You are on page 1of 2

 

5 Simple
Strategies

Remember  
To…  
 
-­‐-­‐-­‐Speak  slowly,  clearly,  and  
naturally.  If  your  pace  tends  to  
be  fast,  focus  on  ensuring  that  
each  syllable  is  clear,  rather  than  
trying  to  speak  slowly.  Try  u sing  
shorter  sentences.  Ask  your  
students  to  signal  you  if  you  are  
speaking  too  quickly.  

- Increase ELL students’
English language
production and peer
interaction.

- Explicitly teach English
language vocabulary and
structure.

- Build on ELLs’

-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Supplement  language  in  your  
classes  with  pictures,  
manipulative  objects,  kinesthetic  
activities,  and  other  ways  of  
teaching  that  use  all  of  the  
senses.  

Background Knowledge
to Increase
Comprehension.

- Increase ELL Parent

-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐If  possible,  provide  a  written  
outline  of  your  talk.  This  will  help  
any  student  with  language  
problems  prepare  for  class  and  
know  where  to  place  their  
listening  focus.  
(Taking  the  time  to  incorporate  
these  strategies  into  your  
teaching,  you  will  help  many  
more  students  become  
engaged,  active  participants)

Involvement.

SURVIVAL
GUIDE

- Increase Writing
Opportunities.

Promoting  Education  for  
All  
š    ›
   

š  ›  

Colette  Monod  

 

1
2

 

KEEP  IN  MIND  

Stages  of  Second  Language  Acquisition      
Stage  I:  Pre-­‐Production  
This  is  the  silent  period.  These  new  learners  will  
listen  attentively.  Total  Physical  Response  methods  
will  work  best  with  students.  ELL  students  at  this  
stage  will  need  much  repetition  of  English  with  
visuals.  

Stage  II:  Early  Production  
This  stage  may  last  up  to  six  months  where  
students  will  develop  a  receptive  and  active  
vocabulary.  Ask  yes/no  questions.  Accept  one  or  two  
word  responses.  Give  students  the  opportunity  to  
participate  in  some  of  the  whole  class  activities.  Use  
pictures  to  support  questions  and  build  vocabulary  

Stage  III:  Speech  Emergence  
Students  can  communicate  with  simple  phrases  
and  sentences  and  will  as  simple  questions  that  may  
not  be  grammatically  correct.  Have  students  read  
short  modified  texts  in  content  area  subjects.  Have  
them  participate  in  duet,  pair  and  choral  reading.    

   

 

Stage  IV:  Intermediate  Fluency  

At  this  stage  students  have  a  vocabulary  of  6000  
active  words.  They  begin  to  use  more  complex  
sentences  when  speaking  and  writing.  Students  feel  
more  comfortable  to  express  their  opinions  and  
share  thoughts.  Students  will  still  be  making  writing  
errors  at  this  stage.  Teachers  must  focus  on  
implementing  various  learning  strategies.  

Stage  V:  Advanced  Fluency  
It  takes  students  4-­‐10  years  to  achieve  cognitive  
academic  language  proficiency  in  a  second  language.  
At  this  stage  most  ELL  students  have  been  exited  
from  ELS  and  other  support  p rograms.  Teachers  
must  still  provide  ELL  students  with  continued  
support  in  the  classroom,  especially  in  content  areas  
such  as  history/  social  studies  and  in  writing.