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SIOP/ Anti-Bias Social Studies Lesson Plan

Name: Rachel Hendrick


Date: December 9, 2015
Grade/Class/Subject: 3rd grade/ Social Studies
Unit/Theme: Economics
Lesson Topic: bartering
State Standards:
Content Area: Social Studies
Standard: Economics
Prepared graduates: Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of
individual choice, market interaction, and public policy
Grade level expectation: Third Grade
Concepts and skills students master: 1. Describe producers and consumers and how goods and services
are exchanged
Evidence outcomes- Students can: b. Describe and give examples of forms of exchange topics to include
but not limited to trade and barter (DOK 1-2)
WIDA Standards: WIDA: Standard 5: The language of social studies
Anti-bias goal 1: Each child will demonstrate self-awareness, confidence, family pride, and positive
social identities.
Content Objective: Students will demonstrate the process of bartering by exchanging with another child
an item that is more valuable to them.
Language Objective: Students will define bartering using a constructive response to write a complete
sentence.
Anti-bias Objective: Students will appreciate that material possessions do not define them, or anyone
else and that all people are valuable regardless of their material possessions.
Key Vocabulary: Bartering, goods, services
Supplementary Materials:
Projector
YouTube video
White board
21 cards with picture of items

Journals
Pencil
Higher Order Questions:
Time:

2 min

2 min

Lesson Sequence / Activities


Motivation:
(Building background, links to experience, links to learning)
Anticipatory set (link to background knowledge):
Begin the lesson by having students talk with an elbow partner about a time when they
exchanged a good with someone else.
Teacher will then provide a scenario of exchanging a good with someone else.
The teacher will have the students think about a time such as on their birthday in which they
have received many different types of candy. Some of these candies are kinds that they may or
may not like. Sometimes a child will offer a sibling or a parent the piece of candy they dont
like for a piece of candy that their sibling or parent would like to give up. The piece of candy
you dont like could be one of their favorite kind. When you exchange these candies with
someone else without using money, is an example of bartering.
Today we are going to be talking about bartering and the exchange of goods.
Presentation:
(Language and content objectives, key vocabulary, comprehensible input, strategies,
interaction, feedback)
The teacher will then introduce the content and language objectives for the lesson.
Content Objective: Students will demonstrate the process of bartering by exchanging with
another child an item that is more valuable to them.
Language Objective: Students will define bartering using a complete sentence.
Direct Instruction: Introduce the concept of bartering and the term.
The teacher will first have the students define the definition of goods and services by calling on
different students in order to reinforce previous learning on these two vocabulary terms. Then
the teacher will define what bartering is and write the definition on the white board as a visual
for the students.
Bartering is exchange (goods or services) for other goods or services without using money.
The teacher will address that the key thing about bartering is that it is the exchange of items
without using money.
Reinforce with a video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hNOt2Y0J8

3 min

Teacher will then provide another scenario of bartering:


Have you ever been to Walmart and wanted to get a gum ball from one of the machines that sit
outside the doors? Suppose you and your friend are both getting a gum ball and you hope to get
the red one because that is your favorite kind and your friend hopes to get the blue one because
that is their favorite kind. You put in a quarter and you end up getting the blue one and your

friend puts in a quarter and ends up getting a red one. You both decide to exchange gum balls in
order to get the kind that you want. This type of exchange is an example of bartering.
2min

Students will then be asked to descibe with an elbow partner, another experience of bartering.
Students will be asked to use the vocabulary term, barter, when explaining their experience of
exchanging an item with someone else.
Practice and Application:
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
(Meaningful activities, interaction, strategies, practice and application, feedback)
(We Do)
Now that the teacher has explained what bartering is, the teacher will address to the class that
they are going to be doing their own class exchange. The teacher will provide each student with
a picture of a item that they will be exchaning with other students. The picture of the items will
be different food items that are used in the Columbian exchange. The teacher will also provide a
visual of the Columbian exchange items on the overhead. The teacher will address that the
Columbian Exchange is an example of a world-wide exchange occuring so that the studnets
have a bigger picture of bartering.

2 min

http://apworldhistory20122013.weebly.com/uploads/9/9/9/6/9996001/5885243_orig.jpg
The teacher will addres one last instruction before starting the exchange. The teacher will
remind the students that the main focus of this activity is not to focus on their items and new
posessions they receive, rather the main focus is understanding the process and experience of
bartering which is to exchange a good with another good without money.
The teacher will then begin the exchange by offering one student one of the items. Announce to
the class that they only have 5 minutes to do the exchnage. Announce when 2 minutes remain.
Teacher- White they are participating in the class exchange, walk around the room and listen to
the different comments made to each other. Observe the activity and write down comments the
students make throughout the exchnage.
When time is up dicuss the lesson: closure.
Teacher will address the following questions with the students:
How many students traded their item for the item they wanted most?

5 min

How many didnt trade at all? Why?


Was there anyone who traded more than once to get the item of their choice?
After the class discussion on these questions, the teacher will go over each item and how these
items are involved in the Columbian Exchange. Students will then understand that different
items are exchanged in the United States with Europe, Africa, and Asia. Students will

understand batering as a bigger picture through the Columbian Exchange.


The teacher will then ask the students what the definition of bartering is one last time by calling
on the students to answer and then repeate the definition one more time. Before the teacher has
the students complete an exit ticket on the definition of bartering and different types of
exchange expereinces, the teacher will address the ant-bias goal and objective.
Anticipatory set- (link to background knowledge)
Video on the Grinch, the true meaning of Christmas. The teacher will use this as an introduction
to the anti-bias objective. The video provides a short clip about how Christmas is not about the
presents and possessions people have.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KO8TNJ-wBX8
Direct Instruction: I want you to turn and talk to a partner about a time that you did something
nice for someone else such as a family member, friend, or loved one.
1 min

The teacher will call on a couple of students to share their experience. The teacher will then
address the anti-bias objective:
Students will appreciate that material possessions do not define them, or anyone else and that
all people are valuable regardless of their material possessions.
The teacher will then address that the items that someone posessess has nothing to do with who
you are as a person. Instead the characterisitcs of a person defines who they are such as being
caring, loving, honest, responsible, and so on.
Next the teacher will connect the lesson of bartering with the anti-bias goal by stating, Today
we learned about the process of bartering which is to exchange a good with another good
without money. There is a holiday coming up in which you sometimes exchange a gift with
another family member, friend, or loved one.

5 min

The teacher will then emphasize gifts of the heart rather than purchased gifts. The teacher will
then ask the students, Rather than giving your parents, friends, or loved ones a purchased gift
for the holiday coming up, what is a gift of the heart that you could give to them?
The teacher will provide the example such as giving your parents or loved ones a hug and
telling them how much you apprecitate what they do for you and that you love them. The
teacher will then address that these gifts from the heart are the best gifts of all and have a lot
more value and meaning compared to an purchased item or gift.
Review and Assessment:
(Review objectives and vocabulary, variety of formative assessments/checks for understanding)
The teacher will review the language, content objectives, and anti-bias objectives with the
students:
Content objective: Students will demonstrate the process of bartering by exchanging with

another child an item that is more valuable to them.


Language objective: Students will define bartering using a constructive response to write a
complete sentence.
Anti-bias Objective: Students will appreciate that material possessions do not define them, or
anyone else and that all people are valuable regardless of their material possessions.
3 min

Assessment (formative): Have students define barter in their journals using a constructive
response to write a complete sentence, list one example of bartering they have been involved in,
and an example of a gift from the heart they can give to their parents, friends, or loved ones.
Extension/ Differentiation:
For students who are ready, I will allow them to write down the three questions that are used for
the class discussion at the end of the activity and answer the questions in complete sentences in
their journal.
For students who need additional support, I will provide a handout with the definition of
bartering and other example scenarios of bartering.
SIOP Features

Preparation
Adaptation of content
Links to background
Links to past learning
Strategies incorporated
Integration of Processes
Reading
Writing
Speaking
Listening
Scaffolding
Modeling
Guided practice
Independent practice
Comprehensible Input
Application
Hands-on
Meaningful
Linked to objectives
Promotes engagement

Group Options
Whole class
Small groups
Partners
Independent
Assessment
Individual
Group
Written
Oral