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TRIBUNE-PHONOGRAPH

~ www.centralwinews.com ~
Serving Abbotsford, Colby, Curtiss, Dorchester, Milan and Unity, Wis.
Vol. 54, No. 52

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

16 pages -- $1

Deadline
is Jan. 5
for spring
candidates
Seat opens up
in city of Colby
By Kevin OBrien
In addition to choosing their preferred
candidate for president, voters in Wisconsin will have a chance to elect candidates for school boards, city councils and
other municipal offices this spring.
As of this week, though, its looking
like it may be a relatively quiet election
season for local races. So far, just one
local incumbent faces a potential challenger.
However, those who want to get their
names on the ballots for the April 5 election have until next Tuesday, Jan. 5, at 5
p.m. to file the required paperwork with
municipal clerks and school districts.
In Abbotsford, resident Dean Wiese has
registered as a candidate to run against
incumbent councilor Joanna Mediger,
who represents Wards 2 and 5.
The city of Colby, meanwhile, has received a notice of non-candidacy from
Ward 4 council member Jeremy Hamm.
Mayor Jim Schmitt and three other in-

Winters here!
Scott Maurina pushes his snow blower into a mound of the white stuff Tuesday morning in Colby. More than a
week after the first official day of winter on Dec. 21, central Wisconsin got its first major snowfall Monday night and
Tuesday morning, when six to eight inches fell.
STAFF PHOTO/CHRISTIAN PARKER

See ELECTION/ Page 16

Colby K-12 holds off on approving school calendar


By Kevin OBrien
Approval of the Colby School
Districts 2016-2017 calendar
was put on hold last week so
that school board members
could review the calendars
from Abbotsford and Spencer at
their next meeting and look for
ways of aligning them.
One of the big stumbling
blocks for Colby aligning its
calendar with neighboring districts is the late start for students every Monday morning
that allows teachers to do week-

ly in-service training.
Classes start at 9:15 a.m. on
Mondays, but teachers arrive
two hours earlier to work on
curriculum development and
other educational topics before
students arrive. This negates
the need for early-release days
and full days off for students
throughout the school year,
which is what Abbotsford and
most other districts do to accommodate in-service training.
The calendar is totally different because we dont do halfdays, said board member Deb

Koncel. That makes us kind of


unique.
As a mother of four, board
member Jennifer Lopez said it
is much easier to schedule daycare with late-start Mondays
rather than early-release and
no-school days throughout the
year.
Im surprised other communities dont follow Colby, she
said.
Superintendent
Steven
Kolden said the shift to latestart Mondays in 2011-2012
school year was rough at

first, but it has since become an


important part of the districts
routine.
Our Monday mornings give
us almost two-thirds more professional development time
than our afternoons did, so I
think thats a positive, he said.
The introduction of late-start
Mondays was part of a switch
from a 175-day calendar to a 180day calendar in 2011. Prior to
that, the district scheduled up
to 10 half-days each school year
for teacher in-service. Adopting
the 180-day calendar put Colby

more in line with Abbotsford,


Spencer and other districts and
eliminated a lot of scheduling
conflicts with shared classes
and extracurricular activities.
Even with the remaining calendar differences, Kolden noted
that the districts are still able
to collaborate on NTC Academy courses and shared online
classes.
I think the calendar becomes
a barrier when you want it to
be, he said. If you dont want

See CALENDARS/ Page 16

Healthcare When You Need It


Walk in without an appointment

49-156236

Allergies, rashes, ear aches, sinus infections, sore throats,


urinary tract infections, immunizations and more.

%BZTt&WFOJOHTt8FFLFOETt*O"CCPUTGPSE

Page 2

Tribune-Phonograph

TRIBUNEPHONOGRAPH
USPS 6402-80
Phone 715-223-2342
FAX 715-223-3505
E-mail: tp@tpprinting.com
Web page:
www.centralwinews.com

THE STAFF
Co-publishers ...................Kris OLeary
...................................... and Kevin Flink
Editor............................. Kevin OBrien
Reporter......................Christian Parker
Photo Technician/Ad Design
Supervisor ...................Karen Gebelein
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........................................Jody Sheahan
Customer Service/Subscriptions/
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Customer Service........ Mary Schuette
IT Coordinator/Customer Service/
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Administrative
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Sales Consultant .........Phil Greschner
Accounting .................. Carola Buehler
Pressroom Supervisor ...... Kevin Flink
Press Operator ............Clint Boettcher
Press Operator ...............Dallas Wiese
Press Operator ................. Sam Hayes

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December 30, 2015) was mailed at the
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30, 2015.
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Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Perspectives
A missing piece
Marathon County has released its draft comprehensive plan. This is a well-researched document, full
of facts and charts, and it sets the stage for addressing two major issues facing our communities over the
coming years. The first is doing a better job serving
the needs of the mentally ill, especially those who
wind up in jail. Second, it underscores the countys
necessary role in reducing phosphorus run-off from
cropland and meeting a federal water quality standard for the Wisconsin River to be announced in 2017.
Yet, there is one area where the comprehensive
plan falls flat. It is silent on the issue of exorbitantly
high health insurance costs here in Marathon County. It shouldnt be.
Citizen Action of Wisconsin reported last week
that health insurance payers in the Wausau, Marshfield and Stevens Point markets are paying among
the states highest insurance rates, especially in the
large employer and individual health insurance categories. Our health insurance rates, right here in
Marathon County, are 27 percent higher than those in
Madison.
This difference equals thousands of dollars in a
family budget. Here, in Marathon County, a man and
wife, both non-smokers at age 55, can buy the cheapest
silver-level health insurance plan with a $13,700 annual deductible for $1,184 a month. The same couple
can buy a similar cheapest silver plan in Dane County for merely $789 a month. The difference amounts to
a staggering $4,740 a year.
The county comprehensive plan talks quite a bit
about health care, but makes no mention that insurances rates here are screamingly high. Instead, the
plan encourages more medical investment.
Marathon County should support activities that
strengthen Central Wisconsin and the Wausau metro areas position as a regional health care center,
reads the draft plan.
There is some logic to this position, but not the
deep reflection which is necessary to good planning.
Health care is a big employer in Marathon County
and one health care provider, Aspirus Wausau Hospital, is in the same league as Greenheck Fan for being
one of the countys biggest employers. Both businesses employ over one thousand people. One can argue
that the county wins when the local medical industry,
supported by government, creates more jobs.
But theres a fallacy in this logic. Central Wisconsin
medical bills are paid by some people out of the area,
true, but mostly by those located here. High health
insurance bills are a tax on everything people and industry wants to do. This creates a drag on the local
economy, making us less competitive.
We know investments made by government in medical infrastructure dont always work out as planned.
Consider as Exhibit One the village of Weston Tax Incremental Finance (TIF) District to support St. Clares
Hospital. It took a bail-out bill authored by Rep. John
Spiros (R-Marshfield) and Sen. Jerry Petrowski (RMarathon) signed by Gov. Scott Walker in November to keep the TIF out of official distress. The bill
lengthens the TIFs useful life by another decade.
It took a yes vote by a Marathon County representative on a Joint Review Board to approve the Weston
TIF and, in turn, build St. Clares Hospital. Knowing
what we know now about the local cost of health
insurance, the laggard performance of the Weston
TIF--did Marathon County follow the right policy in
approving the TIF? Maybe yes, but maybe no.
A careful reading of the countys comp plan outlines a major struggle in the future. By 2025, the county will face a major labor shortage. The health care
industry and manufacturing, both local economic
powerhouses, will compete for a dwindling labor pool.
Marathon County may want to create more health
care jobs, but, in doing so, does it disadvantage manufacturing that also wants to fill jobs? What is the best
approach here? The county draft plan fails to answer
this critical question. Instead, it announces the goal
that all employers will have a strong labor force.
The county comprehensive plan needs to deal with
this critical issue of high health insurance costs before it ends its work.
Guest editorial by Peter Weinschenk, The Record-Review

PAGING THROUGH HISTORY:

A Treasury of Weekly Newspapers


THE PHONOGRAPH
PUBLISHED IN COLBY
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1886

ABBOTSFORD TRIBUNE
PUBLISHED IN ABBOTSFORD
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1960

One athletic program planned


Odd Fellows Ball
for new district
Some eight or ten couples from this
Permission has been received
place attended the Odd Fellows Annifrom the Wisconsin Interscholastic
versary Ball, at Unity, Friday evening,
Athletic Association to operate the
and all had an excellent time. There
athletic program for the new Dorwere over sixty couples in attenAbby
school
dance, which
district as one
made it rather
unit for the
crowded
in
next year.
that small hall.
Although
The boys had
the
Dorchesnot expected so
ter and Ablarge a crowd
botsford high
or would have
schools will be
secured
the
operated sepaskating rink,
rately, the two
but, as it was,
schools will be
all made the
represented tobest of it and
gether by basenjoyed themketball,
footselves to the
HANGING THE GERMAN KAISER, COLBY
ball and other
best of their
1917 OR 1918
athletic teams
ability.
The
SUBMIT YOUR HISTORICAL PHOTOS TO
composed
of
supper was gotFILL THIS SPOT EACH WEEK
boys from both
ten up by the
schools.
ladies of Unity, and that is all that is
A reorganization of the 3-C basketreally necessary to say about it, for if
ball conference is expected as there
there is any one thing the Unity ladies
will be one less team in the northern
excel in more than another it is in getdivision. No change is expected in
ting up public suppers.
the football conference, as DorchesEverything passed off pleasantly
ter does not field a football team.
and the party did not break up until streaks of daylight began to apStores closed Monday
pear in the horizon, and then, many
Stores in Abbotsford will be closed
turned from the hall regretfully. Cole
Monday, Jan. 2.
& Parkill, who furnished the music,
The post office will also be closed,
were in their element, and played
but mail deposited in the outside box
their very best, which went far tobefore 5 p.m. will be sent out.
ward making the evening thoroughly
Similar mail service will be ofenjoyable.
fered on national holidays as a Star
route between Marshfield and Park
New church dedicated
Falls, to run on holidays, was reThe new Lutheran church of the
cently established. The first run was
town of Wein east of Colby was dedimade Dec. 26.
cated last Sunday. The edifice is a comWings Drug Store will be open on
modious frame building 24x34 feet
New Years Day from 9 a.m. to noon,
and well built. Numerous guests from
but will be closed all day Monday,
abroad, some from Black Creek Falls
Jan. 2.
and Spencer, were present at the ceremonies and were hospitably treated
Wings contest winners
by the members of the congregation.
Bruce Klieforth and Lynn Nikolay
The debt on the church was raised
won the grand prizes in the boys
and we are informed that there was
and girls contests at Wings Drug
more than sufficient money raised to
Store. Each was given a bicycle.
free the society from debt.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Perspectives

Page 3

Abby library has more


changes in store for 16

Welcome to 2016 at the


Colby Public Library

The last year has seen some changes


We are constantly working on exat the Abbotsford Library.
panding and improving our collecDo you have an e-reader or mobile tions and programs. There are more
device? You can still download free au- DVDs than weve ever had before. We
diobooks, e-books, music and videos started a seed library and received a
at home through your local library, kit to teach families how to birdwatch.
but now you can get magazines too. In
We started a teen movie night for
fact, we have gotten better at tech sup- older kids and adults. Family movie
port for the Overdrive e-book system, night is still the second Friday of the
so if youre having problems
month at 7 p.m. Our teen
downloading a book from
movies are the night before
our free e-book service, conthe family movie at 6 p.m.
tact us.
Because of the terms of our
Some issues will still relicense to show movies, we
quire contacting a higher
cant advertise the name of
level of support, but most
the movie outside of the liproblems can be resolved
brary or our webpage at ab
relatively quickly. If you
botsfordpl.org. We can pubwant to see what kind of
lish hints about the movies
things you can access at
on our Facebook page, in
home through your comthe Community Calendar
puter or device, you can go
of the paper, and you can
to dbooks.wplc.info.
always call the library at
This year the library has
715-223-3920 for more inforbeen focusing on improvmation.
ing our early literacy serLooking to the next year,
BY
vices. We have partnered
we are considering new prowith other local libraries, ERICA GRUNSETH grams with crafts, movies,
the UW-Extension and the
LEGO Mindstorms, games,
ABBOTSFORD
Clark County Health Degardening and, of course,
partment to provide wel- PUBLIC LIBRARY literacy. We are looking at
come kits for new mothers.
purchasing a new microfilm
DIRECTOR
We have also partnered with
machine to improve access
Head Start to help parents
to our archive of the local
learn about ways to help their chil- paper, so anyone that wants to learn
dren to get ready to read before kin- about local history can come in and
dergarten.
get the information they need easily.
Weve started a 1,000 Books Before
If you have questions about any of
Kindergarten program and several our programs or services, you can conchildren have already reached 400 tact us through e-mail at director@ab
books! We now have a monthly evening botsford.lib.wi.us, by phone at 715-223story time for parents that work dur- 3920, or on our Facebook page.
ing the day. The fourth Thursday of
From everyone at the library, wed
the month at 6 p.m. parents can bring like to say thank you to everyone who
their kids in for a couple of stories and stopped in to see us this year, and we
a craft. We have replaced some of our hope to see you all soon. Happy New
old toys in the kids area too.
Year!

We are excited to announce a book Jan. 15. Doors of the Colby City Hall
and movie challenge for adult readers Community Room open at 4 p.m. for
this year. Make Your Way Across the general crafting of choice. Fabric for
U.S.A. is designed to encourage read- the quilt challenge will be available.
ers to find exciting books and movies A beef stew entre will be served for
at CPL. We have divided the United a nominal fee. Bring an accompaniStates into ten regions. We will feature ment to share if you plan to dine. Join
a different set of states each month. If a great bunch of crafters, learn new
you read a book or view a movie men- skills and make new friends.
tioning one of the states in the region
The afternoon book club will be
of the month, fill out a slip and return meeting Jan. 19 at 1 p.m. to discuss
it to the library for a chance to win The All-Girl Filling Stations Last Reprizes. January kicks off the adult union by Fannie Flagg. Seabiscuit:
reading challenge with the
An American Legend by
featured states of Alaska
Laura Hillenbrand will be
and Hawaii. The friendly
analyzed by the evening club
library staff will be happy
on January 20 at 7:30 p.m.
to get you started on your
Story times, for ages two
reading journey across the
and up, resume Jan. 4 at 9:30
U.S.A.
a.m. for the winter/spring
On Your MarkGet
session. The Monday mornSetQuilt! We are calling time slot has proven to
ing all quilters to enter our
be successful for our youngquilting challenge which
est patrons and families.
begins in January. Quilts
Join the fun as we highlight
will be used as prizes for
special holidays and activiyouth ages three to 12 for
ties to get children moving.
the CPL Summer Reading
This session runs through
Program in 2016. Pick up
April 11. Pick up a schedule
a half piece of the chalat the library.
BY
lenge fabric provided free
Are you having a baby in
VICKY CALMES 2016 or know someone who
of charge. Add your own
fabrics and batting to make
CITY OF COLBY is? We have new baby wela quilt suitable for children
come kits available for our
ages three to 12. Quilts may LIBRARY DIRECTOR youngest readers and their
be machine quilted, hand
families. Stop in the library
quilted or tied.
to pick up the free kit conThe 2016 summer reading program taining useful baby supplies.
theme is On Your Mark, Get Set,
Mark your calendars for Saturday,
READ! It focuses on activities to get Jan. 30. The Friends of the Colby Pubkids active and moving. In addition lic Library will be having its Movie,
to all types of sports for boys and Music, Magazine and Miscellaneous
girls being featured, activities such as Sale set up in the library and rundancing, gymnastics, hunting, hiking, ning throughout February, however,
camping, biking, horseback riding, etc. the first day of the sale will be the last
will also be highlighted. Quilts should Saturday in January, beginning at 9
reflect and support the summer read- a.m. and running until noon. (In the
ing program theme. The finished quilt past, customers liked the sale to begin
size should be approximately 40 inches on a Saturday, so the Friends are tryby 65 inches. Finish your quilt and re- ing to accommodate the wishes of the
turn it to the Colby Public Library by public.) Items are for sale for a small
March 31, 2016. Quilts will be judged fee. A bag sale will run Feb. 22-27.
on quality of workmanship, uniqueCheck our website at www.colby
ness of design and adherence to the publiclibrary.org or our Facebook
summer reading program theme. Gift page at www.facebook.com/colbypub
certificates will be awarded for first, liclibrary for more details on whats
second and third places.
happening, 2016-style, at the CPL.
Craft and Hobby night is Friday,

BE OUR
GUEST

NOTABLE QUOTE

ow many times have we said Next year? We sound like the


Milwaukee Brewers.
Eric Elmhorst,
Colby school board member
discussing plans to align local school year calendars

NEED
EXTRA
CASH?

Sell Your Sporting


Equipment or Vehicle
with a Classied!

BE OUR
GUEST

CLARK COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY PET OF THE WEEK


Pumpkin

52-177120

Pumpkin is one great cat. He is a large-bodied, 10-pound,


three-year-old neutered male, with a beautiful short-haired
brown tabby coat and a great personality. He is here with his
brother, Buster. Both would like to start the New Year with a
home of their own. They are only two of many cats and kittens,
puppies and dogs, just waiting for the right person to come
along and adopt them. If you have room in your heart and home
for them or any of the other pets here, please go to the website
to see their pictures and descriptions. Now is a great time to
look for a new pet. There are 43 cats or kittens and 31 dogs or
puppies here. Surely theres one just right for you. Check them
all out at www.cchs-petshelter.org/id8.html.
If you love animals and have some time, now is a great time to come on down and get
involved at CCHS. You can fill out a volunteer application form online by going to our
website (www.cchs-petshelter.org) and clicking Volunteer at CCHS from the menu, or
stop at the shelter or at our Paws and Claws store in the Marshfield Mall. Come to an
orientation and join our Pet Lovin People group, get a tour of the shelter and well tell
you about all of the many ways to volunteer. Well find just the right spot for you to get
started helping animals. Youll love it!
Get your pets microchipped at our store in the mall, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
w

TP Printing Co.
Abbotsford, WI

715-223-2342

Clark County Humane Society - W3926 St. Hwy. 73, P.O. Box 127, Neillsville, WI 54456
(715) 743-4550 12-3 p.m. Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat petshelter@email.com
www.cchs-petshelter.org or www.facebook.com/petshelter

Page 4

Perspectives

Making the
last game a
title bout
Deep down, I think we all expected the
NFL season to end like this, especially
here in the NFC North. Weve known
all year long that the last game of the
regular season would be played Jan. 4
at ice-cold Lambeau Field between the
Packers and the Vikings. The question
was, would the game really mean anything?
Based on the Vikes dismal performances in recent years, including a 7-9
record in 2014, it
didnt seem like
UT FOR
my home state
team had much of
A WALK
a chance at challenging the longreigning
NFC
North champions,
who very nearly
went to the Super
Bowl less than a
year ago (I cant
resist
bringing
that up.) When the
Pack started this
season going 6-0,
it looked like the
BY
rest of the teams
in the division KEVIN OBRIEN
would have to enEDITOR
dure another year
of tyranny under
the wedge-shaped crowns of cheese.
But then, of course, the Pack did the
unthinkable and lost to both the Lions
and Bears at Lambeau (on Brett Favre
Night, no less). Meanwhile, the Vikings
stumbled along to a winning record with
the occasional embarassing defeat (i.e.,
losing at home to the Seahawks, 38-7).
This past Sunday was about as good as
it gets for long-suffering Minnesota fans;
we got to watch our team win in a blowout. Just so I dont get too excited about
my choke-prone team, I repeatedly reminded myself that the Giants were already eliminated from the playoffs and
were without their star wide receiver.
You know youre a Vikings fan if you
have to rationalize and downplay a 49-17
win over former Super Bowl team.
So, here we sit, just a few days away
from a game that was deemed important
enough to make it the last Sunday Night
Football game of the 2015 season. For me
and my Packer fan wife, this means another tense living room standoff in front
of the TV. Theres even a good chance
that we could have to do it a third time
this year depending on how the teams
are seeded in the playoffs.
Personally, this is my version of the
Super Bowl. I have no illusions of the Vikings plowing their way through teams
like Seattle and Arizona to get to the Big
Game. That may come in another year or
two if we can continue to build on this
years momentum. Perhaps a hometown
Super Bowl is in order when our new
stadium hosts in 2018.
When it comes to comparing Vikings
and Packers over time, my team leads
in only one major category: number
of NFC North (formerly NFC Central)
titles. We have 18 at this point, but the
Pack is creeping up with 14 of their own,
and I dont like that. Green Bay will always be Title Town, so the rest of us
have to cherish whatever lesser accolades we have. Its time for the Vikes to
make it 19 titles.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

W ITHOUT W ORDS

Song ponders what might have been

Its your choice where you go for physical therapy!

SPORT & SPINE

604 N. Division St., Colby


(715) 223-4060

PHYSICAL THERAPY

133 S. Main St., Greenwood


(715) 267-4583

www.sportspineclinic.com

Chad Bogdonovich MA, PT, FAFS

Judith Larson MPH, PT

FOOT & ANKLE PAIN


If left alone a foot or ankle injury
can become recurrent
and strength deficits can occur.
PHYSICAL THERAPY can help injured
patients as well as those experiencing a
gradual onset of pain.

PRIMARY GOALS
Reduce Pain/Swelling Movement Awareness/
Improve Mobility
Gait Training
Functional Strength
Patient Education

COMMON FOOT & ANKLE PROBLEMS


SEEN BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS:
Strain/Sprain
Arthritis Pain
Plantar Fascitis
Heel Spur Pain

Balance & Fall


Prevention
Foot Weakness
Mortons Neuroma

Tendinitis
(Achilles, Peroneal,
Anterior Tibialis,
Posterior Tibialis)

Its Your Choice: In Wisconsin, you pay for your health care, so you
have the right to choose where you go for Physical Therapy. We hope
you allow us to be your provider of choice.

NEWS

Homegrown

H
T

since volunteered information and some back story


of her relationship with Fogelberg.
The two had met in high school and dated in college even though they attended different schools.
Eventually, life took them in different directions and
they lost touch.
Always a holiday favorite, the song had a notable
revival in 2007, especially because Fogelberg passed
away two weeks before Christmas. In honor of the
song, Abingdon Street in Peoria, where the convenience store Dan and Jill met once stood, has been
renamed Fogelberg Parkway.
Happy New Year and fond auld lang syne!

52-175975

Last week, I wrote about my favorite Christmas songs. I have one


more song to add, which isnt really a Christmas song. Its kind of
a Christmas/New Years song by Dan Fogelberg, titled Old Lang
Syne. Yes, another oldie, but goody.
Dan Fogelberg has been a favorite musician in our family for
generations. My mom used to play his music so often in the car
that, when my sister and I were little, we referred to him as Dan
Frogel-weener, for no particular reason. We believed my mom
had a crush on him.
Further back though, my paternal grandmother, who grew up in DeKalb, Ill., had a band
OLD HAT
director in high school who hailed from Peoria
by the name of Lawrence Fogelberg, Dans faHOUGHT
ther. Lawrence, incidentally, is the man Dan
Fogelberg wrote about in the tune Leader of
the Band. So, naturally my grandmother had
a great appreciation for the song when it was
released in 1981.
Both cuts appear on Fogelbergs exceptionally well-done The Innocent Age record.
Old Lang Syne recounts Dan Fogelbergs
chance meeting with an old flame at a convenience store in Peoria, Ill., during the mid 70s
when the two were home for Christmas. FogelBY
berg had long since moved to Colorado to pursue a career in music, while his former girlCHRISTIAN
friend moved to Chicago when she got married.
PARKER
For many (somewhat obvious) reasons, the two
REPORTER
had not heard from each other in a number of
years.
The song tells a somewhat sad saga of the two former lovers,
who still apparently held each other in high regard. Hoping to socialize, but unable to find any bars open on Christmas Eve, the two
purchase some beer and drink it in the car during a snow storm
while catching up. Sharing the joys and excitements of their lives,
both former lovers also express sorrows and discontentments with
their situations as well. The message between the lines is they are
wondering what might have happened if they had ended up together.
Musically the song, as with any of Fogelbergs, is just perfect. A
soulful piano, along with the bell-like sounds of a era-appropriate
Fender Rhodes keyboard, compliment Fogelbergs lyrics flawlessly, leaving no ear wanting. A sappy saxophone, played by Michael
Brecker, ends the song with a jazzy, bittersweet twist.
The interesting fact about Old Lang Syne is that, between its
1981 release and Fogelbergs death in 2007, Jill Greulich, the woman in the song, was totally silent about the fact that the song was
written about her. Even though she was divorced from her husband before the song was even released, she kept quiet because
she didnt want to risk screwing up Fogelbergs marriage. She has

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Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Law Enforcement

Page 5

COLBY-ABBOTSFORD POLICE LOG


Dec. 18 - An officer was
dispatched to an Abbotsford
residence after a man called to
report that his neighbor was
driving on his lawn. The complainant showed the officer tire
tracks in the grass that were
clearly on his property before
turning onto the neighboring
property. The lawn was frozen
so there was no damage, but the
complainant wanted his neighbor to stop driving across his
lawn.
The officer went to the neighbors house, but no one answered the door. He returned the
following day and spoke to the
neighbor about the tire marks
in the complainants yard. The
neighbor said he had stopped
at the complainants house to
ask permission to drive across
his yard, but no one was home
so he did it anyway. The officer
pointed out that he has a driveway in the front and back of his
property so there is no reason to
cross his neighbors lawn. The
neighbor was told he would be
charged with criminal property
damage if it happened again.
Dec. 21 - An officer spoke
with a teen who accused his
older brother of pushing him to
the ground during an argument
in Colby. The complainant said
the altercation had occurred
in the parking lot of a business
and was witnessed by several of
his friends. He said his brother
had been yelling at him to go
home and then pushed him as
he turned to walk away.
The officer spoke to a couple
of the complainants friends,
who both said they saw the

brother push the complainant


down and then pick him back
up, possibly by the neck, and
put him in his car. The officer
then responded to the brothers
house in Curtiss. The brother
said he was concerned about
the complainants well-being because he is hanging around with
people who were into partying
and drinking all the time. He
admitted to pushing him to the
ground but also said the complainant got in his face and was
yelling obscenties at him. He
also expressed concerns about
the complainant not listening
to their parents and getting bad
grades at school.
Dec. 21 - An officer met with
an employee of a local hotel in
reference to a guest who was
smoking in a no-smoking room.
The officer was taken to the
room, which was left in a mess,
with beer cans and pizza boxes
scattered around. The window
was left open and the officer
couldnt smell smoke, but he did
find a cigarette butt in the toilet.
The hotel manager showed the
officer a copy of the bill with a
$75 charge for smoking in the
room. The guest had a home address in Tennessee. The manager thought he was driving truck
for a local company. The officer
went to the company and was
told the man had been fired.
Dec. 21 - An officer was dispatched to a Colby residence in
reference to a harassment complaint. He met with a woman
who said she felt threatened
by her soon-to-be-ex husband.
When she served him with
divorce papers, she said he

CLARK COUNTY COURT


Jonathan Aguayo, 25, Colby,
was sentenced to three years
in prison and three years of
extended supervision after his
probation was revoked on a
2013 conviction for strangulation and suffocation/domestic
abuse. He was given credit for
438 days already served in custody. He was also sentenced to
nine months in jail after his
probation was revoked on a 2013
conviction for battery/domestic
abuse.
Nallely S. Zavala, 23, Abbotsford, was sentenced to 10
days in jail and fined $652 for operating a vehicle without a valid
license/third or greater offense
within three years.
Duane R. Viken, 44,
Dorchester, was fined $3,017.96
and his Department of Natural
Resources license privileges
were revoked/suspended for
three years for a first count of
failure to attach an ear tag to
a deer carcass/as party to a
crime, and was fined $2,468 and
his DNR license privileges were
revoked/suspended for three
years for a second count of failure to attach an ear tag to a deer

carcass/as party to a crime.


Allen W. Viken, 39, Dorchester, was fined $3,021.32 and his
Department of Natural Resources license privileges were
revoked/suspended for three
years for a first count of failure
to attach an ear tag to a deer
carcass/as party to a crime, and
was fined $2,468 and his DNR license privileges were revoked/
suspended for three years for a
second count of failure to attach
an ear tag to a deer carcass/as
party to a crime.
Jonathan E. Isaacs, 26,
Curtiss, was fined $175.30 for a
cracked/damaged vehicle windshield, $155.10 for improper
display of a license plate/tag/
decal, $263.50 for displaying a
false vehicle registration plate,
$180.30 for non-registration, and
$200.50 for operating a vehicle
without insurance.
Tiffaney M. Mercier, 34,
Owen, was fined $649 for disorderly conduct.
Orlando P. Harris, 26, Abbotsford, was fined $589 for operating a vehicle without a valid
license/second offense within
three years.

became verbally abusive and


slammed her car door. He also
sent her a text asking where his
guns were. She believes he is depressed, though he did not make
any suicidal threats.
The complainant said she also
had issues with his mother, who
has been asking her about items
she owns. She said she is worried they may try to steal some
of her possessions, so she photographed some items for documentation. A report was filed
for the record.
Dec. 22 - An officer responded to Colby High School in reference to a student making inappropriate comments to a school
staff member. The officer met
with the principal, who provided him with a written statement
from a teacher. The statement
said the student had been disrupting the class and when told
to start his work, he made a suggestive comment to the teacher.
The principal confronted the
student about the incident, and
he immediately stormed out
of her office and went to study
hall. The principal followed
the student and told him to return to her office or she would
be forced to call the police. The
principal said he slammed his
fist on a table and swore several
times as he left the room. The
student has been warned about
his behavior multiple times this
school year.
The officer met with the student, who denied that his comment to his teacher was inappropriate. The officer said he
has a history of doing that, and
the student did not deny it. He
also admitted hitting the table
and swearing. The officer talked
to him about a previous citation
he received the previous month
and said he would be referred
to the district attorney for disorderly conduct charges. The
student said he will change his
behavior for the remainder of
the school year.
Dec. 22 - The dispatcher for
a school bus company called to

DORCHESTER
POLICE LOG
Dec. 20 - Speeding on North
Third Street.
Dec. 22 - Hit and run - unattended vehicle on Parkside
Drive.
Dec. 23 - Report of unsafe
driving in village.
Dec. 23 - Assist Clark County on South Second Street.
Dec. 23 - Medical alert on
Front Street.
Dec. 24 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.
Dec. 25 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.
Dec. 26 - Drug/narcotic violations on Center Avenue.
Dec. 26 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.

report a vehicle that had passed


two different school buses while
their stop signs were extended.
The dispatcher said two of their
drivers had been stopped on
STH 13 in Colby with their red
lights flashing when a green
Saturn Ion going southbound
passed by without stopping. A
temporary license plate number
was written down, and one of
the drivers said the vehicle was
parked in Unity.
An officer went to Unity and
found the vehicle parked in an
empty lot, but the driver was not
there. The front plate was from
an automobile dealership, and
when the officer called there,
the clerical staff was not available to provide the purchasers
information. The officer said
the department would attempt
another contact later in the
week.
Dec. 22 - An officer was
asked to call a woman who was
requesting a welfare check on
her adult daughter in Abbotsford. The officer spoke to the
mother, who said she has been
trying unsuccessfully to reach
her daughter, who was dealing with a medical issue. She
said her daughters phone goes
straight to voicemail. She also
called the hospital in Marshfield, but her daughter is not
there.
The officer went to the daughters residence in Abbotsford,
but her vehicle was not there
and no one answered the door.
The officer called the mother
back to tell her, and said he
would continue trying to locate
her daughter. A short time later,
the mother called back and said
her daughter was at the hospital
in Medford and everything was
fine.
Dec. 23 - An officer was dispatched to an Abbotsford store
in reference to a retail theft.
He spoke to a store employee
who witnessed a male customer
putting a bottle of vodka down
his pants and leaving the store
without paying for it. The employee said the customer tried
concealing his face but she recognized him as someone who
had previously stolen vodka
from the store. The officer knew
the suspect in question and remembered telling him not to return to the store.
The officer met with the suspect, who denied taking the vodka and said the store employee
has him confused with someone
else. The suspect admitted he
had previously been told not to
return to the store but said it
was the easiest place to fill his
prescription medications. The
officer told him there were other
pharmacies he could go to, and
he agreed to go elsewhere from
now on.
Dec. 25 - An officer spoke
with a Colby woman who said
she was out of town and believed her estranged husband

had broken into her house to retrieve his firearms. She believed
he had drilled the lock on the
back door to gain entry.
The officer went to the Colby
residence but did not see any
tire tracks or footprints in the
snow, nor did he find any signs
of forced entry. The officer
called the complainant back and
told her there were no signs of a
break-in.
Dec. 25 - An Abbotsford
woman came to the police station to report a domestic abuse
incident that occurred in Abbotsford. The woman said she
had recently filed for divorce,
and her husband got mad when
he heard her talking to a male
friend on the phone that night.
She said she has a deadbolt on
her door and when she went to
unlock it, he pushed the door
open, hitting her hand before
coming in, grabbing her by the
shirt and shaking her. He started yelling at her about who she
was talking to. The complainant
said she was crying and telling
him to stop, and he let her go.
She tried to leave the residence,
but he told her to stay so they
could talk. She said he followed
her as she ran into the bathroom and slammed the door. He
continued to yell at her as she
called her mother.
The complainants husband
was called and he agreed to
come to the police station. He
admitted to kicking the door
open, and grabbing and shoving the complainant. He was
arrested for domestic abuse and
transported to jail.
Dec. 25 - An Abbotsford
woman called to report that her
downstairs neighbors were yelling and screaming at each other
and a child was crying. Shortly
after that call, another call came
in from the neighbor requesting
police assistance.
An officer went to the residence and met with a woman
standing outside and visibly
upset. She said she wanted the
male party inside to leave. When
asked, she said nothing physical
happened. The officer went inside and spoke to the male party,
who said they had been arguing
for the past hour but nothing
physical happened. He said he
was happy to leave for the night
but was worried the complainant was trying to kick him out
permanently.
The officer told the complainant that she could not force the
male party out if he also lived
there. He said a formal eviction
process was needed for that.
The male party said he didnt
really have another place to stay
for the night. The officer said
he cant force either of them to
leave, but if he gets called back,
one or both of them are going to
jail. Both parties said they understood and confirmed again
that nothing physical had happened between them.

Page 6

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Comp plan predicts more labor shortages


By Peter Weinschenk
The Record-Review
A constant headline in the news over
the past several years has been that local
manufacturers struggle to find production workers, specifically welders, as the
economy has recovered.
A recently released draft comprehensive plan for Marathon County indicates
that this labor shortage will only worsen
over time.
The draft plan, authored by a ninemember county board task force, notes
that while the countys total population will grow from the current 136,510
to 146,595 by the year 2025, available job
openings will outstrip the available labor force.
The region will have more openings than available workers due to job
growth, retirements and a lack of young
workers, reads the report.
The local economy will likely see a
continued diversification from a strong
manufacturing base to both health care
and tourism.
A job forecast targeting 2024 in the
draft report states that manufacturing,
which now employs nearly one out of
four Marathon County workers, will
need to share the available labor pool
with people who work at hospitals, nursing homes and clinics, as well as restaurants, which serve the local and tourist
populations.
The draft plan says that while manufacturing/production jobs will increase
by 370 to 10,130 by 2024, the food preparation sector will add another 896 workers
and health care another 1,364 employees
in the same time period.

Despite this labor shortage, the draft


plan notes that pay levels in the county
can be a problem. Only 68 percent of
available jobs today pay a living wage
to Marathon County workers. This wage
ranges from $9.98 for a single adult to
$18.98 for a house with two working
adults and three children. The state
minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. The
countys median wage is $38,619.
The draft plan says that the county
needs to develop its workforce, even by
importing workers, in order to provide
ample labor for all county employers.
The plan calls for all workers to be paid
a living wage.
Marathon County is a county where
every person can find a family supporting job and every business will have a
strong work force, the draft plan reads.
The plan says the county should work
with its local two colleges, UW-Marathon County and Northcentral Technical College, to provide trained workers
and to work with the Marathon County
Economic Development Corporation to
encourage business start-ups, through a
local incubator but also through a new
revolving loan fund.
The plan, however, specifically singles
out the health care sector for encouragement. Reads the action plan within the
comprehensive plan draft: Marathon
County should support activities that
strengthen Central Wisconsin and the
Wausau metro areas position as a regional health care center.
Currently, Aspirus Wausau Hospital is
one of the two largest employers in Marathon County. Greenheck Fan Co. is the
countys other largest employer. Both
have over 1,000 employees, according to

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

TOWN OF MAYVILLE
BIDS

NOTICE OF CAUCUS
VILLAGE OF DORCHESTER

The town of Mayville is accepting bids for a 1996 Ford


L8000 dump truck with snowplow, wing, sander steel,
(motor needs work). The stainless steel sander is brand new, will
sell with or without attachments. Any questions, please feel free to
call (715) 613-5929. Please submit before January 11, 2016. Mail
to: Town of Mayville, W1324 Pine Road, Dorchester, WI 54425
or email to: yulandaschrock@gmail.com.
52-177194

the draft plan.


In many respects, Marathon Countys
draft comprehensive plan for 2016 sounds
a lot like the countys plan approved 10
years ago, but, in other aspects, the plan
breaks new ground.
The county still supports curbing urban sprawl with appropriate zoning,
protecting farmland and rural character with state Farmland Preservation
payments and, to be created, a revolving
loan fund to encourage new farmer entries.
The plan encourages, as before, affordable housing, protecting natural
resources, including prime soils, multimodal transportation infrastructure
and economic development.
Nothing new here.
There are, however, two areas where
the action plan within the comprehensive plan calls for some changes. One
area is mental health. A second area is
agricultural run-off.
Marathon County Board chairman
Kurt Gibbs, town of Cassel, who chaired
the comprehensive planning task force,
said that the draft document calls for significant changes in how the mentally ill,
including people with drug and alcohol
abuse issues, are cared for.
The biggest challenge addressed in
the comprehensive plan is in the area
of mental health, he said. The issue is
providing a continuity of care for people
with substance abuse and mental health
problems.
Gibbs said the plan directs the county
to find alternatives to jailing people with
mental illness. Mentally ill people who
do wind up in jail need appropriate services, Gibbs said.

WNAXLP

WASTEWATER NOTICE

In accordance with s.283.55(1)(dm) the city of Abbotsford reported an overflow at the wastewater treatment plant at 504 East
Linden Street on Monday, Dec. 14, 2015. An estimated 30,000 to
50,000 gallons of wastewater overflowed through the intermediated filters, RBC and final clarifiers. The cause was due to a large
amount of rain and saturated soils. The overflow was contained
to the wastewater plant and storm sewer. Corrective action is being taken in the design of the new wastewater treatment plant.
There was no actual or potential for human risk or exposure.
52-177191
WNAXLP

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that Abbyland Foods has petitioned


the Zoning Board of Appeals for the city of Abbotsford, Clark and
Marathon counties, Wisconsin, for a variance to the property
located at 820 E. Spruce, Abbotsford, WI.
This would be for the purpose of constructing a new building.
The placement of this building would be a variance to Ordinance
Section 13-1-49 B-2 Highway Commercial; which requires the
rear yard setback 20 feet.
This public hearing petition will be heard at approximately 4:00
p.m., January 7, 2015. All interested persons wishing to hear this
petition can do so at this time.
Jennifer Lopez
City Clerk
52-177213
WNAXLP

You are hereby notified that a caucus for the purpose of


nominating candidates for the following offices will be held on
Wednesday, January 6, 2016, at 7:00 p.m. at the village clerks
office, located at 228 W. Washington Ave., Dorchester, WI.
Office
Village Trustee
Village Trustee
Village Trustee
50-176837

WNAXLP

Incumbent
Michael Seubert
Kurt Schwoch
Daniella Schauer
Brooke Ruge
Village Clerk-Treasurer

NOTICE OF 1ST ANNUAL

MEMBERSHIP MEETING FOR


PROVISION PARTNERS COOPERATIVE
P.O. BOX 988, MARSHFIELD, WI 54449
When: Thursday, January 14, 2016
Where: Knights of Columbus Hall
400 W. Upham St.,
Marshfield, Wisconsin
Agenda: Lunch - 11:00 a.m.
Business Meeting - 12:00 p.m.
This is your annual meeting for the:
Presentation of the audit report of the business year
2015
To transact any business that may properly come before
the board.

See SHORTAGE/ Page 16

PUBLIC NOTICES
ABBOTSFORD CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
OCTOBER 5, 2015, 6:00 P.M.
Council President Voss called the regular meeting to order at 6:00
p.m.
Roll call: Council President Voss, Horacek, Faber, Anders,
Schwantes, Mediger, and Weideman (Gosse and Mayor Rachu
absent).
Others: Clerk Lopez, DPW Todd Stuttgen, Todd Trader MSA,
Chief Bauer, Chief Apfelbeck, Jon Austin, Mary Giffin, Librarian
Gruenseth, Nina Writz, Chief Esselman, Jeremy Totzke, Ron
Gonnering and K. OBrien Tribune Phonograph.
The Pledge of Allegiance was heard.
Under comments by the council president, Council President Voss
stated she is attending the meeting as a voting member.
There were no comments by the public.
Minutes from the council held September 8 & 9, 2015, were
presented. Motion Mediger/Horacek to waive the reading and
approve the minutes from the council held September 8 & 9, 2015.
Considerations before the council
Under discuss/approve appointment of Joanna Mediger to the
Water & Sewer Committee, it was stated that due to a health issue
and scheduling issues it was suggested adding one more person to
the Water and Sewer Committee to assure a quorum is in attendance,
motion Anders/Faber. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve the appointment of Marty Schwantes to
the 7 member Fire Board; if he is unavailable for a meeting, the
mayor will attend in his place; if the mayor is not available he will
appoint a representative from the council. Motion Anders/Mediger
to appoint Marty Schwantes to the 7 member Fire Board; if he is
WNAXLP

Continued to page 11

As in the past, your support and attendance of this meeting is


greatly appreciated.

Call to RSVP before January 4, 2016, 1-800-236-1041.

Attest: Ben Daul, Secretary

52-177000

WNAXLP

Abbotsford, WI 715.223.2342

52-177119

Submit your Legal Notices


h g ph at legals@tpprinting.com
@
to Tribune-Phonograph
TRIBUNE-PHONOGRAPH

The comprehensive plan anticipates


completion of a federal Total Maximum
Daily Load study on the Wisconsin River
Basin in 2017 and supports reductions of
agricultural run-off to meet a 0.75 micrograms per liter standard within the Wisconsin River.
The draft calls for farmer councils to
come up with strategies to meet this pollution target, as well as further enforcement of county agricultural discharge
regulations.
Meeting this goal will likely be tough.
The comprehensive plan notes that overall county erosion rates have increased.
It reports that an annual Marathon
County Soil Transect Survey has seen
farmland erosion rates increase from
2000 to 2014 from 2.0 to 2.2 tons. In the
Fenwood Creek subwatershed, erosion
rates have spiked from 1.9 to 3.0 tons per
acre.
The comprehensive plan is not quite
the mostly land use oriented comprehensive plan the county wrote in 2010.
The draft plan has a wider scope. Its
overarching theme is the goal that Marathon County should be the healthiest,
safest and most prosperous county in
Wisconsin.
The comprehensive plan newly divides the county into six areas. These
are Antigo Flats, Eastern Lakes, Heart
of America (western Marathon County),
Lumberjack (eastern Marathon County), Wisconsin Central (Wausau metro)
and Wisconsin River Influence (Big Eau
Pleine Reservoir).
Looking at this area, Heart of America, the comprehensive plan reports

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 7

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

Continued from page 8


for a meeting, the mayor will attend in his place; if the mayor is not
available he will appoint a representative from the council. Motion
carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve paying committee pay to the representative
of the Fire Board, Anders stated he personally does not believe this
position should be a paid position. Schwantes felt that the board
already discussed not receiving pay. Motion Schwantes/Horacek to
deny payment for the Fire Board meetings. Motion carried without
negative vote.
Under discuss/approve City Engineering contract S.E.H.,
Medenwaldt stated this is for the work that S.E.H. does at an hourly
rate while working in Abbotsford. It was stated the contract had been
amended to show Jon Strand as the engineer. Motion Schwantes/
Mediger to approve as presented with the stated changes to Jon
Strand as the engineer. Motion carried without negative vote.
Committee Reports
Public Works was presented by Horacek. The current agreement
with CDBG will need to receive approval from CDBG for the time
extension; if the time extension is not granted, the city will need
to place the final coat of asphalt this year. MSA has met with the
contractor and went over punch list items. MSAs goal is to have all
items done in the next week or two.
Public Works update was presented by DPW Stuttgen.
Stuttgen stated that during the Public Works committee meeting a
recommendation was made to gravel the alley between 4th and 5th
Avenue. The cost would be an additional $1,500 to $2,000 to gravel
this alley versus planting grass on it. It was stated that the neighbors
are in favor of having this gravel; with stating that this alley will not
be snow plowed.
Minutes from September 23, 2015, was presented. There were
no comments or concerns. Lopez stated that the accessory building
motion was not on this agenda as the Plan Commission will need to
review that information.
Water and Sewer was presented by Voss. Minutes from September
23, 2015 was presented.
Under discuss/approve Change Order #2 Wastewater Treatment
Plant deduct ($23,662.63), motion Weideman/Schwantes to approve
Change Order #2. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Change Order #1 Lift Station in the
amount not to exceed $159,503.52; this is primarily the new sanitary
sewer from 7th Street to the new lift station. Medenwaldt is requesting
an approval for an amount not to exceed $159,503.52; when actual
prices are determined at a less amount it will require a signature from
the mayor and council president. Motion Anders/Mediger to approve
as presented. Motion carried without negative vote.
Abbotsford Fire, Ambulance Department, Consolidation
Committee was presented by Council President Voss. Minutes from
Fire Department meeting held August 26, 2015, were presented.
Minutes from Ambulance meeting on September 2015 was
presented. Anders questioned what it would cost to hire an on-call
person. Chief Esselman will provide the estimated costs.
The next Consolidation Committee meeting is October 21, 2015,
at Abbotsford Fire Hall at 7:00 p.m.
Abbotsford Library was presented by Council President Voss.
Minutes from September 8, 2015, there were no comments or
questions.
Police Commission was presented by Anders. Police minutes
from September 14, 2015, was presented.
Motion Schwantes/Horacek to approve the police expenditures in
the amount of $17,686.02. Motion carried without negative vote.
Finance and Personnel was presented by Schwantes. The
minutes from September 22 & 30, 2015, were presented.
Under discuss/approve rollover of vacation time for Alan Uhlig,
motion Mediger/Weideman to approve as presented. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve wage increase of 3% for Public Works
Manager Craig Stuttgen ($25.75/hour) effective on his anniversary
date, motion Mediger/Faber to approve as presented. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Public Works job description, updated
description; Stuttgen stated that he is not looking for a part-time
employee or a job shared employee at this time. Medenwaldt stated
that it will be necessary to operate the plant full-time for the first
several months. Discussion of job sharing will need to be postponed
until after the plant is in full operation. It was suggested to add the
obtaining a CDL in the first 6 months of employment to the job
description. Motion Schwantes/Faber to approve the job description
with adding that the employee must obtain a CDL license within the
first 6 months of employment. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve health insurance renewal 21.5% option, it
was stated that this will be discussed further at the October 12, 2015,
meeting with the insurance representative.
License and Building was presented by Schwantes.
Building permits:
Kent Schilling, 300 W. Pine St., driveway; Steve Colby, 108 N.
Sixth St., windows and siding, $12,000; James Melvin, 301 S.
Second Ave., driveway.
Under discuss/approve original operator licenses, motion
Anders/Horacek to approve as presented. Tami Szpara, Kwik Trip
885; Rachael Mueller, Kwik Trip 885; Lisa Beels, Abby Group, Inc;
Scharron Zygowicz, Corral Bar & Grill.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Abbotsford Colby Area Chamber of Commerce was presented by
Lopez. Minutes from September 9, 2015, was presented.
Additional committee meetings were set on the calendar.
Under discuss 2016 budget, Lopez presented suggestions by the
mayor to balance the budget. Concern was expressed regarding
the process and it was felt the finance changes should have been
published. Further discussion will be held on October 12, 2015,
when the mayor is present.
Motion Schwantes/Horacek to adjourn at 6:58 p.m. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Jennifer Lopez, Clerk
52-177184
WNAXLP

sweeping immediately after the leaf pick up and the street sweeping
is not able to be done effectively when the streets are frozen.
Under discuss/approve 2016 health insurance, Cory Toth
presented various options for the 2016 renewal. The current plan has
a 21.5% increase which poses an increase of $17,049.60 from 2015.
Options were presented from both non-ACA plans and ACA plans.
Due to the 2016 price increase in ACA plans it was suggested to
continue with a non-ACA plan for 2016. Motion Schwantes/Mediger
to proceed with the Anthem BC/BS POS Blue Preferred Option
6 w/RX AA Option 3. This plan increases the individual deductible
from $250 to $1,000 and increases the family deductible from $750
to $3,000. It was stated that the levels of coverage on the plan are
the same as in 2015, but the deductibles and max-out-of-pocket
costs are increased. This plan is a 3.88% increase from 2015. It was
stated the cost savings from this option will be placed back in the fire
department budget line item. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve 2016 budget discussion began with the
fire department questioning why the department added to the roster
with now having 32 members versus 20 members in 2012. It was
stated that wages are one area that could be reduced as cost of
equipment is difficult to reduce.
Discussion was held regarding the Mayors salary and it was
questioned if this line item should be reduced.
Stuttgen stated that with the Public Works budget being reduced,
it will still be possible to continue the Elderberry 2 lift project. The
projected cost is $60,000 and it is anticipated to receive $14,000 in
county grant funding.
Motion Voss/Anders to approve the 2016 budget for publication
with moving the savings of $2,562 from health insurance to Fire
Protect-Plan, Maint Oper.
Roll call vote: Voss yes, Horacek yes, Faber yes, Anders
yes, Mediger yes, Weideman no, and Schwantes yes.
Under discuss/approve Steen Pay Application #4 - $110,927.77
motion Schwantes/Voss to approve as presented. It was stated that
Steen is now 92.6% paid. Motion carried without negative vote.
Motion Anders/Weideman to convene into closed session pursuant
to Wisconsin State Statute 19.85 (1) (e) deliberating or negotiating
the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds or
conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or
bargaining reasons require a closed session for the purpose of
negotiating the sale price of the wastewater treatment plant.
Roll call: Voss yes, Horacek yes, Faber yes, Anders yes,
Schwantes yes, Weideman yes, and Mediger yes.
Motion Anders/Voss to convene to open session at 9:31 p.m.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Motion Schwantes/Anders to convene into closed session pursuant
to Wisconsin Statutes Section 19.81 (b) and (c) for the purpose of
considering dismissal, demotion, licensing or discipline of any public
employee and considering employment, promotion, compensation
or performance evaluation data of any public employee over which
the governmental body has jurisdiction or exercises responsibility
specifically regarding deputy clerk/treasurer evaluation.
Roll call: Voss yes, Horacek yes, Faber yes, Anders yes,
Schwantes yes, Weideman yes, and Mediger yes.
Motion Schwantes/Anders to terminate the probationary
employment of Theresa Fischer, Deputy Clerk/Treasurer, effective
immediately. Motion carried without negative vote.
Motion Anders/Voss to convene to open session.
Motion Schwantes/Anders to terminate the probationary
employment of Theresa Fischer, Deputy Clerk/Treasurer, effective
immediately. Motion carried without negative vote.
Motion Voss/Anders to adjourn at 9:54 p.m. Motion carried without
negative vote.
Jennifer Lopez,
Abbotsford City Clerk
52-177185
WNAXLP

Station, it was stated this issue is tabled at this time.


Under discuss/approve Change Order #3 - Miron Construction
Wastewater Treatment Plant; Medenwaldt stated that because the
project is ahead of completion there was an additional cost of $4,196
for the early planting of the reed beds; there will be cost savings at
the end of the project due to the expected early completion. Motion
Voss/Weideman to approve as presented. Motion carried without
negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Pay application #5 Miron Construction Lift
Station $122,584.20, motion Voss/Horacek to approve Pay application #5 as presented. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Pay application #7 Miron Construct
Wastewater Treatment Plant $811,700.32, motion Voss/Horacek to
approve pay application #7 Miron Construct Wastewater Treatment
Plant in the amount of $811,700.32. Motion carried without negative
vote.
Abbotsford Fire, Ambulance Department, Consolidation Committee was presented by Mayor Rachu.
Minutes from Fire, September 23, 2015 was presented. There
were no comments or questions.
Minutes from Ambulance was presented. There were no comments or questions.
Under Consolidation Committee update from the October 21,
2015 meeting, Schwantes stated that during the meeting there were
15 areas of concern that came up. It was stated that the goal is to
have the closest department respond first as the priority is providing
service for the person in need. One large topic was the leadership
of the Fire District; it was stated that the personnel and the chiefs
stay where they are at; but if the consolidation goes through, there
would be one additional District Chief. It was stated that the Abbotsford Fire Department expenses will be recapped and the utilities and
insurance will be provided. It was discussed if the equipment will be
redistributed; at this time the goal is to not move equipment around,
but it will be analyzed during this process. The replacement of equipment will be reviewed at future meetings. The District Chief will also
assist in the future process of purchasing equipment. There was discussion on the Fire Department retirement. Abbotsford is the only
department that does not have this program at this time. In the past
the City of Abbotsford approved this; but a plan was never developed
from the Fire/EMS to pursue this issue. Staffing of the District Chief
was discussed; it was questioned if this should be a full-time or parttime position. It was stated that currently chiefs work about 10 hours
per week. It was stated that having the District Chief be an EMT
would be a great benefit to the area; this would make the position
more affordable. Chief Rannow stated that their current department
could sustain a full-time EMT. Chief Esselman stated that he doubted
that the Abbotsford EMT could sustain a full-time chief alone. It was
stated that this individual could also be the person responsible for
the fire inspections. The committee will again meet on November 17,
2015 at 7:00 p.m. at the Colby City Hall.
Abbotsford Library was presented by Mayor Rachu.
Minutes from October, 2015 were emailed to the council.
Police Commission was presented by Anders.
Police minutes from October 12, 2015, Anders stated they are
working on the ride along policy and a policy will be reviewed in
December.
Motion Anders/Voss to approve the police bills in amount of
$10,931.75. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under Memorandum of Agreement regarding 12 hour shifts, Chief
Bauer stated the Commission and the Union have agreed to a revision to the contract allowing a more family friendly 12 hour shift
schedule. This will allow more weekend time off for the employees.
Motion Schwantes/Horacek to approve the Memorandum of Agreement regarding 12 hour shifts. Motion carried without negative vote.
Anders exited the meeting.
Finance and Personnel was presented by Schwantes.
Minutes from October 14 and 26, 2015, were presented.
Schwantes felt the communication between the fire department and
the city are improving and going forward he does not envision problems.
License and Building was presented by Schwantes
Building permits:
Allen Tranberg, 207 W. Pine St., basement sheetrock, $7,000;
Karen Lapine, 408 N. 2nd Ave, siding, $8,000; Strek-O Doors, 518
Birch Street, dry lumber storage, $20,000; Stada Baba Indust, 308 S.
1st Ave, home remodel, $20,000; Kulas Body Shop, 103 W. Linden,
storage & wash bay addition, $120,000.
Under discuss/approve Original Operator Licenses, motion Weideman/Mediger to approve licenses as presented.
Amy Froeba, Abbotsford Travel Stop; Jessica White, Abbotsford
Travel Stop; Shannon Darby, Abbotsford Travel Stop; Teresa Egge,
Abbotsford Travel Stop; Ashley Pupahal, Holiday SSG; Angela Wein,
Corral Bar & Grill; Brenda Spath, Corral Bar & Grill.
Motion carried 6:1 (Schwantes).
Under discuss/approve Class B Beer, Class C Wine license Medos Family Style Restaurant, motion Mediger/Weideman to approve
Class B Beer and Class C Wine license as presented. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Abbotsford Colby Area Chamber of Commerce was presented by
Lopez.
Minutes from October 7, 2015, was presented. The next meeting
is this week Wednesday at the Colonial Center in Colby.
Additional committee meetings were set on the calendar.
Motion Schwantes/Voss to convene into closed session pursuant
to Wisconsin State Statute 19.85 (1) (e) deliberating or negotiating
the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds or
conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or
bargaining reasons require a closed session for the purpose of negotiating the sale price of the wastewater treatment plant, including
Bill Beil Abbyland Foods.
Roll call: Schwantes yes, Weideman yes, Mediger yes,
Gosse yes, Voss yes, Horacek yes.
Motion Voss/Horacek to convene to open session. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Motion Schwantes/Voss to convene into closed session pursuant
to Wisconsin Statutes section 19.81(c) for the purpose of considering employment, promotion, compensation or performance evaluation data of any public employee over which the governmental body
has jurisdiction or exercises responsibility specifically regarding conducting interviews/hiring of Public Works position
Roll call: Schwantes yes, Weideman yes, Mediger yes,
Gosse yes, Voss yes, Horacek yes.
Motion Schwantes/Mediger to convene to open session.
Motion Horacek/Schwantes to compensate Vern Leffel $19.50 per
hour stating that after a three month review the employee is eligible
for a $0.50 increase and after six months is eligible for one week
vacation. Leffel will be reviewed at his one year anniversary date for
a wage increase to be equal with other Public Work employees with
certification. Motion carried 5:1 (Weideman).
Motion Voss/Schwantes to adjourn at 7:43 p.m. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Jennifer Lopez, Clerk
52-177186
WNAXLP

ABBOTSFORD CITY COUNCIL MINUTES


OCTOBER 12, 2016
CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS
Mayor Rachu called the meeting to order at 8:00 p.m.
Roll call: Mayor Rachu, Voss, Horacek, Faber, Anders, Schwantes,
Weideman and Mediger (Gosse absent).
Others present: Clerk Lopez, DPW Stuttgen, Water/Wastewater
Manager Medenwaldt, Chief Bauer, Chief Apfelbeck, J. Austin,
M. Giffin, Librarian Gruenseth, N. Writz, Cory Toth Spectrum
Insurance, K. OBrien Tribune Phonograph and other interested
citizens.
The Pledge of Allegiance was heard.
There were no comments by the mayor.
Under comments by the public, Mary Giffin expressed concern
with the leaf pick up, requesting that she would like to see the pick-up
dates extended further into November to allow for the late dropping
trees. DPW Stuttgen explained that the city schedules street

ABBOTSFORD CITY COUNCIL MINUTES


NOVEMBER 2, 2015, 6:00 P.M.
CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS
The public hearing for the 2016 City of Abbotsford General Fund
Budget was called to order at 6:00 p.m. Citizen Jenny Jakel thanked
the council for supporting the Chamber of Commerce. Gosse questioned if the line item for the Fire Department Capital Improvement
could be utilized for other items. It was stated that the fire department would need to come back to the city prior to making any purchases out of the Capital Improvement fund and any funds that are
remaining at the end of the year will be rolled over for the next year.
Schwantes explained that this adds flexibility for the uses of that account, the funds can be utilized for other capital improvements other
than trucks.
Mayor Rachu called the regular meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.
Roll call: Mayor Rachu, Voss, Horacek, Anders (via conference
call), Schwantes, Weideman, Mediger and Gosse (Faber absent)
Others present: Clerk Lopez, DPW Stuttgen, Water Wastewater
Manager Medenwaldt, Chief Bauer, Chief Esselman, Chief Apfelbeck, Austin, Librarian Gruenseth, Writz, and K. OBrien Tribune
Phonograph.
The Pledge of Allegiance was heard.
Under comments by the mayor, Mayor Rachu thanked the council
members for their time and dedication during the budget process.
Under comments by the public, Gosse thanked the council for the
flowers he received when in the nursing home.
Motion Voss/Horacek to waive the reading and approve the minutes from the council held October 5 and 12, 2015. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Considerations before the Council
Under discuss/approve 2016 City of Abbotsford General Fund
Budget, motion Voss/Horacek to approve the budget. Roll call: Mediger yes, Schwantes yes, Gosse yes, Weideman yes, Horacek
yes, Voss yes, Anders yes. Motion carried without negative
vote.
Committee Reports
Public Works was presented by Horacek.
Public Works update was presented by Stuttgen. It was stated that
they are nearing the end of the leaf pick up.
Minutes from October 19, 2015 was reviewed.
Under discuss/approve Change Order #1 - Steen Construction
(gravel alley), it was stated that this is for the change of placing
gravel on the alley versus grass. Motion Voss/Mediger to approve
Change Order #1 Steen Construction as presented. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Certificate of Substantial Completion
Steen Construction, motion Horacek/Voss to approve the Certificate
of Substantial Completion for Steen Construction as presented. Motion carried without negative vote.
Water and Sewer was presented by Voss.
Minutes from October 19, 2015 was presented.
Under discuss/approve sewer credit for John Landa in the amount
of $96.56 due to a water pipe break in rental unit, motion Mediger/
Gosse to approve the sewer credit as presented. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Change Order Miron Construction Lift

Page 8

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

T OP L OCAL S TORIES

TITLE TOWN - For the first time since 1958, the Abbotsford Falcons won a conference title in football. By beating the Athens Bluejays, 19-13, in a hard-fought
home game on Oct. 16, the Falcons took sole ownership of the 2015 Cloverbelt
Conference trophy. This topped off an undefeated season for the team.
AT STATE - The Colby
and Abbotsford track
and field teams both
had great seasons in
2015, with Colby senior
Sam Bach, left, qualifying for state in both the
1,600 and 3,200 meter
runs. Abby sent a total
of five athletes to La
Crosse for the state finals, including Kasey
Kollmansberger in shot
put and discus. Relay runners Cheyenne
Riemer, Elli Carpenter, Zoe Kremsreiter
and Jaelyn Friedenfels
also represented Abbotsford at state in the
4x100 relay.

GREEN SCHOOL - Colby Elementary was one of 58 schools from across


the nation designated as a Green Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of
Education for its recycling, composting and energy saving efforts.

THIRSTY CURTISS
- Like Abbotsford just a few
years earlier, the village of
Curtiss was under orders by
the Wisconsin DNR to find
more groundwater in 2015
to keep up with increasing
demand driven by several
major expansions at Abbyland Foods. In June, the villages longtime engineering
firm submitted a proposal to
the Wisconsin Public Service
Commission calling for the
establishment of three new
wells and the rehabilitation
of two older ones that had
stopped producing much
water. Abbyland, as the villages largest consumer of
water, agreed to pay for the
project, which is estimated to
cost nearly $2 million when
completed next year. In October, bursts of pressurized air
were injected into the older
wells, causing water to come
spurting out as if oil had
been struck. Two new wells
are expected to go online
next spring, with plans to drill
a third (13th total) in 2016.
The goal is for the village to
be able to pump 350 gallons
of water per minute, double
its current capacity.

OF

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 9

2015

CONSOLIDATE? - The top local story of 2015 was the decision by elected officials in
Abbotsford, Colby, Dorchester and the townships Holton, Mayville, Hull and Colby to explore a possible consolidated fire and ambulance district. The conversation started at a
special public meeting in January at Dorchesters fire hall, and the next month, retired
fire chief John Neihart of Lake Hallie offered to serve as an unpaid consultant to get the
consolidation process started. However, lingering questions from Abbotsford firefighters
and residents culminated in a well-attended council meeting July 8 (above), when several
audience members expressed their doubts about joining with Colby and Dorchesters
fire departments. An informal committee of local officials continued to meet and discuss
the idea, and in September, a seven-member board was formed with representatives
from each of the interested municipalities. Some of the discussions got heated at times,
including the exchange show at left between former Abbotsford firefighter Jim Brodhagen,
right, and Colby fire chief Ross Rannow. Larry Oehmichen, town of Colby chairman, was
chosen to be the chairman of the board, which plans to meet again Jan. 17 at 6:30 p.m.
at the place the discussion first started, the Dorchester fire hall.
STAFF PHOTOS/KEVIN OBRIEN

NOT A DEAD ISSUE - An ongoing dispute


between the city of Colby and the Colby Memorial Cemetery Association on how best
to split the costs of cemetery maintenance
lurched closer to a court battle this year. A
Nov. 18 joint meeting between the city council and cemetery board failed to produce an
immediate resolution. City attorney Dean
Dietrich, right, and cemetery attorney Tom
Harnisch are representing the two sides.

WHAT TO DO - The question of how to provide the Colby Public Library with
more space came to the forefront in July, when the city council voted in closed
session to make an offer on the old clinic building down the street. Members of
the library board said the clinic had already been ruled out as a viable option five
years ago, and the council eventually dropped the proposal in favor of a possible
expansion onto the existing library building.

SHERIFF MAKES NEWS Clark County Sheriff Greg Herrick


garnered some statewide press
attention in May when he issued a
press release stating that his deputies will not be enforcing a new
law regulating the size of tractors
and other agricultural equipment
on public roads. Herrick said the
fines faced by farmers are excessive to the point of being unconstitutional. Also, on March 27,
Herrick filed a request for a court
injunction against the countys
law enforcement committee,
which had voted in February to
deny his purchase of a pickup
truck, even though the vehicle fit
within his departments budget.
Herrick eventually got the truck he
ordered, which prompted Judge
John Eagon to dismiss his lawsuit in November. Herrick said he
plans an appeal so he can get a
court to rule on his constitutional
authority as sheriff.

Page 10

Tribune-Phonograph

People

COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

CHAMBER MEETING JAN. 6


The Abbotsford-Colby Crossings Chamber of Commerce will hold its next meeting
at noon on Wednesday, Jan. 6, at El Norteno restaurant in Curtiss. The lunch sponsor
is Nicolet National Bank. Call the chamber
at 715-223-3444 ext. 102 by Tuesday, Jan.
5, to reserve a lunch.
FREE-THROW CONTEST JAN. 16
The Colby Chapter of the Knights of
Columbus will sponsor a championship
free-throw contest on Saturday, Jan. 16,
starting at 2 p.m. in the gymnasium of St.
Marys Catholic School in Colby. The contest is open to all boys and girls ages 9 to
14. Championship medals will be awarded
to all winners, who will then advance to the
regional and possibly state championship
contests. Entry forms are available at the
Abbotsford and Colby middle schools, St.
Marys School, as well as at St. Marys, St.
Bernards and St. Louis churches.
COLBY TRAILBLAZERS TO MEET
The Colby Trailblazers Snowmobile Club
will meet Sunday, Jan. 3, at 7 p.m. at Colby
City Hall. All snowmobilers are welcome.
LOS PINGUOS AT TACK CENTER
LuCille Tack Center for the Arts will welcome back Los Pinguos on Friday, Jan. 15
at 7:30 p.m. Called the Latin Beatles by
the Los Angeles Times, these talented musicians will transport the audience with the
flair and passion of Latin rhythms performed
by Spanish guitar, bass and harmonizing
vocals. Originally hailing from Buenos Aires, these musicians merged their talents in
1999 and quickly rose to acclaim.
CUP PANTRY HOURS
The Community United Pantry at Zion Lutheran Church in Colby is open every Tuesday, from 9 to 11 a.m., for individuals wishing to drop off or pick up food.

Decker wins geography bee at CMS


On Dec. 22, Colby Middle School participated in the annual National Geography Bee. Sixth-, seventh- and eighthgrade students took a written test, and the top 10 from each grade qualified for the bee. The champion was eighthgrader Michael Decker, and the runner up is eighth-grader Abbie Hediger. Decker will take an online test in January
to see if he qualifies for the next level.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS

ENGAGEMENT

TRINITY FOOD PANTRY HOURS


The hours for the food pantry at Trinity
Lutheran Church in Unity are Wednesdays,
from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

STEPANEK-GUMZ

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH


Zion Lutheran Church, 301 N. Second
St., Colby, holds Saturday services at 4 p.m.
and Sunday services at 8 a.m. and 10:30
a.m. with Rev. Mark Neumann. For more information, call 715-223-2166.

Richard and Janice Gumz are pleased


to announce the engagement of their son,
Craig, to Rose Stepanek, daughter of Jon
and Madonna Stepanek of Billings, Mont.
The groom-to-be is a 2000 graduate of
Colby High School and a 2004 graduate
of UWEau Claire, where he earned a
degree in communications with a public
relations emphasis. He currently works
for the Minnesota Twins, as the manager
of new business development.
His fianc is a 2006 graduate of Billings Central Catholic High School and a
2010 graduate of the University of Montana, where she majored in broadcast
journalism. She currently works as a
project manager for SportNgin, which
is a sports technology company that provides a website platform for youth and
amateur sports.
They have set a date of Sept. 3, 2016,
at Rock Creek Resort in Red Lodge, Mont.

FIRST UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST


First United Church of Christ, 111 S. Second St., Colby, holds Sunday services at 9
a.m. with Pastor Teri Hanson. For more information, call 715-223-2712.
PEACE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Peace United Church of Christ, 152 S.
Second St., Dorchester, holds Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. with Pastor Doris Ruben.
For more information, call 715-654-5333.
TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
Trinity Lutheran Church, 201 S. Washington St., Unity, holds Sunday services at 10
a.m. with Pastor Al Houts. For more information, call 715-223-2155.
MASS TIMES
St. Bernard Catholic Church, 400 N. Second Ave., Abbotsford, has Mass on Saturday at 4 p.m., with a Spanish-language
Mass by Rev. Tim Oudenhoven at 1 p.m. on
Sunday.
St. Louis Catholic Church, 133 N. Third
St., Dorchester, has Sunday Mass at 10 a.m.
St. Marys Help of Christian Parish, 205 S.
Second St., Colby, has Saturday Mass at 7
p.m. and Sunday Mass at 8 a.m. Call 715223-3048 with questions. Rev. Peter Manickam conducts Mass at all three churches.

Nicolet gives $1,500


to food pantry
Ivadeane Abegglen of the Community United Pantry in Colby accepts a $1,500 donation from Phylis Untiedt at Nicolet National Bank.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

BIRTHS

Craig Gumz and Rose Stepanek

Grambort birth

Schuette birth

A daughter, Ella Marie, was born to


Clint and Lynn Grambort, Wausau,
on Dec. 15, 2015, at Aspirus Hospital in
Wausau. She weighed eight pounds, one
ounce and was 20 inches long.
Grandparents are Jane and Jim
Priebe, Schofield, and Randy and Kathy
Grambort, Abbotsford.

A daughter, Libby Marie, was born to


Darin and Emily Schuette, New Prague,
Minn. on Dec. 21, 2015. She weighed eight
pounds, four ounces.
She joins a brother, Ethan, at home.
Grandparents are Steve and Beth Edwards, Fremont, and Diana Schuette and
the late Eldred Schuette, Riplinger.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 11

HoeDowners
ready
for
another
BITUARIES year of square dancing fun

GENEVIEVE SCHMITT

Genevieve C. Schmitt 99, Abbotsford, formerly of


Green Bay, passed away on Sunday, Dec. 20, 2015, at
Golden LivingCenters - Continental Manor in Abbotsford.
Per Schmitts wishes, a private memorial service
will be held at a later date.
Life Tributes Funeral Home in Spencer is assisting
the family with arrangements.

Albert Lueth
Albert M. Lueth, age
80, of Colby passed away
Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, at
the Colby Retirement Community in Colby.
Albert was born on Aug. 9,
1935, in Medford, the son of
Fielder and Rose (Kristek)
Lueth. He grew up on his
family dairy farm in the rural Curtiss area, attending
grade school in Curtiss. He
was married to the former
Ruby Mae Rucks and to this union five children
were born. They later divorced. Albert worked at
Packaging (aka PCA) from 1956 until 1971. In 1971,
Albert carried on the family tradition of farming
on the family homestead until 1992 when he sold
the farm and lived in Merrill for a short time before moving to Dorchester. Albert was very proud
of his grandson who owns Lueth Plumbing.
His hobbies included spending time with his
family, crossbow and rifle deer hunting, small
game hunting and bowling. Albert was a member of St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church in
Dorchester and the Curtiss Lions Club.
Survivors include his five children, Douglas
(Debbie) Lueth of Tomahawk, Darrell (Debby)
Lueth of Medford, Gregory Lueth of Westboro,
Gloria Nixdorf of Dorchester and LoriAnn (Teddy) Damron of Columbus, Ohio; his brothers, Virgil (Beverly) Lueth of Spring Valley and Arnold
(Lynn) Lueth of Sparta; his sisters, Rosella (Gene)
Jensen of Neillsville and Deanna (Michael) Fanning of Woodruff. Albert is further survived by
his 12 grandchildren, Adam Nixdorf, Andrea
Graff, Shanna Hackel, Brittany Lueth, Travis
Lueth, Shawna Monien, Nicholas Lueth, Aaron
Lueth, Jesse Lueth, Marissa Lueth, Scott Waldvogel, Emily Waldvogel and Eric Waldvogel; and 11
great-grandchildren, Hannah and Blake Nixdorf,
Jebediah Nixdorf, Jeremiah and Lydiah Collopy,
Hunter and Sage Lueth, Bradyn and Ellie Monien
and Fielder Lueth; a longtime friend, Hank Carr;
his foreign exchange daughter, Kari, from Norway; along with many other relatives and friends.
Albert was preceded in death by his parents; a
brother, Elmer Lueth; a sister, Greta Nelson; and
a son-in-law, Wally Nixdorf.
His memorial service was held at noon on Monday, Dec. 21, 2015, at St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church in Dorchester. Pastor Gary Lodholz
presided. Family and friends were invited to
gather on Monday at the church from 11 a.m. until the time of service. The committal service will
be held privately at a later date.
The family would like to thank the Colby EMS
crew and the staff at the Colby Retirement Community for their care and support of Albert and
his family.
Life Tributes Funeral Home-Spencer assisted
the family with arrangements. Visit www.life
tributesfuneralhome.com to share thoughts and
condolences.
Paid obituary 52-177212

OBITUARY POLICY
A free death notice will be available. A death
notice will include name, age, city, date of birth,
date of death and service information (no photo). Funeral home names will be included, but no
web address.
All other obituaries will be charged at a rate of
$5 per column inch.
Call 715-223-2342 with questions.

By Terry Prust
Marshfield
HoeDowners
Come and be part
of the fastest growing square dance club
in Central Wisconsin.
Doesnt matter what season spring, summer,
fall and winter are the
seasons for square dancing as it offers a great social activity for all ages
and genders both single
and couples.
Todays
modern
square dance is not what
one may remember or
have read about from
years ago, and it is most
certainly not what you
may have experienced in
a high school gym class.
Modern square dancing is constantly changing and using square
dance patterns set to
todays music styles of
rock, pop, swing, country and religious. It has
been popular throughout
America, from north to
south, urban to rural.
Square dance clubs
have existed in Marshfield for over 50 years.
Now square dancing
has been undergoing a
revival. The social aspect, as well as being a
fun source of exercise
for both the body and the
mind, has created a new
interest in square dancing.
Feeling tense or restless? According to the
American Heart Association, square dancing
boosts enthusiasm and
optimism, releases tension and helps with relaxation and sleep, tones
muscles, can help control weight and help you
handle stress.

HOEDOWNERS - Members of the Marshfield HoeDowners enjoy weekly


dances and other social events all year long, including Wisconsins long winter
months.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
The active lifestyle
that square dancing offers attracts members to
the HoeDowners Square
Dance Club from all over.
Members not only come
from Marshfield, but
area towns such as Spencer, Colby, Neillsville,
Chili, Greenwood, Arpin, Loyal, Vesper, Junction City, Milladore, Unity, Stratford, Stetsonville,
Owen, Wausau, Wisconsin Rapids and Stevens
Point. Some members
use every Wednesday
night dance as a date
night, or a time to break
away from the daily and
weekly routine of their
jobs and other chores to
spend time with others
in a fun, active and social
event. That is what the
Marshfield HoeDowners
Square Dance club of-

fers.
The club does more
than you might expect.
There are monthly potluck dinners, pie and ice
cream socials, an annual
food drive, service dances at area retirement centers, a camperee in the
fall, holiday theme dances, a real barn dance, and
a day of snowshoeing to
only mention a few.
Come and see what
square dancing is all
about. We invite the general public to the Marshfield HoeDowners open
house and free nights of
dance instructions on
two Wednesdays, Jan. 20
and Jan. 27, at the Lincoln Town Hall, located
on Falcon Road just
south of CTH H, near the
Marshfield
Speedway
beginning at 7:30 p.m.

You are invited to come,


watch the dancers and
enjoy the friendliness of
the club. All guests can
give square dancing a
try. If you cannot make
Jan. 20, give it a try on
Jan. 27.
After watching and
seeing how much fun
square dancing can be,
come each week to continue with the progressive instructions.
Its
fun, good exercise and a
night out with good people at a low cost. Come
and join us. No special
clothing or attire required; just a desire to
have fun with friendly
people.
For more information
contact Terry or Cindy
Prust at (715) 659-4692 or
prustc@hotmail.com.

Abby Lions donate to Cub Scouts


Abbotsford Lions Bonnie Weix and Karen LaPine, in back, present a donation to Cub Scouts Pack
321. Accepting the check is den leader Dawn Esselman. Also pictured are Scouts Gunner Graves,
Jack Esselman and Wade Davis.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

Page 12

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Sports

Abby boys win at Prentice,


fall to Stratford at home

Falcon girls
suffer big
loss away to
Assumption

Coach says
turnovers
hurt chances
at winning
The Abby boys basketball team held
off a stingy Prentice ball club last Tuesday night to come away with a 59-52 victory.
Garrett Rau scored 11 of his game high
30 points in the first half to help the Falcons hold the lead at half, 28-24. Tyler
Kunze and Garrett Rau were the only
two Falcons to have a field goal in the second half but the two came through big
for Abby, scoring 27 second half points
combined to improve the Falcons to 2-1
in conference and 3-3 overall.
Garrett Rau led all scorers with 30
points, Tyler Kunze scored 17, Treven
Gorst eight, and Adam Seefluth and Ean
Rau scored two each.
On Tuesday evening, the boys faced
Stratford at home and lost the game, 5044.
Gorst led the scoring for the Falcons,
earning 20 points, followed by Garrett
Rau, who scored 18. Kunze earned six
points for Abbotsford.
Abbotsford was able to keep Stratford
to a narrow lead through most of the second half of the game.
I thought defensively we played a very
sound game, Falcons coach Brad Podevels said.
For the offensive side, Podevels cited
sloppy shooting as the reason for the
game slipping away. I thought we played
hard, but couldnt limit turnovers, he
said. This cost us at the end of the game.
We took some silly shots we didnt need
to take and turned the ball over too many
times. You cant do that against a good
team like Stratford.
On Jan. 7 the team will face the Edgar
Wildcats at home. The boys take to the
road Jan. 15 to play against the Rib Lake
Redmen.
The boys Marawood north conference
standing so far this season is 3-4.

The Abbotsford girls basketball


teams travelled to Wisconsin Rapids Tuesday and played Assumption
Catholic, losing 70-24.
Assumption is one of the best
teams in the state and when you dont
match their intensity, you will struggle, Falcons coach Gary Gunderson
said. The whole night was a struggle
for us.
Makenzie Klieforth led the scoring
for the Falcons, with ten points and
six rebounds. Samanta Fuentes and
Erika Budzinski each earned four
points. Jaelyn Friedenfels, Kelsea
Kollmansberger and Dylana Schreiner completed Abbotsfords scoring,
each adding two points to the board.
Klieforth had a good game for us,
Gunderson said. But otherwise, we
werent ready to play.
The Falcons girls will play against
the Edgar Wildcats at home Jan. 5.

BOWLING
BOWL WINKLES II
MONDAY SENIORS
DECEMBER 28, 2015
High game men: Rick Ottum, 213; Bob Wolfe, 173;
Ron Schoelzol.
High game women: Mary Griepentrog, 168; Emerita
Phillips, 167; Karen Winkler, 163.
High series men: Rick Ottum, 600; Mark Frey, 465; Jim
Schiferl, 436.
High series women: Mary Griepentrog, 500; Emerita
Phillips, 461; Karen Winkler, 460.

WEVE GOT NEWS FOR

YOU

From editorials and classifieds to local events


and the latest sports stats, we keep you
current with reliable reporting and
entertaining coverage.

ONE MORE ATTEMPT - Garrett Rau tries to put one more shot into the hoop
late in the second half of the game Tuesday against Stratford. Tigers defender
Derrick Schmidt thwarts Raus efforts as he blocks his shot like a giant nutcracker.
STAFF PHOTO/CHRISTIAN PARKER

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Tribune-Phonograph

Page 13

Colby boys, girls fall to Bruce Mound opens


Edgar in doubleheader tubing hill today
Both of Colbys basketball teams
traveled to Edgar Tuesday night for
nonconference games against the
Wildcats.
The girls fell to the hosts by a score
of 49-56, and the boys lost 33-65.
In the girls game, senior Jenna Jicinsky led the Hornets in scoring
with 18 points, including two from the
free-throw line. Fellow senior Sammi
Hayes put up 14 points on the night, followed by senior Paige Bruesewitz with
a three-pointer and two points from inside the paint.
The Hornets were able to pull down
35 rebounds during the game and steal
the ball 10 times, but the Wildcats still
won the turnover ratio by a lot.
Hornets coach Randy Rau said he
gives his players a lot of credit for never giving up on the game and working
until the final seconds.
The girls struggled with the full
court pressure early, he said. When
they got it figured out we did a nice job
of getting the game back to within one
to two points.
The girls return home next Monday,
Jan. 4, for a game against the Thorp
Cardinals at 7:30 p.m., followed by a

Jan. 7 game in Marshfield against Columbus Catholic.


The boys fell behind early and never
got a chance to catch up with the highscoring Wildcats offense. The score
was 45-17 in Edgars favor after the
first half, and the hosts added another
20 points in the second with Colby adding 16.
The Hornets offense was led by Tony
Ortega, who landed a pair of threepointers in the first half and then added two more points in the second.
Nate Meyer also hit two shots from
outside the paint and went one for
three at the free-throw line. Matthew
Karl went four for four at the charity
stripe. As a team, the Hornets made
eight of their 16 free-throw attempts.
By comparison, Edgars top two
shooters tallied a total of 22 points on
the night and the team went seven for
seven at the free-throw line.
The boys begin the new year with a
four-game road stretch, starting with
a trip to Neillsville next Tuesday, Jan.
5, at 7:30 p.m. to take on the Warriors.
The Hornets will then take on Spencer
on Jan. 8, Thorp on Jan. 11 and Loyal
on Jan. 14.

After a nearly snowless December,


the Bruce Mound Winter Sports Area
in southern Clark County was eager to
announce the opening of its snow tubing hill following Monday nights snowstorm.
Its been a late start to the winter
sports season, and early snowmaking
attempts at Bruce Mound were washed
away by rain, says a press release from
the Clark County Forest and Parks Department, which operates the winter
sports area. It seems Old Man Winter
has decided to make up for the absence
of snow this week.
The tubing hill officially opened
Wednesday morning, and Bruce
Mounds beginner ski hill it set to open
this Saturday, Jan. 2, at 10 a.m.
From now until Sunday, the tubing
hill will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

and then will return to normal hours on


Jan. 8, which are Friday evenings from
5 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Feb. 27.
More information on Bruce Mound is
available at the Clark County website,
www.co.clark.wi.us.
Also this week, the county announced
that its county forest ATV trails will reopen as of Friday, Jan. 1, though riders
are urged to use caution as sections may
still be soft and vulnerable to damage.
UTVs are not allowed on the countys
ATV trail system from Nov. 1 to May 14.
The countys snowmobile trails remain closed at this point.
The trails are subject to periodic closure. Updates on recent closures and
openings are available at the county
website or by calling the Forestry and
Parks Department at 715-743-5140.

TUBIN TIME - Clark County announced earlier this week that the tubing hill
at Bruce Mound Winter Recreation Area would open Wednesday and stay
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the rest of this week.
TP FILE PHOTO

PRINTED NEWSPAPER
SUBSCRIPTIONS
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the south
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Abbotsford
a girl,
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system virtually elimina
tral Boil A Central Boiler outdoo
a chari Rietseason,
can pay
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heating
By
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tree. They a boy or
.
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ing abou
system
said
Thur
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water.
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existing
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these tough
new or home and hot a Central Boiler
aKause, this tough
t child she began
choos
worth sday dona
use.* In sense.
ren
your
costs,
think
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and
Chris
years of
good
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tmases who will
to sick nearly $200 family,
rst few just makes
your heating
the oiler.com
in the
that
children
she
this year. have
pedia
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wood
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for itself
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cost of
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ity, and
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are dependen
fuel being
savings
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purch
her
ar girls
ed to makeheld.
*Actual the cost of the
somehow,
Boiler
money
with
Central
and
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2011
said Heide a differ
wanted
sister
gifts with
st. Heide ys holid
Schreiber,
n. We ence nated , Kaitlyn,
a charit patients at
have a the kids in
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and Rach
her
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do this,
be best
After
e pair
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ty for the to ask me decided tball game
chilto knoc
, the
for
dona
scary
at rst, tions. It k on doors
they said. was a little

Ag en
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State wo
uld

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46,950 Listings
*

Please Call 715-223-2342 for Credit Card Payments. All classifieds must be prepaid.

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Deadlines subject to change during holiday weeks

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Automotive
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Agriculture (Misc.)
Card of Thanks
Farm Equip./Machinery
For Rent
Free/Give Away
Help Wanted
Livestock
Miscellaneous
Notices
Real Estate
Wanted to Buy
Work Wanted/Services

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Monday 4:00 p.m. TC SN TRG TP & The RR CS
Thursday Noon: WCWS (Thorp)
SNS (Medford) CWS

TP PRINTING CO.
PO Box 677, 103 W. Spruce St.,
Abbotsford, WI 54405
classsub@tpprinting.com
715-223-2342 Fax: 715-223-3505
www.centralwinews.com

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HELP WANTED

1110 N. Division Street, Colby, WI 54421


715.223.2200 www.pineridgeliving.com

EOE

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS


Clark County Rehabilitation and Living Center, located
just outside of Owen on County Road X, is seeking Certified
Nursing Assistants to join our unique organization.
We have openings on all three shifts and will be taking
applications for both full and part-time positions.
CCRLC is a long-term care facility with specialty in
alzheimers, dementia, rehabilitation, behavioral and
custodial care.
Previous experience in long-term care desired, but we will
provide training to motivated applicants. Drug screening,
caregiver background check, and current WI certification
required for all selected candidates.
CCRLC offers an excellent salary and benefit package.
Application available at:
http://www.co.clark.wi.us/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/68
For further information, contact
Karen Simington, DON, at 715-229-2172, extension 217.

# Weeks
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
_______
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AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY At
Roland Kanneberg Villa, 200-201
N. Eighth Street in Abbotsford,
to accommodate agricultural
processing workers, 2 & 3 bedrooms, rent starts at $455. Owner
paid heat, water, sewer & trash
removal. Certain restrictions apply. For more information please
contact Impact Seven, Inc. at
855-316-8967 or 715-357-0011.
EHO.

Interested applicants can


apply in person at Pine Ridge
Assisted Living in Colby or visit
www.pineridgeliving.com to
print an application.

50-176693

Address ______________________________________________________________

AVAILABLE NOW. One bedroom


apartments at Withee Housing,
Withee. Eligible applicants must
be 62 or disabled. Appliances
and some utilities included.
Building features community
room, car plug-ins, and laundry
facilities. Tenant pay 30% of adjusted monthly income. For an
application please contact: Impact Seven, Inc. at 855-316-8967
or 715-357-0011. EHO. impact@
impactseven.org.

CAREGIVERS

Applications will be accepted until Friday, January 15.

Name ________________________________________________________________

FOR RENT - Marathon, 4 bedroom ranch home, natural gas


heat, new furnace, near schools,
attached garage, also detached
garage. No pets. Located 2 miles
from Marathon. Available 1-1-16.
Please call 715-443-2347 or 715581-1929.

COME JOIN OUR TEAM!


NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
50-176670

Submit resume or application (available in the Clerk's


office or on our website, www.dorchesterwi.com,
under the 'Forms & Permits' tab), references, and
salary requirements to the Dorchester Clerk's office,
228 W. Washington Ave., Dorchester, WI 54425.

HELP WANTED

AVAILABLE AT Green Acres


Terrace in Colby. 2 bedroom,
1 bath for $550 for 11/1/15. Includes lot rent. Utilities not included. Cats considered, sorry
no dogs. Vacant lots for $225.
Colby, WI. 715-340-2116.

W4266 CTH X, Owen, WI 54460-8932


Clark County is an ADA/CRC/EEO Employer.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 15

DOGS-CATS-PETS

WANTED TO BUY

HELP WANTED

GERMAN SHEPHERD Puppy,


black female, 9 weeks, parents
on site, ears already standing,
shots, dewormed, Marathon
area, $300. 715-680-0318.

AKC
GERMAN
Shorthaired
Pointer puppies, 10 weeks old,
males, $400, good with children,
all shots and vet checked. 715654-5089.

WANTED: GUNS - new and


used. Turn them into ca$h or
trade for a new one! Shay Creek
in Medford, 715-748-2855.

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS For


waitress and cook. Apply in person, Abby Cafe, Abbotsford.

GET YOUR online subscription to the


Tribune-Phonograph, The RecordReview or The TRG (Tribune Record
Gleaner) and you wont have to wait
for it to come in the mail. They are
available Wednesday afternoon. Go
to www.centralwinews.com today to
subscribe.

ENGLISH SETTER Puppies, 2


males and 1 female, all vaccinations to date, great grouse dogs.
Dan, 715-257-1461.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FOX TERRIER Cross puppies


free to good home. 715-6545435.

FOR SALE
DINETTE SET, 2 extension leaves
and 4 chairs, $50. 715-255-9053.
FOR SALE. Feeder pigs, 25-35
lbs. Holstein feeder steers, 550700 lbs., fed whole corn and
pellets mix and some hay. 715581-6403.

NOTICES

We are looking for a


Cheese Packaging Plant Manager

51-176910

Responsibilities for this position will include ensuring


food safety, work load balance, scheduling, training, basic
troubleshooting and performance feedback while following
and holding company employees accountable to company
policies and standard operating procedures.
The ideal candidate will need to possess the following
skills:
Must be a self starter.
Strong written and verbal communication skills.
Ability to troubleshoot, problem solve, and
correct problems.
Excellent people skills.
Knowledge of food safety.
Packaging experience.
Demonstrated leadership experience.
To
apply,
please
send
your
resume
to
northhendren@ceas.coop or apply in person at North
Hendren Co-op Dairy, Willard, Wis. 715-267-6617.

NOW HIRING
growingtogether
Land OLakes, Inc., a cheese-processing plant in central
Wisconsin, has the following employment opportunities:

Maintenance Mechanics:
Class C or Above
Applications will be taken until Jan. 5, 2016
Apply in person between the hours of 7:30
a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at 306 Park St., Spencer, WI.
Or e-mail rsum to: cwcasey@landolakes.com

TECHNICAL TRAINING OR PREVIOUS


MAINTENANCE MECHANIC EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED REQUIRED
Ideal candidates will have knowledge and hands-on experience
in the following areas: Electrical, Mechanical, Hydraulics,
Pneumatics, Plumbing, Refrigeration, and General Repair.
The ideal candidate must be able to pursue job assignments
completely, thoroughly, with safe, efcient plant operations.
Must be able to pass forklift training test and safely operate. Must
have knowledge of OSHA safety procedures normally acquired
during on-the-job training. Must furnish own hand tools.
Mandatory that applicant be available for work assignment to any
of three (3) shifts within a 24-hour production operation. Final
shift assignment will be determined upon hire. Must be available
for voluntary and scheduled overtime as well as extended hours
and weekend work as assigned.
Land OLakes offers medical, dental and vision insurance,
short-term disability benets, and shift differential. Successful
candidates will need to complete a mandated drug screen, preemployment physical assessment and background check.

Land OLakes, Inc.


306 Park St., Spencer, WI 54479

AFTER CHRISTMAS Specials.


Das Deutsch Eck, W705 Colby
Factory Road, Colby. 715-2234573. 25-50% off rubber stamps.
Free grab bag with $50 purchase. Some limits and exceptions. December 28-31. Open
January 1, 3-7 p.m.
CATCH US ON THE WEB. Visit www.
centralwinews.com to view featured stories from The Tribune-Phonograph and The Record-Review.
Local advertisers also available on
www.centralwinews.com.

Caregivers Come Join Our Team


COUNTRY TERRACE OF WISCONSIN
in Stratford has full & part-time positions available. Previous experience is not needed. We will
provide all the training and certificates that are required. We offer a number of benefits. A fun
homelike environment with competitive wages. Background check required per DHS83. EOE
Please apply at:

Country Terrace
of Wisconsin
808 N. 3rd Ave., Stratford, WI 54484

STONE SETTER. All types masonry, brick, block and stone,


stone walls, basement, barns.
715-897-4177.

www.carepartners-countryterrace.com

HELP WANTED
MEYER MANUFACTURING Corporation is accepting applications for laser and press brake
area leader, prior leadership
experience or machine operation and technology experience
desired, pay based on qualifications. Also accepting applications for a qualified laser operator, press brake operator, CNC
machinist and welders - start at
up to $16.75/hr. and general labor and assemblers - $14/hr. All
positions include excellent benefits - paid vacation, 6% match
401K, (4) 10 hr./day work week,
tuition reimbursement, health
insurance and profit sharing. Apply online at meyermfg.com or in
person at Meyer Mfg. Corp, 574
West Center Ave., Dorchester,
WI.

See our website for further information:


52-177095

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are currently accepting applications for experienced shop & field installation
personnel. Preferred candidates need to have experience in
stainless steel welding, fabricating and pipe fitting.
We offer:

Competitive Wages
Vacation
Overtime
Personal Days
7 Paid Holidays
401K (Company Contribution)

Apply at:

46-175622

Subsistence Pay
Full Wage Travel Time
Doubletime on Sundays
Health Insurance
Paid Hotels

CUSTOM
FABRICATING
& REPAIR, INC.

PRODUCTION
ASSOCIATES
Wausau Window and Wall Systems, an industry leader in engineered window and curtainwall systems, is seeking to add production associates in both facilities! We have openings on
2nd shift in Wausau and openings on 2nd and
3rd shift in Stratford!
Wausau Window and Wall Systems offers a
great starting wage of $14.75/hour plus a $0.40/
hour shift differential. We also offer a competitive benefit package including medical, dental,
prescription and vision coverage, vacation, personal time, 10 paid holidays/year, 401(k) and
stock purchase plans, life and disability plans,
incentive plan and tuition reimbursement.
To apply, visit us at www.wausauwindow.com
and click on the Careers link. Wausau Window
and Wall Systems is a division of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. and we are an Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer Women/Minorities/
Protected Veterans/Individuals with Disabilities
are encouraged to apply.

Process Systems Engineering Installation &


Custom Fabrication Specialist for the Food,
Dairy and Pharmaceutical Industry.
1932 E. 26th, P.O. Box 296,
Marshfield, WI 54449
Or call for an appointment (715) 387-6598
or (800) 236-8773.

Construction Lead
Opportunities
Medford, WI

$2,000 Sign on Bonus


Lester Buildings, a leader in post-frame (pole barn
construction has an exciting full-time carpentry opportunity,
and a Construction Lead opening based out of the Medford,
WI area. We are a safety conscious, quality-minded, team
oriented company.
Construction Lead Candidates: responsibilities include
planning, organizing and supervising the construction of all
buildings while supervising a 3-4 member crew and ensure
all safety policies and procedures are followed.
Qualied candidates must have a minimum of 5 years
carpentry, 2 years post frame and experience in a working
supervisory role. Must have valid drivers license and meet
driving criteria guidelines.
Pay is competitive and based on experience. Full-time
employees will also receive a full benets package, incentive/
bonus plans, computer and company truck. Come join our
team and help build someones dream!

Apply online at www.lesterbuildings.com


(Construction Lead Medford posting)
51-176911

52-177085

EOE M/F/D/V

TRUCK DRIVER Wanted for grain


hopper division, home weekends. Saturday morning mechanic. Looking for drivers, also
home daily route. 715-571-9623.

Witmer
mer Furniture is looking for people in our
saw and assembly departments. First shift,
competitive wages, Mon.-Fri., 6 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Will train the right individuals.
Apply in person at
200 S. 11th St., Abbotsford, WI 54405

WORK WANTED

Land OLakes, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity and Afrmative


Action Employer. We enforce a policy of maintaining a drug-free
workplace, including pre-employment substance abuse testing.
52-177105

HELP WANTED. Part/full time


farm help. Milking, cleaning,
some calf work and feeding.
Owen. Call 715-613-3510.

51-176849

DOGS-CATS-PETS

EEO Employer Female/Minority/Veteran/Disabled/Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity

Page 16

Tribune-Phonograph

Calendars

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Election

2016-2017 CALENDAR-SCHOOL DISTRICT OF COLBY

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1

to do something, you say it doesnt work


because of the calendar.
Board president Bill Tesmer suggested
that Kolden could perhaps host a meeting of area superintendents to discuss
calendar alignments.
If you cant get superintendents on
board, youre fighting an uphill battle,
and it doesnt get the parents involved,
he said.
Kolden agreed to bring the proposed
2016-2017 calendar to the Jan. 18 meeting
in a format that can be edited according
to the board members wishes.
At a joint meeting of the two neighboring school boards in October, officials
from both districts said calendar alignment should be possible.
Abbotsford board president Don Medenwaldt said the idea of aligning the calendars has come up quite a bit in past
discussions about collaborating.
It would require some degree of undoing by each district to make things
mesh, he said. Its not impossible, but
change comes hard sometimes.
As written, both districts plan to start
the 2016-2017 school year on Sept. 1 for
students, with Colbys last day of school
one day later (June 2) than Abbotsfords,
on June 1. Both districts plan to release
students early on the last day of class.
To provide adequate time for parentteacher conferences, Colby schools will
also release students early on Oct. 20 and
March 2, while Abbotsford schools only
do this once on Oct. 5.
Abby also has early-release days set
for Nov. 18, Feb. 17 and March 17, and
three full days of no classes for teacher
in-service training: Oct. 6, Jan. 20 and
April 13.
Board member Eric Elmhorst, a teacher in the Abbotsford School District,
said the Colby school board should forge
ahead with aligning its calendar to other
area districts, and let Abbotsford be
their island if they want to keep theirs
the same.
How many times have we said Next
year? he said. We sound like the Milwaukee Brewers.

23

18

SCHOOL DAYS - Above is the Colby School Districts


proposed 2016-2017 calendar, and below is the Abbotsford School Districts 2016-2017 calendar, as approved
at an October board meeting.

Shortage
Continued from page 6
that it is a 668 square mile region with a
population of 28,155. This equates to 42.1
persons per square mile. This region of
the county has the youngest median age,
38.4 years old. The Heart of America has
16 homes per square mile with the countys largest household size, 2.72 people.
Members of the county comprehensive plan task force besides Gibbs
include supervisors Charles Soukup,
Arnold Schlei, John Robinson, Sandi Cihlar, John Durham, Craig McEwen, Ken
Day and Matt Hildebrandt.
The text of the county comprehensive
plan draft is at the Marathon County
website. Citizens are invited to comment
on the plan.

EXCELLENCE IN CHIROPRACTIC AND WELLNESS CARE

FROSTWOOD APARTMENTS in COLBY

Landmark

Back and Neck Care


Extremity Care
Spinal Decompression
Carpal Tunnel Care
Disc Conditions

TFEV-502007

For showing and application:

Serving the Abbotsford and Colby


communities for 25 years, Im proud to deliver
quality Chiropractic and Wellness Care.
TMJ Treatment
Laser Treatment
Wellness Care
Work Comp Care
Auto Accidents

Dr. Robin G. Frank, D.C.


601 E Spruce Street
Abbotsford, WI 54405

C O M PA N Y

Call FRANK at 920-765-0133 or 1-800-924-3256


LANDMARK COMPANY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER

(715) 223-6308

IS YOUR FORKLIFT GETTING OLD?


IS IT COSTING TOO MUCH TO REPAIR?
Hyundai Lease Rates As Low As 2.5%, 0 Payments in Advance,
Best Warranties
Gas LP
Electric
Diesel
3-55,000
Capacity

901 Main Street, Marathon, WI 54448

715-843-LIFT (5438)

www.alliedhealthchiro.com

TF-500249

AVAILABLE ONE & TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS


FOR RENT. Rents from $477 includes water, sewer,
garbage and hot water. On-site coin laundry. On-site
Caretaker. No AGE restrictions.
TF-500240

cumbent council members Ward 3


Ald. Nancy OBrien, Ward 2 Ald. Todd
Schmidt and Ward 1 Ald. Jason Thieme
are all up for reelection. If no one registers to be on the ballot as a replacement
for Hamm, the council will need to appoint someone to fill the vacated seat.
Jeff Kolzow, the District 10 representative on the Clark County Board of
Supervisors from the Colby area, has
also declared his intent not to run for reelection. Resident Bryce Luchterhand is
the only registered candidate so far to fill
that seat.
Three incumbents on Colby School
Board Jennifer Lopez, Eric Elmhorst
and Lavinia Bonacker have all registered their intent to run for reelection.
As of Monday, no challengers have filed
campaign papers.
Two Abbotsford School Board incumbents, Andy Baldus and Gary Schraufnagel, are also running for reelection. To
date, no challengers have officially come
forward.
Curtiss has scheduled its spring caucus for Jan. 5 at 5:30 p.m., and Dorchester
will have its caucus the following night,
Jan. 6 at 7 p.m., prior to the monthly village board meeting.

www.forkliftmgmt.com

We Deal In Solutions

Colby School District

Winter Community Education Classes


The Colby School District Community Education
catalog is available on the website at:

Let us help you care


for your loved one
for a short time.

Ceramics

Love,
L
ove,
Mom, D
Mom,
Dad,
ad John, Ali,
Conrad,
& Hazel
Conr
Co
nrad
ad,
d, Warren
W

Financial Planning
Create-a-Card
Registration forms are available on the
he website or at the District
Ofce (505 W. Spence St.) and must be returned with payment.
Please feel free to contact Kristen Seifert, Community Education
Coordinator, at 715-223-2301, ext. 2 or by email at
kseifert@colby.k12.wi.us if you have any questions.

52-177103

715.223.2352

Water Aerobics

52-176132

702 West Dolf Street Colby, WI 54421

Class offerings include:


Swim Lessons

December
D
eccem
30th
52-177022

Medication management
Assistance with bathing,
personal grooming and
toileting when needed
Semi-private and
private rooms

Click on the Parents/Community tab and then


Community Education.

Lucinda

We offer respite care for up to 30 days.


Call for room availability.
Three meals a day plus snacks
24-hr. skilled nursing
supervision
Daily housekeeping and
laundry services
Planned activities

www.colby.k12.wi.us

H
Happy
Bi
Birthday