations, such as shopping, travel, and running errands. Instructors emphasize speaking by assigning skits and oral reports. Students will also improve their writing skills through the completion of creative essays and thematic compositions. Cultural content includes short stories, music, and films related to the Hispanic world, to which students respond orally and through writing. Instruction and student responses are mostly in Spanish. Much work is done in pairs and small groups. Assessment includes tests and quizzes, oral and written reports, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (20-30 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Spanish V/AP Language Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is the second year of the two-year AP cycle and includes the second half of the AP Language syllabus as well as a continuing thorough review of grammar. See the description for Spanish IV AP-Language for further details relative to expectations. Note: Students have the option of taking this course for college credit (3 credits). Prerequisite: B+ in previous course and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B 1131 1132 Spanish IV 1127 Spanish IV 1128

Honors Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment/staffing permits. This course is the second of the two-year Spanish IV/V honors syllabus. The thematic situations of this cycle are different from the previous cycle but continue the development of competence in grammatical structure and vocabulary. Thematic projects are based on current events and different readings from major Hispanic and Spanish authors. Students will complete all class work in Spanish. Assessment includes tests and quizzes, skits, short essays, written and oral reports, and class participation. Daily homework (30-40 minutes) includes reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Appropriate grade in previous course (see course selection guidelines) and teacher recommendation
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 39 of 76.

Spanish V

This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The department offers this course when enrollment/staffing permits. The second year of a two-part cycle builds on and expands the skills developed in Spanish IV. The second cycle of themes, readings, grammar review, short stories, and films is distinct from the fourth-year program, while the basic premise of the course—enhanced communication—remains the same. Classes are conducted mostly in Spanish. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, skits, oral and written reports, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (20-30 minutes) is assigned daily. Prerequisite: Appropriate grade in previous course (see course selection guidelines) and teacher recommendation This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B Spanish V 1130

College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is an introduction to the basic language patterns and constructions of Latin. It reinforces and strengthens English language skills by comparing the structure and vocabulary of the two languages. Students also study the cultural contributions of the ancient Romans, especially their myths and legends. Students will complete projects on aspects of Roman life. Instructors provide students with a survey of Roman culture in the first century C.E., in the context of daily, public, and private life. Students also analyze the cultural legacy of the ancient world. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3C Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Students who have been successful in middle school Latin, or in high school Latin I, and have demonstrated selfmotivation, should continue their study of Latin at the Honors level II. This course begins with a thorough review of the material learned in Latin I, and continues the introduction to the language through more extended readings of adapted Latin. Emphasis on the various language skills, the connections between English and Latin, and the contributions of classical civilization remain the same, as the narrative structure of the textbook expands the repertoire of linguistic constructions, and broadens the view of first-century life in the Roman Empire. This course will prepare students for the advanced levels of Latin. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3C College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course completes the basic introduction to Latin grammatical forms, to give the student a clear understanding of the principles of an inflected language. Special emphasis is placed upon the contribution of Latin to English vocabulary, the use of Latin phrases and abbreviations commonly encountered in English, and strategies for recognizing and decoding Latin roots in English. Through supplementary readings and projects, students will also become more aware of Rome’s role in the development of Western civilization. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3C Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits In this honors course, highly motivated students begin to master some of the more complex grammatical forms and syntactical structures of Latin prose, and will begin to develop some familiarity with the more common meters of Latin poetry. After thoroughly reviewing previously learned material, students will continue their investigation of life in Rome in the first century through the narrative of the textbook, and through brief passages of authentic Latin of various authors. Students will examine both primary and secondary sources to gain insight into the life of the ancient world. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D, 4A
February 18, 2010 Page 40 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Latin I

1151

Latin II

1154

Latin II

1153

Latin III

1156

Latin III

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits In this course, students will continue to acquire Latin grammatical forms and syntactical structures. They will also examine more sophisticated transformations of Latin vocabulary forms to English derivatives, and increase their ability to decipher the Latin roots of complex English words. With a judicious use of English translations compared to authentic Latin, students will examine events, ideas, and people from the ancient world that have had a lasting influence on Western civilization. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D, 4A Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits At this stage the student will complete the introduction to Latin structures. All the ordinary forms found in classical Latin prose will have been used and practiced in the context of the continuing narrative of the text. Students will also consolidate their understanding of the history of the Roman Republic and Empire, and of the major features of the private and public life of the Romans. They will begin a closer investigation of the period of transition from Republic to Empire through the accounts of Eutropius, Cicero, Julius Caesar, Augustus, and Pliny. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D, 4A College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Students will complete their acquisition of Latin forms and structures. They will continue to increase their mastery of English word formation through an introduction to Greek roots. The focus in Roman culture will be the development of the Roman political system from kingship, through republic, to empire. This is the terminal course of the college preparatory program. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D, 4A Honors Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This is the culminating course of the high school honors sequence. It is a course in reading and interpreting Latin literature. The highly motivated, well-prepared, and independent student who undertakes this course will be expected to become engaged in selecting authors and genres of interest to him or her, to read extensively in both primary and secondary sources, to research and write at some length on the style, significance and content of the chosen authors. In recent years, students have read Pliny, Vergil, the lyric poets, and Petronius. Students will be expected to investigate their authors in English in the summer preceding this course. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D, 4A Foreign Language Electives: Bailes y Música de Paises Hispanos: 1180 College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Dances and Rhythms of Spanish-Speaking Countries Semester 3 Credits This elective course is available to all FHS students in grades 10-12; no prior experience in Spanish is required. Students will explore various “music cultures” from the Spanish- speaking World. This will be done through the analysis of rhythms and styles of dance that are rooted in the cultures of Native America, Europe and Africa. Instructors will teach basic dance steps from a variety of rhythmic styles. Assessment includes research projects, multi-media presentations, oral presentations, performances, class participation, and class discussion. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D Word Etymology: The Legacy of Greek and Latin 1181 College Preparatory Semester Grades 10, 11, 12 3 credits Latin V 1159 Latin IV 1157 Latin IV 1158

1155

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 41 of 76.

This elective course is available to all FHS students in grades 10-12; no prior experience in Latin is required. Instructors provide students with a basic introduction to the etymology of words in the English language. Students will broaden their vocabulary base and will be able to deduce meanings of unfamiliar English words. Course content includes medical, scientific, and legal terminology, as well as often seen Latin and Greek verbs and numbers. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, essays, projects, and class participation. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 4B Greek and Roman Mythology College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3 credits This elective course is available to all FHS students in grades 10-12; no prior experience in Latin is required. This semester course serves as an introduction to the major gods, goddesses, and heroes of the Greeks and Romans, and the myths involving them. Readings in English will emphasize the role of the gods in the daily life of ancient people. Students will explore the relationships among the gods and the interactions between gods and mortals. Myths studied will include Chaos and the beginning of the world, the Titans, the rise of Zeus and the Olympian gods, and accounts of the major heroes Perseus, Theseus, Jason, and Hercules. The Trojan War and its heroes Achilles, Odysseus, and Aeneas will also be discussed. The course will culminate in an analysis of modern interpretations of these myths, including a student-created video project. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 4B 1120 1182

College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This section of Spanish is intended for self-directed learners who wish to learn first-year Spanish language and culture within an online platform. The course will guide students (who have little or no knowledge of the language) through learning the basic patterns and grammatical constructions of Spanish. Students will apply basic vocabulary and grammatical structures to real-life situations in order to communicate on a basic level through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will upload media files, complete listening activities, take timed assessments, engage in online chat, and more. As such, students who enroll in this course must have the ability to employ computer technology. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, short writing assignments, videos, small projects, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (15-20 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D

Spanish I (online only)

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT The Mathematics Department offers a wide range of courses to provide students with opportunities to actively participate in learning the structure and the nature of mathematics, while developing analytic skills that will help them apply basic principles to other areas of study and everyday living. Students begin their mathematics program at FHS at different points, based on their middle school programs. The basic sequence of mathematics courses is Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. Many students enroll in higher-level mathematics courses after successful completion of Algebra II. All mathematics courses make use of technology in the form of computer software, such as Geometry Sketchpad, Minitab, and/or graphing calculators. Technology allows students to visualize the mathematics that they are learning as well as lessening the burden of voluminous and complicated numerical computation. Students should check with their current mathematics teachers for recommendations about appropriate types of graphing calculators. The Mathematics Department requires that students purchase their own calculators (which will be used throughout their math program at the high school and beyond). Algebra I College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Algebra I is an entry level course offered in the college preparatory program. The major topics to be covered include the properties of the real number system, polynomials and operations with polynomials, factoring, exponents, solving equations and inequalities, relations, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and rational expressions. These algebraic topics will be integrated in real world problems that also explore topics from discrete mathematics, such as statistics, probability, graphs, and others. A major goal of the course is to introduce the language of algebra and foster the integration of geometry and technology in real world situations. Students will evaluate formulas, apply the Pythagorean Theorem, Triangle Sum Theorem, Triangle Inequality Theorem. They will determine algebraic expressions, solve linear equations and inequalities, graph solutions, interpret graphs, and other work that will prepare them with a foundation for further study in mathematics.
February 18, 2010 Page 42 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

1201

Since algebra permeates all of mathematics, a strong foundation in this first course is essential for success in future courses. For students to experience success in algebra they will need familiarity with number facts and operations and a commitment to work hard both in class and on the daily homework (30 minutes or more). Students will be expected to actively participate in class, both as individuals and as team members. Since technology is becoming increasingly more important, it is integrated into our lessons. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course in order to complete assignments both in class and at home. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Geometry CP or Honors based on grades and recommendation of Algebra 1 CP teacher. Prerequisite: Recommendation of 8th grade Math teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Honors Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits Algebra I Honors is the entry level course offered in the honors program. Topics are introduced at a high level of rigor and precision. The major topics to be covered include the properties of the real number system, polynomials and operations with polynomials, factoring, exponents, solving equations and inequalities, relations, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and rational expressions. These algebraic topics will be integrated in real world problems that also explore topics from discrete mathematics, such as statistics, probability, graphs, and others. A major goal of the course is to introduce the language of algebra and foster the integration of geometry and technology in real world situations. Students will evaluate formulas, apply the Pythagorean Theorem, Triangle Sum Theorem, Triangle Inequality Theorem. They will determine algebraic expressions, solve linear equations and inequalities, graph solutions, interpret graphs, and other work that will prepare them with a foundation for further study in mathematics. Since algebra permeates all of mathematics, a strong foundation in this first course is essential for success in future courses. For students to experience success in algebra they will need familiarity with number facts and operations and a commitment to work hard both in class and on the daily homework (30 minutes or more). Students will be expected to actively participate in class, both as individuals and as team members. Since technology is becoming increasingly more important, it is integrated into our lessons. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course in order to complete assignments both in class and at home. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Geometry CP or Honors based on grades and recommendation of Algebra 1 CP teacher. Prerequisite: Recommendation of 8th grade Math teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grade 10 Full Year 6.0 Credits Concepts in Algebra and Geometry is a course that continues the development of algebraic thinking established in Algebra 1 CP. The content of this course is designed for those 10th grade students who need more time to assimilate the basic algebraic concepts necessary for the continuation of mathematics. Concepts in Algebra and Geometry will focus on the following concepts: polynomials and operations with polynomials, solving equations and inequalities, relations, systems of equations and inequalities, rational expressions, nomenclature of geometry, and deductive reasoning. For success in Concepts in Algebra and Geometry, students will need familiarity with number facts and operations and a commitment to work hard both in class and on the daily homework (30 minutes or more). Students will be expected to participate actively in class, both as individuals and as team members. Students will use graphing calculators and are required to have their own calculators to complete assignments both in class and at home. Grades in this class will be based on homework, class work, tests, and quizzes. Completion of Concepts in Algebra and Geometry will provide students with a solid foundation in a comprehensive algebra program as well as a foundation in the principles of geometry, which will afford them greater success in more advanced mathematics courses. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Geometry CP or Honors based on grades and recommendation from Concepts of Algebra and Geometry teacher. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1 CP and recommendation from Algebra 1 CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Geometry Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Geometry Honors takes a formal approach to the discipline. Topics are developed with a high degree of rigor and precision and include angle relationships, line relationships, congruent and similar triangles and polygons, circles, quadrilaterals, conFranklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 43 of 76.

Algebra I

1202

Concepts in Algebra and Geometry

1210

1212

structions, and area and volume of plane and solid figures. The development of the course will integrate algebra and discrete topics that will also be examined analytically. Transformation functions will be employed in the analysis of plane figures that are reflected, rotated, dilated or translated. Three-dimensional figures, measurement and connection with other disciplines are also given much attention in the course. Developing the student’s mathematical power to explore, make conjectures, and reason logically is a major goal. Students who elect this course will be expected to work hard. A graphing calculator is required for this course. Computer technology and other graphics utilities will be employed to explore, conjecture, and simplify learning. Activities, real world applications, continual review and the use of graphics technology will be part of the pedagogical tools that will assist student learning. Students will be assigned homework daily and will be expected to actively participate in class activities and complete out-of-class projects. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Algebra 2 Honors or CP based on grades and recommendation of Geometry Honors teacher. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1 Honors with minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 1 CP with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Algebra 1 CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The major topics covered in Geometry CP include angle relationships, perpendicular and parallel lines and planes, congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, similar polygons, circles, constructions, area of polygons and lateral area, surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures. Analytical relationships will be established, as topics from algebra and discrete mathematics are integrated, using transformations of points and figures on the Cartesian Coordinate system. Activities, real world applications, continual review and the use of graphics technology will be part of the pedagogical tools that will assist student learning. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The use of applicable software will assist students in learning the vocabulary and the concepts of geometry along with the properties and characteristics of the plane figures. Students will be assigned homework daily and will be expected to actively participate in class activities and complete outof-class projects for successful completion of the course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Algebra 2 Honors or CP based on grades and recommendation of Geometry Honors teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 CP/Honors or Concepts in Algebra and Geometry This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Algebra II Honors extends and further explores topics already developed in Algebra I and Geometry, and the course includes new topics from both continuous and discrete mathematics. Concepts will be developed with rigorous and stringent attention to detail, processing and understanding. Topics will include: polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, matrices, graphs, systems of equations, inverses, sequences, series and combinations. A real world orientation has guided both the selections of the content and the applications. Activities are included in many lessons, and up-to-date technology is used and integrated throughout the course. Students will explore, analyze and consider the mathematics from an algebraic, numerical and graphical approach in an effort to synthesize their newly acquired knowledge. Homework will be assigned daily. To be successful in this honors course students must have a strong algebraic foundation and fluency in algebra vocabulary. Willingness to work hard, to participate individually and in groups, and effectively communicate orally and in writing are requirements for success. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for the course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Pre-Calculus CP/H based on grades and recommendation of Algebra 2 H teacher. Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry Honors with minimum grade of C or completion of Geometry CP with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Geometry CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The Algebra II CP course includes all the topics covered in the honors program: linear relations, functions, graphs, matrices, systems of equations, powers, inverses, radicals, trigonometry, series, combinations, etc. The development of the course, however, is less rigorous and applies more intuitive understanding. The graphing calculator and other technology
February 18, 2010 Page 44 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Geometry

1211

Algebra II

1222

Algebra II

1221

prompts will be used to clarify concepts and analyze the concepts from a graphical and numerical as well as an algebraic perspective. Algebra is an important component of all mathematics, and since students will be confronted with complex algebraic manipulations in any college math course they take, it makes sense to continue the development of algebraic algorithms and procedures. In this course students will develop skills in carrying out various algorithms; identify mathematical properties and relationships; apply mathematics in real-world situations; and produce graphical representations of concepts. Homework will be assigned daily. Students are expected to be active participants in class, both individually and in group work. A solid background in basic algebra and geometry is essential for success. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Pre-Calculus (Honors or CP), based upon grades and recommendation of Algebra 2 CP teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry CP/Honors This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The Algebra II A CP course is the first part of a two-year course sequence that is designed specifically for students who need more time and individual attention in order to become proficient with the concepts of Algebra. A strong emphasis is placed one ensuring that students have mastered the concepts learned in previous mathematics courses. Topics include equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, systems, polynomials and rational expressions. The graphing calculator and other technology prompts will be used to clarify concepts and analyze the concepts from a graphical and numerical as well as an algebraic perspective. Algebra is an important component of all mathematics, and since students will be confronted with complex algebraic manipulations in any college math course they take, it makes sense to continue the development of algebraic algorithms and procedures. In this course students will develop skills in carrying out various algorithms; identify mathematical properties and relationships; apply mathematics in real-world situations; and produce graphical representations of concepts. Homework will be assigned daily. Students are expected to be active participants in class, both individually and in group work. A solid background in basic algebra and geometry is essential for success. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be required to enroll in Algebra II B CP. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

Algebra II A

1219

College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The Algebra II B CP course is the second course in this two-year sequence. This course completes the Algebra II curriculum and begins an investigation of some advanced topics, such as trigonometric functions. The graphing calculator and other technology prompts will be used to clarify concepts and analyze the concepts from a graphical and numerical as well as an algebraic perspective. Algebra is an important component of all mathematics, and since students will be confronted with complex algebraic manipulations in any college math course they take, it makes sense to continue the development of algebraic algorithms and procedures. In this course students will develop skills in carrying out various algorithms; identify mathematical properties and relationships; apply mathematics in real-world situations; and produce graphical representations of concepts. Homework will be assigned daily. Students are expected to be active participants in class, both individually and in group work. A solid background in basic algebra and geometry is essential for success. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Students must have successfully completed Algebra II A in order to enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II A CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

Algebra II B

1220

College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Modeling with Applications is based on the premise that students learn best when they are actively involved in the process. In this course, students do not first learn mathematics and then apply what they’ve learned. Rather, important questions
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 45 of 76.

Mathematical Modeling with Applications

1226

about the real world come first. Students analyze situations and apply the mathematical concepts needed to solve problems. Contextual questions drive the mathematics. In each unit, students build, test, and present models that describe a real-world situation or problem, such as deciding where to build a fire station. Class activities involve discussion, investigations in groups, computer explorations and presentations by students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

Honors Grades 10, 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course has as its objective the development of a broad base foundation in mathematics upon which to build the concepts of calculus. A solid foundation in algebra and geometry is essential, and students are expected to have successfully completed both Algebra II Honors and Geometry Honors. Students will continue to develop and extend previously learned topics and encounter new concepts that are necessary in future study. All topics will be explored in detail and in depth, analyzing the concepts from an algebraic as well as from a numerical and graphical perspective. The topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and circular functions. Vectors, polar equations, parametric equations, systems, sequences, series and other topics from discrete mathematics, are also part of the curriculum. The concepts are explored and applied in real world problems integrated with graphics utilities and other technological prompts. Success in this course requires a great deal of focus and work, both in class and at home. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Those students who successfully complete the course with a grade of B+ or better will be prepared for the AP Calculus course offered at the high school. Upon completion of Pre-Calculus Honors, students will be able to enroll in Calculus (AP, Honors, or CP), Statistics (AP, Honors, or CP) or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of Pre-Calculus teacher. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 Honors with minimum grade of C+ or completion of Algebra 2 CP with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation from Algebra 2 CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course has as its objective the development of a broad base foundation in mathematics upon which to build the concepts of calculus. A solid foundation in algebra and geometry is essential. Students will continue to develop and extend previously learned topics and encounter new concepts that are necessary in future study. All topics will be explored in detail and in depth, analyzing the concepts from an algebraic as well as from a numerical and graphical perspective. The topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and circular functions. Vectors, polar equations, parametric equations, systems, sequences, series and other topics from discrete mathematics, are also part of the curriculum. The concepts are explored and applied in real world problems integrated with graphics utilities and other technological prompts. Success in this course requires a great deal of focus and work, both in class and at home. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Calculus (AP, Honors, or CP), Statistics (AP, Honors, or CP) or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of Pre-Calculus teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/Honors This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D Pre-Calculus 1231

Pre-Calculus

1232

Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits AP Calculus AB develops all topics on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam. The topics include a preliminary review of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and conics. (This is completed during summer break.) The concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to real world problems are explored, developed, and analyzed in detail with a high degree of rigor and sophistication. The development of the course encompasses a theoretical approach as well as a concrete understanding. All topics are explored numerically, graphically, and algebraically. The course is demanding with respect to classwork and homework. Success in this course requires a strong and sound foundation in logic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, plus a sincere devotion to hard work and
February 18, 2010 Page 46 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Calculus AB

1253

persistent effort with a clear and focused mind. A graphing calculator is required. Students who complete this course take the AP Calculus AB exam for credit and/or advanced placement standing in college. Four college credits can also be earned through the Early Enrollment Program at Rhode Island College. Prerequisite: Completion of Pre-Calculus H with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Pre-Calculus teacher. Refer to the first few pages of this document for additional information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is offered to those students who have completed the calculus AB syllabus. The course completes the remaining topics of a second semester college calculus course. The topics covered include a review and an extension of the differential and integral topics covered in the AB syllabus and expand the applications of these concepts. Additional topics include parametric, polar, and vector functions and power series. (A review of additional topics is completed during summer break.) The course is demanding with respect to classwork and homework. Success in this course requires a strong and sound foundation in logic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, plus a sincere devotion to hard work and persistent effort with a clear and focused mind. A graphing calculator is required. Students who complete this course take the AP Calculus BC exam for credit and/or advanced placement standing in college. Prerequisite: Completion of Calculus AB with minimum grade of C or Calculus H with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Calculus H teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This calculus course will develop most of the topics that are on the syllabus of the AP Calculus AB course at a slower rate and with a less rigorous tone. The syllabus will include a preliminary review of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric, functions and conics. (Most of this review is completed during summer break.) The concept of differentiation and integration and their applications to real world problems are explored, developed, and analyzed. The development of the course encompasses a theoretical approach as well as a concrete understanding. All topics are explored numerically, graphically, and algebraically. The course is demanding with respect to classwork and homework. Success in this course requires a strong and sound foundation in logic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, plus a sincere devotion to hard work and persistent effort with a clear and focused mind. A graphing calculator is required. Upon completion of this course, students may enroll in AP Calculus BC, Statistics (AP, Honors, or CP) or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of the calculus honors teacher. Four college credits can be earned through the Early Enrollment Program at Rhode Island College. Prerequisite: Completion of Pre-Calculus Honors with a minimum grade of C or completion of Pre-Calculus CP with minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Pre-Calculus CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Calculus is a rigorous course designed to strengthen and extend students’ mathematical background. Topics presented are from continuous as well as discrete mathematics and include probability, polynomial and logarithmic functions, sequences, series, and an introduction to the derivative and integral concept of calculus. Since complex algebraic manipulations permeate all college mathematics, it is reasonable to continue skill development with patterns and algebraic algorithms at this stage of the student’s education. Students will find that the review and extension of the previously encountered concepts will connect their knowledge and help them assimilate new understandings. The use of the graphing calculator to explore the mathematical concepts will further clarify and deepen their understanding and generate more questions for exploration. Calculus will further connect topics and extend the application of mathematics to real world problems. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. To experience success the student must do daily homework, explore out-of-class projects and actively participate in class. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus H/CP and recommendation of Pre-Calculus teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 47 of 76.

Calculus BC

1254

Calculus

1252

Calculus

1251

College Preparatory Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Discrete Mathematics covers a wide-scope curriculum. Topics, such as logic, properties of integers, sequences, induction, recursion, combinatories, graphs, and networks are all discrete topics important in understanding current mathematics and its uses, particularly relative to computers. All of the content is studied in detail for its application to real-world problems using methods and applications settings that are reality oriented. This course also gives strong attention to the reason gin process used by mathematicians and those that use mathematics. Since complex algebraic manipulations are necessary in virtually all college mathematics courses that students will encounter, we continue to practice these skills, and develop an appreciation for the deductive approaches in many feels of study. The instructional methods used are designed to maximize the student's acquisition of skill and concept. The ability to analyze and carry out algorithms, the ability to develop and use mathematical properties and relationships, the ability to apply mathematics to real situations, and the ability to represent or picture mathematical concepts are all goals for students. Students enrolled in this course must have a solid understanding of the algebra and geometry of their previous courses. Students will be required to do homework daily, along with other outof-class projects. To be successful, students must be persistent with their work, must assume responsibility for the content, and must be actively involved in the process. A graphic calculator is required for students enrolled in this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Statistics CP or Calculus CP based on grades and recommendation of Discrete Teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus H/CP and recommendation of Pre-Calculus teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester Course 3.0 Credits This course focuses on the applications of mathematics to a variety of subjects and careers. The curriculum emphasizes mathematical modeling including process, collection, representation, interpretation, and prediction from real data. Models will come from many diverse areas including physics, economics, sports, health care, finance, biology, political science, sociology, and engineering. Instruction and assessment are designed to promote mathematical thinking by engaging students in exploring, analyzing, and applying important mathematical concepts and methods. Students will work in collaborative groups and individually as they investigate, conjecture, verify, generalize, prove, apply, evaluate, and communicate mathematical ideas. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in Statistics CP, Calculus CP or Discrete Math CP based on grades and recommendation of Applied Mathematics Teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/H and recommendation of Algebra 2 teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The Advanced Placement Statistics course introduces students to the major Concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Students who successfully complete the course and examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester college course in introductory statistics. AP Statistics is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed a second year course in algebra, regardless of the student’s intended college major. At least one statistics course is typically required for majors such as engineering, mathematics, psychology, sociology, health science, and business. This course will explore examples in diverse fields. Appropriate use of technology, student projects, and alternative assessments will be incorporated. This is a non-calculus based introductory course. A graphing calculator is essential for success in this course. Summer reading will be assigned. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 Honors with a minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Algebra 2 Honors teacher. Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 1E, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Honors Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Statistics Honors will explore and develop the four conceptual themes of the Advanced Placement Statistics program in less depth. Successful completion of this course will give students a preview and a firm foundation for any college statistics
February 18, 2010 Page 48 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Discrete Mathematics CP

1255

Applied Mathematics

1224

Statistics

1243

Statistics

1242

course. Students will complete group projects, including a culmination project employing inference. A graphing calculator will be used in class and for the daily homework assignments. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 or Pre-Calculus H with a minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 2 CP or Pre-Calculus CP with a minimum grade of B+ and recommendation of Pre-Calculus CP teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 1E, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Emphasis will be placed upon statistical applications relative to data and concepts, rather than formal probability and theory. Through active learning students will learn ideas and skills that will allow them to integrate their knowledge with other disciplines. Technological student projects, including use of Mini-tab and other forms of assessment will be incorporated, making Statistics an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed a second year of algebra. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Homework is assigned daily. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/H or Pre-Calculus CP/H. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 1E, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Computer Science I Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Students entering into the Computer Science I (CSI) course will be exposed to many of the concepts essential in the understanding and construction of computer programs. These concepts will be introduced and explored using the Java programming language. The course will cover a number of key topics crucial to software development including: variables, branching, looping, arrays, objects, sorting, data structures, and software engineering techniques. Students, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to design, build and modify Java components. Work will be primarily project-based, with a concentration on developing actual hands-on skills. Most work and exams will be on the computers and will be completed in class. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 H with a minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 2 CP with a minimum grade of B+ This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E Computer Science II 1263 1260 Statistics 1241

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course provides the continuation of the introduction to Java Programming. Topics include creating a Java application and applet, manipulating data using methods, decision making and repetition with reusable objects, arrays, loops, and layout managers using external classes, creating menus and button arrays using the abstract windows, swing interfaces with sorting and searching, writing data to a sequential data file, and accessing databases using JDBC. Topics will also include an introduction to the AP Computer Science A exam. Prerequisite: Completion of Computer Science I with a minimum grade of C This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E Advanced Placement Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The third course of the Computer Science series focuses upon preparing the student for the Advanced Placement Test in Computer Science AB. The course will begin with a review of CSI. Additional concepts will be introduced, such as analysis of algorithms, and advanced topics in sorting, data structures, algorithms, and software engineering. The class will participate in a full-lifecycle development project, with a goal of completed application by the end of the year. The course will expand beyond simple programming to involve homework, research, and reports, as students begin to explore more of the history and theory behind computer programming. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 H with a minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 2 CP with a minimum grade of B+ This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 49 of 76.

Computer Science AP

1264

College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester Course 3.0 Credits This course will explore the many places where the fields of art and mathematics overlap. Students will be exposed to a wide range of art, covering a long historical period and a great variety of styles. Topics may include: sculpture in ancient Greece, use of proportion in art, perspective, perspective machines and cameras, golden section, knots, and symmetry, Twentieth-century geometric art, chaos, and fractals. This course will use students’ interest in art or architecture as motivation for learning the mathematics needed to construct or to understand the work of art as well as art history. The course will be varied by demonstrations, hands-on class projects, films, videos, computer graphics, and perhaps a field trip. Success in this course requires a great deal of focus and work, both in class and at home. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in PreCalculus CP, Statistics CP or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/Honors This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s); 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Honors Grade 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course includes the study of vectors in the plane and space, systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, Eigen values and eigenvectors. Technology will be an integral part of this class. Concepts from linear algebra are used in nearly every upper level mathematics course and have become quite important in physics, engineering, and statistics. This is an introductory course in linear algebra primarily intended for students in mathematics, science, and engineering. Use of a graphing calculator is required for this course. Prerequisite: Completion of AP Calculus AB, BC or Honors with minimum grade of C and recommendation of AP Calculus teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s); 1D, 3A, 3B History of Mathematics College Preparatory Grade 12 Semester 3.0 Credits In this course, you will see firsthand many of the results that have made what mathematics is today and meet the mathematicians that created them. One particularly interesting attribute of these “builders: of mathematical structures is how clear they are about what to prove. The course will survey major mathematical developments beginning with ancient Greeks and tracing the development through Hindu-Indian mathematics, Arabic mathematics, and European mathematics’ up to the19th century, if time permits. Potential topics covered include geometry, number bases and number theory, algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, probability, and calculus. Mathematics did not arise in a vacuum, and students should obtain some overview of the world history into which mathematical development was embedded. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 CP or Honors and recommendation of Algebra 2 teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s); 1D, 3A, 3B 1223 Linear Algebra 1256

Geometry in Art and Architecture

1215

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Trigonometry, a one-semester course, prepares students for further studies of mathematical topics in Calculus and Physics. The course begins by teaching students to measure angles in degrees and radians, arc lengths, and chords. Students then study the basic trigonometric functions, sine, cosine, and tangent, and their inverses as well as the relationships of these functions to chords and right triangles. In addition, students apply their study of trigonometric functions and identities to find angles of elevation and depression and solve right triangles. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in PreCalculus CP, Statistics CP or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of Trigonometry teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/Honors This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3D

Trigonometry

1230

February 18, 2010 Page 50 of 76

Franklin High School Program of Studies

Game Development in Java (online only)

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Game development consists of many different aspects including programming, modeling, texturing, mapping, sprite design, and more. By the end of this game design course, students will be able to comprehend advanced programming methods, as well as master many aspects of game design. Student will develop one or two final mini-games that will encompass everything they have learned. This course may be taken in conjunction with Computer Science 1 or 2 Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 H with a minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 2 CP with a minimum grade of B+ This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E

1265

MUSIC PROGRAM

The music curriculum is designed to provide all students with knowledge and skills in music. Music courses also give students the tools for creating, communicating, and making informed and critical choices about aesthetic values in music. Student commitment and the development of good practice habits are integral qualities of the music program. Chorus Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Chorus is open to all students in Grades 9-12. Students without prior musical training are encouraged to join. Chorus is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Students will learn about how their voices function, proper vocal health practices as applied to both singing and speaking and how to use their voice through proper vocal technique using a variety of exercises and music that will span many different, styles, genres, time periods and languages. Students will also learn musical skills Including basic theory, ear training and sight singing as well as look at the historical, political and social significance of the music studied In class. Team building and assertive leadership skills are also key concepts taught in this class. Students are assessed through performance as well as traditional and non-traditional assessments. Honors students will complete a musical project designed to advance the students musical knowledge outside of the school day and benefit the community either through community service in the arts or performance. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits Chorus is open to all students in Grades 9-12. Students without prior musical training are encouraged to join. Chorus is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Students will learn about how their voices function, proper vocal health practices as applied to both singing and speaking and how to use their voice through proper vocal technique using a variety of exercises and music that will span many different styles, genres, time periods and languages. Students will also learn musical skills including basic theory, ear training and sight singing as well as looking at the historical, political and social significance of the music studied in class. Team building and assertive leadership skills are also key concepts taught in this class. Students are assessed through performance as well as traditional and non-traditional assessments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1.0 Credits Chamber Choir is open to all students in Grades 9-12 by audition and meets 3-4 hours per week outside of the regular school day. The Chamber Choir is a performance-oriented course in that rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. This course is an extension of the daytime choral program and focuses on advanced vocal practices and repertoire for smaller, technically proficient choral ensembles and singers. This group will study music covering many different, styles, genres, and languages including but not limited to vocal jazz and popular a cappella. Students must either be enrolled In Chorus during the school day or take private voice lessons to qualify to participate in this ensemble. Students will be assessed through performance as well as traditional and non-traditional
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 51 of 76.

1811

Chorus

1810

Chamber Choir

1812

assessments. Auditions take place in September. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Concert Band 1803 Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 (See separate course descriptions for freshmen) Full Year 5.0 Credits The Concert Band (Honors) is open to all students in Grades 10-12 who play a wind or percussion instrument usable in a modern wind band. Students without prior training on one of these instruments may be admitted at the discretion of the director, based on the availability of private musical instruction. The Concert Band is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music of various time periods and styles is studied, and at times the ensemble may be broken into smaller groups based on the performing abilities and instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course requires personal practice outside of the school day. Students will also be assessed on basic elements of music theory and history as they relate to the music being performed. Students are required to complete a musical project each term. Students enrolled in Concert Band (Honors) are required to participate in the Pep Band. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Concert Band 1802 College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 (See separate course descriptions for freshmen) Full Year 5.0 Credits The Concert Band is open to all students in Grades 10-12 who play a wind or percussion instrument usable in a modern wind band. Students without prior training on one of these instruments may be admitted at the discretion of the director, based on the availability of private musical instruction. The Concert Band is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music of various time periods and styles is studied, and at times the ensemble may be broken into smaller groups based on the performing abilities and instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course requires personal practice outside of the school day. Students will also be assessed on basic elements of music theory and history as they relate to the music being performed. Students enrolled in the Concert Band are eligible to participate in the Pep Band. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B

Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits The Wind Ensemble is open to students in grades 9-12 by audition/ recommendation. The wind ensemble is an advanced performing ensemble designed to challenge the most ambitious students. The Wind Ensemble is a performance-oriented course and additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Students study music of various time periods and styles and at times will be broken into chamber music ensembles based on the performing abilities and instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of the course requires daily personal practice and private instruction is expected. Students are required to complete a graded audition each term in which a student’s ability to perform scales, musical patterns and performance music will be assessed. Students in the Wind Ensemble are required to participate in the Pep Band. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 2.0 Credits The Jazz Ensemble I is open by audition to all students in Grades 9-12 who play an instrument usable in a modern Jazz Ensemble. The Jazz Ensemble rehearses approximately four to five hours per week outside of the school day and travels to festivals in and out of the state throughout the year. The Jazz Ensemble is a performance-oriented course in that rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music is studied from various time periods and styles throughout the history of Jazz. Successful completion of this course requires individual practice outside of the school day. Auditions for the Jazz Ensemble are held in September. Rehearsals are held after school. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Jazz Band 1806

Wind Ensemble

1804

February 18, 2010 Page 52 of 76

Franklin High School Program of Studies

College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 2.0 Credit The Jazz Ensemble II is open by audition to all students in Grades 9-12 who play an instrument usable in a modern Jazz Ensemble. The Jazz Ensemble rehearses approximately three hours per week outside of the school day and travels to festivals in and out of the state throughout the Year. The Jazz Ensemble is a performance- oriented course in that rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music is studied from various time periods and styles throughout the history of Jazz. Successful completion of this course requires individual practice outside of the school day. Auditions for the Jazz Ensemble are held in September. Rehearsals are held after school. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Honors Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits String Orchestra Honors is a course open to all students in Grades 9-12 who play a string instrument usable in a modern orchestra. Students with musical training on non-orchestral instruments, as well as untrained but interested students may be admitted at the discretion of the director based on the availability of private instruction time. Students meeting these criteria must take private lessons on their instrument. String Orchestra is a performance-oriented course, in that additional rehearsals and public performance are an integral part of the course. Music suited to full and chamber orchestra is studied from all musical time periods. The string orchestra can be divided into separate performing groups such as full orchestra, chamber orchestra, and small ensembles based on performing abilities or instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course will require personal practice outside of the school day. Basic elements of music theory and history will also be assessed as they relate to the music being performed. Honors students will be required to complete a musical project each term. These projects will consist of preparing audition pieces, performances of all 12 major scales with speed and accuracy, and an audition for Concert Hour. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits String Orchestra CP is a course open to all students in Grades 9-12 who play a string instrument usable in a modern orchestra. Students with musical training on non-orchestral instruments, as well as untrained but interested students may be admitted at the discretion of the director based on the availability of private instruction time. Students meeting these criteria must take private lessons on their instrument. String Orchestra is a performance-oriented course, in that additional rehearsals and public performance are an integral part of the course. Music suited to full and chamber orchestra is studied from all musical time periods. The string orchestra can be divided into separate performing groups such as full orchestra, chamber orchestra, and small ensembles based on performing abilities or instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course will require personal practice outside of the school day. Basic elements of music theory and history will also be assessed through class performance and tests as they relate to the music being performed. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Honors/College Prep Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1.0 Credit Students will study and perform musical literature written for orchestra. This performance group is further designed to develop and enhance individual and ensemble skills. Students are required to attend and perform at all rehearsals and concerts. Rehearsals will be held before and after school. Enrollment is by audition and/or consent of the instructor. All students enrolled in String Orchestra are also enrolled in this course. Attendance at rehearsals and performances is mandatory. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Music Theory AP is a year-long course open to all students in Grades 10-12. Students must have the permission of the instructor or department head in order to be eligible for this course. Students enrolling in this course should have substantial prior musical knowledge including reading fluency in one or more Clefs, knowledge of major and minor key signatures,
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 53 of 76.

Jazz Ensemble II

1805

String Orchestra

1821

String Orchestra

1820

Full Orchestra

1822

Music Theory AP

1840

and an understanding of rhythm and beat. The goal of this course is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Music Theory. The course will cover intervals, triads, four part writing, analysis and ear training. Students will be assessed using homework, traditional tests and quizzes, projects, and performances on various instruments and voice. Prerequisite: A grade of 80% or higher in Introduction to Music Theory is a required prerequisite for students who do not participate in an FHS daytime performing ensemble. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3C, 1E College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 5.0 Credits This course is an introduction to the principles of music theory. It includes the study and development of practical skills in reading, writing, listening, sight singing, musical signs and terms, intervals, triads, major and minor scales, key signatures, meter and rhythm. There is also an introduction to basic harmony. A passing grade of 80% or higher in this class is a required prerequisite for students who do not participate in an FHS daytime performing ensemble who intend to enroll in Advanced Placement Music Theory. This course is also highly recommended for students in performing ensembles who intend to enroll in Advanced Placement Music Theory. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A, 3B, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3C, 1E College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Jazz is considered by many to be the first art form developed by the United States to gain worldwide acclaim. One of the most unique, challenging and rewarding aspects of performing jazz is the freedom of the performer to make up the music as it is performed, commonly termed improvising. Students in Jazz Improvisation will learn basic techniques for approaching the various styles of jazz including blues, swing, and bebop. Students will learn the theory and history of jazz as it applies to performance practice. Students will be assessed through a variety of formats including written work, projects and performances. It is suggested that students be fluent in reading music on their primary instrument and that they have at least three years of playing experience on that instrument. No prior jazz experience is necessary and any instruments are welcome but must be supplied by the student. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course is a performance-based class for students interested in exploring and performing musical theater, operetta and operatic vocal literature. Through guided instruction, singers and pianists will collaborate to put together a program of musical scenes and songs that will be performed for elementary and middle school students and the Franklin community as their final project. Students will learn how the human voice functions, strategies for healthy vocal production, acting techniques and stage movement for singers. They also will learn about historical influences on musical theater and opera, role research, character development, and audition techniques. In addition to the final project, students will be assessed through traditional and non-traditional methods including projects, singing quizzes, tests, journal writing, personal and group performance evaluations, and critical self-evaluations. Prerequisite: All students must complete one year of chorus or one full year of theater courses. Singers are expected to have a strong basic knowledge of their instrument upon entering this class and should be prepared to sing by themselves in front of their peers on a regular basis. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 American Popular Music and Society College Preparatory Grades 9,10,11,12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course studies the historical influences and music theory of 20th Century American Popular Music. Students will learn and apply basic performance techniques on all instruments commonly used in this music, including guitar, piano, bass, and drums. The outcome for this course is a final project in which students will compose a popular song using the theoretical, historical, and applied instrumental knowledge learned throughout the course. These songs will be performed and recorded by students in the class. In addition to the final project, students will be assessed through traditional tests and quizzes and
Franklin High School Program of Studies

Music Theory I

1887

Jazz Improvisation

1807

Music Theater Workshop

1815

1830

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playing tests on each of the instruments studied. No prior performance experience on any of these instruments is expected or necessary. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1D, 3A, 3B, 3D, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 1E, 3C, 4A College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits Recording Techniques is a semester course open to all students. The course will explore the basic principles of recording, including acoustic properties, hardware specifications, and the recording and editing process. The course will culminate in a group-recording project. Students are assessed through traditional tests, quizzes, and homework as well as group work and projects. Recording Techniques is offered both semesters and is required for Recording Techniques II. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1D, 1E, 2 College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits The course will explore in-depth principles of recording including microphone specifications, acoustics, multi-track recording on digital workstations and computer software, expanded mixing ideas, and applying polishing effects in the mastering stage of recording. Students will be required to complete individual and group recording projects, along with accumulating recording time on locations. Students will be assessed through quizzes, tests, group work, and projects. This class is open to all students who passed Recording Techniques I with a grade of 80% or better. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1D, 1E, 2 Freshman Honors Grade 9 Full Year 5.0 Credits The Freshman Band (Honors) is for all students in Grade 9 who play a wind or percussion instrument usable in a modern wind band. Students must have prior training on one of these instruments, and middle school experience. The Freshman Band is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music of various time periods and styles is studied, and at times the ensemble may be broken into smaller groups based on the performing abilities and instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course requires personal practice outside of the school day. Students will be assessed on basic elements of music, basic concepts of playing their Instrument, and performing In at least four concerts per year. Students enrolled in Freshman Band (Honors) are required to participate in the Pep Band. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 College Preparatory Grade 9 Full Year 5.0 Credits The Freshman Band is open to all students in Grade 9 who play a wind or percussion instrument usable in a modern wind band. Students must have prior training on one of these instruments, and middle school experience. The Freshman Band is a performance-oriented course in that additional rehearsals and performances outside of the school day are an integral part of the course. Music of various time periods and styles is studied, and at times the ensemble may be broken into smaller groups based on the performing abilities and instrumentation of its members. Successful completion of this course requires personal practice outside of the school day. Students will also be assessed on basic elements of music basic concepts of playing their instrument, and performing in at least four concerts per year. Students enrolled in the Freshman Band are eligible to participate in the Pep Band. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5 College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course is a performance-based class for students interested in selecting, perfecting and performing vocal music appropriate to their own voice. Voices will be evaluated and analyzed, and song selections and styles will be individualized and geared to each student. Students will learn how their voice functions and strategies for healthy vocal production. They will learn various vocal styles such as pop, jazz, country, musical theater, contemporary, rock, blues and classical (if
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Recording Techniques I

1831

Recording Techniques II

1832

1801

Freshman Band

1800

Pop Idol Workshop

1814

interested). They will perform in class juries which will be videoed for evaluation. Audition techniques and strategies will be learned, as well as microphone use and work with a live accompanist. All students must be prepared to sing by themselves in front of the class on a regular basis. They will be evaluated through traditional and non-traditional methods including projects, singing juries, and group evaluations as well as critical self-evaluations. Students are strongly encouraged to be in Chorus and participate in the school vocal activities and productions. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1C, 1D, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1E, 2, 4A, 4B, 5

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH PROMOTION DEPARTMENT Franklin High School recognizes that regular physical activity is important for all students. As such and consistent with Massachusetts General Laws, the school requires four years of physical education for all students in grades 9-12. Franklin High School has developed three pathways by which students may meet the physical education requirement: 1. 2. 3. Through participation in the school physical education classes once per cycle for two semesters per year. Through participation on one of the school’s athletic teams (SUBJECT TO ELIGIBILITY POLICIES). Through participation in an outside of school organized physical activity or activities totaling more than 30 hours in a school year, including those listed in the Pathways description or other activities that may be proposed by students, that receive prior administrative approval. In order to meet the requirements for approval, the proposed program must have a strong instructional component.

Students will select a pathway as part of the course selection process. Students who select Pathway 2 or 3 must complete and return the Pathways selection form along with a detailed description of the activity on the first day of school in order to gain final approval. Any student who fails to return the completed form will be enrolled in Pathway 1. Students electing option 1 will be scheduled into a physical education class once per cycle opposite a five (5) credit course. Students electing options 2 or 3 may either participate in a directed study opposite a five (5) credit course, or elect additional six (6) credit courses. If a student elects to participate in the school’s physical education pathway, the student must have elected at least one five (5) credit course. Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 2.5 Credits This elective will provide opportunities for students to learn and participate in a variety of team sports with a focus on action, teamwork, fair play and sportsmanship, tournament play and FUN. As an enrichment opportunity, the class will also visit the Patriots “Hall of Fame” and participate in a variety of activities in collaboration with staff from the Patriots. Games to be played include but not limited to: gator ball, lacrosse, Ultimate Frisbee, softball, basketball, floor hockey, mat ball, flag football, “Capture the Flag,” and soccer. Speed and Strength Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 2.5 Credits This course will teach students the skills and provide opportunities needed to improve speed, strength, power, endurance, balance and agility for participation in a variety of sports, other activities, or personal well being. A program design for specific sport training will also be available. Instead of having to work after school on improving your skills, be with friends in a friendly yet challenging environment. Lifetime Activities Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 2.5 Credits Life-long sport, recreation, and leisure activities will be taught and experienced. This course will include but not limited to: golf, archery, bocce, horseshoes, Ladder Ball, Bag-O, badminton, wiffle ball, croquet, and outdoor adventure experiences. This is a great opportunity to build relationships, and learn fun activities for an entire lifetime. A culminating activity can include an overnight camping experience. Group Exercise Grades 9, 10, 11 Semester 3.0 Credits This will be a cutting-edge fitness class designed to challenge the body, renew motivation and yield incredible results. Students will be taught how to build strength, stamina, and tone. Personal programs will be designed. The class will
Franklin High School Program of Studies

Team Sports I and II

1621

1623

1625

1626

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include; Yoga, pilates, circuit training, TaeBo, ‘Boot” camp, Core Training (on fitness balls), step aerobics, “Ab” Sculpting, Zumba Dance, and activities for stress management and relaxation. Instead of having to pay and travel to a gym, be in school with friends and experience a fun way to improve and build a healthy body and mind. Health Promotion Grade 9 Semester 2.5 Credits The Health Education curriculum reflects the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Frameworks and addresses student needs based on the MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey that is conducted in grades 9-12 every two years. These courses support the following Academic Expectations: 1A, 1B, 1D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A The courses assess the following Academic Expectation(s): 5 Health Promotion (online) Grade 9 Semester 2.5 Credits The Health Education curriculum reflects the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Frameworks and addresses student needs based on the MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey that is conducted in grades 9-12 every two years. These courses support the following Academic Expectations: 1A, 1B, 1D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A The courses assess the following Academic Expectation(s): 5 1611 1611

Grade 9 The content of the ninth grade Health Education curriculum is presented in a systematic, sequential, and age-appropriate manner. For some units, students complete a series of self-assessments to evaluate various aspects of their health. Content areas include: mental health, suicide prevention, stress and time management techniques, human development and sexuality, organ donation, prevention of dating violence, Alcohol 101, STD and pregnancy prevention, substance abuse prevention using research based curricula, fast food survival guides, American Heart Association, CPR, and how to access reliable health information and resources. Students work individually and collaboratively on activity based lessons. Students are required to complete one library research project/presentation per term and four hours of community service for the year. Leadership and Wellness College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course is for students who may be interested in entering the fields of physical education, coaching, athletic training, or wish to develop better leadership and personal wellness skills. Students will be involved in a variety of activities in both the classroom and gymnasium. Students will research current information in the seven components of wellness, complete self assessments in both leadership and wellness, teach activities and lessons to peers and underclassmen, complete projects that promote advocacy, and coordinate school wide activities such as a Health Fair and Blood Drive. College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course is intended for health promotion for athletes and active students. Focuses on specific topics that are critical to athletic performance such as developing a healthy diet that meets the needs of the specific sport or athlete, maintaining focus and motivation, time management and goal setting, dealing with the stress of competition, use of substances to enhance performance, and career exploration in this field. In addition to classroom work, guest speakers and field trips will enrich this learning experience that can be valuable beyond the high school experience. Food and Fitness College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits This course will provide education and hands-on activities with an emphasis on practical ways to promote healthy nutrition and fitness. Topics include “snack attacks,” cafeteria bites,” avoiding the “Freshmen 15 in College, “Obesity in a Bottle” (soda, sport drinks) and the Fast Food Frenzy. Guest speakers, career opportunities and special presentations as well as providing advocacy within the school and community will provide additional opportunities for students. College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 2.5 Credits A course designed for students in Peer Leadership, Mediation, Mentoring, and other student leaders to participate in an advanced leadership program to develop 21st Century Skills that will prepare students for tomorrow’s leaders in the school, Leadership in Action 1629 1628 Enhancing Sport and Athletic Performance 1627 1622

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February 18, 2010 Page 57 of 76.

community, and beyond their high school experience. A variety of enrichment opportunities, guest speakers, career exploration, planning /implementing actual events will be part of the learning experience.

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Science Department offers a variety of courses in the biological, earth, and physical sciences. The science program is structured to provide students of all abilities the opportunity to experience four years of science. Upon completion of the science program, students will understand interconnections among the physical, biological, and social worlds. These understandings will enable our students to achieve an increasingly comprehensive and reliable understanding of the human species and its environment. Students develop awareness of the natural world by engaging in the following practices: observing, critical thinking, experimenting, and validating. Mathematical skills and knowledge are required to some degree in all science courses. Students should be careful to select science courses that align with their proficiency in mathematics.

Honors Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits Biology Honors serves as an introduction to the concepts crucial to life on Earth. Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Molecular and Mendelian Genetics, Classification, Evolution and Diversity, and Ecology are the main topics covered in this yearlong course. Through a combination of lectures, experiments, multi-media presentations, and longitudinal projects students gain an understanding into the complexity and wonder of life. Utilization of this material will allow the student to understand, analyze, and make critical decisions about modern biological issues. Student projects will be carried out during the year affording students an opportunity to demonstrate an understanding of concepts illuminated throughout the course. Success in Honors Biology is highly dependent on strong language ability. Enrollment guidelines: A minimum grade of B+ in Grade 8 Science and English This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):3C, 3D College Preparatory Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits Biology CP provides students with an introduction to the various ideas key to the understanding of modern Biology. Basic Chemistry, Cells, Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology are the major concepts of this introductory course. Each concept is presented in various formats including multi-media, discussion groups, and lectures. Students demonstrate their understanding of biologic concepts through self-directed investigations, topic presentations, and laboratory experiments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):3C, 3D Biology 1302

Biology

1303

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course entails the study of Earth’s origin, history, structure, and systems. Using rocks, minerals, and maps as a foundation, students will learn how the earth formed, as well as the geo-physical, geo-chemical, and internal/external energy systems that continue to shape and re-shape the planet. The effects of the rock, water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles on earth systems are explored in this course. Classroom activities, laboratory experiences, independent projects, and occasional field excursions are provided to enhance each student’s understanding and application of the course material. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A & 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C & 3D

Geology

1367

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Oceanography is the study of the physical features and natural resources in the Earth’s oceans. This course deals mainly with physical oceanography and encompasses topics such as the: geology and geography of ocean basins; physical properties of sea water; marine chemistry; salinity and density; circulation of the oceans; waves; tides; the transfer of energy; oceanographic instruments, tools, and methods; as well as the interdependent relationships between ocean and
February 18, 2010 Page 58 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Oceanography

1361

human systems. Classroom activities, independent projects, laboratory experimentation, and web-based research are used to advance student knowledge and understanding of ocean concepts, theories, and phenomena. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A & 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C & 3D Meteorology College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Meteorology is the study and scientific exploration of Earth’s atmosphere, weather, and climate and its effect on humans and the environment. Among the topics to be covered in this course are the atmosphere, evaporation, condensation, precipitation, atmospheric pressure, winds, air masses, fronts, storms, weather forecasts, climate, climate changes, and the interactions that occur between the biosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere. Students will advance their skills in science through the use of laboratory techniques, projects, field studies, and web-based research. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A & 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C & 3D Astronomy College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits An exploration of the history, position, composition, evolution and characteristics of planets, stars, and other objects in space through the use of current events, sky observations, lab experiments, and projects. Students will learn how to observe and investigate objects in the sky, survey our own planet, as well as explore the solar system. Students will also investigate stars, constellations, galaxies, and the origin of the universe, as well as the technologies used to explore space. Some nighttime observations will be required. Students are expected to be proficient in Algebra and Geometry, as these math skills will be utilized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra and Geometry, and successful completion of Chemistry, or student may be concurrently enrolled in Chemistry This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A & 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D 1343 1362

History of the Universe

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3 Credits This course highlights a chronological exploration into man’s understanding of the universe in which we live. Students will explore scientific discoveries that have lead to current understandings about the history of the universe, the evolution of life forms, and the laws and theories that relate to both. Students will: compare ancient philosophies to modern atomic theory and models; learn how spectral analysis has been used to measure the speed of expansion, star classification, and the age of the sun; as well as investigate astrophysical concepts such as Big Bang Theory, Nebular Theory, and the age of the universe. The process of dating events and phenomena in Earth’s history through fossils, sediment layering, and radioisotope techniques will be explored. The remainder of this course will be dedicated to investigating the “tree” of all life forms on Earth. Prerequisite: Chemistry This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A & 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C & 3D

1344

Ecology

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This is a course that involves the design of nature; that is, the interrelationships amongst all living and non-living components of the environment. The course will include discussions regarding the delicate balance of nature and the diverse interactions that exist among life forms, supplemented by lab work. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 4A & 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C

1360

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February 18, 2010 Page 59 of 76.

Land Use

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course involves the study of limited land resources and how they are used. Land is consumed for agriculture, industry, transportation, recreation, and homes. As a natural resource it is being depleted. The current use of land and alternative practices will be discussed, and a long term project involving a proposal for land development in Franklin will be required. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 4A & 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C

1363

Pollution: Sources, Treatment and Prevention

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course addresses various forms of environmental pollution including: air, water, land, climate, etc., and will include investigations of pollution causes and treatments, as well as an emphasis on preventive measures that man can implement. The course will include a combination of classroom activities, discussion, and lab experiences. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 4A & 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C Alternative Energy and Conservation College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Alternative Energy and Conservation is an exploration of the limitations of fossil fuels as an energy source, and the viability of alternatives (solar, wind, etc). The course will include a combination of classroom activities, discussion, and lab experiences. Prerequisite: Biology This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 4A & 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C 1365

1364

Chemistry

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is for the self-motivated student interested in pursuing a career in science, engineering, and medical fields. Content is presented at an advanced level and pace. Students in Honors Chemistry will explore the chemical and physical nature of matter, atomic structure, Periodic Table, chemical bonds, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, solutions, acids and bases, nuclear reactions, equilibrium, and kinetics. The laboratory experience directly supports the concepts introduced in the classroom. The language of chemistry is incorporated in class discussion and laboratory experiences. This course takes a traditional mathematical approach to chemistry and requires well developed mathematical reasoning and skills. Students will experience greater success in the course if they are currently enrolled in Algebra II Honors. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D

1322

Chemistry

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is for students interested in pursuing a career in science, engineering, and medical fields. Students in Chemistry will explore the chemical and physical nature of matter, atomic structure, Periodic Table, chemical bonds, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, solutions, acids and bases, nuclear reactions, equilibrium, and kinetics. The laboratory experience directly supports the concepts introduced in the classroom. The language of chemistry is incorporated in class discussion and laboratory experiences. This course takes a traditional mathematical approach to chemistry and will require mathematical reasoning and skills. Prerequisites: Students must have (1) Completed Algebra I with a minimum grade of “C”, (2) Completed Geometry with a minimum grade of “C” or be concurrently enrolled in Geometry This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D

1321

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course is an introduction to chemistry concepts, with an emphasis on problem-based learning. The class takes an issues-based approach in the study of matter, through the use of curriculum developed by the American Chemical Society. Students investigate real world societal issues, with a focus on water quality, structure and use of materials, and petroleum use throughout the world. Students will engage in discussion and debate of chemistry-related issues and problem solving, as well as develop proficiency in fundamental laboratory techniques, including measurement, data collection and analysis, and the manipulation of laboratory apparatus. Grades will be based on daily homework, tests, quizzes, laboratory activities, class participation, and projects. Prerequisite: Students must have (1) successfully completed Algebra 1 and (2) successfully completed Geometry or be concurrently enrolled in Geometry This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Chemistry in the Community II is a course designed for students who wish to continue their study of chemistry through problem-based learning. As with Chemistry in the Community I, the class takes an issues-based approach in the study of matter, through the use of curriculum developed by the American Chemical Society. Students investigate real world societal issues, with a focus on the chemistry of the atmosphere, industrial application, nuclear interactions, and the chemistry of food. Students will engage in discussion and debate of chemistry-related issues and problem solving, as well as develop proficiency in fundamental laboratory techniques, including measurement, data collection and analysis, and the manipulation of laboratory apparatus. Grades will be based on daily homework, tests, quizzes, laboratory activities, class participation, and projects. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed Chemistry in the Community I Please Note: It is not required that a student take this course immediately following Chemistry in the Community I. This course may be taken at any point beyond the Chemistry in the Community I prerequisite. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Chemistry in the Community II 1325

Chemistry in the Community I

1324

College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits You’ve been engaged by “CSI” and have been fascinated by “NCIS” but how accurately do these shows portray the realities of forensic science? The field of forensic science comprises several areas of study (anatomy, chemistry, biology, physics, etc.) and this course aims to integrate these sciences in the pursuit of justice. This course will focus on the criminal investigation process which will include crime scene investigation, evidence gathering procedures and subsequent laboratory analysis of evidence. Each student should finish this class with an understanding of the history and definition of forensic science, legal framework in which forensic science is conducted, common and recently developed forensic applications, potential forms of evidence and their analysis, and presentation of facts for a court of law. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is for the student who intends to pursue higher education in the sciences and/or engineering. The problemsolving approach emphasizes the application of physical science principles to real-life situations and requires a significant mathematics background. Course topics include the study of mechanics (kinematics and dynamics), forces, work, energy and waves (sound and light). Laboratory experiments and activities are integrated to allow the students to experience “the way physics works” as they study the concepts. Special topics from outside sources will supplement the class material. Each student is required to complete three design and construction projects in addition to the laboratory work. Successful completion of this course is required for enrollment in Physics AP. After completing this course, students will be able to quantitatively define/ describe the dynamics between forces, work, and energy. Students will show proficiency in solving motion problems cinematically. Students will accurately analyze motion graphically. Students will show a working knowledge of waves and how they are related to the concepts of sound and light. Students will be able to show how the
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 61 of 76.

Introduction to Forensic Science

1367

Physics

1342

concepts studied are integrated into understanding the universe. Historically, students who performed well in this course had successfully completed Geometry Honors and Algebra II Honors and were concurrently enrolled in Algebra III/Trigonometry or Pre-Calculus. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is for the student who has interest in the physical sciences. A traditional presentation of the concept of motion, forces, work, power, energy, and waves (sound and light) is made with emphasis on problem-solving techniques. Although the approach is more qualitative than quantitative, a sound background in mathematics is necessary. To be successful, students should have completed Algebra II with a grade of C or better. Laboratory experiences are used to emphasize the concepts and allow students to become familiar with apparatus. Students are required to design and construct three projects. Outside readings are required to augment the class material. After completing this course, students will be able to define/describe the dynamics of motion and demonstrate an ability to solve problems involving motion. Students will be able to show the interconnection of force, work, power, and energy. Students will be able to construct motion graphs and make conclusions from graphs of this type. Students will show a basic knowledge of waves and how sound and light behave as waves. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 4 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Wave Physics will cover the branch of physics which deals with light and sound. Beginning with a study of waves in springs and water, students will then learn about topics such as mirrors, lenses, color, rainbows, pitch, frequency, resonance, interference and diffraction. Basic algebra will be used in mathematical problem solving. Hands-on laboratory experiences will be used to emphasize the concepts and allow students to become familiar with equipment. The topics covered will be related to the study of music, art and photography Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course will explore the topics of electricity, magnetism, and the relationship between the two. Topics covered will be electrostatics, electric fields, electric currents, electric power, dc circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism, motors, and generators. Through hands-on laboratory experiences students will become familiar with using basic electric meters, such as voltmeters and ammeters. Basic algebra will be used in mathematical problem solving. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Honors Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Comparative Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the morphology and physiology of vertebrates and their evolutionary lineage. Through the extent of this course, students will be exposed to the physiologic and morphologic underpinnings of the vertebrate body plan. Topics covered within this course include: movement and support, integration and coordination, processing and transport, and reproduction with an emphasis on a variety of vertebrate groups. Students enrolled in the course will, by its completion, have gained an understanding of the major organ systems and their respective roles in the maintenance of systemic homeostasis along with a general understanding of the evolutionary history of each of the major vertebrate groups. Extensive dissection is a key component of this course. Special focus will be placed on the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and nervous system. Requirements: Students electing this course are expected to have successfully completed Biology (H) and Chemistry (H) and should possess strong verbal and communication skills. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):3C, 3D
February 18, 2010 Page 62 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Physics

1341

Wave Physics

1348

Electricity and Magnetism

1347

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and the function of the human body. This course will emphasize how disease affects human systems. Topics of discussion include: movement and support, integration and coordination, processing and transport and reproduction. At the conclusion of the course, students will develop an appreciation of the form and function of the human body and gain an understanding of the role each organ system plays in the homeostasis of the human organism. Dissection is a component of this course. Students electing this course should have successfully completed Biology and should possess strong verbal and communication skills. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Behavioral science examines and compares animal and human behavior. Both biological and environmental influences on behavior will be studied. Topics will include innate vs. learned behaviors, communication, predator/prey relations, social behavior, courtship and mating strategies, migration, dominance and territoriality, and rhythmic behaviors. After completing this course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of both how and why an organism behaves as it does (biology vs. environment); design and carry out labs that will examine various behaviors discussed in class; analyze data in order to write formal lab reports; provide routine care and maintenance of animals us in the course. Students will be required to write four research papers, and complete a human behavior field experiment using a topic approved by the instructor. Students enrolling in this course should have successfully completed a course in biology. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 3B, 3C, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3D Advanced Placement Grade 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The Biology AP course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college Biology course. Its aim is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. This course teaches an understanding of concepts, science as a process, scientific inquiry methods and the application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns. The major themes in this course include: science as a process; evolution; energy transfer; continuity and change; relationship of structure to function; regulation; interdependence in nature; and science, technology and society. The AP program mandates twelve labs, and several additional experiences are included to increase proficiency in the required labs. Lab work is designed to develop skills such as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental design, manual manipulation, lab safety, data interpretation, statistical analysis, and operation of technical equipment. Laboratory experiences are a major component of the AP Biology program and constitute approximately one third of the course credit. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Biology, which may result in college credit and/or advanced placement. Students who enroll in this course must have attained a minimum grade of B+ in Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry. Concurrent or previous enrollment in Honors Comparative Anatomy and Physiology is highly recommended. They should also have a keen interest in the biological sciences and complete a summer reading assignment. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Chemistry AP Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Advanced Placement Chemistry is the equivalent of a general chemistry course taken during the first college year. The theoretical aspects of chemistry are explored with emphasis on mathematical modeling. The major topics include Kinetic Molecular Theory, Structure of Matter, Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamics. Students must be self-motivated and well organized with good time management skills. The course requires students to spend at least five hours per week in independent study. Students electing this course must complete a summer requirement including basic problem solving strategies and atomic structure. To enroll in AP Chemistry, students should have completed or be enrolled in Pre- Calculus. Prerequisite: Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C, 2, 3A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s):3C, 3
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 63 of 76.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

1306

Behavioral Science

1305

Biology AP

1308

1323

Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Physics AP is a second year course for students who are expressly interested in majoring in the physical sciences or engineering in college/university and who plan to pursue a career in one of these areas. After a review of topics from Honors Physics, other classical topics such as electricity, magnetism, optics, and energy will be studied as well as modern physics concepts and astronomy/cosmology. Laboratory work will be integrated into the course and involve traditional experiments of these topics. Much use will be made of video series to study the modern concepts. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam for Physics that is given in May. A series of selected reading/problem solving assignments is a requirement as preparation for this course. Prerequisite: Completion of Physics Honors course with a minimum grade of “B+” and recommendation from current science teacher This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Environmental Science AP Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This course is offered to students in the 11th and 12th grades that meet the prerequisites and is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students who enroll in this course must have attained a minimum grade of B+ in Honors Biology or Honors Chemistry. They should have an interest in environmental science and will be required to complete a summer reading assignment, to submit at least one research project/paper per quarter, and to take the advanced placement exam in May. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 3B, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 3A Introduction to Forensic Science (online) College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits You’ve been engaged by “CSI” and have been fascinated by “LA Law” but how accurately do these shows portray the realities of forensic science? The field of forensic science comprises several areas of study (anatomy, chemistry, biology, physics, etc.) and this course aims to integrate these sciences in the pursuit of justice. This course will focus on the criminal investigation process that will include crime scene investigation, evidence gathering procedures and subsequent laboratory analysis of evidence. Each student should finish this class with an understanding of the history and definition of forensic science, legal framework in which forensic science is conducted, common and recently developed forensic applications, potential forms of evidence and their analysis, and presentation of facts for a court of law. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grade 10 Semester 3.0 Credits Students will investigate the history and functionality of the cosmos. The objectives of this class are intended to reach an understanding of our known universe and provide a grand perspective of the universe. Students will explore the methods by which astronomers measure cosmic distances, composition of stars and intergalactic matter, as well as the behavior of matter under the physical laws of our universe. Some of the coursework involves Algebra and Geometry skills. Students are expected to be proficient in Algebra and Geometry before attempting this course. Prerequisite: 1) Successful completion of Chemistry, Algebra, and Geometry and 2) Successful completion of Physics or students may be concurrently enrolled in physics This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Astronomy (online) 1346 1350 1366

Physics AP

1345

February 18, 2010 Page 64 of 76

Franklin High School Program of Studies

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT At Franklin High School, the social studies curriculum is based on the Massachusetts Social Studies Framework. Instruction aims to produce students who are actively involved in their own education. Students are encouraged to distinguish fact from opinion, to recognize cause and effect relationships, to understand the place of the United States in a diverse world society, and to appreciate the role of citizens in a participatory democracy. All courses provide opportunities to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. In addition, students are given opportunities to be successful with both traditional and authentic assessments that consider diverse learning styles. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. College Preparatory Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits Grade 9 World History at the college preparatory level will follow the same thematic overview as the honors course. More attention will be paid to making sure students have a strong foundation in reading and writing skills, as well as skills in organizing information via different note taking strategies. This will ensure that students can achieve a high level of learning. Students will be presented with a thematic overview of world history from the rise of the Absolute monarchs to the 21st century. College preparatory level students will also learn the skills necessary to become information problem solvers, but will engage in activities designed to give them the necessary support they may need. Students will be introduced to giving oral presentations using presentation software. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3B Honors Grade 9 Full Year 6.0 Credits Grade 9 Honors World History is open to freshmen who have demonstrated skill in reading comprehension and writing. Enrollment in Honors English is helpful. The course follows the recommended topics published in the Massachusetts Social Studies State Frameworks. Students will be presented with a thematic overview of world history from the rise of the Absolute monarchs to the 21st century. Students will be introduced to the historical method of research through the use of primary and secondary sources. Students should expect nightly homework assignments as well as short and long-term writing assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C College Preparatory Grade 10 Full Year 6.0 Credits United States History I will begin in 1750 with the late colonial period of North America and end with a study of America at the turn of the century. Student achievement will be supported by varied teaching strategies that continue to strengthen reading, writing, and organizational skills. Students will engage in Internet research using their problem solving skills. Students at this level will also be required to write a research paper and give oral presentations, enhanced by technology. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3B Honors Grade 10 Full Year 6.0 Credits United States History I will begin in 1750 with the late colonial period of North America and end with a study of America at the turn of the century. The course will cover major skills and topics presented in the state Social Studies Frameworks. Enrollment in Honors English will be helpful. The honors course will continue to place emphasis on strong reading and writing skills. Utilizing their information problem solving skills, students will continue to strengthen their Internet research skills. Student work will include writing a major research paper, oral presentations, and technology enhanced presentations. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3B United States History I 1422 United States History I 1421 World History (c. 1450 to Present) 1412 World History (c. 1450 to Present) 1411

Franklin High School Program of Studies

February 18, 2010 Page 65 of 76.

United States History II

College Preparatory Grade 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits Grade 11 U.S. History at the college level will begin with a brief review of the late 19th century and devotes the majority of the year to the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be taught to write an analysis of an historical event based on primary and secondary sources. Students will also work on research skills such as finding the appropriate sources to fit an assignment, summarizing the main points of documents, and preparing a report or paper that incorporates the research and uses appropriate citations. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to place major historical events in the proper time period, analyze the main institutions of the U.S. government, and write from a point of view. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B Honors Grade 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits Grade 11 Honors U.S. History is open to students who can read historical documents from a variety of sources and who write with clarity. Enrollment in Honors English is helpful. In keeping with the Massachusetts frameworks, the course will begin with a brief review of the late 19th century and devotes the majority of the year to the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will continue to develop their research skills by completing library assignments, and they will also use written as well as oral presentations to demonstrate their mastery of research assignments. At the conclusion of the course, students will understand the role of the United States in the world, be able to analyze readings for bias and point of view, write historical essays with supporting information and a point of view, and make comparisons among different time periods in history. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3B Advanced Placement Grade 11 Full Year 6.0 Credits Advanced placement U.S. History is open to students who possess the ability, motivation, and maturity to acquire information from a college textbook and a variety of other sources. Enrollment in Honors English is required. Students will write analytical essays based on a series of primary source documents, and they will read in books outside of assigned textbook pages. Students will be required to complete research projects, speak in front of the class, work in groups and participate in large and small groups. Following the curriculum for an advanced placement course, students will begin the year with a quick review of the colonial period and then proceed to spend a large portion of the year on the 19th and 20th centuries. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to take the advanced placement exam for college credit or placement. The exam requires students to pass a rigorous set of multiple-choice questions, write a lengthy essay based on a set of documents, and write two essays, which cut across time periods. Summer reading and daily assignments are required. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. Prerequisite: Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3C, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3 Open Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major sub-fields within psychology. The curriculum is based upon the American Psychological Association (APA) recommended scope and sequence standards for a high school psychology class. Students will be able to recognize psychology as a scientific study of human behavior and mental processes by studying facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the five major domains of psychology. The following units of study are examples of those offered in this semester course: • Introduction to Psychology • Biological Basis of Behavior • Lifespan Development (Ex. Childhood/Adolescence) • States of Consciousness • Introduction to Social Psychology
February 18, 2010 Page 66 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

1431

United States History II

1432

United States History/AP

1433

Psychology I

1439

The course, which is primarily theory based, uses readings, case studies, role-plays, presentations, demonstrations, problem solving, writing assignments, and selected videos to present the major concepts, theories, and methodologies of modern psychology. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3C, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3D Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major sub-fields within psychology. The curriculum is based upon the American Psychological Association (APA) recommended scope and sequence standards for a high school psychology class. Students will be able to recognize psychology as a scientific study of human behavior and mental processes by studying facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the five major domains of psychology. The following units of study are examples of those offered in this semester course: • Introduction to Research Methods • Motivation and Emotion • Thinking and Language • Personality and Assessment • Psychological Disorders and Treatment Psychology II is open to juniors and seniors who possess strong reading comprehension and writing skills. Enrollment in at least honors English is suggested. The course, which is primarily theory based, uses readings, case studies, presentations, demonstrations, role-plays, problem solving, writing assignments of varying lengths, research assignment(s), and selected videos to present the major concepts, theories, and methodologies of modern psychology. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3B Open Honors Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Sociology will study human relationships in society. The course affords students the opportunity to learn about themselves and others in group behavior. Students will be introduced to some of the major concepts of sociology including gender, race, and family. Sociology is open to juniors or seniors who possess strong reading comprehension and writing skills. The course uses case studies, readings, and selected videos to present the major concepts, theories, and methodologies of modern Sociology. Students will be responsible for summarizing main ideas and making presentations to the class. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-range assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3A, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3B, 3D College Preparatory Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course introduces students to the major issues facing the world, country, state and community. Students will be presented numerous opportunities to develop and improve problem solving skills. Some topics may include the political spectrum, foreign policy, social issues, campaigns, the environment and much more. Students will take part in group and individual projects, nightly homework assignments, as well as other project-based learning activities. Also, by engaging in collaborative groups as they develop a group consensus on issues, students will gain the experience they need to live in a democratic society. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 3A, 3B Honors Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course introduces students to the major issues facing the world, country, state and community. Students will be presented numerous opportunities to develop and improve problem solving skills. Some topics may include the political spectrum, foreign policy, social issues, campaigns, the environment and much more. Students will take part in group and individual projects, nightly homework assignments, as well as other project-based learning activities. This course will provide opportunities for students to explore, understand and practice qualities of responsible citizenship. This course is
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 67 of 76.

Psychology II

1440

Sociology

1444

Contemporary Issues

1446

Contemporary Issues

1447

focused on preparing students for their college experience. A strong emphasis will be placed on required reading and writing. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 3A, 3B American Society through Film Open Honors Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 credits This semester elective is open to all juniors and seniors interested in examining film as a medium for understanding our history and culture. The goal of the course is to expose students to many aspects of society including: race, gender, social stratification, economics, politics, and history through the lens of Hollywood. Students will be required to analyze and interpret major and independent films as well as documentaries. At the conclusion of the course students will have an increased understanding of the role that cinema plays in our society as well as an understanding of its role as a medium. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C 1448 1445

Street Law

College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course in the practical applications of the law will provide students with an understanding of the legal rights and responsibilities of citizens. We will begin with an overview of the U.S. Constitution and traditions and precedents of American justice, and using this knowledge, examine criminal law, civil (tort) law, family law, and consumer law. Contemporary controversies in the law and Constitution will be an area of particular focus. America’s Longest War: The Vietnam War 1335 College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 and American Society Semester 3.0 Credits The course will explore causes of America’s longest war, how the war was fought, the changing nature of American involvement in Vietnam and the impact of the war at home. It will examine the society, culture and politics of 1950’s – 1970’s America. Using film, music, news footage, and documents topics studied will also include the Youth Movement, Counterculture, Hippies, the Music Revolution, and the Anti-war movement.

Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits Advanced placement economics prepares students for the College Board macroeconomics examination in May. Students who are enrolled in honors math courses or college preparatory statistics will have an increased chance of success. The course uses a college textbook, and it involves daily homework assignments, class discussion, short papers, and oral presentations. Basic concepts such as supply and demand, GDP, the Federal Reserve System, fiscal and monetary policies, foreign trade, the business cycle, and employment patterns form the basis of this course, which emphasizes analysis, and interpretation of economic models. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to analyze a set of economic statistics and predict what measures the government and the Federal Reserve Board would take to improve economic conditions. Summer reading is required. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as short-term and long-term assignments. Prerequisite: Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C Advanced Placement Grades 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The advanced placement course in modern European history follows a chronological approach to the major events that have shaped European history from 1450 to the present. The course content is consistent with the syllabus prepared by the College Board, and it prepares students for the May advanced placement examination. Students who elect AP must read from a variety of sources in addition to the two textbooks, write analytical essays based on primary source documents, complete at least one research assignment per term by using secondary and primary sources, speak in front of the class, work well in groups settings, and participate in class discussions. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to make comparisons across different time periods, and they should be able to score successfully on the national examination. Summer reading is required of all students. In order to be successful, students must complete nightly homework as well as long-term assignments. Prerequisite: Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements.
February 18, 2010 Page 68 of 76 Franklin High School Program of Studies

Economics/AP

1452

European History/AP

1450

This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3C Advanced Placement Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits AP US Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the US. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, beliefs, groups, and ideas that constitute US government and politics. The course content is consistent with the syllabus prepared by the College Board, and it prepares students for the May advanced placement examination. Students who complete this course will be able to: • Know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to US government and politics • Understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences • Be able to analyze and interpret basic data pertaining relevant to U.S. government and politics Prerequisite: Refer to the first few pages of this document for information and requirements. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 2, 3A, 3B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C AP Psychology Advanced Placement Grade 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice (Taken from the Advanced Placement Course Description in Psychology by the College Board). The aim of the course is to provide the student with a rigorous learning experience, equivalent to most college introductory psychology courses. Students completing this course will also be prepared to take the AP Psychology examination. Cult of Personality College Preparatory Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course would be targeted to juniors and seniors who have completed USII or AP US history. The course will focus on the most extraordinary and interesting political personalities of the 20th century throughout the world including Stalin, Churchill, Kennedy, Ceauscescu, Thatcher, Mao, Gandhi, etc. Prerequisite: Successful completion of US II or AP US History or taking one of these courses concurrently This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D 1449 1453 US Government and Politics 1451

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL ONLINE COURSES For the school year 2010-2011, Franklin High School will be offering online academic courses using the Franklin Public Schools Course Management System. Online courses provide the opportunity for students to take classes in a setting other than the traditional face-to-face classroom. These courses are designed to meet a student’s individual needs and preferences as all course materials and class activities can be accessed online 24/7. Students will have the opportunity to take these courses during the school day as part of their academic schedule or afterschool as additional academic courses. Students will receive the same high quality of instruction as in a classroom but in an online environment as all of our online courses meet the same high academic standards as our traditional classroom courses. At the beginning of each course, students will receive a detailed syllabus that explains in-depth the overall expectations for the course. The bulk of student-to-teacher and student-to-student interactions will take place through discussion forums and virtual classrooms. Not only do instructors check the discussions and offer almost immediate feedback, the students also will benefit from the diverse perspectives and opinions offered from both the instructor, as well as fellow online students. Some of the courses will meet only online while other courses will be hybrid courses where students will meet with the
Franklin High School Program of Studies February 18, 2010 Page 69 of 76.

teacher on a weekly basis. Assignments, quality discussion postings and research papers are a large part of most online coursework and will most directly affect a student's final grade in any given course. Journalism College Preparatory Grades 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course is dedicated to teaching students the skills needed to communicate in print and web based media. Although the emphasis is on writing skills, the course will also include the following activities: interviewing, researching, observing, reporting, reacting, synthesizing, and designing layout. Students will also learn to become knowledgeable consumers of media information. They will learn to improve editing skills as they work with their own articles and participate in peer editing sessions. Student work will be published on the high school web site after it has been approved by the course instructor/s. An important goal of the course will be to raise awareness in journalism as a career. This course does not fulfill the four-year requirement for English. It will be piloted mostly in an online format, with a few required in-class sessions. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s):1A, 1B, 3A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 1D, 2

Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Graphic Design II is a semester course in which students will further their understanding of graphic design. Students will create advanced graphic artworks and designs using Adobe Creative Suite. This course is geared towards those students who have an interest in declaring graphic design as their major in college. This course is designed to simulate the workings of a professional graphic design studio, and students will be given “jobs” with very specific parameters, including deadlines. Creativity, craftsmanship, personal effort, critical thinking, sketchbooks, and homework assignments are all included in the grading process. In order to succeed in this class, students must meet the criteria given for each assignment, be prepared to question and critique their own work as well as the works of other artists, and approach each art project with an open mind and positive attitude. Note: This course is an online course using Franklin High School’s CMS system. The class will meet during the semester a few times. Students must be able to work independently, manage their time and workload accordingly. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design I This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3B, 5 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3D, 3E College Preparatory Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 6.0 Credits This section of Spanish is intended for self-directed learners who wish to learn first-year Spanish language and culture within an online platform. The course will guide students (who have little or no knowledge of the language) through learning the basic patterns and grammatical constructions of Spanish. Students will apply basic vocabulary and grammatical structures to real-life situations in order to communicate on a basic level through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will upload media files, complete listening activities, take timed assessments, engage in online chat, and more. As such, students who enroll in this course must have the ability to employ computer technology. Assessment includes tests, quizzes, short writing assignments, videos, small projects, and class participation. Oral and/or written homework (15-20 minutes) is assigned daily. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1C This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1D College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits You’ve been engaged by “CSI” and have been fascinated by “LA Law” but how accurately do these shows portray the realities of forensic science? The field of forensic science comprises several areas of study (anatomy, chemistry, biology, physics, etc.) and this course aims to integrate these sciences in the pursuit of justice. This course will focus on the criminal investigation process that will include crime scene investigation, evidence gathering procedures and subsequent laboratory analysis of evidence. Each student should finish this class with an understanding of the history and definition of forensic science, legal framework in which forensic science is conducted, common and recently developed forensic applications, potential forms of evidence and their analysis, and presentation of facts for a court of law. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D Introduction to Forensic Science Spanish I

Graphic Design II

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

Astronomy

College Preparatory Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Students will investigate the history and functionality of the cosmos. The objectives of this class are intended to reach an understanding of our known universe and provide a grand perspective of the universe. Students will explore the methods by which astronomers measure cosmic distances, composition of stars and intergalactic matter, as well as the behavior of matter under the physical laws of our universe. Some of the coursework involves Algebra and Geometry skills. Students are expected to be proficient in Algebra and Geometry before attempting this course. Prerequisite: 1) Successful completion of Chemistry, Algebra, and Geometry and 2) Successful completion of Physics or students may be concurrently enrolled in physics This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3C, 3D College Preparatory Grade 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits This course would be targeted to juniors and seniors who have completed USII or AP US history. The course will focus on the most extraordinary and interesting political personalities of the 20th century throughout the world including Stalin, Churchill, Kennedy, Ceauscescu, Thatcher, Mao, Gandhi, etc. Prerequisite: Successful completion of US II or AP US History or taking one of these courses concurrently This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 2, 3B, 3C, 3D Game Development in Java Honors Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 3.0 Credits Game development consists of many different aspects including programming, modeling, texturing, mapping, sprite design, and more. By the end of this game design course, students will be able to comprehend advanced programming methods, as well as master many aspects of game design. Student will develop one or two final mini-games that will encompass everything they have learned. This course may be taken in conjunction with Computer Science 1 or 2 Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 H with a minimum grade of C or completion of Algebra 2 CP with a minimum grade of B+ This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 2 This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E College Preparatory Grade 10, 11, 12 Semester Course 3.0 Credits This course will explore the many places where the fields of art and mathematics overlap. Students will be exposed to a wide range of art, covering a long historical period and a great variety of styles. Topics may include sculpture in ancient Greece, use of proportion in art, perspective, perspective machines and cameras, golden section, knots, and symmetry, Twentieth-century geometric art, chaos, and fractals. This course will use students’ interest in art or architecture as motivation for learning the mathematics needed to construct or to understand the work of art as well as art history. The course will be varied by demonstrations, hands-on class projects, films, videos, and computer graphics. Success in this course requires a great deal of focus and work, both in class and at home. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to enroll in PreCalculus CP, Statistics CP or Discrete Mathematics CP based on grades and recommendation of teacher. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 CP/Honors This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s); 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Geometry in Art and Architecture Cult of Personality

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

The Special Education Department of Franklin High School offers participating students a curriculum that is based upon each student’s specific needs as stated in his/her Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Entrance into this program is in

Franklin High School Program of Studies

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accordance with Chapter 766, Massachusetts Special Education Regulations, which requires referred students to be evaluated through a team process. As a result of a Team Evaluation, an individualized educational plan is developed and implemented which may provide one or more of the following services or course offerings: academic support, replacement academic subjects, inclusion subjects, speech and language therapy, counseling services and/or other specialized services deemed appropriate by the team to accommodate the unique learning style of each participating student. A full range of special education services is available to identified students who need support in order to be successful in regular education classes. The program is designed to provide study skills, reinforce mainstreamed curriculum and enhance basic academic skills.

Academic Support Program Academic Support is designed to provide assistance with mainstream courses, improve skills, and to increase proficiency with study skills. This class is intended to allow the student to maintain consistent, satisfactory progress in regular education courses. This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 5

Alternative Education Program Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Alternative Education is designed to provide an educational setting for students who have experienced difficulty in the regular course of study. The goal of the Alternative Classroom Program is reintegration of the students into the regular course of study by providing necessary support to ensure successful performance in a full or shared schedule of classes in regular education.

Resource Program Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 The Resource Program is designed to provide academic subjects for students who require replacement classes in one or more classes within a small group setting in order to be successful academically. Replacement courses are offered in the areas of English, math, social studies, and science. A range of courses is offered to provide instruction in applied reading and math skills in relation to critical thinking skills.

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

FRANKLIN ARTS ACADEMY

The Franklin Arts Academy is a pathway within Franklin High School designed to give students with an interest in the performing and visual arts an opportunity to explore their area of passion. These academic classes are designed to deliver high quality standards fully integrating the arts with a process driven curriculum. The areas of art concentration will be: Architecture, Musical Production, Theatre, Video Production, and Visual Arts. All of the FAA classes will be heterogeneously grouped. All students will have the opportunity to earn Honors credit if they complete the honors level projects and homework. The Franklin Arts Academy will begin in the fall of 2010 with an 11th grade cohort of 25-30 students. There is an application process; contact the Guidance Department or Art Director for more information on the application process and deadlines.

Mission Statement The Franklin Arts Academy will inspire students to learn through the Arts. As a nurturing community, the Academy will be a space where students can flourish within an academic and cultural climate that promotes creation, individuality, and critical thinking through an integrated, project-based curriculum.

Core Goals To create a small learning community that provides students with the skills and opportunities that will foster artistic growth through active participation, engaging them in their own learning To connect with and provide culture for the community at large To teach the students 21st century skills for our ever-changing and interdependent world To provide a learning environment that is heterogeneous, where students can demonstrate their abilities and growth through assessments that meet the levels of proficiency for college entrance To introduce work experience through the exploration of employment, internships, and graduate educational opportunities To create a thriving art scene

Franklin Arts Academy: Creative Literacy

Open Honors Grade 11 Full Year 5.0 Credits This 11th grade integrated studio course is designed to build skills in each of the five arts areas (Music Production, Theatre, Video Production, Visual Arts, Architecture, and Arts Management). Students will also be developing problem-solving and risk-taking abilities through the thematic lens of “The Arts are Social commentary: Creative Literacy in the 20th Century”. In this full-year class, students will work for the first two trimesters in building foundation skills in two interrelated subjects per trimester, such as Visual Arts & Architecture in one trimester, and Music Production, Theatre, and Video Production in another trimester. In the third trimester, students will have the ability to specialize in a major field and pursue projects and studies in that field taught and mentored by an FAA teacher/advisor. Students will be expected to work individually, and in small and large groups. Class work and projects will make connections to the U.S. History period of 1875 to 2001 and will also link to real-world, social and business challenges.
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1782

Students may take this course for CP or Honors credit with additional requirements to be met for Honors-level work. Inclass work and the finished products will be collected in individual student portfolios, and preparation will be given for the Junior Year Review assessment by FAA faculty in late spring. Prerequisites: Students must have completed two of the following courses with a “C” or better: Intro Art I, Drawing, Intro to CAD, American Popular Music, Video Production I, or Theater I. Consideration will be given to other semester courses in the Music and Visual Arts Departments as well as arts courses taken outside of FHS. This course supports the following academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 5 This course assesses the following academic Expectation(s): 1D, 1E, 3C, 3D Franklin Arts Academy: Humanities 1082 Open Honors Grade 11 (English 11 and History 11) Full Year 12 Credits This 11th grade integrated Humanities course allows students to make connections focusing on culture and events in literature’s context or background as they relate to plot, theme, and character development. This integration furthers the progression of verbal, perceptual, imaginative, critical thinking, reading, and writing skills needed for organizing and understanding our world in communicable ways. Students will be exposed to the incorporation of cultural movements, social trends, mass culture and pertinent literary criticism through units from American History: turn of the century modernism to, minimally, the upheaval of the 1960s and 1970s. The study of humanities promotes civil discussion of conflicts, placing current issues and literature into historical context while providing experiences of arts integration through learning. Students may take this course for CP or Honors credit with additional requirements to be met for Honors-level work. Students will read texts including but not limited to The Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye, and Death of a Salesman, as well as independent reading texts. In addition to class work, the student will be required to complete projects related to their artistic studies in the Creative Literacy class. Students will gain exposure to various modes of discourse as well as expectations to formulate ideas through those genres of writing. In the capstone writing assignment, students will create an argumentative thesis framed by the concept that literature is a reflection of the time period. Prerequisites: A passing grade for 10 English and 10 History This course supports the following academic expectations: 1A, 1B, 1C, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D This course assesses the following academic expectations: 1C, 2, 3B Franklin Arts Academy: Mathematics and Science III 1282 Open Honors Grade 11 (Mathematics and Science III) Full Year 12 credits This 11th grade integrated mathematics and physics-based science course emphasizes the relationship and application of mathematical and scientific principles to real-life situations encountered in the arts. This course covers the material of two full year courses. Course topics typically will include kinematics, work and energy, wave theory, sound, light, electricity and basic electronics. The mathematical topics that apply to the sciences included linear functions, graphics, quadratics, exponentials, and trigonometry. Laboratory and investigative activities will have an arts focus and will combine the science with the mathematics. In addition to class work, the student will be required to complete projects related to their artistic studies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to quantitatively analyze sound, optics, movement, electricity and electronics encountered in the arts. Prerequisites for this course are prior completion of Algebra I and Geometry This course supports the following Academic Expectations: 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2, 4A, 4B This course assesses the following Academic Expectations: 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

SENIOR PROJECT Grade 12 9 Credits As a participant in the Senior Project, students will increase their awareness of the necessary steps for achieving a set career, service, or artistic path by participating in a full-time externship during the final quarter of their senior year. Students will complete various project objectives including: 70 hours of professional externship experience, written reflection papers, a cumulative portfolio, and a final presentation to a panel. Students must submit a proposal for Senior Project by the end of their junior year. The proposal is reviewed by a panel who will determine if the Project has the potential to be completed successfully. Upon acceptance into the Senior Project, students will enroll in a preparatory course during the 3rd term of their senior year (see Senior Project Course below), and then commence their externship during the final quarter of their senior year. Senior Project provides students with the opportunity to apply their academic, social, and civic skills developed throughout the course of their experiences at FHS and realize connections between their high school education and future careers. Since students direct their own experiences, they keep themselves engaged and participate in a meaningful academic, professional, and personal experience that may ultimately shape the course of their futures. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 3C, 4A This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1B, 1D, 1E Grade 12 1.25 Credits The Senior Project also will be a valuable tool in determining the student’s mastery of our academic expectations in the areas of knowledge, communication, problem-solving, and responsibility. During the third term students will begin researching their chosen topic and they will write a 10-12 page paper on their research findings. In addition, students will explore various topics such as ethics in the workplace, character development, leadership development, and communication and interviewing techniques. Throughout the course speakers will be invited to speak with students regarding their chosen fields. This course supports the following Academic Expectation(s): 1A, 1B This course assesses the following Academic Expectation(s): 1C, 3A, 3B, 3D COURSE OF STUDY: GRADES 9-12 SELECTION CHECKLIST Scheduling the proper courses for the next year is one of the most important activities in which you will engage this school year. It is very important that you do a careful and thorough job. This Program of Studies is a tool for you and your parents to use in the scheduling process. This booklet describes the courses as they will be offered. It describes the level of difficulty and the number of periods per week that a course is offered. Please read the Program of Studies carefully before completing the course selection sheet. Please read the prerequisite policy at the front of the Program of Studies which states that students need a “C” to stay in an honors course, an “B+“ to move up to an honors course, and a “B+” to advance from an honors course into an AP course. If there is a special prerequisite or course requirement, it will be listed at the end of the course description. Please make careful choices. It is very difficult to change a course once the selection process has been completed. If you need assistance with the course selection process, or if you have any questions about the courses that are listed, please speak to your teachers and contact your guidance counselor. THE EARLY ENROLLMENT PROGRAM The Early Enrollment Program is a school/college partnership with Rhode Island College which offers high school seniors and select juniors an opportunity to earn college credits while they are completing their high school diplomas. EEP has granted thousands of students, college credits for courses that they have completed while still in high school. In many instances, students have eliminated as much as one full semester of college work by enrolling in the EEP. Currently, Spanish 4 AP, Spanish 5 AP, Calculus AP, US History AP, and Calculus Honors courses have been designated EEP courses. These courses overlap with courses being offered at Rhode Island College. Students who choose to sign up for these courses at Franklin High School may do so without commitment to the college; however, if they decide to take these courses for college credit, then they enter into a partnership with the college by registering and paying a nominal registration fee and a significantly reduced tuition for each credit in which they enroll. When they successfully complete the course, the grade they receive appears on their high school transcript and on an official RIC transcript; they may use these credits as they enter RIC or transfer them to one of the many colleges and universities which accept RIC credits.
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Senior Project Externship

1999

College Preparatory

Senior Project Seminar

1995

College Preparatory

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING YOUR SCHEDULE

Freshmen (2014) 1. Have you selected English, Math, Biology, Social Studies, Foreign Language, Health Ed., P.E.? 2. Are you taking 6 courses each semester? 3. Do your choices agree with your teachers’ and guidance counselor’s recommendations? 4. Does your program prepare you for your long-range education or vocational plans? 5. Will you participate in P.E. during the school day or select an alternate pathway? 6. Will you be taking any courses online instead of during a scheduled period?

Sophomores (2013) 1. Have you passed all your previous requirements? 2. Have you selected English, Math, Science, Health Ed. and P.E.? 3. Will you be taking 6 courses each semester? 4. Will you have at least 60 credits before entering your junior year? 5. Do your choices agree with your teachers’ and guidance counselor’s recommendations? 6. Have your parents signed your course selection sheet? 7. Does your program meet Massachusetts Higher Education Admission Standards? 8. Will you participate in P.E. during the school day or select an alternate pathway? Juniors (2012) 1. Have you passed all your previous requirements? 2. Have you selected English, U.S. History, Health, and P.E.? 3. Will you have at least 90 credits before the beginning of your senior year? 4. Are you taking 6 courses each semester (in addition to Health Ed. and P.E.)? 5. Do your choices agree with your teachers’ and guidance counselor’s recommendations? 6. Have your parents signed your course selection sheet? 7. Remember, you must have 20 credits in English, 15 credits in social studies, (including U.S. History)15 credits in science (biology), 15 credits in mathematics, 10 credits in a sequence, 7.5 credits in Health Ed. And 7.5 credits in P.E. in order to graduate. 8. Does your program meet Massachusetts Higher Education Admission Standards? 9. Will you participate in P.E. during the school day or select an alternate pathway? Seniors (2011) 1. Have you passed all your previous requirements? 2. Have you selected English? 3. Will you have 120 credits (including 7.5 P.E. credits) upon completion of your senior year? 4. Are you taking 6 courses each semester? 5. Do your choices agree with your teachers’ and guidance counselor’s recommendations? 6. Have your parents signed your course selection sheet? 7. At the end of the year, will you have the necessary credits to graduate? You must have 20 credits in English, 15 credits in social studies (including U.S. History), 15 credits in science (including biology), 15 credits in mathematics, 10 credits in a sequence, and 7.5 P.E. credits in order to graduate. 8. Does your program meet Massachusetts Higher Education Admission Standards? 9. Will you participate in P.E. during the school day or select an alternate pathway?

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Franklin High School Program of Studies

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