You are on page 1of 4

Lane1 

Richard Lane 
Theresa Simonsen 
ENGLISH 2010­012 
4 November 2015 
Arguments About the MPAA Rating System 
Film ratings by Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA for short) which where 
films are made by the following ratings: G, PG, PG­13, R, X and NC­17. Any of these are based 
on the content on the movie itself, and how specific movies are appropriate or inappropriate for 
children. Been around since 1966, where when films were started have material that are 
inappropriate, began as their choice is no release or else release them with safety, and this is how 
the MPAA was created. Since then G (General Audience), R (Restricted) and X (Adults Only) 
were existed with an M rating (Mature Audience), which was for mature audience, similar with 
the rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested) which was replaced decades later, before it was GP. 
In 1984, Steven Spielberg has his own thought of another rating since his films ​
Indiana Jones 
and the Temple of Doom​
 (director) and ​
The Gremlins​
 (Producer), starting to have content that are 
too violent and scary, since then both of these film were complained and have been rated PG. 
This is an idea for creating the rating PG­13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned), with ​
Red Dawn 
making the first. Than now the controversial ratings X and NC­17, which are both for adult only 
and no one under 17 permitted. 
X and NC­17 are one of the most controversial film ratings. There are quite a lot of films 
that have been rated, some almost been edit for an R rating, or else surround and cannot be  

Lane2 
released in some movies theaters. This is what happen to these films, they were released, and 
NC­17 and X rated.  
Henry & June​
 and ​
Showgirls​
 are the examples. ​
Henry & June​
 released in 1990, making it 
the first NC­17 replace the rating X. Released by Universal Pictures. The film itself, some people 
thinks this movie might consider to be pornographic due to some explicit sexual content and 
dialogue. ​
Showgirls,​
 release in 1995 by Metro­Goldwyn Mayer and contains “erotic nudity and 
sexuality throughout and for some graphic language and sexual violence” (NC­17 description). It 
was also considered to be pornographic, but as some of the people of MPAA, it wasn’t. Author 
Kevin S. Sandler in his article, he states that these films weren’t. On my own opinion, it’s 
pornographic and never meant to be theatrically release. Major studios should be aware of this or 
else use art house studios such as Fox Searchlight Pictures or Sony Pictures Classics. Another 
words, an R rating just like Warner Bros. ​
A Clockwork Orange​
 and ​
The Wild Bunch​
 (both 
contain strong violent content and while ​
A Clockwork Orange​
 contains a scene of brutal sexual 
assault). Paramount Pictures ​
Saving Private Ryan​
, was an almost NC­17 also, to me It was 
considered to be a rating creep. 
Films right now, NC­17 is rare, though it shouldn’t be allowed. G is fairly rare, even the 
latest Disney Animated and Pixar film would barely carry that rating, since ​
Up​
, almost every 
Pixar film now have moments of “thematic elements” and intense perilous contents. For my own 
thoughts, Pixar is now longer for younger children, although PG is for children with a parental 
guardian. PG, PG­13 and R are mostly common. PG and PG­13 are most competitive since ​
Star 
 

Lane 3 
Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith​
 and ​
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire​
, both release in 
2005 and the first in the franchise receiving PG­13 for “sci­fi violence and some intense images” 
(​
Star Wars Episode III​
 MPAA rating description) and “sequences of fantasy violence and 
frightening images” (​
Harry Potter​
 rating description). PG­13 competitive with R also like 
Marvel’s The Avengers​
, (PG­13 for intense sequences of sci­fi action and violence throughout 
and a mild drug reference) almost got an R rating due a brief bloody death scene, and 
Prometheus​
, decisions for PG­13 or R, but R (for sci­fi violence including some intense images, 
and brief language) wins, all thanks to the violent content was present in the film itself. ​
Bully​
 a 
documentary film, was release with an R rating, not allowed in school to show the truth of 
bullying, but instead later re­released with a PG­13 but also bears the strong language. 
 
 

 

Citation 
LeBlanc, D. "​
MPAA: Alphabet Soup​
." ​
Christianity Today​
 34.16 (1990): 70. ​
Academic Search 
Premier​
. Web. 26 Oct. 2015. 
 
Sandler, Kevin S. "The Naked Truth: Showgirls And The Fate Of The X/NC­17 Rating." ​
Cinema 
Journal​
 40.3 (2001): 69. ​
Academic Search Premier​
. Web. 27 Oct. 2015. 
 
Austin, Bruce A. "The Influence Of The Mpaa's Film­Rating System On Motion Picture 
Attendance: A Pilot Study." ​
Journal Of Psychology​
 106.1 (1980): 91. ​
Academic Search Premier​

Web. 6 Dec. 2015. 
 
Attanasio, Paul. "The Rating Game." ​
New Republic​
 192.24 (1985): 16­18. ​
Academic Search 
Premier​
. Web. 6 Dec. 2015. 
 
Gleiberman, Owen. "Bully And The Broken MPAA." ​
Entertainment Weekly​
 1201 (2012): 52­53. 
Academic Search Premier​
. Web. 6 Dec. 2015.