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RUNNING HEAD: HUSH UNIT PORTFOLIO PROJECT

Honors U.S History Unit Portfolio Project


Michelle Voykovic
Allatoona High School

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

1A Political
STANDARDS
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th
century.
a. Explain the development of the House of Burgesses, Bacons Rebellion, and the development
of slavery.
b. the establishment of town meetings and development of a legislature, the loss of the
Massachusetts charter and the transition to a royal colony.
c. Explain the development of the mid-Atlantic colonies; include the Dutch settlement of New
Amsterdam and subsequent English takeover, and the settlement of Pennsylvania.
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution.
a. Explain how the end of Anglo-French imperial competition as seen in the French and Indian
War and the 1763 Treaty of Paris laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.
b. Explain colonial response to such British actions as the Proclamation of 1763, the Stamp Act,
and the Intolerable Acts as seen in Sons and Daughters of Liberty and Committees of
Correspondence.
The development of Virginia propelled the development of twelve more colonies on the
east coast of America. The development of a structured government was quickly underway with
the establishment of the House of Burgesses and a legislature. This was a huge step considering
how far they had come from the Mayflower Compact. During this time Britain practiced
salutary neglect, letting the colonies do what they needed to do with little government
interruption. Great Britain later realized it still needed the colonies under its hand, economically
mostly, and started controlling different aspects of life in the New World, commonly by placing
taxes. Massachusetts was one colony that didnt agree with the new rules, which eventually led
to the revoking of its charter. Refusing to obey the Navigation Acts, Massachusetts became a
royal colony in which they were indirectly subject to the rule of the monarch. As soon as other
countries saw the potential in the colonies, they gained interest. For a short period of the time,
the Dutch settled present-day New Your City, calling it New Amsterdam. The British, of course
wanting more land, simply told the Dutch they would fight for the colony and the Dutch werent
willing to put up the same fight resulting in their loss. Lord Baltimore and John Oglethorpe, to
name a few, are credited with the founding of the thirteen colonies.
Vocab
John Smith
Roger Williams
William Penn
John Winthrop
Patrick Henry
John Adams
Benjamin Franklin
James Oglethorpe

Lord Baltimore
Sam Adams
John Hancock
Benedict Arnold
Bacons Rebellion
House of Burgesses
Mayflower Compact
Proprietary Colony

1A Social

Royal Colony
Salutary Neglect
First Continental Congress
Treaty of Paris 1763
Albany Plan of Union
New Amsterdam
Boston Tea Party

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

STANDARDS
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th
century.
b. Describe the settlement of New England; include religious reasons, relations with Native
Americans (e.g., King Phillips War), religious tensions that led to the founding of Rhode Island,
and Salem Witch Trials.
SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North
America developed.
c. Identify Benjamin Franklin as a symbol of social mobility and individualism.
d. Explain the significance of the Great Awakening.
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution.
c. Explain the importance of Thomas Paines Common Sense to the movement for independence.
The people that migrated to the New World wanted religious, economic, and political freedom,
but most importantly, they wanted a fresh start. Most of these people were poor back in England
and were drowning in their own debt. America promised hope in new beginnings without the
weight of the government on their shoulders. Although America did provide these things, there
were some occurrences they didnt expect. The Native Americans were a big problem for these
people because they needed to settle but the Natives kept resisting their efforts. Many wars broke
out as a result of the ongoing conflicts, with King Phillips War being one of the biggest. Now
that the puritans were free to practice their religion, they were very closed-minded when it came
to accepting people with different beliefs. These outliers, also known as radicals, were sent to
Rhode Island which has a notorious reputation for being troublesome. Roger Williams and
Anne Hutchinson were both radicals sent to Rhode Island for standing up for their religious
beliefs. The idea of witches was popular diagnosis for these outsiders. The majority made these
people do horrific things to test if they were evil, and would commonly end in death, known as
the Salem Witch Trials. Eventually, the pilgrims were becoming a worldlier people which
sparked the Great Awakening. Speakers from all over the country would talk about the
repulsions they were subject to if they didnt keep God in the center of their lives.
Vocab
Roger Williams
Anne Hutchinson
George Whitfield
Thomas Paine
Lord Baltimore
Christopher Columbus
Great Awakening
Half-way Covenant

King Philips War


Powhatan
Puritans
Quakers
French and Indian War
Proclamation of 1763
Pontiacs Rebellion
Pilgrims/Separatists

1A Economic

Salem Witch Trials


Sons of Liberty
Committees of
Correspondence
Common Sense
Quartering Act
Boston Massacre

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

STANDARDS
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North
America during the 17th century.
a. Explain Virginias development; include the Virginia Company, tobacco
cultivation, and relationships with Native Americans such as Powhatan, and
the development of slavery.
b. Describe the half-way covenant.
d. Explain the reasons for French settlement of Quebec.
e. Analyze the impact of location and place on colonial settlement,
transportation, and economic development; include the southern, middle,
and New England colonies.
SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and
society of British North America developed.
a. Explain the development of mercantilism and the trans-Atlantic trade.
b. Describe the Middle Passage, growth of the African population and AfricanAmerican culture.
American began to flourish with the first successful settlement at
Jamestown, VA granted by a charter from the king and founded by the
Virginia Company. This attempt at settlement conquered previous ones
due to the navigable rivers and harbors, and more fertile soil overall.
Investors initiated this settlement for the sole purpose of wealth. Because of
this, the first colonists were not well equipped for what would happen if no
gold was found. This was the case for the first few years, along with
disagreements with the Native Americans. A war broke out between the
settlers and the natives led by Chief Powhatan which resulted unfortunate
when it came time for the settlers to learn how to live off the land. The
terrible times persisted until John Rolfe came into the picture with the
tobacco crop. Tobacco grew abundantly and provided a huge profit, enough
to sustain the population at the time. Because harvesting tobacco was such
a tedious job, the need for labor was intense. This is when slavery came into
play. In the beginning, most workers were indentured servants from
England needing to pay off their debt but soon Blacks from Africa became
the main source of labor. They were bought, sold, and traded by white
settlers, however pacified the need for workers. The slaves were part of the
Triangle Slave Trade in which the Americas would give Europe raw
materials, Europe would sell the finished products to Africa, and Africa would
give slaves to the Americas.
Vocab
John Rolfe
Patrick Henry
Christopher
Columbus

James Oglethorpe
Cash Crop/Staple
Crop
Virginia Company

Indentured Servant
Joint Stock Company
Mercantilism

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Middle Passage /
Triangle Slave Trade
Navigation Acts
Stamp Act

Intolerable Acts
/Coercive Acts
Daughters of Liberty
Northwest Passage

Townshend Acts
Chief Powhatan

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

1B Political
SSUSH4 The student will identify the ideological, military, and diplomatic aspects of the
American Revolution.
a. Explain the language, organization, and intellectual sources of the Declaration of
Independence; include the writing of John Locke and the role of Thomas Jefferson.
b. Explain the reason for and significance of the French alliance and foreign assistance and the
roles of Benjamin Franklin and the Marquis de Lafayette.
c. Analyze George Washington as a military leader; include the creation of a professional
military and the life of a common soldier, and describe the significance of the crossing of the
Delaware River and Valley Forge.
d. Explain the role of geography at the Battle of Yorktown, the role of Lord Cornwallis, and the
Treaty of Paris, 1783.
SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that brought about the
adoption and implementation of the United States Constitution.
a. Explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation and Daniel Shays Rebellion led to a
call for a stronger central government.
b. Evaluate the major arguments of the anti-Federalists and Federalists during the debate on
ratification of the Constitution as put forth in The Federalist concerning form of government,
factions, checks and balances, and the power of the executive, including the roles of Alexander
Hamilton and James Madison.
c. Explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically the Great Compromise, separation of
powers (influence of Montesquieu), limited government, and the issue of slavery.
d. Analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights.
e. Explain the importance of the Presidencies of George Washington and John Adams; include
the non-intervention in Europe, and the development of political parties (Alexander Hamilton).
SSUSH6 The student will analyze the impact of territorial expansion and population
growth and the impact of this growth in the early decades of the new nation.
b. Describe Jeffersons diplomacy in obtaining the Louisiana Purchase from France and the
territorys exploration by Lewis and Clark.
c. Explain major reasons for the War of 1812 and the wars significance on the development of a
national identity.
The Revolutionary War marked the beginning of new era in the colonies. The odds were
not in Americas favor because of their small military numbers, amateur strategies, supplies, etc.
George Washington, a highly skilled military leader, did phenomenal job leading the American
army against British forces. When morale started to fade, Washington would surprise everyone
with a victory. This was evident at Valley Forge when supplies were at an all-time low and
disease was at an all-time high. Washington was able to lead his troops in the famous Crossing
the Delaware. At the time, the task seemed so impossible because there was no hope. This
boosted the spirit of the soldiers immensely and helped them continue forward in the battle of
their lives. Towards the end of the war, the French intervened on the American side and defeated

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

the British. Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, VA on October 19, 1781 guaranteeing


American Independence. Because of the trouble Britains demanding government caused in the
colonies, America was trying to avoid a strong central government at all costs. This is when the
Federalist and Anti-Federalist views came in. There were times when the government was so
weak, events like Shays Rebellion occurred. This set a precedent for a stronger, more efficient
control rather than a limited government. The American government was taking steps to
becoming stronger and more efficient.
VOCAB
Federalist
Anti-Federalist
Checks and Balances
Great Compromise
Separation of Powers
Bill of Rights
Limited Government
Cabinet
Saratoga/Yorktown
Treaty of Paris 1783
Land Ordinance 1785
Northwest Ordinance 1787
Constitutional Convention
Democratic Republican
Party
Federalists Party
Sons of Liberty
Committees of
Correspondence

Bicameral Congress
First Continental Congress
Militia
Second Continental
Congress
Natural Rights
Virginia Plan
New Jersey Plan
Popular Sovereignty
Electoral College
Precedent
Loose Construction
Strict Construction
XYZ Affair
Alien and Sedition Acts
Virginia and Kentucky
Resolutions
Impressment
War Hawks

War of 1812
Judicial Review
John Adams
Alexander Hamilton
George Washington
John Locke
Lord Cornwallis
John Jay
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
Benjamin Franklin
Marquis de Lafayette
Patrick Henry
Aaron Burr
Articles of Confederation
Declaration of
Independence
The Federalist Papers
Constitution

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

1B Social
STANDARDS
SSUSH4 The student will identify the ideological, military, and diplomatic aspects of the
American Revolution.
a. Explain the language, organization, and intellectual sources including the writing of John
Locke and Baron Montesquieu of the Declaration of Independence.
c. Analyze George Washington as a military leader; include the life of a common soldier, and
describe the significance of the crossing of the Delaware River and Valley Forge.
d. Explain the role of geography at the Battle of Yorktown, the role of Lord Cornwallis, and the
Treaty of Paris, 1783.
SSUSH6 The student will analyze the impact of territorial expansion and population
growth and the impact of this growth in the early decades of the new nation.
a. Explain the Northwest Ordinances importance in the westward migration of Americans,
and on slavery, public education, and the addition of new states.
The Revolutionary War was a golden topic for writers at the time. People all over the country
had mixed feelings about entering into combat and others simply werent informed. Authors like
Thomas Paine, John Locke, and Baron Montesquieu used their pens to uncover the reality of
the situation along with their personal opinions. Their work was read all over the colonies and
even in England. They gave colonists perspective and let them form their own ideas. John
Lockes writing was so potent that it laid as the foundation for the Declaration of Independence.
During the war, George Washingtons leadership inspired soldiers to keep fighting and boosted
the morale back at the Homefront. At Valley Forge, the most devastating stop for Americans in
the war, Washington was able to get his troops back on their feet by reminding them of their
cause. There was a sense of nationalism arising in America. Several years after the war, during
westward migration and under the Articles of Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance was put
into place. This set up a system that allowed territories south of the Great Lakes region and
outside of the thirteen colonies to become states based on their population. This type of
settlement paved the way for education and even the abolition of slavery.
VOCAB
Valley Forge
Three Fifths Compromise
Common Sense
Boston Massacre
Precedent
John Locke
Thomas Paine
Baron de Montesquieu

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

1B Economic
STANDARDS
SSUSH4 The student will identify the ideological, military, and diplomatic aspects of the
American Revolution.
d. Explain the Treaty of Paris, 1783.
SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that brought about the
adoption and implementation of the United States Constitution.
e. Explain the importance of the Whiskey Rebellion
SSUSH6 The student will analyze the impact of territorial expansion and population
growth and the impact of this growth in the early decades of the new nation.
a. Explain the Northwest Ordinances importance in the westward migration of Americans, and
on slavery, public education, and the addition of new states.
As the relationship between the colonies and Great Britain grew more hostile, there was
no choice but to declare war. The colonies had sent England their Declaration of Independence in
1776 which insinuated rebellion. The American Revolutionary War lasted roughly from 1775 to
1783, resulting in independence for the colonies. The Treaty of Paris 1783 formally brought the
war to an end giving The United States the land they occupied plus more thanks to Benjamin
Franklin. He was able to negotiate a deal that granted the patriots more land than what they had
originally won. The catch was that the Americans could no longer harass loyalists and had to
easily allow debt-collecting by the British. Fast forward a few years and the U.S is structuring
their new government. Alexander Hamilton, clearly seeing the desperate need for money at the
time, suggested placing a tax on whiskey to compensate. This was a very controversial idea,
however the tariff did get placed. Enraged, a group of farmers brought about the Whiskey
Rebellion. The government excised its power showing that it was not a force to be reckoned
with. Years before, the same type of rebellion occurred in which Daniel Shays and a massive
group of farmers rebelled against tax collections, known as Shays Rebellion. The government
took little to no action, however noticed that an army needed to be available in likewise
situations. This is how the Whiskey Rebellion highly reflected on the governments austerity.
VOCAB
Shays Rebellion
Whiskey Rebellion
Precedent
Tariff
Daniel Shays

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

10

2A Political
STANDARDS
SSUSH6 The student will analyze the impact of territorial expansion and population
growth and the impact of this growth in the early decades of the new nation.
b. Describe the reasons for and importance of the Monroe Doctorine.
SSUSH7 Students will explain the process of economic growth, its regional and national
impact in the first half of the 19th century, and the different responses to it.
b. Describe the westward growth of the United States; include the emerging concept of
Manifest Destiny.
d. Explain womens efforts to gain suffrage; include Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Seneca
Falls Conference.
e. Explain Jacksonian Democracy, expanding suffrage, the rise of popular political culture,
and the development of American nationalism.
SSUSH8 The student will explain the relationship between growing north-south divisions
and westward expansion.
a. Explain how slavery became a significant issue in American politics; include the slave
rebellion of Nat Turner and the rise of abolitionism (William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick
Douglass, and the Grimke sisters).
b. Explain the Missouri Compromise and the issue of slavery in western states and
territories.
c. Describe the Nullification Crisis and the emergence of states rights ideology; include the
role of John C. Calhoun and development of sectionalism.
d. Describe the war with Mexico and the Wilmot Proviso.
e. Explain how the Compromise of 1850 arose out of territorial expansion and population
growth.
As the United States began to set war precautions, they felt it was best to stay out of foreign
affairs. President James Monroe proposed the idea that America stay out of European affairs
and declare that they are not open for colonization. This idea came to be known as the Monroe
Doctrine and served a greater purpose during the Spanish-American War. Tariffs were put in
place to protect industry in the U.S. however only ended up protecting Northern industry without
taking Southern farming into consideration. This inequality led to the Nullification Crisis in
South Carolina, led by John C. Calhoun. The South in general was not fond of the tariffs put in
place, however South Carolina was the only state to take action. They decided the tariff, known
as Tariff of Abominations, would not be valid in their state. The federal government viewed this
act of rebellion as unconstitutional, however the South threatened to secede of the tariff was not
removed. Eventually, the tariff was removed which pacified the tension between the North and
the South temporarily, and created the idea of sectionalism. Slavery was also an extremely
controversial issue at the time. When Missouri applied for statehood, it chose to apply as a slave
state, upsetting the representative balance the North and South had in congress. As a solution,
Maine, originally part of Massachusetts was added as a free state (Missouri Compromise). This
was a quick fix to the slavery issue at hand and set aside the underlying cause.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

11

VOCAB
Adams-Onis Treaty

Wilmot Provisio

Secede

Monroe Doctrine

Whig

Fugitive Slave Act

Suffrage

Womens Movement

Declaration of Sentiments

Jacksonian Democracy
(Age of Jackson)

Spoils System

Marbury v. Madison

Indian Removal Act

Henry Clay

Lone Star Republic

Neal Dow

Alamo

Andrew Jackson

Treaty of Guadalupe
Hidalgo

John Marshall

Sectionalism
Mexican American War

Tariff of Abominations

Compromise of 1850
Missouri Compromise
Nullification Crisis

Daniel Webster
John C. Calhoun

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

12

2A Social
STANDARDS
SSUSH7 Students will explain the process of economic growth, its regional and national
impact in the first half of the 19th century, and the different responses to it.
b. Describe the westward growth of the United States including the emerging concept of
Manifest Destiny.
c. Describe reform movements, specifically temperance, abolitionism, and public school
d. Explain womens efforts to gain suffrage; include Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Seneca
Falls Conference.
e. Explain Jacksonian Democracy, expanding suffrage, the rise of popular political culture,
and the development of American nationalism.
The Second Great Awakening gave rise to a new American attitude; one of high moral
standards. The desire to aspire to new heights, especially for the acceptance into heaven, was one
of great priority. These ideas inspired change and a feeling of moral responsibility. The
temperance movement was introduced during this time, enforcing the ben of alcohol. The
Abolitionist Movement and a yearning for higher education also received immense support.
America began to see a rise in womens individuality. They started to demand rights, and one of
those rights being the right to vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton shocked both males and females
everywhere when she started advocating womens suffrage. Her stance really took center stage
when she wrote and stated the Declaration of Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention in
1848. During this era of industrialization, education was brought about in a new light. People
started seeing it as an advantage rather than a burden, therefore taking steps in creating the
school systems we have in place today. Native Americans suffered a great deal during this time
as the idea of Manifest Destiny pushed them further out west and eventually into confined
reservations. Andrew Jackson is known for his push for the Indian Removal Act sending the
Native Americans on the infamous Trail of Tears to Oklahoma.
VOCAB
Nationalism
Spoils System
Indian Removal Act
Trail of Tears
Transcendentalist
Second Great Awakening
Temperance Movement
Abolitionist Movement
Seneca Falls Convention
Manifest Destiny
Nat Turners Rebellion
Nativist

Revivalist
Mormon
Utopian Community
Freedman
Womens Movement
Oregon Trail
Hudson River School
Tariff of Abominations
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Henry David Thoreau
Horace Mann
Susan B. Anthony

Grimke Sisters
Joseph Smith
Lucretia Mott
Dorothea Dix
William Lloyd Garrison
Frederick Douglass
Nat Turner
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Sojourner Truth
Samuel F.B. Morse

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

13

2A Economic
STANDARDS
SSUSH6 The student will analyze the impact of territorial expansion and population
growth and the impact of this growth in the early decades of the new nation.
a. Describe the construction of the Erie Canal, the rise of New York City, and the
development of the nations infrastructure.
SSUSH7 Students will explain the process of economic growth, its regional and national
impact in the first half of the 19th century, and the different responses to it.
a. Explain the impact of the Industrial Revolution as seen in Eli Whitneys invention of
the cotton gin and his development of interchangeable parts for muskets.
b. Describe the westward growth of the United States; include the emerging concept of
Manifest Destiny.
The late 1800s marked the famous Industrial Revolution. The United States began to strengthen
its infrastructure through developments in technology. The construction of the Erie Canal
provided a large economic advantage for the country by greatly reducing shipping costs and
making New York City the biggest commercial center in the U.S at the time. Robert Fulton
invented the steamboat which allowed cargo to travel upstream, greatly reducing the time it took
to ship goods, and allowing a greater product yield. In the field transportation through land,
railroads had the biggest impact. What would at one time take months to transport across the
U.S, could now be done in days. People and shipments were now able to get where they needed
to be quicker and more efficiently than ever before. Eli Whitneys invention of the cotton gin
revolutionized the farming world. Cotton was able to be separated from its seeds at a much faster
rate. Theoretically, the cotton gin was supposed to reduce the need for slaves, but ended up doing
the opposite as farmers demanded a greater work output. Women slowly started entering the
workforce in the example of the Lowell girls. They worked in the factories operating cloth and
left when they got married. As Americans started migrating west, they found gold along the way,
and the California Gold Rush was famous for that. This served as a huge incentive to migrate
west and achieve the idea of manifest destiny.
VOCAB
Turnpike

Tariff of 1816

Oregon Trail

National Road

Labor Union

California Gold Rush

Erie Canal

Cotton Gin

Forty-Niners

Industrial Revolution

American System

Tariff of Abominations

Interchangeable Parts

Expansionist

Gadsden Purchase

Public School Reform

Santa Fe Trail

Eli Whitney

Lowell Girl

Mountain Men

Samuel Slater

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Robert Fulton

14

Francis Cabot Lowell

2B Political
SSUSH9 The student will identify key events, issues, and individuals relating to the causes,
course, and consequences of the Civil War.
a. Explain the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the failure of popular sovereignty, Dred Scott case,
and John Browns Raid.
b. Describe President Lincolns efforts to preserve the Union as seen in his second
inaugural address and the Gettysburg speech and in his use of emergency powers,
such as his decision to suspend habeas corpus.
c. Describe the roles of Ulysses Grant, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, William T.
Sherman, and Jefferson Davis.
d. Explain the importance of Fort Sumter, Antietam, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, and the
Battle for Atlanta and the impact of geography on these battles.
e. Describe the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation.
SSUSH10 The student will identify legal, political, and social dimensions of Reconstruction.
a. Compare and contrast Presidential Reconstruction with Radical Republican
Reconstruction.
b. Explain efforts to redistribute land in the South among the former slaves.
c. Describe the significance of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.
d. Explain the impeachment of Andrew Johnson in relationship to Reconstruction
e. Analyze how the presidential election of 1876 and the subsequent compromise of
1877 marked the end of Reconstruction
Tensions between the North and South had blown out of proportion. There were major
differences between the two sides creating hostility that brewed exponentially. Slavery, being
one of the larger conflicts, caused many problems such as The Kansas-Nebraska Act. Popular
Sovereignty was the only thing the North and South could agree upon, however made matters
worse than intended. Americans fled to Nebraska and Kansas to place their vote for a slave or
free state even though only the states residents were allowed to vote. Bleeding Kansas
became the infamous nickname of the inconsistent state, and that simply goes to show the extent
each side was willing to go to in order to prove their supremacy. Lincolns election proved to be
detrimental to the health of the Union as South Carolina immediately seceded with a multitude of
states following. Despite Lincolns orders, there was no going back. The Civil War had begun.
Throughout the combat, Antietam and Gettysburg proved to be the bloodiest battles, the Battle
of Vicksburg split the confederacy in half, and the Battle of Atlanta paved the way for the
Union victory. Reconstruction also resulted in two points of views. Radical Republicans
wanted to give states more power by letting them write their own constitutions as long as they
ratified the 14th amendment and let African Americans vote. The presidential point of view
enforced the ten-percent plan Lincoln had put in place before his assassination, make the south
accept the 13th amendment, and pledge allegiance to the Union.
VOCAB
Kansas-Nebraska Act
Popular Sovereignty

Dred Scott v. Sanford


States Rights

Secession

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Emancipation
Proclamation 1863
Thirteenth Amendment
Fourteenth Amendment
Fifteenth Amendment
Impeach
Carpetbagger
Scalawag
Gettysburg Address
Sectionalism
Habeas Corpus
William T. Sherman
Jefferson Davis
Abraham Lincoln
Andrew Johnson

15

Presidential
Reconstruction
Radical Republican
Andrew Johnson
Impeachment
1876 Presidential Election
Compromise of 1877
Lincolns Second
Inaugural Address 1865
Bleeding Kansas
Harpers Ferry
Know Nothings
Fort Sumter
Antietam
Vicksburg
Gettysburg

2B Social

Anaconda Plan
Blockade
Civil Rights Act of 1866
Republican Party
Copperheads
John C. Calhoun
Dred Scott
John Brown
Ulysses S. Grant
Robert E. Lee
Stonewall Jackson
Battle for Atlanta
Appomattox

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

16

SSUSH9 The student will identify key events, issues, and individuals relating to the causes, course,
and consequences of the Civil War.
e. Describe the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation.
SSUSH10 The student will identify legal, political, and social dimensions of Reconstruction.
b. Explain efforts to redistribute land in the South among the former slaves and provide
advanced education (Morehouse College) and describe the role of the Freedmens Bureau.
c. Describe the significance of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.
d. Explain Black Codes, the Ku Klux Klan, and other forms of resistance to racial equality
during Reconstruction.
Although the Civil War highly deals with the stigma of blood and casualties, it brought forth new
ideals regarding the equality of men. On January 1, 1863, President Lincolns Emancipation
Proclamation freed all slaves in rebellious states resulting in a depletion of the Souths
manpower and a heighted cause of the Union in the eyes of the Europeans. The Freedmens
Bureau was established to help former slaves conduct everyday activities by providing food,
shelter, medicine, clothing, jobs, and medical-care facilities. It even tried to redistribute land
confiscated or abandoned during the Civil War to the newly freed slaves. The bureau, however,
was shut down a few years later due to a lack of personnel, money shortages, and pressure from
white southerners. The 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments served to safeguard the equality of
former slaves. Together they abolished slavery, made all people born in the U.S official citizens
overruling the Dredd Scott v. Sanford Supreme Court case, and allowing all citizens the right to
vote without discrimination. There were groups that still did not agree with these laws and put
other laws in place to beat the system. These include but are not limited to the Black Codes.
Congress put these codes in place in an effort to suppress former slaves freedom without
necessarily contradicting the Civil War amendments. Hate groups plagued with racism like the
Klu Klux Klan gained power during this time using violence to eliminate minorities, but
specifically blacks. The Reconstruction Era definitely saw conflicting social ideas.

VOCAB
Dred Scott v. Sanford

Black Codes

Copperhead

Emancipation Proclamation
1863

Freedmens Bureau

Dred Scott

Morehouse College

John Brown

Klu Klux Klan

Harriett Beecher Stowe

Underground Railroad

Stephen Douglass

Thirteenth Amendment
Fourteenth Amendment
Fifteenth Amendment

Harpers Ferry

2B Economic

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

17

SSUSH9 The student will identify key events, issues, and individuals relating to the causes,
course, and consequences of the Civil War.
f. Explain the importance of the growing economic disparity between the North and the
South through an examination of population, functioning railroads, and industrial
output.
SSUSH10 The student will identify legal, political, and social dimensions of Reconstruction.
b. Explain efforts to redistribute land in the South among the former slaves and provide
advanced education (Morehouse College) and describe the role of the Freedmens
Bureau.
Primarily through differing economic roles, the North and South started to grow in
completely opposite directions. The Norths economy was based on textiles and industry.
Their climate and soil didnt allow for a substantial crop harvest. By 1860, the north
possessed 90% of the nations manufacturing. Everything the South produced, the North
could make ten times faster and of better quality. Because of its urban setting, the North
attracted cheap immigrant labor thus making these cities larger and more powerful. The
Souths economy was based primarily on agriculture. Sharecropping and Tenant
Farming were one of the most prominent forms of farming they pursued. Cotton became
the most valued export in the U.S by 1815, and by 1840, the South produced two-thirds of
the worlds cotton. In contrast to the North, the southern states only controlled a minimal
amount of railroads and banks. This proved a major downfall in the Civil War as the North
could transport their supplies without fear. There were some Northerners that moved to the
south to take advantage of the Souths political and economic instability, earning the term
Carpetbaggers. The Confederacy had the most intelligent generals that came up with
the most brilliant attacks, but lost because of the Norths material advantages. During the
Reconstruction era, the South had a significantly hard time recovering. The North
demolished them in every aspect. In an effort to help the South recover, the Union
developed the Freedmens Bureau, serving as a welfare agency for freed blacks and poor
whites.
VOCAB
Carpetbagger
Freedmens Bureau
Sharecropper
Tenant Farming
Reconstruction

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

18

3A Political
STANDARD 12: Analyze important consequences of American industrial growth.
7. Describe the growth of the western population and its impact on Native Americans (497-500)
with reference to Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee. (500-503)
STANDARD 13: Identify major efforts to reform American society and politics in the
Progressive Era.
11. Describe the rise of Jim Crow, Plessy v. Ferguson, and the emergence of the NAACP. (520522, 528, 565-567)
13. Describe the significance of progressive reforms such as the initiative, the recall, and (554555) referendum direct election of senators; reform of labor laws; and efforts to improve living
conditions for the poor in cities. (578)
14. Describe the conservation movement and the development of national parks and forests;
include the role of Theodore Roosevelt
STANDARD 14: Explain Americas evolving relationship with the world at the turn of the
twentieth century.
14. Explain the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the anti-Asian immigration sentiment on the
west coast (523-524)
Progressivism and Nativism played a big role in the U.S at this point in history. As the
U.S expanded, Native American groups kept decreasing, specifically through force.The Battle at
Wounded Knee was the last major attempt of the Native Americans to protect their soil and
culture, but were demolished completely. The U.S put the Dawes Act in place in an effort to
eliminate the Native American culture by splitting up tribes and assigning men areas to live to
enforce Americanization. Back in Washington, the people demanded to have a greater say in the
creation of laws and election of officials. In response, the government put in place the initiative,
recall, and referendum system in which the citizens could propose laws, approve/veto laws, and
remove elected officials from office if they felt they werent serving their job correctly. The
government became more democratic in that sense; giving citizens a greater role. As for
Nativism, the U.S had allowed a great deal of immigration. Angel and Ellis Island were built
welcoming people fresh off the boat. Immigration, however was significantly controlled when
Americans felt as though the immigrants were taking their jobs, especially the Chinese because
they worked for a lot less money than the average American. The Chinese Exclusion Act of
1882 shows how although the Chinese were instrumental to building the Transcontinental
Railroad and other important projects, the U.S was willing to ban their immigration and risking
bad blood with China.
Vocab
Robber Baron
Nativism
Progressivism
Initiative
Referendum
Recall
Direct Primary

19th Amendment
18th Amendment
Laissez Faire
Patent
Socialism
Dawes Act
Poll Tax

Literacy Test
Populist Party
Gilded Age
Land Grants
Grandfather Clause
Captains of Industry
Square Deal

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Progressive Party
Booker T. Washington
Theodore Roosevelt
Eugene V. Debs
Margaret Sanger
W.E.B Dubois

19

Pullman Strike
Wounded Knee
Plessy V. Ferguson
Interstate Commerce
Commission

3A Social

Chinese Exclusion Act


1882
Sherman Anti-Trust Act
Haymarket Riot
Homestead Strike

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

20

STANDARD 11: Describe the growth of big business and technological innovations after
Reconstruction.
2. Describe the impact of the railroads in the development of the West, including the
Transcontinental Railroad, and the use of Chinese labor. (507-508, 511-512)
4. Describe the inventions of Thomas Edison, including the electric light bulb, motion pictures,
and the phonograph, and their impact on American life. (438-439)
STANDARD 12: Analyze important consequences of American industrial growth.
5 Describe Ellis Island (466-470), the change in immigrants origins to southern and eastern
Europe (464-465), and the impact of this change on urban America. (472-474)
6 Identify the American Federation of Labor and Samuel Gompers. (454)
7 Describe the growth of the western population and its impact on Native Americans (497-500)
with reference to Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee. (500-503)
STANDARD 13: Identify major efforts to reform American society and politics in the
Progressive Era.
9 Explain Upton Sinclairs The Jungle and federal oversight of the meatpacking industry. (551556)
10 Identify Jane Addams and Hull House and describe the role of women in reform movements.
(552, 557-562)
11 Describe the rise of Jim Crow, Plessy v. Ferguson, and the emergence of the NAACP. (520522, 528, 565-567)
12 Explain Ida Tarbells role as a muckraker. (551)
13 Describe the significance of reform of labor laws; and efforts to improve living conditions for
the poor in cities. (578)
14 Describe the conservation movement and the development of national parks and forests;
include the role of Theodore Roosevelt
The Gilded Age had its downside and the muckrakers of the era did quite the job exposing
its fauna. Standard Oil and tenements, although two completely different subjects, share the
similarity that they were two-faced. Ida Tarbell exposed Rockefeller of his unfair business
practices and eventually dismantling his company. Jacob Riis, another well-known
muckraker, took photographs detailing the horrific conditions of tenements that housed the
poor, which he published in his book, How the Other Half Lives. These journalists shed light
on what the world was blinded, making the Gilded Age not so gilded. As women during this
time fought hard for equality, Jane Addams didnt let the odds stop her when she created the
Hull House; a settlement house that offered immigrants English lessons, finance seminars,
and other lessons that taught immigrants how to conduct their everyday lives in their new
country. In fact, women all around the country started finding ways in which they could
contribute to society surpassing traditional views of what their roles shouldve been. Racism
started becoming a prominent issue for African Americans as hatred was starting to dwindle
their stature. Jim Crow Laws divided whites and blacks like never before seen. Colored
people had to use separate buses, bathrooms, restaurants, hotels, and whites were always the
priority. Interracial marriages were illegal at the time. The 1896 Plessy V. Ferguson Supreme
Court case upheld these laws ruling they were separate but equal. This case was eventually
overturned by Brown V. Board of Education in 1954.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Vocab
Social Darwinism
Sweatshop
Nativism
Tenement
Assimilate
Jim Crow Laws
Muckraker
Settlement House
NAACP
18th Amendment
19th Amendment
Ellis Island
Motion Picture Camera
American Federation of
Labor
Hull House
Socialism

21

Knights of Labor
Angel Island
Americanization
Poll Tax
Literacy Test
Melting Pot
Gilded Age
Mass Culture
Suspension Bridge
Time Zones
Meat Inspection Act
Pure Food and Drug Act
Samuel Grompers
Sitting Bull
Upton Sinclair
Ida Tarbell
Booker T. Washington

Horatio Alger
Margaret Sanger
Jacob Riis
Henry Grady
Ida B. Wells
Jane Addams
W.E.B Dubois
Mark Twain
Terrence V. Powderly
Pullman Strike
Wounded Knee
Plessy V. Ferguson
The Jungle
Haymarket Riot
Homestead Strike

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

22

3A Economic
STANDARD 11: Describe the growth of big business and technological innovations after
Reconstruction.
1 Explain the impact of the railroads on other industries, such as steel, and on the organization
of big business. (440-441)
2 Describe the impact of the railroads in the development of the West, including the
transcontinental railroad, and the use of Chinese labor. (507-508, 511-512)
3 Identify John D. Rockefeller and the Standard Oil Company and the rise of trusts and
monopolies. (444-446)
4 Describe the inventions of Thomas Edison, including the electric light bulb, motion pictures,
and the phonograph, and their impact on American life. (438-439)
STANDARD 12: Analyze important consequences of American industrial growth.
6. Identify the American Federation of Labor and Samuel Gompers. (454)
8. Describe the 1894 Pullman strike as an example of industrial unrest. (455-456, 457)
STANDARD 13: Identify major efforts to reform American society and politics in the
Progressive Era.
12. Explain Ida Tarbells role as a muckraker. (551)
The Gilded Age marked a highly competitive economic time in American history. There
was no government regulation of business, so Robber Barons, otherwise known as Captains of
Industry, had a greater influence on the nation than the president. John D. Rockefeller, founder
of Standard Oil, and Andrew Carnegie (Steel Industry) acquired their wealth by monopolizing,
which is illegal today. They bought out their competition through vertical or horizontal
integration resulting in a self-built empire. As a result, these robber barons could drive up their
prices enough to hurt the consumer. This is why the government has put regulations on
necessities so that the consumer doesnt have to pay millions for something like air conditioning.
The Gilded Age was also a time of industrial unrest. As the government adopted the laissez faire
approach, there were no labor laws. The relationship between the workers and captains of
industry was far from fair, in which the founders got rich while the workers got paid minimally
and had to work countless hours. Uprisings, such as the 1894 Pullman Strike, occurred often.
The American Federation of Labor played a large role in obtaining fair labor practices across the
U.S. Led by Samuel Gompers, it welcomed all skilled workers and used tactics such as collective
bargaining to promote their cause.
Vocab
Laissez faire
Progressivism
Corporation
Monopoly
American Federation of
Cartel
Trust
Labor
Horizontal Integration
Robber Baron
Entrepreneur
Vertical Integration
Social Darwinism
Patent
Company Town
Sweatshop
Bessemer Process
Collective Bargaining
Urbanization
Mass Production
Socialism

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Knights of Labor
Poll Tax
Mass Transit
Skyscrapers
Gilded Age

23

New South
Homestead Act
Protective Tariff
Gospel of Wealth
Captains of Industry

Thomas Edison
John Rockefeller
Andrew Carnegie
Henry Grady
Transcontinental Railroad

3B Political
STANDARD 14: Explain Americas evolving relationship with the world at the turn of the
twentieth century.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

24

B. Describe the Spanish-American War, the war in the Philippines, and the debate over American
expansionism. (592-598, 599-601, 598)
C. Explain U.S. involvement in Latin America, as reflected by the Roosevelt Corollary to the
Monroe Doctrine and the creation of the Panama Canal. (604-609)
STANDARD 15: Analyze the origins and impact of U.S. involvement in World War I.
A. Describe the movement from U.S. neutrality to engagement in World War I, with reference to
unrestricted submarine warfare. (624-625, 626)
C. Explain Wilsons Fourteen Points and the proposed League of Nations. (641-645)
D.
Describe passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, establishing Prohibition, and the Nineteenth
Amendment, establishing woman suffrage. (578, 561-562)
STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.
A. Explain how rising communism and socialism in the United States led to the Red Scare and
immigrant restriction. (649-650)
The United States, through the Monroe Doctrine, made clear to the world that they were closed
for colonization and that they would not get involved in foreign conflict unless someone were to pose
a threat to the security of the nation. The Monroe Doctrine was put in place to keep European Powers
out of the Western Hemisphere for good. In the early 1900s, the U.S saw that Latin America was
becoming weak and open to invasion by the Europeans. When Roosevelt took office, he passed an
addition to the Monroe Doctrine, the Roosevelt Corollary, stating that the U.S would protect its
economic interests in Latin America using force if needed. This act of imperialism let the World see
Americas growing sphere of influence, showing they were not a force to be reckoned with.
Woodrow Wilson was also an advocate of neutrality and did everything in his power to avoid war. He
unfortunately had to go against his views when the Germans sent the Zimmerman Note and sunk the
Lusitania. These two events inevitably reeled the U.S into WWI as they directly posed a threat to the
security of the nation. When the war came to an end, Woodrow Wilson wrote out Fourteen Points
that promoted lasting peace through freedom of the seas, end to secret agreements, etc. He also
proposed the creation of a League of Nations which the U.S did not end up joining because it went
against our policy of isolationism.
Vocab
Imperialism
Central Powers
Fourteen Points
Jingoism
Selective Service Act
Platt Amendment
Boxer Rebellion
Treaty of Versailles
Teddy Roosevelt
Open Door Policy
Progressive Party
Woodrow Wilson
Big Stick Diplomacy
Square Deal
William H. Taft
Dollar Diplomacy
Rough Riders
George Dewey
Moral Diplomacy
Treaty of Paris
Francis Ferdinand
Roosevelt Corollary
Spheres of Influence
Henry Cabot Lodge
Militarism
Great White Fleet
Alfred T. Mahan
U-Boat
Panama Canal
William R. Hearst
Espionage Act
Lusitania
John Pershing
League of Nations
Zimmerman Note
Matthew Perry
Red Scare
Alsace-Lorraine
Vladamir Lenin
Armistice
Conscientious Objector
Warren G. Harding

3B Social
STANDARD 15: Analyze the origins and impact of U.S. involvement in World War I.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

25

B. Explain the domestic impact of World War I, as reflected by the origins of the Great Migration,
the Espionage Act, and socialist Eugene Debs. (634, 632)
D. Describe passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, establishing Prohibition, and the Nineteenth
Amendment, establishing woman suffrage. (578, 561-562)

STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.


B. Explain how rising communism and socialism in the United States led to the Red Scare and
immigrant restriction. (649-650)
America mobilized immensely for the entrance into WWI. Women took over traditional male
roles which had never been seen before. These new jobs helped women in their fight for gender
equality. Due to increased manufacturing, many African Americans moves to the North for better job
opportunities, known as the Great Migration. The south was full of racial prejudice (KKK) and the
standard of living was not comparable North. The Urban League was created to help African
American citizens transition to life in the north as there were so many that migrated. A fear of
political radicalism spread across the nation after the war, known as the first red scare. Communism
and socialism were seen as a major threat to the American democracy and many were suspected of
treason. The fear was so prevalent, the U.S executed Palmer Raids in which they arrested anyone
and everyone they thought were culpable of a radical mentality, most of these suspects being
immigrants. Although 500 foreign citizens were deported, the Palmer Raids were eventually put to a
halt by the U.S Department of Labor who were primarily in charge of the deportation and didnt
approve of Palmers approaches. One example of this paranoia was the Sacco and Vanzetti Case.
These two Italians, free of a criminal record, were convicted of a murder in which there was an equal
amount of evidence proving their guilt and innocence. They were however charged with the murder
though fear that they were foreign radicals.

Vocab
Imperialism

Red Scare

Anti-Defamation League

Yellow Press

Palmer Raids

Conscientious Objector

Moral Diplomacy

Social Darwinism

Sacco and Vanzetti

Great Migration

Urban League

William R. Hearst

3B Economic

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

26

STANDARD 14: Explain Americas evolving relationship with the world at the turn of the
twentieth century.
C. Explain U.S. involvement in Latin America, as reflected by the Roosevelt Corollary to
the Monroe Doctrine and the creation of the Panama Canal. (604-609)
STANDARD 15: Analyze the origins and impact of U.S. involvement in World War I.
B. Explain the domestic impact of World War I, as reflected by the origins of the Great
Migration, the Espionage Act, and socialist Eugene Debs. (634, 632)
As the U.S was on an imperialism trek, it sought out ways to broaden its sphere of influence.
In an effort to further U.S interests overseas, former President Taft proposed the Dollar
Diplomacy. This was an approach in which America would gain power by to guarantee loans
to foreign countries using private capital. Taft used the Roosevelt Corollary to justify his
means saying it was to help stabilize the economic concerns in Central America. The Dollar
Diplomacy substituted dollars for bullets and peacefully achieved power and agreements
with foreign countries. The Open-Door Policy in China serves as proof of Tafts success.
During the War, the domestic impact in the U.S was surreal. Women and African Americans
were working jobs they had never worked before which was great for the war effort but some
problems did surface. Roosevelt implemented the Square Deal which enforced fair labor
practices ensuring increased production efficiency and limited waste. This program went
along with Roosevelts platform of regulating businesses and conserving natural resources.
Progressivism was in full swing.
Vocab
Imperialism
Dollar Diplomacy
Reparations
Progressivism/Progressive Party
Social Darwinism
Square Deal
Panama Canal
Fourteen Points
Hepburn Act
Extractive Economy
Open-Door Policy

4A Political

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

27

SSUSHS17: Analyze the causes and consequences of the great depression.


C.
Explain the social and political impact of widespread unemployment that resulted in
developments such as Hoovervilles. (710-712)
SSUSHS18: Describe franklin roosevelts new deal as a response to the depression and
compare the ways governmental programs aided those in need.
A Explain the passage of the Social Security Act as a part of the second New Deal. (741, 738)
B Identify Eleanor Roosevelt as a symbol of social progress and womens activism. (748-749)
C Identify the political challenges to Roosevelts domestic and international leadership; include
the role of Huey Long, the court packing bill, and the Neutrality Act. (746, 739, 779)
The political impact of the Great Depression was devastating. The government did not have
a strong Federal Reserve leading to weak banks throughout the nation. The unemployment
rate reached an all-time high of 25%. Because of the increasing poverty rate, people moves to
little shantytowns which they nicknamed Hoovervilles with the intention of the president
who caused their misfortune. In 1928, after the end of WWI, 62 countries signed the
Kellogg-Briand Pact outlawing war unless it was for self-defense. The treaty did not meet
peoples expectations as anyone could classify even the minutest occurrences as an act of
self-defense. WWII began shortly after the treaty was signed and although it isnt always
looked as this way, the war effort proved to be one of the reasons America overcame the
Great Depression. In another effort to leave the Great Depression, Roosevelt implemented a
number of reform programs he collectively named the New Deal. These reform programs
included, but were not limited to the TVA, Agricultural Adjustment Act, Social Security Act,
etc. One of the biggest changes of the U.S at the time was Roosevelts ratification of the 21 st
amendment allowing the consumption of alcohol, ending prohibition. He enacted these
reforms and policies in his first hundred days in office. In his inaugural address, Roosevelt
had promised to take direct, vigorous action to help Americans end their anguish, which he
did in fact accomplish.
Vocab
Teapot Dome Scandal

New Deal

Herbert Hoover

Kellogg-Briand Pact

Fireside Chat

Franklin Roosevelt

Scopes Trial

TVA

Huey Long

Quota System

Second New Deal

Eleanor Roosevelt

Prohibition

Court Packing

Hoovervilles

Volstead Act

Black Cabinet

Social Security Act

Great Depression

The Wizard of Oz

Localism

Neutrality Act of 1939

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

28

4A Social
STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.
B. Identify Henry Ford, mass production, and the automobile. (660-663)
C. Describe the impact of radio and the movies. (680-681)
D. Describe modern forms of cultural expression; include Louis Armstrong and the origins of
jazz, Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley. (690-663)
SSUSHS17: analyze the causes and consequences of the great depression.
B. Explain the impact of the drought in the creation of the Dust Bowl. (714-715)
SSUSHS18: describe franklin roosevelts new deal as a response to the depression and
compare the ways governmental programs aided those in need.
D Describe the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority as a works program and as an effort
to control the environment. (736)
E Explain the Wagner Act and the rise of industrial unionism. (744)
D. Identify Eleanor Roosevelt as a symbol of social progress and womens activism. (748-749)
The 1920s proved to be a decade of dramatic cultural change. People were defying
conservative standards and a new sense of lavishness developed. Flappers, jazz, and the Model
T were societal staples that gave the U.S its opulent glamour. Unfortunately, Prohibition loomed
in the horizon and made its presence known through multiple conservative groups and eventually
by the law. This alcohol ban, however, didnt stop the party goers. Bootleggers began to smuggle
in the prohibited goods and companies started finding ways in which alcohol could be distributed
without directly breaking the law. The Harlem Renaissance is also a major societal
advancement housed under the Roaring 20s. This undertaking kindled a newfound sense of black
culture. Tin Pan Alley illuminated a variety of songwriters and music publishers resulting in a
melting pot of emerging music styles and artists. The luxuriousness of the decade abruptly ended
after the Stock Market Crash of 1929. Millions were left unemployed and downtrodden. The era
of posh and perfection brought about unforeseen consequences, both monetary and agricultural.
The Dust Bowl resulted in the depletion of crops, pushing Americans out of the Midwest. Bread
Lines all throughout the country were evidence that Americans even had to go through trouble to
eat. This Great Depression lasted until WWII rolled around creating jobs and a new sense of
hope.
Vocab
Model T
Modernization
Fundamentalism
Scopes Trial
Prohibition
Scopes Trial
Bootlegger
Flapper
Lost Generation

Jazz
Harlem Renaissance
Great Depression
Bread Line
Dust Bowl
Okies
Hoovervilles
Bonus Army
Fireside Chat

Welfare State
Louis Armstrong
Zora Neale Hurston
Charlie Chaplin
Babe Ruth
Charles Lindbergh
Ernest Hemingway
Langston Hughes
John Steinbeck

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

29

4A Economic
STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.
B. Identify Henry Ford, mass production, and the automobile. (660-663)
C. Describe the impact of radio and the movies. (680-681)
D. Describe modern forms of cultural expression; include Louis Armstrong and the origins of
jazz, Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley. (690-663)
SSUSHS17: analyze the causes and consequences of the great depression.
F Describe the causes, including overproduction, under-consumption, and stock market
speculation that led to the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression. (702-706)
G Explain the impact of the drought in the creation of the Dust Bowl. (714-715)
H Explain the social and political impact of widespread unemployment that resulted in
developments such as Hoovervilles. (710-712)
SSUSHS18: Describe franklin roosevelts new deal as a response to the depression and
compare the ways governmental programs aided those in need.
I Describe the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority as a works program and as an effort
to control the environment. (736)
J Explain the Wagner Act and the rise of industrial unionism. (744)
K Explain the passage of the Social Security Act as a part of the second New Deal. (741, 738)
The 1920s is a decade known for its glamour and prosperity. Budgets were inexistent and no
one ever lost. The stock market was highly incentivized through the introduction of credit.
People were able to borrow money to buy stocks, pay back what they borrowed and keep the
profit. Although one would think the practice was risky, stocks only rose and profit never ceased
to increase. During this time, Henry Ford released his line of assembly Model T which was
much less expensive. Americans felt as though life couldnt get better, until the 1929 Stock
Market Crash. Stocks are only worth what people are willing to pay for them. As the 1920s
went on, people became afraid of how long the good times would last, so they took precautions
and sold their stocks. Fear spread quickly and others started to do the same until, one day, stock
prices dropped tremendously and everyone got stuck in debt, leading to the Great Depression.
Although speculation played a large role in the stock market crash, weak banking systems, lack
of federal control over business, and confidence in buying on margin also were key causes.
When farmers and manufacturers started seeing demand go up for their products, they
overproduced greatly. When 1929 rolled around, they had to sell all of those crops and products
by lowering their prices in hopes that the items would sell. This also contributed to the drastic
drop of stock process, leaving Americans in a self-dug hole of debt and despair.
Vocab
Mass Production
Model T
Bull Market
Buying on Margin
Dawes Plan
Speculation

Great Depression
Black Tuesday
Trickle-Down Economics
Bonus Army
New Deal
Social Security Act

Collective Bargaining
Wagner Act
Welfare State
Henry Ford

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

30

4B Political
SSUSHS19: identify the origins, major developments, and the domestic impact of world
war ii, especially the growth of the federal government.
a. Explain A. Philip Randolphs proposed March on Washington, D.C., and President
Franklin D. Roosevelts response. (810)
b. Explain the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the internment of Japanese- Americans,
German-Americans, and Italian-Americans. (789, 813)
c. Explain major events: include the lend-lease program, the Battle of Midway, D-Day, and
the fall of Berlin. (785, 807, 819, 823)
d. Describe Los Alamos and the scientific, economic, and military implications of
developing the Atomic Bomb
e. Compare the geographic locations of the European Theater and the Pacific Theater and
the difficulties the U.S. faced in delivering weapons, food, and medical supplies to
troops.
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
a. Describe the creation of the Marshall Plan, U.S. commitment to Europe, the Truman
Doctrine, and the origins and implications of the containment policy. (850, 848)
b. Explain the impact of the new communist regime in China, the outbreak of the Korean
War, and how these events contributed to the rise of Senator Joseph McCarthy. (854, 855857, 873-875)
c. Explain the role of geography on the U.S. containment policy, the Korean War
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
a. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of Sputnik
I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
In the late 1930s, Communist leaders had become a major threat to all nations. Their
power surged through hope of salvaging stumbling economies and inadequate
administrations. Hitler expanded Germany, invading weak countries and taking over a
substantial amount of Europe. The U.S, recalling the events of WWI, knew there would not
be a good ending to this imperialistic trek, and therefore put in place the Neutrality Acts of
1939. This would keep the U.S out of all foreign affairs, but little obstacles along the way
made it hard to stick to the plan. The Cash and Carry policy/Lend-Lease Act showed just
how much the government wanted to help other countries while trying to avoid alliances.
Appeasement was a major factor in WWII that did more harm than good. The League of
Nations was primarily the group to offer concessions to different leaders in order to achieve
peace. The U.S abided by its policy of containment throughout all of WWII and poses as a
major cause of the Cold War. Stalin and Truman had very different opinions towards free
elections. What seemed like miniscule differences turned into severe tensions, bringing forth
the Iron Curtain. The Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan were steps the U.S took to
decrease communisms sphere of influence, but served as catalysts to a silent, unforgiving
feud.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Vocab
Neutrality Act of 1939
Kamikaze
Island hopping
Appeasement
Holocaust
Los Alamos
Allied Powers
Axis Powers
Internment
Atom Bomb
Marshall Plan
Truman Doctrine
Totalitarianism
Anschluss

31

Lend-lease Act
Blitzkrieg
Unconditional surrender
Tuskegee Airmen
Nuremberg Trials
Yalta Conference
United Nations
Geneva Convention
Satellite State
Cold War
Iron Curtain
Containment
NATO
Warsaw Pact

Manhattan Project
SEATO
38th Parallel
Arms race
Brinkmanship
Eisenhower Doctrine
Hollywood Ten
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
Munich Pact
Atlantic Charter
Bataan Death March
Blacklist
Mao Zedong
Nikita Krushchev

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

32

4B Social
SSUSHS19: identify the origins, major developments, and the domestic impact of world
war ii, especially the growth of the federal government.
a Explain A. Philip Randolphs proposed March on Washington, D.C., and President
Franklin D. Roosevelts response. (810)
b Explain the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the internment of Japanese- Americans,
German-Americans, and Italian-Americans. (789, 813)
c Describe war mobilization, as indicated by rationing, war-time conversion, and the role of
women in war industries. (792, 814, 809)
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
a Explain the impact of the new communist regime in China, the outbreak of the Korean
War, and how these events contributed to the rise of Senator Joseph McCarthy. (854, 855857, 873-875)
Despite the efforts to remain neutral during WWII, the U.S was bound to enter combat. The
attack on Pearl Harbor proved to be sufficient in succumbing the nation to war. Thousands of
innocent lives were taken and the Japanese were to blame. The U.S had developed resentment
towards the Japanese, including those living within American borders. Japanese Internment
Camps were made to seclude the race as a punishment, however not nearly as severe as the
Holocaust concentration camps. Germans and Italians were also subject to this isolation as a
result of heightening war tensions. The fear of Communism had begun to spread throughout the
United States bringing about another Red Scare. Joseph McCarthy, a U.S senator at the time,
had manifested accusations of disloyalty resulting in a wide-spread paranoia and many court
cases biased on this fear. On a positive note, however, promoted the role of women in the
workforce as a necessity to the success of America. They even furthered the movement towards
better working conditions resulting in the Executive Order 8802. At this time, everyone did
their part to help the soldiers fight the best they could through rationing food and constructing
war materials.
Vocab
Executive Order 8802

Nuremberg Laws

Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Holocaust

Genocide

J. Robert Oppenheimer

Internment of Japanese
Americans

Red Scare

Eleanor Roosevelt

McCarthyism

A. Philip Randolph

Pearl Harbor

Douglass McArthur

Anti-Semitic

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

33

4B Economic
SSUSHS19: identify the origins, major developments, and the domestic impact of world
war ii, especially the growth of the federal government.
f. Describe war mobilization, as indicated by rationing, war-time conversion, and the role of
women in war industries. (792, 814, 809)
g. Describe Los Alamos and the scientific, economic, and military implications of
developing the Atomic Bomb
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
d. Describe the creation of the Marshall Plan, U.S. commitment to Europe, the Truman
Doctrine, and the origins and implications of the containment policy. (850, 848)
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
b. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of Sputnik
I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
The Great Depression presented the worst economic downfall in the history of the United
States. The unemployment rate reached an all-time high of 25%. As WWII became a pressing
issue, the U.S was in great fear of getting involved as Americans were doing everything they
could to merely get by. Once the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, there was no choice but to
mobilize. The war effort provided jobs and a dedication to the betterment of the nation. This
unexpected turn of events essentially rescued America from the Great Depression. The Truman
Doctrine, one of the main causes of the Cold War, brought forth the Eisenhower Doctrine and the
Marshall Plan helping European and Middle Eastern Countries with monetary aid to help with
post-war recovery. The U.S had adequately recovered from the fiscal distress when the Cold War
rolled in. The USSR and the U.S showed a disparity in opinions regarding governing strategies,
and proved to be enough to go to war. These two countries did not ever engage in physical
combat as the WWII had just ended. They did engage in an arms race. Both sides spent millions
in science to catalyze technological advances. At the peak of their rivalry, experts began to
measure their progress in the amount of times each country could destroy the world. Besides
excessive spending and leaving Russia in financial misery, the Cold War allowed both countries
to exceed their technological limits and showed the World how powerful they really were.
Vocab
Rationing
Marshall Plan
Truman Doctrine
Eisenhower Doctrine

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

34

5A Political
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
a. Describe the Cuban Revolution, the Bay of Pigs, and the Cuban missile crisis. (956-958)
b. Describe the Vietnam War, the Tet offensive and growing opposition to the war. (984-991,
995-996)
c. Explain the role of geography on the U.S. containment policy, the Korean War, the Bay of
Pigs, the Cuban missile crisis, and the Vietnam War.
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
a. Describe the impact television has had on American culture; include the presidential
debates (Kennedy/ Nixon, 1960) (897, 900, 953)
b. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of Sputnik
I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
SSUSH23 The student will describe and assess the impact of political developments
between 1945 and 1970.
a. Describe the Warren Court and the expansion of individual rights as seen in the Miranda
decision. (972-973)
b. Explain Lyndon Johnsons Great Society, including the establishment of Medicare. (969971)
c. Describe the social and political turmoil of 1968, including the assassinations of Martin
Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the events surrounding the Democratic
National Convention. (996-999)
SSUSH24 The student will analyze the impact of social change movements and
organizations of the 1960s
a. Describe the rise of the conservative movement as seen in the presidential candidacy of
Barry Goldwater (1964) and the election of Richard M. Nixon (1968). (968-969, 999)
The rivalry between the United States and USSR persisted through the 50s and 60s. As both
countries battled through the arms race, weaker countries became submissive to the needs of
these superpowers. Cuba, for example, served as a Soviet base for nuclear arm storage. Large
quantities of missiles were being assembled and were being pointed right at the States. This was
infamously known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. The U.S found out though images shot through
a U-2 Spy Plane. Kennedy did not want the Soviets to know the U.S discovered their secret and
met with his advisors to discuss the problem for many days. They decided on placing a naval
blockade on Cuba to prevent the Soviets from bringing in more missiles. Kennedy and
Khrushchev negotiated a deal. The Soviets would remove their missiles from Cuba in exchange
for the U.S removing their missiles from Turkey and not invading Cuba. Separately, tensions had
built between the U.S and Cuba as Fidel Castro began to adopt a communist regime. In an effort
to suppress their government, the U.S organized the Bay of Pigs invasion which failed and
strengthening Castros Power. The U.S had also engaged in conflict with the Vietnamese in the
Gulf of Tonkin Incident which claims that Vietnamese forces attacked American destroyers.
This event resulted in the unwanted military involvement in the Vietnam War, but more
importantly is known for granting President Johnson the power to send troops to Vietnam
without the approval of Congress under certain restrictions.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Vocab
Domino Theory
Tet offensive
Interstate Highway Act
Vietnam War
Cuban Missile Crisis
1960 Kennedy Nixon
Debate
Warren Court
Johnsons Great Society
Miranda V. Arizona
Civil Rights Act 1957
Civil Rights Act 1964
24th Amendment
Democratic National
Convention

35

Deferment
Taft- Hartley Act
AFL-CIO
Brown V. Board of
Education
De Jure Segregation
March on Washington
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
Equal Rights Amendment
Roe v. Wade
Hawks
Doves
Students for a Democratic
Society
Henry Kissinger

Bay of Pigs
Robert Kennedy
Lyndon Johnson
Nikita Khrushchev
Thurgood Marshall
Barry Goldwater
Cesar Chavez
Richard M. Nixon
Fidel Castro
John F. Kennedy
Earl Warren
Medgar Evers

5A Social
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

36

c. Describe the baby boom and its impact as shown by Levittown and the Interstate
Highway Act. (883, 889, 890)
d. Analyze the impact television has had on American life; include the development of the
personal computer and the expanded use of air conditioning.
e. Describe the impact television has had on American culture; include the presidential
debates (Kennedy/ Nixon, 1960) (897, 900, 953)
SSUSH22 The student will identify dimensions of the Civil Rights movement, 1945 1970.
a. Identify Jackie Robinson and the integration of baseball.
b. Explain Brown v. Board of Education and efforts to resist the decision.
c. Describe the significance of Martin Luther King, Jr.s Letter from a Birmingham Jail and
his I Have a Dream speech.
d. Describe the causes and consequences of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting
Rights Act of 1965.
SSUSH23 The student will describe and assess the impact of political developments
between 1945 and 1970.
d. Describe the Warren Court and the expansion of individual rights as seen in the Miranda
decision. (972-973)
e. Explain Lyndon Johnsons Great Society, including the establishment of Medicare. (969971)
f. Describe the social and political turmoil of 1968, including the assassinations of Martin
Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the events surrounding the Democratic
National Convention. (996-999)
SSUSH24 The student will analyze the impact of social change movements and
organizations of the 1960s
b. Describe the National Organization of Women and the origins and goals of the modern
womens movement. (1023)
c. Analyze the anti-Vietnam War movement. (992-994, 998-999, 1002-1003)
d. Analyze Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers movement. (1029-1030)
e. Explain the importance of Rachel Carsons Silent Spring and the resulting developments;
include Earth Day, the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the
modern environmentalist movement. (1034-1035, 1036-1037)
Post WWII America shows a push towards Civil Rights. The 50s and 60s were not only
known for the Baby Boom and Levittowns, but the Civil Right Movement featuring many
influential activists both white and colored. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the SCLC
and Civil Rights martyr, was famous for his passionate speeches and the nonviolent protests he
coordinated. His Letter from a Birmingham Jail and the March on Washington served as one
of the best validations for nonviolent protests as a political tactic. He spoke with such conviction
that his voice was heard throughout the nation and brought Americans together to fight for Civil
Rights despite their differences. The Judicial Branch also abided by the Civil Rights mentality
and was clearly demonstrated through the Warren Court. Earl Warren, the Head Supreme
Court Justice at the time, strived to make the law help the individual. One his most famous cases
was Brown v. Board of Education. He ruled in favor of the Civil Rights movement saying
separate was not equal, overturning the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling. Environmental reforms also

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

37

took place, with Rachel Carsons Silent Spring being one of the main causes. It illuminated the
toxic uses of chemicals in nature and how they affect the everyday life of the average American.
The EPA, Environmental Protection Agency, was created to defend and enforce environmental
protection laws.
Vocab
Baby Boom
National Organization of
Women
United Farm Workers
Silent Spring
EPA
Rock-n-Roll
Beatnik
Conservative Movement
Montgomery Bus Boycott
Sit-In
SNCC
SCLC

Freedom Ride
Black Power
Black Panthers
Sunbelt
Nuclear Family
Television
De Facto Segregation
Brown v. Board of
Education
Letters from a Birmingham
Jail
March on Washington
Counterculture

Generation Gap
Freedom summer
Kent State University
Martin Luther King
Rachel Carson
Rosa Parks
James Meredith
Malcom X
Jackie Robinson
Cesar Chavez
Gloria Steinem

5A Economic
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

38

d. Explain the role of geography on the U.S. containment policy, the Korean War, the Bay of
Pigs, the Cuban missile crisis, and the Vietnam War.
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
f. Describe the baby boom and its impact as shown by Levittown and the Interstate
Highway Act. (883, 889, 890)
g. Analyze the impact television has had on American life; include the development of the
personal computer and the expanded use of air conditioning.
h. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of
Sputnik I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
SSUSH23 The student will describe and assess the impact of political developments
between 1945 and 1970.
g. Explain Lyndon Johnsons Great Society, including the establishment of Medicare. (969971)
America post-war promised economic prosperity. Home innovations such as the personal
computer and air conditioning allowed people to live in climates and at distances that would
have previously been unfavorable. The idea of a franchising and multinational corporations
had emerged and the ma and pa type businesses began to decrease. Business had begun to take
priority close to how it was in the late 1800s. President Johnson had developed a program he
named Johnsons Great Society. It was a set of domestic reforms put in place to eliminate
racial injustice and poverty. Some of its most famous reforms include Medicare, Medicaid and
Urban Renewal. These programs were aimed specifically at helping those with financial needs
that could only be met with government assistance. Many people today benefit from the use of
Medicare and Medicaid. The ability of the government to sustain the basic needs of Americans
promotes spending in other areas of the private sector, therefore helping the economy. These
reforms strayed from the traditional conservative appeals that had been sought after many years
before. This change in government approach fit in perfectly with the normal ebb and flow of
political platforms in American administration.

Vocab
Levittown
Air Conditioning
Personal Computer
Consumerism
Johnsons Great Society
Medicare

Information Industries
Franchise Business
Multinational Corporations
Fair Deal
Information Industries
Franchise Business

Multinational Corporations
Inner City
Urban Renewal
Medicaid

5B Political
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

39

1. Describe President Richard M. Nixons opening of China, his resignation due to the
Watergate scandal, changing attitudes toward government, and the Presidency of Gerald
Ford. (1009, 1010, 1049-1052, 1055-1057)
2. Explain the Carter administrations efforts in the Middle East including the Camp David
Accords, his response to the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Iranian hostage crisis. (10651067)
3. Describe domestic and international events of Ronald Reagans presidency, including
Reagonomics, the Iran-contra scandal, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. (1081-1083,
1087-1091)
4. Explain the relationship between Congress and President Bill Clinton, including the North
American Free Trade Agreement and his impeachment and acquittal. (1111-1112, 1115,
1113)
5. Analyze the 2000 presidential election and its outcome, emphasizing the role of the
Electoral College. (1119-1120)
6. Analyze the response of President George W. Bush to the attacks of September 11, 2001,
on the United States, the war against terrorism, and the subsequent American interventions
in Afghanistan and Iraq. (1122-1125)
The 1970s and moving forward saw a switch in political ideologies. Conservative practices
were no longer deemed the go-to move in major administrative decisions. Nixon played a large
role in this change of heart. This president was able mend relations and positively reform foreign
policies with China by recognizing it. He explained how there was no world-wide communist
movement and even sent a ping pong team over to participate in one of their competitions to
show how the U.S was willing to converse. This led to frequent trade with China and has had an
extremely beneficial impact on the U.S that is still evident today. Nixon, however, resigned from
his presidency due to the Watergate Scandal he infamously admitted having ties to. During the
Jimmy Carter Administration, the arms race had been put to a halt when both the Soviet Union
and the U.S agreed to quantitative equality of nuclear weapons. This idea was introduced during
Nixons presidency when SALT I was signed and brought full circle when the countries signed
SALT II. Carters presidency is well known for the Camp David Accords in which the U.S
helped Egypt and Israel negotiate peace. The U.S had started dealing with terrorism from the
Middle East during the Iranian Hostage Crisis in 1980, and received direct terror on 9/11 with the
falling of the twin towers. The War of Terror was declared during George W. Bushs presidency
which led to American involvement in Afghanistan.
Vocab
Silent majority
SALT I
Affirmative action
Watergate
25th Amendment
Executive privilege
Pardon
Amnesty

Helsinki Accords
SALT II
Camp David Accords
New Right
Iranian Hostage Crisis
Glasnost
Iran-Contra Affair
NAFTA

Impeachment
Bush v. Gore
Taliban
9/11
Operation Enduring
Freedom
Strategic Defense Initiative
Apartheid

Michelle Voykovic
Honors US History
Coach Tilton
12/13/15

Operation Desert Storm


Contract with America
EU
Al Qaeda
Department of Homeland
Security

40

Patriot Act
No Child Left Behind
Richard Nixon
Gerald Ford
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan

Sandra Day OConnor


George H.W. Bush
Sadam Hussein
William Jefferson Clinton
George W. Bush
Nelson Mandela

5B Social
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.
a. Explain the impact of Supreme Court decisions on ideas about civil liberties and civil
rights, including such decisions as Roe v. Wade (1973) and the Bakke decision on affirmative
action. (1026, 1083, 1062)
The battle between conservative and political ideologies played a big role in American life
post 1970s. With modernization kicking in, a Conservative Movement was started to stop the
spread of influence of abortion, the equal rights amendment, homosexuality, and affirmative
action. These freedoms were once again conceived through Supreme Court rulings strived to

protect individuals rights. The Roe v. Wade decision overturned a state law saying abortions
were forbidden except to save the life of the mother. The Bakke decision ruled in favor of the
individual when he sued against racial preferences in university admissions. This is when the
idea of New Right became prominent as so many social changes were taking place. During the
Bush administration, the No Child Left Behind Act was created to ensure the academic success
of all students as well as making sure teachers were highly qualified. This act was important as it
was the start of many reforms aimed at the younger generations. Rather than trying to eliminate
poverty and illiteracy in adults, the root of the problem was being focused on. Today we can
enjoy the fruits of these labors as all classes of people have the support of the government to
carry out daily routines as well as freedom of choice in every aspect of their lives as Americans.
Vocab
Silent Majority
Conservative Movement
Christian Fundamentalist
Helsinki Accords
Moral Majority
New Right
AIDS
Iranian Hostage Crisis
No Child Left Behind
Apartheid
Bob Woodward
Carl Bernstein
Ronald Reagan
Nelson Mandela

5B Economic
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.
1. Describe domestic and international events of Ronald Reagans presidency, including
Reagonomics, the Iran-contra scandal, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. (1081-1083,
1087-1091)
Ronald Reagan is often referred to as the greatest president the United States has ever
had. This is mainly due to the fact that he lowered taxes more than 30% which had never been
seen before. A period of stagflation had plagued the country for several years before the
Reagan administration, however changed due to the introduction of supply-side economics,
also known as Reaganomics. This government strategy was based on the idea that if taxes
were lowered, families would have more money to spend on leisure products, therefore

reducing unemployment and boosting the economy. This economic reform lowered the
unemployment rate to 2.5% and countered the effects of inflation in the U.S. Reagans
reputation suffered a blow when the Iran-Contra Affair was exposed. The president was
secretly selling weapons to Iran to fund the Contras in Nicaragua in hopes of releasing the
hostages. As this was against American policy, there was talk of impeachment. It was decided
that Reagan had too good of an impact on the nation to let the issue ruin his presidency. The
Soviet Union, our infamously worthy competitor in the Cold War, had essentially lost due to
its overspending. The bankruptcy proved to be fatal causing the world power to crumble
making the U.S look even better than it had in previous decades.
Vocab
Stagflation
OPEC
Supply-Side Economics
Weapons of Mass Destruction
Savings and Loan Crisis
Iran-Contra Affair
EU
Ronald Reagan