You are on page 1of 6

Lesson Plan

Unit Title

Basics of Geometry
Measuring and Constructing Angles

Subject Area

8th grade Geometry

Lesson Title

Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

Audience Description

This is the Advanced Geometry class that meats for 1st hour.
There are 10 students in this class. They are all advanced
students and working on high school level material. They work
at a faster pace. They all considered gifted. They can sit
wherever they want to. In the front there is normally a table of 5,
a table of 4 and then 1student sits by her.

Lesson Length

44 minutes. 8:27 am to 9:09 am

Objectives

Students will be able to use inductive reasoning to solve


problems.
Students will be able to use deductive reasoning to solve
problems.
Students will be able to know the difference between inductive
and deductive.
Students will be able to make and test a conjecture.
Students will be able to make counterexamples.

Standards/Benchmarks
These are all of the standards
for this whole unit. This is
only day 3 of the unit which
is all of chapter 2.

Mathematics | High SchoolGeometry


CongruenceGCO
Provegeometrictheorems.
9.Provetheoremsaboutlinesandangles.
10.Provetheoremsabouttriangles.
11.Provetheoremsaboutparallelograms.
Similarity,RightTriangles,andTrigonometryGSRT
Provetheoremsinvolvingsimilarity.

4.Provetheoremsabouttriangles.
5.Usecongruenceandsimilaritycriteriafortrianglestosolve
problemsandtoproverelationshipsingeometricfigures.

Anticipatory Set
Time: 7 minutes

Warm-up for today will be to write one of the conditional


statements on the board that was the home practice. If the
conditional statement that student wants to write is already up
there, then they need to write a new one.
Some examples are:
If a quadrilateral is a kite, then it is not a trapezoid.
If a quadrilateral is a rectangle, then it is a parallelogram.
If a quadrilateral is a square, then it is a rhombus, a rectangle,
and a parallelogram.
If a polygon is a rhombus, then it is a quadrilateral.

Go over the examples and ask if everyone agrees by doing


thumbs up or thumbs down. If there are thumbs down have them
explain why.

If the class keeps getting off subject and has side conversations
then go over the rules of the class again. If they continue with
the conversations and not working then I will move students so
they are sitting somewhere else.
Lesson Activities
Total time: 34 minutes.

First we will be doing vocabulary. They will be writing this in


their interactive composition notebook on page 23 and 25. Write
the vocabulary words on the board.
Conjecture: unproven statement based on observation.
Inductive reasoning: Finding a pattern in specific cases to write
conjectures for general cases. (Specific general).
Deductive reasoning: Use facts, definitions, accepted properties,
and the laws of logic to form a logical argument.
Law of Detachment: If the hypothesis of a true conditional
statement is true, then the conclusion is also true.

Example (write on board):


If two segments have the same length, then they are congruent.
You know that BC = XY. Using the Law of Detachment, what
statement can you make?
Answer: Because BC = XY satisfies the hypothesis of a true
conditional statement, the conclusion is also true.
Another example:
If 90 < mR < 180, then R is obtuse. The measure of R is
155. Using the Law of Detachment, what statement can you
make?
Answer: R is obtuse.
Making and Testing a Conjecture:
Q: Make and test a conjecture about the sign of the product of
any three negative integers.
A: The product of any three negative integers will be a negative
integer. Tests: 5 (2)(1) = 10; 7(3)(5) = 105; 50(10)
(5) = 2500
Q: Make and test a conjecture about the sum of any five
consecutive integers.
A: The sum of any five consecutive integers is five times the
middle (third) number. Tests: 2+3+4+5+6=20=5(4);
2 + (1) + 0 + 1 + 2 = 0 = 5(0); 10 + (9) + (8) + (7) +
(6) = 40 = 5(8)
Counterexample: Specific case for which the conjecture is false.
Q: Find a counterexample to show that the conjecture is false.
The value of x^2 is always greater than the value of x.
Sample answer: 0^2 = 0, 0 > 0
Q: The sum of two numbers is always greater than their
difference.
Sample answer: 5 + (3) = 8 and 5 (3)=2, 8> 2

Closure
3 minutes

Now the students will be working individually in their big idea


student journal on page 42-43 #1-10. Do not work on number 11
and 12, we will be learning that tomorrow. Also they will be
working out of the book on some problems from page 80 #10-20
even. This will be the home practice. They can write their
answers on page 24.
Pass out a notecard to students. We will be doing an exit slip
today. Write down something that you still have a question on or
something that you learned today. Turn it in and review the
questions/lessons learned.

Modifications

As of right now, there are no modifications for these students.

Resources

Interactive notebooks, projector, whiteboard, Big ideas Math


Geometry book, pencil, paper, notecards.

Summative Assessments

The first one is the warm up activity to make sure that they know
how to write a conditional statement about parallelograms. The
next one will be the examples on the board and if they get the
correct answers and how they got there. Another one is the exit
slip to see if they learned the main lesson or if they need more
explanation.

We will be reviewing home practice tomorrow and it will be


checked for completion. Some of the problems will be on the
composition notebook quiz.

Student Journal page 42-43 #1-10 (there is a copy of the book on the
back teacher desk as well)
In Exercises 14, describe the pattern. Then write or draw the next two
numbers, letters, or figures.
1. 20,19,17,14,10,
3. C,E,G,I,K,
2. 1,2,3,5,7,
In Exercises 5 and 6, make and test a conjecture about the given
quantity.
5. the sum of two negative integers
6. the product of three consecutive nonzero integers
In Exercises 7 and 8, find a counterexample to show that the
conjecture is false.
7. If n is a rational number, then n^2 is always less than n.
8. Line k intersects plane P at point Q on the plane. Plane P is
perpendicular to line k.
In Exercises 9 and 10, use the Law of Detachment to determine what
you can conclude from the given information, if possible.
9. If a triangle has equal side lengths, then each interior angle
measure is 60. ABC has equal side lengths.
10.
If a quadrilateral is a rhombus, then it has two pairs of
opposite sides that are parallel. Quadrilateral PQRS has two pairs
of opposite sides that are parallel.
Answers (also in teacher edition textbook)
1. The difference between two numbers is one more than the
difference between the previous two numbers; 5, 1
2. The list items are prime numbers that have alternating negative and
positive signs; 11, 13
3. The list items are letters in alphabetical order with every other letter
skipped; M, O

5. The sum of any two negative integers is a negative integer. Sample


answer: 3 + (3) = 6. 41 + (50) = 91, 100 + (900) =
1000
6. The product of three consecutive nonzero integers is an even
number.
7. (3/2)^2=(3/2)(3/2)=(9/4)>(3/2)
8. Line k and plane P can intersect at point Q at any angle.
9. Each angle measure of ABC is 60.
10. not possible