You are on page 1of 6

Unit 2: Africa 

Urbanization: Motivations and Challenges 
 
Name: ​Kelly Aquilla, Towson University
 
CLASS DESCRIPTIONS: 

Date: ​Sept, 17, 2015 

2AC: GT World Cultures, mixed both in gender and racial makeup, 30 students total. Not 
many problem students. One student has a 504 for social anxiety. There are two students in 
the back two seats who are talkative, one who is more distracting than the other. Generally 
attentive and participatory. Not all are truly GT students. 
3AC: Standard World Cultures, mixed both in gender and racial makeup, 25 students total. 
This class is challenging ­ both for its size and for its attitude. There are approximately 10 
students with 504s. One female student is repeating 7th grade and performs little to no tasks. 
There are two students at the front of the classroom who talk constantly and provide 
distraction to other students. The female is the instigator and other teachers have had similar 
issues. Her mother has been called. There is one male student who can become 
overwhelmed and start to cry/self harm. He can be managed by keeping him on task and 
presenting him things in chunks. This is the period before they go to lunch at 12:40 PM so 
they are usually anxious for class to end. Before the lesson begins, students in 3AC will be 
moved to new seating arrangements where they will work with partners that have been 
pre­assigned.  
4AC: Standard World Cultures, mixed both in gender and racial makeup, 17 students total. 
Class is small and students are friendly. One male student is a distraction by calling out and 
instigating conversations with other students. He can be managed by redirecting him back to 
his work and keeping him on task. Another male student is heavily dependent on teacher 
interaction and has a flash pass for bathroom reasons. This is their class after lunch and last 
class of the day. They are usually low key until it's time to leave. 
 
Unit:​ Africa 
Lesson:​ Urbanization ­ Motivations and Challenges 
 
Prior Knowledge:​ Students on Tuesday and Wednesday would have been studying different 
geographical areas in Africa. They have been working on the Africa Unit for approximately 1.5 
weeks now. 
 
ALIGNMENT: 
STANDARD: 
3.C.1.a.: Identify 
reasons why people 
migrate, such as 
economic 
opportunity, climate, 

OBJECTIVE: By the 
end of today’s 
lesson, SWBAT 
identify the reasons 
why people migrate 
to urban areas. 

ASSESSMENT: 
Think­Pair­Share 
Lists, Classroom 
Discussion, 
Underlining of 
Newsweek Article 

ACTIVITY: Directed 
Readings 

political reasons and 
government policies. 
STANDARD:3.D.1.: 
Analyze why and 
how people in 
contemporary world 
regions modify their 
natural environment 
and the impact of 
those modifications. 

OBJECTIVE: By the 
end of today’s 
lesson, SWBAT 
identify and analyze 
the challenges 
caused by 
urbanization and 
population density. 

ASSESSMENT: 
Responses to 
questions on back of 
“Urbanization in 
Africa” handout and 
Quickwrite Exit Ticket 

ACTIVITY: 
“Urbanization in 
Africa” Chart and 
Questions, 
Quickwrite 

 
MATERIALS: 
Student Materials Required: Urbanization packet, ​Africa​ textbook, Interactive Notebooks, 
pen/pencil, glue, scissors 
Technology Required: Computer, Projector, Powerpoint, Youtube 
 
 
Before the lesson begins, students in 3AC will be moved to new seating arrangements where 
they will work with partners that have been pre­assigned. All other class will work with the 
person sitting next to them.   
 
3AC Partners:  
Cheyenne L. 
Breana N. 
Muhammad A. 

Bailey S. 
Amaya H. 
Eric C. 

Caleb B. 
Michael P. 

Caleb B. 

Noah F.  Maddy H. 

   
Kamil S.  Wyatt B. 

Sam U. 

   
Grace C. 

 
 
LESSON PROCEDURE:  
Opening Activity­ Drill and Debriefing: 
Time Allotted: 5­10 MINS 
Where: Interactive Notebook, Drill Section 
 

Shawntiere C 

Kast F. 

 

Savannah A 

Jacob K. 

Jada J.  Gavin K. 
Trinity J. 

Tyler K. 

Alyssa H.  Aaron H. 

Students will draw graphic from PowerPoint into drill section, using 5­10 lines. They will be 
identifying what rural, suburban and urban communities are through words or pictures. There 
will then be a teacher/student debrief of the drill with the following questions: 
 
TEACHER QUESTION:  
Can someone give me a word that describes an urban community? ​(Call on multiple students) 
Can someone give me a word that describes a suburban community? ​(Call on multiple 
students) 
Can someone give me a word that describes a rural community? ​(Call on multiple students) 
EXPECTED STUDENT RESPONSES: 
Urban: city, buildings, buses, traffic, high population density, no grass, apartment buildings, 
businesses, skyscrapers 
Suburban: individual homes, grassy areas, outside city, space 
Rural: farms, lots of space, animals, forests, far outside city limits 
 
TEACHER QUESTION: Which area, do you think, usually has the most people living and 
working in it? 
EXPECTED STUDENT RESPONSES: Urban, maybe suburban. 
 
TEACHER QUESTION: Why would people be drawn to urban communities over rural 
communities? 
EXPECTED STUDENT RESPONSES: jobs, housing, affordability, family 
 
Transition: ​Students will read the objective for the day and I will have them identify the 
important words and concepts. “By the end of today’s lesson, I will be able to ​identify​ the 
reasons why people migrate​ to urban areas and ​the​ ​challenges​ caused by ​urbanization and 
population density​.” 
 
Adaptations: None required for this task.  
Activity 1 ­ Directed Reading, Think ­ Pair ­ Share, and Class Discussion 
 
Time Allotted: 15­20 MINS, 5­7 MINS, 5­7 MINS 
Where: Textbook and Packet 
 
Directed Reading: Students will silently read the 2.5 pages on “Moving to the City” found in 
their Africa textbook, which focuses on Kenyans moving from rural communities to Nairobi for 
economic reasons. 
 
Think­Pair­Share: Students will talk to their partner about the two directed reading questions 
listed on the slide. They will make a list that they can use during the group discussion. 

Class Discussion: Students will give their discussed answers from the Think­Pair­Share in a 
quick classroom debrief. 
 
Class Discussion: The teacher will have the students share the answers that they wrote down 
with their partner.  
 
Transition: ​Students will be asked to determine if people in the United States still move to 
urban areas for work. Students will be asked to determine which groups of people may move 
to urban areas.  
 
Adaptations: ​The textbook was selected for this grade level based on its readability ­ no 
adjustments to the text have been made. It is already chunked into sections to break up 
reading and provide guidance through titles.  
Activity 2 ­ Directed Reading and Class Discussion 
 
Time Allotted: 15 MINS, 10 MINS 
Where: Packet and Interactive Notebook 
 
Students will read an article from Newsweek on why millennials still move to urban 
communities. While reading, students will be underlining the reasons that motivate people to 
move to urban areas even though technology makes working from home in the suburbs or 
rural communities possible.  
 
Reading:​ ​http://www.newsweek.com/why­cities­hold­more­pull­millennials­cloud­317735 
 
TEACHER QUESTIONS: 
Why do millennials move to urban areas? 
How are their reasons similar to people living in Kenya who are moving to the city of Nairobi? 
How are their reasons different? 
Does anyone know what the process is when people are moving to cities is called? 
EXPECTED STUDENT RESPONSES: 
Job opportunities, community 
Job opportunities, economic reasons 
Community versus economic reasons 
                Students may not know terminology,  
but this with act as an introduction to the term urbanization. 
 
Transition:​ Students will be asked if they think there are negatives or challenges to having lots 
of people in one place.  
 

Adaptations:​ The article has been shortened and words have been changed to meet the 
students’ reading needs.  
Activity 3 ­ “Urbanization in Africa” Chart and Questions 
 
Time Allotted: 15 MINS, 10 MINS 
Where: Interactive Notebook and Packet 
 
Students will be given “Urbanization in Africa” and prompted to work with their 
Think­Pair­Share partner to figure out what all of the statistics mean. They will cut out the 
stats and glue them on the left hand side of their Interactive Notebook. On the right hand side, 
with their partner, they will write down their thoughts and conclusions about the stats. They 
will then be told to answer the three question prompts inside their packet. Instruction on how 
to read the chart will be provided before students begin analysis. 
 
Transition:​ Students will be asked to close their Interactive Notebooks and that they will be 
hearing from people who live in urban communities in Africa about the positive and negatives 
of urbanization. 
 
Adaptations: ​No adaptations necessary for this task. 
Closing Activity: Video Viewing and Quickwrite Exit Ticket 
 
Time Allotted: 3 MINS, 10 MINS 
Where: Packet 
 
YouTube​:​ ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=142&v=1tU9QA7RIO4 
Title: Planning for Africa’s Growing Cities 
Source: World Bank 
Length: 2.26 MINS 
 
Adaptations: ​No students with hearing or visual impairments that need special viewing.  
 
QUICKWRITE PROMPT: What are the challenges faced by people who live in urban 
communities? Who should respond to these concerns? What solutions might you suggest? 
 
Transition:​ Students will be informed where to turn in their packets and reminded to complete 
the homework.  
 
 
Safety Valve:​ “Most Challenging Region in Africa” Assessment 
Homework: ​“Most Challenging Region in Africa” Assessment 

 
 
 
 
 
 
TEACHER QUESTIONS CHEAT SHEET 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Opening 

Can someone give me a word that describes an urban community? 
Can someone give me a word that describes a suburban community?  
Can someone give me a word that describes a rural community?  
 
Which area, do you think, usually has the most people living and working in it? 
Why would people be drawn to urban communities over rural communities? 
 
Move on to objective reading and probing. 

Activity 1 

What are some reasons people are moving from rural communities to urban 
communities in Kenya? 
How do people help and connect with each other in Nairobi? 

Activity 2 

Why do millennials move to urban areas? 
How are their reasons similar to people living in Kenya who are moving to the 
city of Nairobi? 
How are their reasons different? 

Activity 3 

 

Closing 

QuickWrite Prompt: What are the challenges faced by people who live in urban 
communities? Who should respond to these concerns? What solutions might 
you suggest?