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Behavior

Intervention Plan 1

Behavior Intervention Plan


Amie Pizura
DIFF 512
Dr. Hunt
March 30th, 2015

Behavior Intervention Plan 2



1. Literature Review
Behavior problems in classrooms today has seem to become a popular topic that is

discussed across the country. Unwanted behavior, like calling out, or flipping desks
because a child has become upset is a major issue in todays classrooms has caused
teachers and students to miss out on valuable instructional time because the unwanted
behavior needs to be addressed first. How does one teacher find that perfect behavior
plan to implement into his or her class year after year? That perfect plan does not exist
because no two students or two classes are the same, but how do teachers find that perfect
plan that will help that student who is displaying that unwanted behavior become
successful?
Behavior plans are strategies that teachers use to decrease a negative/unwanted
behavior that a child is exhibiting. There are many different types of behavior plans that
teachers can use depending on the situation they are experiencing, from individualized
sticker charts to whole a whole class behavior plan like being a bucket filler. Some
unwanted behaviors that can arise in our classrooms today are violent behaviors, like
flipping desks that could cause harm to themselves, fellow classmates or staff. Teachers
are the ones who are responsible to keep everyone safe in the classroom, and it can all
start with the proper intervention plan. Teachers must develop classroom procedures to
provide for their safety of their students if violence should occur within the classroom
(Murdick, 1993, paragraph 4).
Teachers can begin to find a proper behavior plan by collecting data to find if there is
a need for a behavior plan to be put in place. Once data is collected teachers then need to
find and implement plan on how they are going to change the negative behavior.
Teachers can take workshops that will teach them about different strategies that will work

Behavior Intervention Plan 3


and how to implement them to keep their classrooms safe. It is crucial that teachers
know their students and begin to find what might be triggering these unwanted behaviors,
especially if you have a child who has a disability in your classroom. . Once teachers
discover the effectiveness of their first interventions, the majority insisted on applying the
techniques to some form of learning or academic issue in a second intervention
(MacDonald, 1972, p. 424). To make a behavior plan effective teachers must know their
students, they must know what triggers the unwanted behavior down to how to calm that
student down, especially with a child who has a disability.
autistic child may have a narrower range of performances than the normal child,
the major difference between them is the relative many things of a simple sortriding a
bicycle, climbing, walking, tugging on someones sleeve, running, etc. (Ferster, 1961, p.
439). Autistic children have difficulties expressing their needs/wants so their display of
negative/unwanted behavior is a result of them becoming frustrated. Self-contained
classrooms are typically for students who have a sever disability that has caused them not
to be able to be in a general education classroom for some reason or another. These
students are students who might need a behavior plan because they are having difficult
ways to control their anger. The autistic childs behavior becomes unique only when the
relative frequency of occurrence of all the performances in the childs repertoire is
considered (Ferster, p. 438).
Disability or no disability parents and teachers need to be in constant contact and on
the same page once a behavioral plan is in place. Students need to have consistency in
their life and if the plan can be carried from school to home the probably of seeing the
unwanted behavior will begin to decrease faster. Behaviors occurring because of their

Behavior Intervention Plan 4


effects on the parent are especially likely to be weakened by intermittent reinforcement


and extinction, because the parental reinforcements are function of other variable and
behavioral processes usually not directly under the control of the child (Ferster, 1961, p.
443-444). If a child does become enraged because of a matter that happened at home
teachers need to remember, to keep calm under situations like this, and teachers must
remember the protocols that they need to follow to get the enraged child under control.
A behavioral plan that is properly introduced and used to help decrease an unwanted
behavior begins to teach students how to become self-aware of the behavior they are
displaying and it may cause others around them to feel uncomfortable and feel unsafe.
Teachers need to keep up to date on proper protocols and tactics on how keep themselves,
and their students safe in the classroom. Behavior plans allow for teachers to have
effective classroom management again, as well as showing students how their behaviors
can not only affect their lives but others around them as well.
2. Definition of the Behavior
Avoidance behavior is defined by a pervasive pattern of avoiding or withdrawing from
social interaction; a defense mechanism by which a person removes himself/herself from
unpleasant situations (medical-dictonary.thefreedictonary.com/avoidance+behavior).
The behavior that my focus student is displaying is a type of avoidance behavior. He
really likes to avoid his work when he feels like the work he is assigned to complete is
too difficult for him. His avoidance is not something that occurs every day, but when it
does he is trying to get attention from an adult figure. I have been able to observe this
behavior through visual observation. When observing my focus students negative
behavior he has outbursts, he has tantrums, he uses verbal threats towards adults such as
you hate me, Im going to kill you, and he also sometimes tips desks or furniture to get
avoid doing his work. To measure my focus students avoidance behavior I kept track of
how many times he had these outbursts in a day and the duration of the outburst. The
longest duration that I recorded was 5 minutes long, and I counted up to more than 5xs a
day that he has showed avoidance behavior. Justin also showed positive behavior as
well. Seeing him follow the classroom rules, and joke with teachers and staff started to
peek about Tuesday-Thursday. Justin really did show a bit of a change on Mondays and
Fridays but especially the last day of school before a break.
3. Indirect Data

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a. Teacher/Staff Interviews
1. When is the student successful during his/her school day? What is working?
Justin is most successful when new in information/skills are introduced by connecting it
to what he already knows and feels comfortable demonstrating. When his school days
follow a consistent routine and expectations are reasonable but high. Using humor where
appropriate keeps him smiling and more open minded.
2. What areas of difficulty does the student have during which activities do these occur?
Writing is often a challenge. Although he often writes words for 'fun', asking him to
write a sentence or paragraph brings about whining and refusal. Solving word problems
in math also brings out negative behaviors. Justin's ability to deal with frustration
decreases as long school breaks approach. This is likely due to the change in daily
routines, he really likes coming to school.
3. Does the student currently receive any other support in the school?
Justin is in a classroom with 6 other students, one teacher and 4 aides. He gets
counseling twice a week and speech therapy 3 times per week.
4. Why do you think the student is experiencing difficulty?
Justin is a very verbal student with autism and had an extremely impoverished and
unstable early home life experience. While he is able to communicate verbally, his
understanding of verbal communication is much lower than others expect. When he
misunderstands something, he tends to believe his own 'worst case scenario' and acts
accordingly. It can be difficult to clear up these misunderstandings. He also struggles
with reading and understanding social cues. He has learned to be distrustful of most
people and will test limits to see if they really mean what they say. His academic skills
are significantly below grade level, partly due to his disability, but also do to outside
stressors interfering with his ability to learn for many years at a young age. His home life
has stabilized in the last couple of years and his academic growth has been remarkable.
b. Student Interviews
1. What do you think of school?
Its alright, I like school. It would be better if we could play on the computer all day or
watch movies.
2. What do you like best? Least?
I dont like to do work. Work is boring unless its on the computer.
3. What are the rules in your classroom?
The rules are respect others, listen to the teacher and classmates.
4. What do you think of them?
They are alright
5. Do you get into trouble sometimes? Why do you think?
Yeah sometimes, I get in trouble when I back talk to Ms. Marcie because I dont like to
do my work some days.
6. Generally is work too hard for you? Too easy?
No I think its pretty easy, but some things are hard for me. I like math
7. What would make you like school better?
I would like school more if we could play on the computer all day, I really like lunch and
after lunchtime and if we could watch movies all day too.
8. Do adults notice when you do a good job?

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Yes they do, and they tell me if I do something good. I also get a sticker if I am nice to
other classmates.
After reviewing what my focus students teacher wrote about him and what my focus
students responses were when I interviewed him it was clear to see that most of his
outbursts or negative behavior really starts to show around a few days/week before a
break or a change in his routine happens. After his teacher wrote that now I look back
after the observation hours that I put in and I could see that pattern happening.
1. Introduction
My focus student is in a self-contained classroom in a BOCES setting. There are students
from all over the BOCES area that come to this facility at Midlakes Central School.
There are 6 students in this classroom and these students come from different school
districts like; Canandaigua, Marcus Whitman, Red Jacket and a few others. Since these
students ages range is 9-10 but they some are working at a first and second grade levels.
While others were being mainstreamed into some of grade level science and social
studies classes. The classroom setting has 6 desks and the teachers desk, there is one
computer in the classroom that the students can use. There is a kitchen as well as a
bathroom in this room. The students only leave the room to go to a special (gym,
library). They eat breakfast, lunch and have specials like music, and the whole group
counseling come into the classroom. There are 4 aids in the classroom plus the teacher,
most of the students in the room have a one-to-one aid while two of the students shared
an aid that worked between the two of them.
2. Definition
Justin is autistic and he has difficulties with adjusting to change in routine or to familiar
surroundings. Justin really does not show that he is autistic he is a high functioning
autistic individual, the only way you would know that he has a disability is that he is nonstop talking all day long, which relates to his auditory processing disorder. By Justin
talking all the time he is avoiding his work as well as seeing attention. Justin does not get
a lot of attention at home so by him talking and blurting things out like you hate me or
Im going to kill you he is gaining negative attention from an adult. Avoidance
behavior is defined by a pervasive pattern of avoiding or withdrawing from social
interaction; a defense mechanism by which a person removes himself/herself from
unpleasant situations (medical-dictonary.thefreedictonary.com/avoidance+behavior).
Justin also if aggravated enough could flip a desk/chair, hide under furniture, throwing
things or run from the room. Justin having these behavioral outbursts are his final
attempt to get out of doing an assignment or a task he believes he will not succeed at.
3. Teacher Staff Interviews
When talking with my cooperating teacher about Justin she told me that he comes from a
very rough life; his dad had a traumatic brain injury, leaving him mentally retarded,
Justins mom died and Justin is basically left to raise his two younger siblings. His dad
doesnt hold a job so the family crashes on peoples couches every other week. Justin
sometimes shows up to school in the same clothes day after day. The clothes Justin
wears never fit him, and they are most likely to be his dads. Justin is a really sweet kid,
but he has to feel you out to see if you are a person he can trust. My cooperating teacher
told me one time Justins home life was not going well and he asked my cooperating

Behavior Intervention Plan 7


teacher to take him home with her. We talked about the questions; when is the student
successful during his school day? What is working?, What areas of difficulty does the
student have and during which activates do these occur?, Des the student currently
receive any other supports in the school?, and why do you think the student is
experiencing difficulty? Looking at the responses my cooperating teacher provided me
with helped me understand who Justin is and how I can begin to find ways to find an
intervention strategy that works.
4. Student Interview
After looking at the questions I asked Justin and his responses they were pretty much
what I expected them to be. Justin is not one who likes to talk about his feelings. Justin
likes to talk about things he is interested in, like maps and movies. Justin comes from the
one of the most dysfunctional families in the class. Justins dad had a traumatic brain
injury, leaving him mentaly retarded. Justins mom died when he was young, and that
basically leaves Justin who is autistic to raise his himself and his two younger siblings.
Justins dad is unemployed and he often comes to school wearing the same clothes two or
three days in a row. Knowing Justins background and seeing what his actual responses
were to the questions I asked him; what do yout think of school, what do you like best
and least, what are the rules in the classroom, what do you think of them, do you get into
trouble sometimes, why do you think, generally is work too hard for you or too easy,
what would make you like school better, and do adults notice when you do a good job?
Comparing his responess, to what I observered, and what his teacher stated I could see
that Justin is missing a set routine in his life. Justin likes having routine and easily gets
agitated when there is a break coming up or it is getting close t the weekend (typically his
negative behavior starts to show on Fridays).
1. Re-define the Behavior
Avoidance behavior is defined by a pervasive pattern of avoiding or withdrawing from
social interaction; a defense mechanism by which a person removes himself/herself from
unpleasant situations (medical-dictonary.thefreedictonary.com/avoidance+behavior).
The behavior that my focus student is displaying is a type of avoidance behavior. He
really likes to avoid his work when he feels like the work he is assigned to complete is
too difficult for him. His avoidance is not something that occurs every day, but when it
does he is trying to get attention from an adult figure. I have been able to observe this
behavior through visual observation. When observing my focus students negative
behavior he has outbursts, he has tantrums, he uses verbal threats towards adults such as
you hate me, Im going to kill you, and he also sometimes tips desks or furniture to get
avoid doing his work. To measure my focus students avoidance behavior I kept track of
how many times he had these outbursts in a day and the duration of the outburst. The
longest duration that I recorded was 5 minutes long, and I counted up to more than 5xs a
day that he has showed avoidance behavior. Justin also showed positive behavior as
well. Seeing him follow the classroom rules, and joke with teachers and staff started to
peek about Tuesday-Thursday. Justin really did show a bit of a change on Mondays and
Fridays but especially the last day of school before a break.
2. Baseline Data
I decided to document the data for a narrative with the ABC form and the quantitative
using the interval and frequency count as a form of tallies and stopwatch. I chose to do

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an ABC form and keep track of how many times this student did the negative behavior
because it was easy to keep track for me. Since he has an aid and they have to document
his behavior on his behavior plan anyways. I feel that it was easy to fill out the ABC
form because Justin is typically a good kid and when he does show his negative behavior
its because there is a reason (from home or its almost the weekend or break). Justin also
shows negative behavior during reading and math because sometimes he already has it in
his mind that the assignment is to difficult before he gives the assignment a chance. It
was easy to document the duration and frequency because when Justin shows a negative
behavior it is short, or he does that behavior the whole setting of math or reading (30
minutes).
3. Convert the Data to a Chart

After Lunch

Science
Frequency
Duration (minutes)

Reading

Math

20

40

60

80

100

120

4. Analyze Data and Formulate a Hypothesis


After looking at the collected data I noticed that Justin displays most of his negative
behavior during Reading and Math time. The types of behavior that Justin shows during
those two times vary from some minor behavior outbursts to verbal protests. The
function of the behavior I want to get Justin to avoid is the verbal protests (i.e. the yelling
out).
5. Baseline Data
I used two types of data collection forms; ABC method and the duration and frequency of
the behavior. I decided to use these two forms to collect data because it allowed myself
to see when Justin was displaying negative behavior and what exactly those behaviors
were and how his aid and teacher responded to those behaviors. Justin already has a BIP
plan so when his aid would document some of his outbursts I knew that those outbursts
were something I should focus on. It was very easy to observe Justin; he is a very
outgoing kid who is not affected by someone watching him while he is doing his work. I
worked with Justin before this assignment and he showed the same outbursts and other
negative behaviors that I documented. I noticed that his behaviors began to occur when
his aid would tell him what he was doing for reading and math. Justin would become

Behavior Intervention Plan 9


defensive and shuts down. Thats when he becomes vocal, and starts to rip up his paper
or break his pencils. Most of this behavior comes about when Justin knows that there is a
change happening in his schedule or living environment. His teacher and aids can
typically assume when Justin will begin to show these behaviors.
6. Analysis and Function
The function of the behavior is to get Justin to verbal outburst. I plan on doing this by
implementing a daily point system that where he earns points and at the end of the week
he can spend his points at the classroom store or he can hold those points till he has
enough to get a certain item. I think that this will help Justin with managing his outburst,
he can see on a chart when he will be earning points. I will have to inform Justin that he
will only earn points if he does not have any verbal outburst. With Justin we can use
humor as long as it is gentle teasing when appropriate, to get him to do his work so if he
does say you get outta here you can tease him back by saying okay and pretended like
you getting up to leave to get him back on track. Also using positive tone with him if he
is becoming agitated also will earn him points. Justins verbal outburst that I am most
concerned about is you hate me and Im going to kill you which if agitated enough
will say to staff members.
I think this point system will work for Justin because he likes to get things, even if they
are dollar store trinkets. Since Justin does not come from a very stable home him getting
little things like a dollar store trinket will mean a lot to him.
7. Reflection
What I have learned through observing was that Justin is a very intelligent student. He is
able to know the difference between when someone is being sarcastic. I was able to see
that even though Justin gives his aids and teacher a hard time he really does want to make
them proud and do his best on his work. Justin does show a consistent patter because, he
typically shows the negative behavior before the weekends, before long breaks and
sometimes during the week if his dad ends up moving the kids to a new place to sleep for
the week. I really like observing and working with Justin, and he knows when he
misbehaves, and is always looking to make his mistake better.

8. Intervention
b) Teaching plan: I plan to teach Justin how to get his needs met without having verbal
outburst, by giving him sticks or an object when he needs to take a break. For Justin to
be able to take a break he must feel agitated with the situation he is currently in. During
this break Justin is allowed to get up from his desk (leaving work) and walk into the
kitchen area or in front of the room. Justin cannot leave the classroom incase he decides
he is going to run. Justins aid will make sure that they stand near the door when Justin
requests a break. Since Justin has verbal outbursts like you hate me or Im going to
kill you. I would teach Justin how to use this strategy by modeling how to use the tame
a time stick. I will also put on his desk pictures of different feelings so when he can
relate to one of those pictures then it is time to use a stick.
c) Response strategies: If the previous strategy did not work and other strategies that the
teacher already had in place I would plan to respond calmly, and make sure that I go

Behavior Intervention Plan 10


through all my options before restraining the student. I know that especially with an
autistic child they need to have a set routine, and if you are planning on deviating from
that set schedule you need to give them a few hours/days notice so they have time to
prepare for the adjustment. Justin has had instances where he has tried and has escaped
from the classroom. Since the behavior I am trying to address is Justin reducing the
amount of verbal outburst, I will want to make sure that Justin goes through all of his
options; taking a breath, a break, before going to the final option of taking away his
sticker for that subject and knowing that could upset him in the end
9. Intervention Data
Once the intervention plan was set in place the only day that Justin showed any verbal
outbrst was Friday the day before break. I knew he would have some outburst because
his schedule was going to be different for the next 9 days. Justin does not do well when
he does not know what is going to happen tomorrow. I did warn him at the beginning of
the week that we were going to be going on break Friday. He was very receptive until
Friday, which I knew would happen. Justin did use his sticks to take breaks when he
thought he was going to have an outburst. The verbal outbursts happened during the after
lunch activity because he knew it was getting close for going home.

After Lunch

Science
Frequency
Duration (in minutes)

Reading

Math

10

20

30

40

50

10. Reflection
The interventions that I planned on using and implemented into Justins daily
routine are ones that my cooperating teacher and myself came up with. We tied in
what previously have worked for other students who showed similar negative
behaviors. The sticker chart and having the Justin earn points that he can use at
the end of the week to earn a prize has helped decrease his verbal outburst
drastically. It has been effective the week before their spring break when we
implemented it. Behaviors occurring because of their effects on the parent are
especially likely to be weakened by intermittent reinforcement and extinction,
because the parental reinforcements are function of other variable and behavioral
processes usually not directly under the control of the child (Ferster, 1961, p.

Behavior Intervention Plan 11


443-444). Since Justins home life is not stable the only stable thing he has in his
life is school that is why it is important that we as his teachers get to implement
something that he looks forward to achieving without knowing he is changing his
behavior.
The autistic childs behavior becomes unique only when the relative frequency
of occurrence of all the performances in the childs repertoire is considered
(Ferster, p. 438). I knew that this strategy would work because my cooperating
teacher told me she used this strategy with other students like Justin, and she said
it was very effective. I have watched this type of strategy put into use in a general
education class before, so I knew how to implement it and the gist of the strategy.
I was not sure how this strategy would work for a student who was in a selfcontained classroom.
I believe that this strategy will work for Justin in the future. I implemented it for
a week and a week before break and I saw drastic changes in his behavior except
for that Friday. My cooperating teacher said she would keep me updated on how
he does for the rest of the year. He seemed to like it because he could get a prize
at the end of the week. Many teams fail to monitor the effectiveness of behavior
intervention plans and the maintenance of the students behavior over time
(Shepard, L. & Linn, D., 2015, p. 218) if it wasnt for my cooperating teacher,
and knowing what strategies have worked for Justin in the past I would not have
known if this strategy would work ultimately.
My cooperating teacher and I came up with the plan together, I told her my idea
and she said she has used that strategy before. With both of us on the same page
and being able to know what the outcome looks like it was very easy to
implement and get Justin on board. Since I brought that idea from another school
and my cooperating teacher had implemented it on other students I would say that
most teachers know of this strategy and have or would use it in their classroom.
This strategy can be used for any student even if they dont have a behavior that
needs to be reinforced.
I could see myself using this type of strategy in my future classroom, but if I
needed to modify it to fit certain students needs or my schedule I would either
make this strategy available for the whole class and then I know my focus student
will not be singled out. I would also be able to differentiate it to fit whatever
negative behavior a student was showing and make it fit them and their interests;
for example if a student was into surfing the web then I would allow them to go
on the internet for 10 minutes at the end of the day if they earned so many points
throughout the week.

Behavior Intervention Plan 12



Appendices:

Student Questions:
What do you think of school?
What do you like best? Least?
What are the rules in your classroom?
What do you think of them?
Do you get into trouble sometimes? Why do you think?
Generally is work too hard for you? Too easy?
What would make you like school better?
Do adults notice when you do a good job?
Teacher Questions:
1. When is the student successful during his/her school day? What is working?
2. What areas of difficulty does the student have during which activities do these occur?
3. Does the student currently receive any other support in the school?
4. Why do you think the student is experiencing difficulty?
Baseline Data
Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (math time)
Date: 2/12/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was instructed to Yells at aid you hate me
work on math assignment Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 30 second
Pushes paper on the
ground
Frequency: 4 times
Duration: 30 seconds
Begins to rip math paper
up
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 30 minutes
(whole class period)
Tries to leave desk

Frequency: 5 times
Duration: 5 minutes
Yells at aid Im going to
kill you
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 2 minutes
Throws pencil on the

Consequence
No response (documents)
Picks up paper

Documents but ignores

Aid gets up and blocks


Justin from leaving the
room
No response (documents)

Picks pencil back up

Behavior Intervention Plan 13



ground
Frequency: 7 times
Duration: 30 minutes (the
whole class period)
Pouts
Frequency: 7 times
Duration: 15 minutes
Yells at aid to get outta
here
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 2 minutes
Verbally refuses to do
math paper
Frequency: 15 times
Duration: 25 minutes
Goes to the bathroom
Frequency: once
Duration: 5 minutes




Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Reading)
Date: 2/13/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was instructed to Rocking in his chair
complete reading
Frequency: 8 times
assignment
Duration: 3 minutes
Threw pencil on the
ground, to avoid
completing writing
assignment
Frequency: 15 times
Duration: 8 minutes
Went to the bathroom
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 6 minutes
Yelled get outta here
Frequency: 4 times
Duration: 5 minutes
Pushed paper off desk
Frequency: 10 times
Duration: 8 minutes
Refused to answer group
questions

No response
Okay goodbye Justin
(documents)
Documents the verbal
refusal
No response

Consequence
Asked to put chair back on
the ground
Documented and teacher
picked pencil back up

No response
Documented
Documented
No response (but
documented)

Behavior Intervention Plan 14



Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 10 minutes


Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Science)
Date: 2/16/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was instructed to Went to the bathroom
participate in science
Frequency: 2 times
activity
Duration: 8 minutes
Rocking in chair
Frequency: 6 times
Duration: 10 minutes
Asked other students
questions
Frequency: 4 times
Duration: 5 minutes

Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (After lunch)
Date: 2/17/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was instructed to Refused to do activity
participate in after lunch

yoga
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 7 minutes
Picked at his shirt
Frequency: 10 times
Duration: 3 minutes
Kicked shoes off

Frequency: once
Duration: 30 seconds
Yells this is stupid
Frequency: twice
Duration: 1 minute
Yells this is stupid
(again)
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 2 minutes

Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Math)
Date: 3/3/15
Antecedents
Behavior

Consequence
No response
No response
No response

Consequence
Documented; given a
second choice of what to
do after lunch
No response
Teacher responds; if you
take your shoes off you
must participate in yoga
No response
(documented)
No response
(documented)

Consequence



Student was instructed to
complete math
assignment

Behavior Intervention Plan 15



Yells get outta here
Frequency: once
Duration: 30 seconds
Yells this is stupid
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 2 minutes
Pouts
Frequency: 10 times
Duration: 15 minutes
Rocks in chair
Frequency: 15 times
Duration: 5 minutes


Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Math)
Date: 3/4/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Throws pencil
complete math
Frequency: 5 times
assignment
Duration: 15 seconds
Rips paper
Frequency: 6 times
Duration: 5 minutes
Tells aid that they hate
him
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 3 minutes
Tells aid they are stupid
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 3 minutes
Pounds on the keyboard
Frequency: 15 times
Duration: 10 minutes
Goes to the bathroom
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 10 minutes

Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (science)
Date: 3/5/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Brakes pencil
complete science
Frequency: once
assignment
Duration: 30 seconds
Asked to sharpen pencil

No response but
documented
No response but
documented
No response
Asked to put chair on the
ground

Consequence
Documented
No response
No response (but
documented)
No response (but
documented)
Asked to stop
No response

Consequence
Ignores (documented)
Aid sharpens pencil

Behavior Intervention Plan 16



Frequency: once
Duration: 2 minutes
Asks for an eraser
Frequency: once
Duration: 1 minute
Rips math paper in half
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 30 seconds
Tapes up math paper
Frequency: once
Duration: 3 minutes
Yells this is stupid
Frequency: 4 times
Duration: 2 minutes


Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Reading)
Date: 3/6/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Laughs at other students
complete reading
Frequency: 3 times
assignment
Duration: 6 minutes
Refuses to participate
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 2 minutes
Does not complete work
Frequency: once
Duration: 15 minutes
Yells this is stupid
Frequency: 5 times
Duration: 2 minutes
Breaks pencil
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 1 minute

After intervention:
Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Math)
Date: 3/23/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Broke pencil
complete a math
Frequency: 3 times
assignment
Duration: 5 minutes
Picked at paper
Frequency: 5 times

Ignored
Documented
Documented
No response
(documented)

Consequence
Asked to remember
classroom rules
Documented
Documented
No response
No response

Consequence
No response
No response

Behavior Intervention Plan 17



Duration: 10 minutes
Went to the bathroom
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 15 minutes


Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Math)
Date: 3/24/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Pushed paper of the desk
complete math
Frequency: 8 times
assignment
Duration: 3 minutes
Asked for his water bottle
to be refilled
Frequency: once
Duration: 3 minutes
Got frustrated with the
computer
Frequency: 9 times
Duration: 10 minutes

Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Reading)
Date: 3/25/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Rocked in his chair
complete a reading
Frequency: 5 times
assignment
Duration: 4 minutes
Played with water bottle
Frequency: 7 times
Duration: 8 minutes
Stabbed eraser
Frequency: 15 times
Duration: 6 minutes

Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (Science)
Date: 3/26/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student was asked to
Played with science
complete a science activity materials
Frequency: 3 times
Duration: 10 minutes
Ignored following
directions (asked what

No response

Consequence
No response
Aid went to fill water
bottle after he completed
a math problem
Was asked not to pound
on the keyboard

Consequence
Asked to put the chair on
the ground
Water bottle was taken
away
Ignored

Consequence
Materials taken away

Directions were not


repeated

Behavior Intervention Plan 18



was going on)
Frequency: once
Duration: 2 minutes
Broke pencil
Frequency: 2 times
Duration: 3 minutes


Student: Justin
Setting: Inclusive classroom (After Lunch)
Date: 3/27/15
Antecedents
Behavior
Student as asked to
Yelled get outta here
participate in after lunch
Frequency: 3 times
activity
Duration: 2 minutes
Yelled this is stupid
Frequency: 5 times
Duration: 4 minutes
Started pouting
Frequency: once
Duration: 10 minutes

No response

Consequence
Documented (no
response)
Documented (no
response)
No response

Reference
Ferster, C. B, (1961). Child Development. Positive Reinforcement and Behavioral
Deficits of Autistic Children. 32, pp.437-457.
MacDonald, S. & Gallimore, R., (1972). Introducing Classroom Behavior Management
Skills to Experienced Teachers. Journal of Educational Research. 65 (e.g. 2), pp.
420-424.
Murdick, N. L., & Gartin, B. C., (1993). How to Handle Students Exhibiting Violent
Behaviors. Clearing House. 66, pp.278-280
Shepherd, T. L. & Linn, D., (2015). Behavior and classroom management in the multicultural
classroom. 1st ed. California: SAGE Publications, INC.

Behavior Intervention Plan 19