You are on page 1of 9

SUPPLEMENT

to the
FIRST ANGELS MESSAGE
(The True Science of Education)
(Pt. 5)

Now, as never before, we need to understand the true science of education. If we fail to understand this, we shall
never have a place in the kingdom of God{1MCP 53.2} 1897
It would be a mistake to separate Brother Sutherland from the school, because he has a spiritual hold upon
educational lines of work...{GCB, April 24, 1901 par. 10}

Sister White mentions E.A. Sutherland 203 times in the SOP section of the EG White CD Rom

and
She mentions him 31 times in the Biography section of the same CD Rom
The Pioneers mention him 337 times in the Pioneer section of the E.G. White CD Rom
E. A. Sutherland wrote a book called Studies in Christian Education
We will continue reading from this book to find out what the Father of True Christian Education has to say
In regards to what caused the Protestant Nations to reject the 1st Angels Message which is what is
Going to be the same reason to cause SDAs to receive the Mark of the Beast
http://www.andrews.edu/campusplan/wp2012/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Studies-in-ChristianEducation.pdf

SOP on Manual Training:


Chap. 24 - Manual Training
At the creation, labor was appointed as a blessing. It meant development, power, happiness. The changed
condition of the earth through the curse of sin has brought a change in the conditions of labor; yet though now
attended with anxiety, weariness, and pain, it is still a source of happiness and development. And it is a safeguard
against temptation. Its discipline places a check on self-indulgence, and promotes industry, purity, and firmness. Thus
it becomes a part of God's great plan for our recovery from the Fall. {Ed 214.1}
The youth should be led to see the true dignity of labor. Show them that God is a constant worker. All things in
nature do their allotted work. Action pervades the whole creation, and in order to fulfill our mission we, too, must be
active. {Ed 214.2}
In our labor we are to be workers together with God. He gives us the earth and its treasures; but we must adapt
them to our use and comfort. He causes the trees to grow; but we prepare the timber and build the house. He has
hidden in the earth the gold and silver, the iron and coal; but it is only through toil that we can obtain them. {Ed
214.3}
Show that, while God has created and constantly controls all things, He has endowed us with a power not wholly
unlike His. To us has been given a degree of control over the forces of nature. As God called forth the earth in its beauty
out of chaos, so we can bring order and beauty out of confusion. And though all things are now marred with evil, yet in
our completed work we feel a joy akin to His, when, looking on the fair earth, He pronounced it "very good." {Ed 214.4}
As a rule, the exercise most beneficial to the youth will be found in useful employment. The little child finds both
diversion and development in play; and his sports should be such as to promote not only physical, but mental and

***continue on next page***

spiritual growth. As he gains strength and intelligence, the best recreation will be found in some line of effort that is
useful. That which trains the hand to helpfulness, and teaches the young to bear their share of life's burdens, is most
effective in promoting the growth of mind and character. {Ed 215.1}
The youth need to be taught that life means earnest work, responsibility, care-taking. They need a training that will
make them practical--men and women who can cope with emergencies. They should be taught that the discipline of
systematic, well-regulated labor is essential, not only as a safeguard against the vicissitudes of life, but as an aid to allaround development. {Ed 215.2}
Notwithstanding all that has been said and written concerning the dignity of labor, the feeling prevails that it is
degrading. Young men are anxious to become teachers, clerks, merchants, physicians, lawyers, or to occupy some
other position that does not require physical toil. Young women shun housework and seek an education in other
lines. These need to learn that no man or woman is degraded by honest toil. That which degrades is idleness and
selfish dependence. Idleness fosters self-indulgence, and the result is a life empty and barren--a field inviting the
growth of every evil. "The earth which drinketh in the rain that cometh oft upon it, and bringeth forth herbs meet for
them by whom it is dressed, receiveth blessing from God: but that which beareth thorns and briers is rejected, and is
nigh unto cursing; whose end is to be burned." Hebrews 6:7, 8. {Ed 215.3}
Many of the branches of study that consume the student's time are not essential to usefulness or happiness; but it
is essential for every youth to have a thorough acquaintance with everyday duties. If need be, a young woman can
dispense with a knowledge of French and algebra, or even of the piano; but it is indispensable that she learn to make
good bread, to fashion neatly-fitting garments, and to perform efficiently the many duties that pertain to
homemaking. {Ed 216.1}
To the health and happiness of the whole family nothing is more vital than skill and intelligence on the part of the
cook. By ill-prepared, unwholesome food she may hinder and even ruin both the adult's usefulness and the child's
development. Or by providing food adapted to the needs of the body, and at the same time inviting and palatable,
she can accomplish as much in the right as otherwise she accomplishes in the wrong direction. So, in many ways, life's
happiness is bound up with faithfulness in common duties. {Ed 216.2}
Since both men and women have a part in home-making, boys as well as girls should gain a knowledge of
household duties. To make a bed and put a room in order, to wash dishes, to prepare a meal, to wash and repair his
own clothing, is a training that need not make any boy less manly; it will make him happier and more useful. And if
girls, in turn, could learn to harness and drive a horse, and to use the saw and the hammer, as well as the rake and the
hoe, they would be better fitted to meet the emergencies of life. {Ed 216.3}
Let the children and youth learn from the Bible how God has honored the work of the everyday toiler. Let them
read of "the sons of the prophets" (2 Kings 6:1-7), students at school, who were building a house for themselves, and
for whom a miracle was wrought to save from loss the ax that was borrowed. Let them read of Jesus the carpenter,
and Paul the tentmaker, who with the toil of the craftsman linked the highest ministry, human and divine. Let them
read of the lad whose five loaves were used by the Saviour in that wonderful miracle for the feeding of the multitude; of
Dorcas the seamstress, called back from death, that she might continue to make garments for the poor; of the wise
woman described in the Proverbs, who "seeketh wool and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands;" who "giveth
meat to her household, and their task to her maidens;" who "planteth a vineyard," and strengtheneth her arms;" who
"stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea, . . . reacheth forth her hands to the needy;" who "looketh well to the ways
of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness." Proverbs 31:13, 15, R.V.; 31:16, 17, 20, 27. {Ed 217.1}
Of such a one, God says: "She shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her
in the gates." Proverbs 31:30, 31. {Ed 217.2}
For every child the first industrial school should be the home. And, so far as possible, facilities for manual training
should be connected with every school. To a great degree such training would supply the place of the gymnasium,
with the additional benefit of affording valuable discipline. {Ed 217.3}
Manual training is deserving of far more attention than it has received. Schools should be established that, in
addition to the highest mental and moral culture, shall provide the best possible facilities for physical development
and industrial training. Instruction should be given in agriculture, manufactures,--covering as many as possible of the
most useful trades,--also in household economy, healthful cookery, sewing, hygienic dressmaking, the treatment of
the sick, and kindred lines. Gardens, workshops, and treatment rooms should be provided, AND the work in every line
should be under the direction of skilled instructors. {Ed 218.1}
***continue on next page***

The work should have a definite aim and should be thorough. While every person needs some knowledge of
different handicrafts, it is indispensable that he become proficient in at least one. Every youth, on leaving school,
should have acquired a knowledge of some trade or occupation by which, if need be, he may earn a livelihood. {Ed
218.2}
The objection most often urged against industrial training in the schools is the large outlay involved. But the object
to be gained is worthy of its cost. No other work committed to us is so important as the training of the youth, AND
every outlay demanded for its right accomplishment is means well spent. {Ed 218.3}
Even from the viewpoint of financial results, the outlay required for manual training would prove the truest
economy. Multitudes of our boys would thus be kept from the street corner and the groggery; the expenditure for
gardens, workshops, and baths would be more than met by the saving on hospitals and reformatories. And the youth
themselves, trained to habits of industry, and skilled in lines of useful and productive labor--who can estimate their
value to society and to the nation? {Ed 218.4}
As a relaxation from study, occupations pursued in the open air, and affording exercise for the whole body, are the
most beneficial. NO LINE OF MANUAL TRAINING IS OF MORE VALUE THAN AGRICULTURE. A greater effort should be
made to create and to encourage an interest in agricultural pursuits. Let the teacher call attention to what the Bible
says about agriculture: that it was God's plan for man to till the earth; that the first man, the ruler of the whole world,
was given a garden to cultivate; and that many of the world's greatest men, its real nobility, have been tillers of the
soil. Show the opportunities in such a life. The wise man says, "The king himself is served by the field." Ecclesiastes 5:9.
Of him who cultivates the soil the Bible declares, "His God doth instruct him to discretion, and doth teach him." Isaiah
28:26. And again, "Whoso keepeth the fig tree shall eat the fruit thereof." Proverbs 27:18. He who earns his livelihood
by agriculture escapes many temptations and enjoys unnumbered privileges and blessings denied to those whose
work lies in the great cities. And in these days of mammoth trusts and business competition, there are few who enjoy
so real an independence and so great certainty of fair return for their labor as does the tiller of the soil. {Ed 219.1}
In the study of agriculture, let pupils be given not only theory, but practice. While they learn what science can
teach in regard to the nature and preparation of the soil, the value of different crops, and the best methods of
production, let them put their knowledge to use. Let teachers share the work with the students, and show what
results can be achieved through skillful, intelligent effort. Thus may be awakened a genuine interest, an ambition to
do the work in the best possible manner. Such an ambition, together with the invigorating effect of exercise,
sunshine, and pure air, will create a love for agricultural labor that with many youth will determine their choice of an
occupation. Thus might be set on foot influences that would go far in turning the tide of migration which now sets so
strongly toward the great cities. {Ed 219.2}
Thus, also, our schools could aid effectively in the disposition of the unemployed masses. Thousands of helpless
and starving beings, whose numbers are daily swelling the ranks of the criminal classes, might achieve self-support in
a happy, healthy, independent life if they could be directed in skillful, diligent labor in the tilling of the soil. {Ed 220.1}
The benefit of manual training is needed also by professional men. A man may have a brilliant mind; he may be
quick to catch ideas; his knowledge and skill may secure for him admission to his chosen calling; yet he may still be far
from possessing a fitness for its duties. An education derived chiefly from books leads to superficial thinking. Practical
work encourages close observation and independent thought. Rightly performed, it tends to develop that practical
wisdom which we call common sense. It develops ability to plan and execute, strengthens courage and perseverance,
and calls for the exercise of tact and skill. {Ed 220.2}
The physician who has laid a foundation for his professional knowledge by actual service in the sickroom will have
a quickness of insight, an all-around knowledge, and an ability in emergencies to render needed service--all essential
qualifications, which only a practical training can so fully impart. {Ed 220.3}
The minister, the missionary, the teacher, will find their influence with the people greatly increased when it is
manifest that they possess the knowledge and skill required for the practical duties of everyday life. And often the
success, perhaps the very life, of the missionary depends on his knowledge of practical things. The ability to prepare
food, to deal with accidents and emergencies, to treat disease, to build a house, or a church if need be--often these
make all the difference between success and failure in his lifework. {Ed 221.1}
In acquiring an education, many students would gain a most valuable training if they would become self-sustaining.
Instead of incurring debts, or depending on the self-denial of their parents, let young men and young women depend
on themselves. They will thus learn the value of money, the value of time, strength, and opportunities, and will be
under far less temptation to indulge idle and spendthrift habits. The lessons of economy, industry, self-denial,

***continue on next page***

practical business management, and steadfastness of purpose, thus mastered, would prove a most important part of
their equipment for the battle of life. And the lesson of self-help learned by the student would go far toward
preserving institutions of learning from the burden of debt under which so many schools have struggled, and which
has done so much toward crippling their usefulness. {Ed 221.2}
Let the youth be impressed with the thought that education is not to teach them how to escape life's disagreeable
tasks and heavy burdens; that its purpose is to lighten the work by teaching better methods and higher aims. Teach
them that life's true aim is not to secure the greatest possible gain for themselves, but to honor their Maker in doing
their part of the world's work, and lending a helpful hand to those weaker or more ignorant. {Ed 221.3}
One great reason why physical toil is looked down on is the slipshod, unthinking way in which it is so often
performed. It is done from necessity, not from choice. The worker puts no heart into it, and he neither preserves selfrespect nor wins the respect of others. Manual training should correct this error. It should develop habits of accuracy
and thoroughness. Pupils should learn tact and system; they should learn to economize time and to make every move
count. They should not only be taught the best methods, but be inspired with ambition constantly to improve. Let it
be their aim to make their work as nearly perfect as human brains and hands can make it. {Ed 222.1}
Such training will make the youth masters and not slaves of labor. It will lighten the lot of the hard toiler, and will
ennoble even the humblest occupation. He who regards work as mere drudgery, and settles down to it with selfcomplacent ignorance, making no effort to improve, will find it indeed a burden. But those who recognize science in
the humblest work will see in it nobility and beauty, and will take pleasure in performing it with faithfulness and
efficiency. {Ed 222.2}
A youth so trained, whatever his calling in life, so long as it is honest, will make his position one of usefulness and
honor.{Ed 222.3}
Other Quotes re Manual Labor:
There is a large field open before the self-supporting gospel worker. Many may gain valuable experiences in ministry
while toiling a portion of the time at some form of manual labor, and by this method strong workers may be
developed for important service in needy fields.{AA 355.2}
The physical as well as the religious training practiced in the schools of the Hebrews may be profitably studied. The
worth of such training is not appreciated. There is an intimate relation between the mind and the body, and in order
to reach a high standard of moral and intellectual attainment the laws that control our physical being must be
heeded. To secure a strong, well-balanced character, both the mental and the physical powers must be exercised and
developed. What study can be more important for the young than that which treats of this wonderful organism that
God has committed to us, and of the laws by which it may be preserved in health? {PP 601.1}
And now, as in the days of Israel, every youth should be instructed in the duties of practical life. Each should
acquire a knowledge of some branch of manual labor by which, if need be, he may obtain a livelihood. This is
essential, not only as a safeguard against the vicissitudes of life, but from its bearing upon physical, mental, and moral
development. Even if it were certain that one would never need to resort to manual labor for his support, still he
should be taught to work. Without physical exercise, no one can have a sound constitution and vigorous health; and
the discipline of well-regulated labor is no less essential to the securing of a strong and active mind and a noble
character. {PP 601.2}
Every student should devote a portion of each day to active labor. Thus habits of industry would be formed and a
spirit of self-reliance encouraged, while the youth would be shielded from many evil and degrading practices that are
so often the result of idleness. And this is all in keeping with the primary object of education, for in encouraging
activity, diligence, and purity we are coming into harmony with the Creator.{PP 601.3}
Useful manual labor is a part of the gospel plan. The Great Teacher, enshrouded in the pillar of cloud, gave directions
to Israel that every youth should be taught some line of useful employment. Therefore it was the custom of the Jews,
the wealthy as well as the poorer classes, to teach their sons and daughters some useful trade, so that, should
adverse circumstances arise, they would not be dependent upon others, but would be able to provide for their own
necessities. They might be instructed in literary lines, but they must also be trained to some craft. This was deemed
an indispensable part of their education.{CT 307.1}

***continue on next page***

Students who have gained book knowledge without gaining a knowledge of practical work cannot lay claim to a
symmetrical education. The energies that should have been devoted to business of various lines have been neglected.
Education does not consist in using the brain alone. Physical employment is a part of the training essential for every
youth. An important phase of education is lacking if the student is not taught how to engage in useful labor. {CT
307.3}
And further, by these, my son, be admonished: of making many books there is no end; and much study is a weariness
of the flesh. Ecclesiastes 12:12 {ML 144.1}
Mental effort without corresponding physical exercise calls an undue proportion of blood to the brain, and thus the
circulation is unbalanced. The brain has too much blood, while the extremities have too little. The hours of study and
recreation should be carefully regulated, and a portion of the time should be spent in physical labor. . . . {ML 144.2}
The health cannot be preserved unless some portion of each day is given to muscular exertion in the open air.
Stated hours should be devoted to manual labor of some kind, anything which will call into action all parts of the
body. Equalize the taxation of the mental and the physical power, and the mind . . . will be refreshed. {ML 144.3}
The minds of thinking men labor too hard. They frequently use their mental powers prodigally, while there is
another class whose highest aim in life is physical labor. The latter class do not exercise the mind. Their muscles are
exercised, but their brains are robbed of intellectual strength; just as the minds of thinking men are worked, but their
bodies are robbed of strength and vigor by their neglect to exercise the muscles. . . . Health should be a sufficient
inducement to lead them to unite physical with mental labor. {ML 144.4}
Moral, intellectual, and physical culture should be combined in order to have well-developed, well-balanced men
and women. Some are qualified to exercise great intellectual strength, while others are inclined to love and enjoy
physical labor. Both of these classes should seek to improve where they are deficient, that they may present to God
their entire being, a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to Him, which is their reasonable service. {ML 144.5}
The health should be as carefully guarded as the character.
TO SUM IT ALL UP REGARDING MANUAL LABOR:
Manual training is deserving of far more attention than it has received. Schools should be established that, in
addition to the highest mental and moral culture, shall provide the best possible facilities for physical development
and industrial training.

SUPPLEMENT
to the
FIRST ANGELS MESSAGE
(The True Science of Education)
(Pt. 6)

Now, as never before, we need to understand the true science of education. If we fail to understand this, we shall
never have a place in the kingdom of God{1MCP 53.2} 1897
It would be a mistake to separate Brother Sutherland from the school, because he has a spiritual hold upon
educational lines of work...{GCB, April 24, 1901 par. 10}

Sister White mentions E.A. Sutherland 203 times in the SOP section of the EG White CD Rom

and
She mentions him 31 times in the Biography section of the same CD Rom
The Pioneers mention him 337 times in the Pioneer section of the E.G. White CD Rom
Just type in his last name Sutherland and youll find all the quotes
E. A. Sutherland wrote a book called Studies in Christian Education
We will continue reading from this book to find out what the Father of True Christian Education has to say
in regards to what caused the Protestant Nations to reject the 1st Angels Message which is what is
going to be the same reason to cause SDAs to receive the Mark of the Beast
http://www.andrews.edu/campusplan/wp2012/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Studies-in-ChristianEducation.pdf

Pages 37-38
12. STUDENT SELF-GOVERNMENT AND CHRISTIAN DEMOCRACY
INDIVIDUALITY, ORIGINALITY AND INDEPENDENCE OF thought and action on the part of the student are in the end
destroyed by the Papal system of education and other systems derived from it. This system is intended by its
promoters to destroy these vital elements of character in order to make the individual a willing, blind, obedient
servant to the mandates of men. The Papacy cannot prosper except as it does destroy these most godlike faculties of
man. Individuality, originality and independence of thought and action are developed by Christian education. This
system is intended to develop minds capable of being guided by the Holy SpiritThey learn to take their orders from
the Captain of the Lord's army whose hand is among the wheels of the affairs of men to prevent confusion, anarchy, and
disobedience to any organization which is based upon correct principles.
God was preparing a company who could be guided completely by His Spirit in the giving of the midnight cry. Only
those trained to take the initiative, to be self-governing, would dare break away at the call of God from the errors and
customs of Rome as found in the Protestant churches.
"THE MIDNIGHT CRY was heralded by thousands of believers. Like a tidal wave the movement swept over the
land...Fanaticism disappeared before this proclamation like early frost before the rising sun...All were of one heart
and of one mind...It caused a weaning of affection from the things of this world, a healing of controversies and
animosities, a confession of wrongs...It was not the most talented, but the most humble and devoted who were first
to hear and obey the callTHOSE WHO HAD FORMERLY LED IN THE CAUSE WERE AMONG THE LAST TO JOIN THIS
MOVEMENT. The churches in general closed their doors against this message, and a large company of those who
received it withdrew their connection...There went with it an impelling power that moved the soul." (G. C. pp. 400402).
***continue on next page***

It does not require deep thought to discover the cause of the failure of the educational system of the Protestant denominations to train men and women to participate in the midnight cry. The whole scheme of education of that era,
aside from the reform movement which was largely broken down by the pressure of the popular church leaders, was
to make men conservative, fearful of leaving the well-trodden paths of action, and of course "the churches in general
closed their doors against this message." Protestant teachers and preachers, in harmony with the Papacy, had for
years bound the minds of students and church members to creeds both in education and religion, until their
adherents were governed by tradition, prejudice, bigotry, and fear of their leaders. They had lost their love and
power for self-government. Consequently, God could not lead them by His spirit; their organization was rejected; they
had morally fallen; the second angel called them Babylon.
On the other hand, a few devoted schools, educational reformers and ministers, had trained a small company to
prize the privilege of being governed by the Spirit of God as revealed in His word.This shows you that true selfgovernment does not mean do-as-you-please; it means that self shall be governed by the Word of God. While this
company was cast out of the church organizations, while they left their crops, their tools, and
Page 39
former employments of all kinds to participate in what seemed to those who had not learned self-government to be a
fanatical movement, yet from such a company sprang the wonderful Seventh-day Adventist church. And this church is
called to set before the world a system of schools, institutions and organizations of self-governing Christians, such as
this world has never before seen.
THE CHARACTER capable of carrying the Midnight Cry had to be developed in the Christian manual training schools,
or in the school of the common walks of life. The leader of this movement, William Miller, "the farmer prophet," like
Christ and John the Baptist, was educated in the latter. His biographer, a man well qualified to judge the value of the
popular educational system of the churches, writes, "What now, would have been the effect of what is called a
regular course of education? Would it have perverted him, as it has thousands? Or would it have made him
instrumental of greater good in the cause of God?would it have placed him in the crowded ranks of those who are
content to share in the honor of repeating the twaddle, true or false, which passes for truth in the school or sect
which has made them what they are? We think it would have been difficult to pervert him; but where so many who
have been regarded as highly promising have been marred by the operation, he would have been in great dangerwe
doubt if he would have been a better subject to be used as an instrument of Providence. There are those who survive
the regular course uninjuredthere is a third class, who are a stereotype representation of what the course makes
themWhatever might have been the result of any established course of education in the case of William Miller, such
a course was beyond his reach; he was deprived of the benefit, he has escaped the perversion." (Miller, pp. 15-16).
This is that William Millerwho later brought the first angel's message to OberlinEvery Seventh-day Adventist is
approaching his final test, just as the Protestant churches approached theirs in 1844. Ours will come with the loud cry,
the latter rainthose not able to depend upon their own efforts for support, who are not making the Bible the basis
of study, and physiology the basis of every educational effort; all who, in other words, "do not understand the true
science Of education" will have no part in the kingdom of God or in the loud cry.
CHARACTER NEEDED FOR THE LOUD CRY IS SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE MIDNIGHT CRY:--"The message of the third
angel will be proclaimed. As the
Page 40
time comes for it to be given with the greatest power, the Lord will work through humble instruments, leading the
minds of those who consecrate themselves to His service. The laborers will be qualified rather by the unction of His
Spirit than by the training of literary institutions(G. C., p. 606).
The Jesuit schools taught their students blind obedience. The student was not required to go to God for wisdom
regarding his conduct. His teacher assumed that responsibility. True self-government, which may be defined as
bringing one's conduct into harmony with God's principles as expressed in His Word, was absolutely neglected. The
terrible effects of the Papal system of school discipline has been seen during the first angel's message. Those students
who blindly followed teachers rather than God's principles were bound by customs, traditions, organizations and
leaders at a time when the Spirit of God was calling them to follow the truth(Madison School, P. 28).

***continue on next page***

"THE OBJECT OF DISCIPLINE is the training of the child for self-government... Having never learned to govern
himself, the youth recognizes no restraint except the requirements of parents or teachers. This removed, he knows
not how to use his liberty, and often gives himself to indulgence that proves his ruin...(Ed. pp. 285-292).
JEFFERSON, THE FATHER OF DEMOCRACY, knowing that self-government was not taught in the schools of his day,
and that democracy cannot exist in the State unless its principles are first taught and practiced in the school,
introduced this principle into the University of Virginia. "It is very generally known that at the University of Virginia
exists a remarkable system of student self-government, by which a high morale and a manly tone of self-reliance have
been successfully maintainedSelf-government established a frank and kindly spirit of cooperation between master
and pupil. It repressed all dishonorable practices of cheating in and examinations, and promoted a spirit of
independence and self-respect." (Jefferson, P. 94).
Page 41-42
OBERLIN found it necessary, in the training of the right kind of missionaries, to develop a system of self-governmentthe spirit of equality, the absence of classes and casts based upon mere artificial distinctions, is marked...The
Faculty never sought to lord it over the students as being themselves superior, nor have they insisted upon a
particular show of honors, reverence, or respect even. They played the role of elder brothers to their pupils. Titles
were unknown, and students addressed their teachers as 'Brother Finney,' or 'Brother Mahan'" Self-rule was the
ideal. The assembled youth were to learn how to use freedom by being left freeEach individual has full liberty to
make the most of himself, and stands for just what he is worth in heart or brain(Oberlin, p. 399).
IN OBERLIN, "the regulations are few. No strict personal surveillance was ever undertaken. The student has been
thrown greatly on his own responsibility, with the understanding that his continual enjoyment of the privileges of the
school must depend upon his satisfactory deportment...No monitorial system has ever been adopted. Each young
man reports weekly in writing to the professor in charge, his success or failure in attendance upon prescribed
duties"The youth must be impressed with the idea that they are trusted...If pupils receive the impression that they
cannot go out or come in, sit at the table or be anywhere even in their rooms, except they are watched, a critical eye
is upon them to criticize and report, it will have the influence to demoralize and pastime will have no pleasure in it.
This knowledge of a continual oversight is more than a parental guardianship, and far worse...This constant watchfulness is not natural, and produces evils that it is seeking to avoid." (C. E., p. 46).
HORACE MANN ON SELF-GOVERNMENTHorace Mann wrote, "One of the highest and most valuable objects to
which the influences of a school can be made conducive, consists in training our children to be self-governing."
He gave the young men to understand "that he looked to them to be their own police
Mr. Mann, however, was always on the alert to assist these self-governing students by a word of caution, or by
forewarning them of impending troubleAt one time he wrote, "Our dormitory, nearly filled with male students, has
no tutor or overseer(Mann, Vol. 1, 438, 515).
13. TRAINING MISSIONARIES TO BE SELF-SUPPORTING
A LAYMEN'S MISSIONARY MOVEMENT
It was the divine plan that the midnight cry and the third angel's message should be carried to every nation,
kindred, tongue and people. God wanted an army trained to carry forth this practical religion to a world which had
been educated away from the gospel order by the pagan and Papal systems of education.
We have seen that Christian education, as developed by the educational reformers in every Protestant
denomination, made possible a mighty laymen's movementIt was Satan's studied effort to thwart this selfsupporting laymen's movement. He accomplished his desired results by exalting worldly literature to a place above
the Bible; by consuming practically all the student's time in mental effort, and leading him to depreciate the practical
in education; by leading to a gradual substitution of athletics, sports and games for manual labor. Satan is
endeavoring to deceive the very elect, the remnant church.
The Protestant denominations could not "carry the message of present truth in all its fullness to other countries,"
because they did not "first break every yoke" of worldly education; they did not "come into the line of true
education(Madison School, p. 28).
SELF-SUPPORTING STUDENTS AND TEACHERS:--prophets sustained themselves by tilling the soil or in some mechanical employment...Many of the religious teachers supported themselves by manual labor." (C. E., p. 61).