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Supplying More Local Fruit

to the Scranton Commons


Jon Dekovitch, Maddie Petrancuri, Kevin Schneider, and Nick Tate

400 EAST SECOND STREET BLOOMSBURG, PA 17815


(570) 389-4000
TO: Aramark Corporation - Bloomsburg division
FROM: Jon Dekovitch, Maddie Petrancuri, Kevin Schneider, and Nick Tate
DATE: November 17, 2014
SUBJECT: Supplying local fruit to the Scranton Commons
Purpose
We are writing to propose a greater variety of nutritious fruits in the Scranton Commons at
Bloomsburg University. Students tend to choose unhealthy meals at the Commons due to the
lack of healthier choices that are offered. Its important to note, however, that students do not
dislike the healthier options, as the whole fruit and fruit salad sections tend to be frequently
empty. Whole fruit options include apples, oranges and bananas, but it is easy to see that most of
them are shipped in and contain many preservatives. It is crucial to encourage students to eat
healthy, and one of the best strategies to implement is buying fruit from local farms. By
purchasing these fruits, the university will be able to offer students the delicious quality of local
food and bring financial support to the community. We have included in our proposal the
following sections: the current situation, our plan, our qualifications, the costs and benefits, our
budget, and a list of frequently asked questions.

The Current Situation

The majority of Bloomsburg students have breakfast, lunch, and dinner at Scranton Commons.
There are an abundance of meats, such as chicken and beef, as well as prepackaged side dishes
and salads. Unfortunately, fresh fruit choices are extremely limited throughout each meal time.
The Bloomsburg Campus Dish website claims fruits are shipped to the university from local
places; however, there is currently only one farm on that list. Also, there are only three
continuous whole fruits offered: bananas, oranges, and apples. The only other fruit option is the
mixed fruit salad in the salad bar section. This salad contains honeydew melon, pineapple, and
cantaloupe, but all of them come from cans. Canned fruit is not fresh, and some have added
sugar or syrup which can lessen health benefits. Canned fruit also doesnt have the same taste
quality that students enjoy. When students don't enjoy Commons fruit, whether its due to lack of
options or refusal to eat canned fruit, they eat less healthy or even take their business elsewhere.
Proposed Project Plan
We propose to add variety to the fruit selection at Bloomsburg University by supplying seasonal,
local, and farm-fresh fruits to the Scranton Commons. Local farmers will be paid for their fruit,
and the leftovers will be distributed to the Wesley United Methodist Church charity in downtown
Bloomsburg. This ensures physical and financial benefits for the Bloomsburg community.
Introducing fresh fruit options in the Commons will help students choose healthier eating habits,
and the local shipping costs of the fruit will save money for the university.
Qualifications
All of us eat at the Commons at least once a day, so we know what is currently being offered and
the steps that can be taken to host better options. We care about what our fellow students and
faculty eat, and we want to take this small step to improve their lifestyle choices. Through our
research, the Bloomsburg area will enjoy the benefits. Surrounding organizations and
universities can also follow suit and take the initiative to implement more local, healthier
solutions.
Costs and Benefits
Having fresh fruit will benefit the Bloomsburg community for many reasons. First, vegetarians
and vegans will have a larger selection of food available for them to eat. Also, with a larger and
healthier supply, we truly believe that more students and faculty will be satisfied with the fruit
options. Our plan will also help the students and faculty make more nutritious decisions. Along
with the benefits for our school, there are also community benefits. When we donate the extra
fruit to Wesley United Methodist Church, not only do less fortunate people get to enjoy fresh
fruit, but Bloomsburg University immediately gets a good name in the community. The pricing
required to get the fruit to the university and the price of the fruit are far lower than shipping in
fruit from places like Florida and California. Although a larger selection of fruit seems like a tiny
change at a mid-size university, we believe it will increase the well-being of our fellow students,
faculty, and community.
Total Budget Breakdown
Fruit costs

Farm 1- Little Red Hen Farms in Muncy, PA


Fruit

Number of Shares*

Price per Share**

Total

Grapes

$500

$2500

Blueberries

$500

$2500

Strawberries

$500

$2500

Cantaloupes

$500

$4000

Apples

10

$500

$5000

Total Little Red Hen Farms Cost: $16500

Farm 2- Gibs Farm in Catawissa, PA


Fruit

Number of Shares

Price per Share

Total

Melons

$540

$4320

Watermelons

$540

$4320

Blackberries

$540

$2700

Cherries

$540

$2700

Peaches

$540

$3240
Total Gibs Farm Cost: $17280

Shipping of Unused Fruit to Wesley United Methodist Church


Departure
Scranton
Commons

Delivery
130 West 3rd St.
Bloomsburg, Pa
17815

Times per
Week
1

Mileage
3.4

Price per
Mile***
$0.89

Base
Rate
$19.95

Total
$22.97

Total Shipping Cost:$22.97


Total Budget for Fresh Fruit for 2 semesters: $68,455.04

*One share of fruit is 3 pounds of that fruit delivered weekly for one semester
**The price of a share of fruit includes delivery costs
***Gas cost may account for $5.00 each trip, included in Total Budget

FAQ
1.
2.

How fresh is the fruit?


The fruit is transported straight from the local farms to the commons every week. The
fruit is never frozen or processed, besides washing routines before serving.
Where does the unused fresh fruit go?

3.
4.

The unused fruit is sent to a soup kitchen at Wesley United Methodist Church.
What types of fresh fruit are offered?
Peaches, apples, melons, grapes, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, cherries,
watermelons and cantaloupe will be offered, dependent on the season.
Is fresh fruit that much healthier?
Though fresh fruit contains natural sugars, there are no chemicals, freezing, or
preservatives added. Thus, the fruit is quite healthier and easily digested by the body.

Conclusion
Supplying the Commons with more diverse and high-quality fruits will benefit the entire
Bloomsburg community. Students will choose this healthy alternative once they see how fresh
and delicious these local fruits are. Not only will the university save money on shipping costs, it
will help the local farming businesses. Thanks to our plan to donate the leftover fruits, food can
go to those who desperately need it. By making one small change at Bloomsburg University, we
can take part in a larger initiative to change our communitys lifestyles for the better.