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Advanced Algebra Trig Pacing Guide

Power Center Academy High School
Spring 2016
Unit 5: Analytical Trigonometry
Big Ideas
The equation affects the
behavior of the graph
A quantity can be
represented numerically in
various ways.

Length: 7 Weeks

Dates: January 5 – February 19

Enduring Understandings
The measure of an angle in
standard position is the
input for two important
functions called cosine and
sine of the point on the
terminal side of the angle
that is 1 unit from the origin.
Trigonometric functions are
periodic functions.

Essential Questions
How does prior knowledge of
ratios help in understanding the
trigonometric functions?
What situations in life would
require the use of trigonometry?
What approaches can be used
to verify an identity?

Trigonometric ratios are
dependent only on angle
measure.
Week 1: Jan 5 - Jan 8
Standards:
GCCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.IF.C.7.E
Graph exponential and logarithmic functions,
showing intercepts and end behavior, and
trigonometric functions, showing period, midline,
and amplitude.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.TF.B.5
Choose trigonometric functions to model periodic
phenomena with specified amplitude, frequency,
and midline.*

Objectives:
Analyze Trig graphs (period, amplitude,
asymptotes, domain, range)
Write equations from graphs.
Write equations from word problems.

Notes

TN. F-IF.2. Identify or analyze the distinguishing
properties of exponential, polynomial, logarithmic,
trigonometric, and rational functions from tables,
graphs, and equations
TN.G-GT1. Interpret transformations of
trigonometric functions.
Week 2: Jan 11 - Jan 15
Standards:
GCCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.IF.C.7.E
Graph exponential and logarithmic functions,
showing intercepts and end behavior, and
trigonometric functions, showing period, midline,
and amplitude.

Objectives:
Interpret trig equations.
Transform trig graphs.
Write equations of graphs.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.TF.B.5
Choose trigonometric functions to model periodic
phenomena with specified amplitude, frequency,
and midline.*
TN. F-IF.2. Identify or analyze the distinguishing
properties of exponential, polynomial, logarithmic,
trigonometric, and rational functions from tables,
graphs, and equations
TN.G-GT1. Interpret transformations of
trigonometric functions.
Week 3: Jan 19 - Jan 22
Quiz 22nd
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.SRT.C.6

MLK Day
Objectives:

Understand that by similarity, side ratios in right

Find the length of missing sides.

triangles are properties of the
Side the missing angle using trig identities.
angles in the triangle, leading to definitions of
trigonometric ratios for acute
angles.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.SRT.C.7
Explain and use the relationship between the sine
and cosine of complementary
angles.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.SRT.C.8
Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean
Theorem to solve right triangles in
applied problems.*
Week 4: Jan 25 - Jan 29
Standards:
G.TI.1 Apply trigonometric identities to verify
identities and solve equations. Identities include:
Pythagorean, quotient, sum/difference, doubleangle, and half-angle.

Objectives:
Apply Trig identities to simplify expressions

Week 5: Feb 1 – Feb 5
Quiz 4th
Standards:
G.TI.1 Apply trigonometric identities to verify
identities and solve equations. Identities include:
Pythagorean, quotient, sum/difference, doubleangle, and half-angle.

Objectives:
Apply Trig identities to simplify expressions

Apply Trig identities to verify other identities

Apply Trig identities to verify other identities

Week 6: Feb 8 – Feb 11
Standards:

Objectives:

G.TI.1 Apply trigonometric identities to verify
identities and solve equations. Identities include:
Pythagorean, quotient, sum/difference, doubleangle, and half-angle.
Week 7: Feb 16 – Feb 19
Unit Test: Feb 19
Standards:
G.TI.1 Apply trigonometric identities to verify
identities and solve equations. Identities include:
Pythagorean, quotient, sum/difference, doubleangle, and half-angle.
F.IF.2 Analyze qualities of exponential, polynomial,
logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational
functions and solve real world problems that can
be modeled with these functions(by hand and
with appropriate technology). ★

Apply Trig Identities to solve Trig Equations

Objectives:
Apply Trig Identities to solve Trig Equations
Model with trigonometric functions and analyze
the qualities of the function in terms of the
contextual situation.

Unit 6: Conics
Unit Goals:
Big Ideas
The characteristics of
the equation determine
the shape of the graph
Conic sections reflect
real-world phenomena.

Length: 4
Weeks

Dates: February 22 – March 18

Enduring
Understandings
Conics represent parts of
a cone

Essential Questions
What properties does an equation
have to graph a circle, ellipse,
parabola, or hyperbola?

There are four types of
curves known as conic
sections: parabolas,
circles, ellipses, and
hyperbolas. Each curve
has its own distinct
shape and properties.

Week 1: Feb 22 – Feb 26
Standards:
A.C.1 Display all of the conic sections as portions
of a cone.

Objectives:
Display all of the conic sections as portions of a
cone.

A.C. 2 From an equation in standard form, graph
the appropriate conic section: ellipses,
hyperbolas, circles, and parabolas. Demonstrate
an understanding of the relationship between
their standard algebraic form and the graphical
characteristics.

Graph Quadratics (review), Ellipses, Hyperbolas
and Circles in standard form

CN.7 Know the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra;
show that it is true for quadratic polynomials

Know the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra;
show that it is true for quadratic polynomials

Locate and interpret critical points on the graph

Notes

F.IF.4 Identify characteristics of graphs based on a
set of conditions or on a general equation such as
y= ax2+ c.
F.IF.5 Visually locate critical points on the graphs
of functions and determine if each critical point is
a minimum, a maximum, or point of inflection.
Describe intervals of concavity and increasing
and decreasing.
Week 2: Feb 29 – Mar 4
Unit Quiz: Thurs, Mar 3rd
Standards:
A.C. 3 Transform equations of conic sections to
convert between general and standard form.
A.C. 2 From an equation in standard form, graph
the appropriate conic section: ellipses,
hyperbolas, circles, and parabolas. Demonstrate
an understanding of the relationship between
their standard algebraic form and the graphical
characteristics.

Objectives:
Convert conics from general to standard form
Relate the elements of the equation to graphical
features

F.BF.1 Understand how the algebraic properties of
an equation transform the geometric properties
of its graph. For example, given a function,
describe the transformation of the graph resulting
from the manipulation of the algebraic properties
of the equation (i.e., translations, stretches, and
changes in periodicity and amplitude)
Week 3: March 7 – 11
Standards:
F.IF.5 Visually locate critical points on the graphs
of functions and determine if each critical point is
a minimum, a maximum, or point of inflection.

Objectives:
Solve real world problems using conics

Describe intervals of concavity and increasing
and decreasing
Week 4: March 14 - March 18
Unit Test: 18th
Standards:
A.REI.4 Solve systems of nonlinear inequalities by
graphing.

Unit 7: Vectors and
Matrices
Unit Goals:
Big Ideas
Graphical methods of adding
and subtracting vectors are
applied to problems dealing
with displacement and
velocity
Matrices have properties
similar to, but not the same
as those of real numbers

Length: 3
Weeks

Objectives:
Solve real world problems using conics
Solve systems of equations using conic graphs

Dates: March 28 – April 15

Enduring Understandings
Essential Questions
A matrix is an array of
What is the relationship
numbers
between operations with
matrices and operations
Vectors are used to describe with real numbers?
quantities that have both
magnitude and direction.
How are vectors and the
concept of slope
related?

Week 1: March 28 – April 1
VM.1 Recognize vector quantities as having both

Objectives:
Represent vectors by a directed line segment

Notes

magnitude and direction. Represent vector
quantities by directed line segments, and use
appropriate symbols for vectors and their
magnitudes (e.g., v, |v|, ||v||, v).
VM.2 Find the components of a vector by
subtracting the coordinates of an initial point
from the coordinates of a terminal point.
VM.4 Add and subtract vectors.
a. Add vectors end-to-end, component-wise, and
by the parallelogram rule. Understand that the
magnitude of a sum of two vectors is typically not
the sum of the magnitudes.
b. Given two vectors in magnitude and direction
form, determine the magnitude and direction of
their sum.
c. Understand vector subtraction v – w as v + (–
w), where –w is the additive inverse of w, with the
same magnitude as w and pointing in the
opposite direction. Represent vector subtraction
graphically by connecting the tips in the
appropriate order, and perform vector subtraction
component-wise.
VM.5 Multiply a vector by a scalar.
a. Represent scalar multiplication graphically by
scaling vectors and possibly reversing their
direction; perform scalar multiplication
component-wise, e.g., as c(vx, vy) = (cvx, cvy).
b. Compute the magnitude of a scalar multiple cv
using ||cv|| = |c|v. Compute the direction of cv
knowing that when |c|v ≠ 0, the direction of
cv is either along v (for c > 0) or against v (for c
< 0).
VM.3 Solve problems involving velocity and other
quantities that can be represented by vectors.

Use appropriate symbols for vectors and their
magnitude.
Recognize vectors as mathematical objects
having both magnitude and direction
Add / subtract vectors using a variety of
methods: end-to-end, parallelogram, and
component-wise
Interpret operations on vectors (+, –, ×)
geometrically
Understand why the magnitude of the sum of
two vectors is usually less than (sometimes
equal to) the sum of their magnitudes
Represent scalar multiplication graphically
Compute the magnitude of a scalar multiple cv
using ||cv|| = |c|v.
Compute the direction of cv knowing that when
|c|v ≠ 0, the direction of cv is either along v
(for c > 0) or against v (for c < 0).
Solve problems involving velocity and other
quantities that can be represented by vectors.
Calculate and interpret the dot product of two
vectors.

VM.6 Calculate and interpret the dot product of
two vectors.
Week 2: April 4 – 8
VM 7. Use matrices to represent and manipulate
data, e.g., to represent payoffs or incidence
relationships in a network.

Planning Day
(Wednesday)
Objectives:
Use matrices to represent and manipulate data
Define the order of a matrix as the number of
rows by the number of columns

VM. 8 Multiply matrices by scalars to produce new
matrices, e.g., as when all of the payoffs in a
Multiply matrices by scalars to produce new
game are doubled.
matrices
VM.9 Add, subtract, and multiply matrices of
appropriate dimensions.

Add, subtract, and multiply matrices of
appropriate dimensions.

VM.10 Understand that, unlike multiplication of
numbers, matrix multiplication for square
matrices is not a commutative operation, but still
satisfies the associative and distributive
properties.

Add and subtract matrices and know these
operations are possible only when the
dimensions are equal

VM. 11 Understand that the zero and identity
matrices play a role in matrix addition and
multiplication similar to the role of 0 and 1 in the
real numbers. The determinant of a square matrix
is nonzero if and only if the matrix has a
multiplicative inverse.
VM. 12 Multiply a vector (regarded as a matrix
with one column) by a matrix of suitable
dimensions to produce another vector. Work with
matrices as transformations of vectors.
VM.13 Work with 2 × 2 matrices as
transformations of the plane, and interpret the

Recognize that matrix addition and subtraction
are commutative
Recognize that matrix multiplication is not
commutative
Understand and apply the properties of a zero
matrix
Understand and apply the properties of an
identity matrix
Find the determinant of a square matrix and
understand that it is a nonzero value if and only
if the matrix has an inverse

absolute value of the determinant in terms of
area.
Week 3:April 11 - 15
Unit Test: April 15th
Standards:
VM 7. Use matrices to represent and manipulate
data, e.g., to represent payoffs or incidence
relationships in a network.

Determine the area of the plane using the
determinant

Objectives:
Multiply a vector by a matrix

Apply matrix transformations to vectors
VM. 8 Multiply matrices by scalars to produce new
matrices, e.g., as when all of the payoffs in a
Use 2 X 2 matrices as transformations of a
game are doubled.
plane
VM.9 Add, subtract, and multiply matrices of
appropriate dimensions.

Represent a system of linear equations as a
matrix

VM.10 Understand that, unlike multiplication of
numbers, matrix multiplication for square
matrices is not a commutative operation, but still
satisfies the associative and distributive
properties.

Find the inverse matrix and use it to solve a
system of linear equations

VM. 11 Understand that the zero and identity
matrices play a role in matrix addition and
multiplication similar to the role of 0 and 1 in the
real numbers. The determinant of a square matrix
is nonzero if and only if the matrix has a
multiplicative inverse.
VM. 12 Multiply a vector (regarded as a matrix
with one column) by a matrix of suitable
dimensions to produce another vector. Work with
matrices as transformations of vectors.
VM.13 Work with 2 × 2 matrices as
transformations of the plane, and interpret the

absolute value of the determinant in terms of
area.

Unit 8: Final Review

Length: 2
Weeks

Dates: April 18 - May 2

Notes

Unit Goals:
Review of all standards covered throughout both semesters of Pre-Calculus
Week 1: April 18 - 22

TN Ready
(lower Math)

Review based on low proficiency skills
Week 2: April 25 - May 2
FINAL EXAM: (Multiple Choice) Friday, April 29
FINAL EXAM: (Task) Monday, May 2

Unit 9: Intro to Calculus
Unit Goals:
Composition of Functions
End behavior and asymptotes
Introduction to Limits

Length: 2
Weeks

Dates: May 3 - May 27

Notes