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VAPING PROPOSAL

Submitted
Jeffrey Clatterbuck
to: D.A.R.E
Submitted From: Parent Teacher Student Association
12 November 2015

Table of Contents
1
..Abstract
2
.Introduction
3
...Plan
4
.....Benefits
5.
.Approach and Evaluation
6
..Appendix

Abstract
I am trying to inform young people of the detrimental health effects of smoking ecigarettes on the human body. I will do this by submitting a proposal to D.A.R.E asking them to
come teach the health effects of e-cigarettes and smoking to the students. E-cigarettes and vaping
has become overwhelmingly popular with the younger students. This is why I am pitching a
proposal to have D.A.R.E come in and talk to the teens about how smoking an electronic
cigarette can still be as harmful as smoking regular cigarette.

Introduction
Although, there has been a decrease in traditional cigarette use in high school students
between 2011 and 2014 (15.8% to 9.2%) E-Cigarette use has skyrocketed (1.5% to 13.4%). The
reason that this is a problem is because Vaping was originally intended to be a smoking cessation
device not something that would become a hobby among the youth. The reason that this has
happened is that E-cigarette companies are advertising to the youth, and not to the people that
could benefit from using them as a method to help them quit smoking. One way that these
companies are advertising to the youth is by using sweet flavors such as cotton candy and sour
apple which caters to young people and not avid smokers. Another way is through television
advertisements, although, advertising traditional cigarettes was banned in 1971. E-cigarette
companies can still advertise both on television and the radio. This is a serious problem because
many young people believe that E-cigarettes are completely harmless and will not affect their
bodies in a negative way. Even though many experts agree on the subject that E-cigarettes are the
lesser of the two concerning health when compared with traditional cigarettes that does not mean
that they are without harm. Nicotine, the addictive stimulant in both types of cigarette, has been
proven to alter the development of the brain in young people.

Plan
The best solution to the problem regarding electronic cigarettes and youth consumption is
to start an electronic cigarette awareness initiative in the already existing D.A.R.E program.
Some may think that this initiative would cost the school system more money, however, there is
already an existing D.A.R.E program and adding an extra lesson would not largely affect the
existing school curriculum. There are not many other solutions out there in bringing awareness to
the youth about the harmful after effects of smoking any nicotine product.
Through this plan teachers will be able to inform the students of the negative health
effects of vaping in hopes of reducing the amount of students that do in fact use e-cigarettes. The
D.A.R.E program could include an extra lesson in addition to the health effects of nicotine lesson
and delve deeper into the subculture of vaping and e-cigarettes. This in turn will lower the 13.4%
of adolescents that have reported using e-cigarettes.
With the new federal grant and the revamped DARE curriculum which is no longer as
preachy and more inclusive children should be more accepting of the message. The new
program no longer teaches adolescents that they should just say no, that the only answer to drugs
is to just not do them. Now the message is teaching the why, why drugs are bad, what is wrong
with drugs, and the after effects of what can happen if they do try drugs. The new approach is
more modern and more easily understandable. A course on vaping would most certainly fit in
with the new approach.

Benefits
The
obvious benefit
would be a
reduction in the
percentage of
adolescents
reporting usage of
vapes and electronic cigarettes. This will lead to a reduction in future respiratory infections,
cancers, and asthma related medical incidents. The only way that this would be possible is
through the DARE initiative teaching adolescents that any nicotine in any form is still nicotine
and can still prove harmful. As seen above in the chart from 2011 to 2014 there has been a large
switch in high school students using e-cigarettes versus the traditional cigarette.
While the electronic-cigarette does not include the same carcinogens as the traditional
cigarette does, it still has nicotine in it which can irritate the lungs and lead to respiratory issues.
The same way that the tobacco company was targeting adolescents with sweet flavors, the
vaping world is appealing to young people because of the plethora of juice or nicotine flavor(s)
they can choose from. There has also been an increase in the amount of vape shops and e-

cigarette vendors. For example, it is common now to see e-cigarette or vape vendors have stands
in malls, airports, and shops near college campuses.

Approach
As this is an initiative for adolescents and should be added to the already existing DARE
program it would take place during school. Within a year the addition of the vape lesson will be
implemented and students will have begun to learn about the negative health effects of vaping.
Students will learn how even though vaping right now is popular it still is just as serious as
smoking a traditional cigarette.
Since the government had granted additional funding to the revamped DARE program
the costs should be minimal for the school. Adding the vaping lesson should not cost much and
should not pose much additional work for teachers and supporting staff. The only actual cost
would be to educate the D.A.R.E instructors on the new lesson.

Evaluation
The CDC takes a survey every fiscal year regarding tobacco use which has recently
begun to include E-cigarettes. This survey would be a great way to evaluate the changes in the
percentage of adolescent E-cigarette users without creating another expense in the plan. These
surveys would be able to judge if the plan has succeeded or not.

Appendix
Reaves, Jessica. "Just Say No to DARE." Time. Time Inc., 15 Feb. 2001. Web. 12 Nov. 2015.
"Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students United States, 20112014." Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Apr. 2015.
Web. 12 Nov. 2015.