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Isabelle Seward

Mr. Yagid
9/3/14
Article Review: Why Woodpeckers Don’t Get Concussions
Pappas, S. (2012, April 10). Why Woodpeckers Don't Get Concussions. Retrieved September 3,
2014.
Article Body: A study on the anatomy of woodpeckers was performed to see how these
birds do not receive concussions. It was discovered that although they are susceptible to force
1000 times that of gravity, their strong neck muscles, thick cranial bone and third eyelid help to
protect them from traumatic brain injuries. By understanding the structures of the woodpeckers
skull, scientists could develop better helmets or safety gear to prevent concussions in humans.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/4/14
Article Review: Combatting TBI by Engineering Resilience in the Brain
Lerner, E. (2014, May 31). Combatting TBI by Engineering Resilience in the Brain. Retrieved
September 4, 2014.
Article Body: Researchers at UPenn studied the axons of neurons and how they react
under sudden stress such as TBI. The author uses the analogy of the axons being “rail tracks” and
the protein (tau) which acts as the “crossties” for the axons. When someone receives a
concussion, the tau proteins are less likely to stretch and absorb the shock causing the axons to
break. Using this information the scientists are able to begin researching ways to engineer the tau
as a drug to provide elasticity.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/4/14
Article Review: A Beautiful Mind: Brain Injury Turns Man Into Math Genius
Lewis, T. (2014, May 5). A Beautiful Mind: Brain Injury Turns Man Into Math Genius .
Retrieved September 4, 2014.
Article Body: After being attacked outside a bar and receiving not only a concussion,
but PTSD and OCD, Jason Padgett developed the ability to visualize complex mathematical
equations in his day to day life. He is capable of envisioning geometric patterns and formulas
with things that he sees every day. Scientists call this phenomenon Synesthesia and predict that
his abilities will be remain permanent.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/9/14
Article Review: Sarah Jane’s Dad to President Obama: Tackle the Number One Health Crisis
M.B.A., P. (2014, June 3). Sarah Jane's Dad to President Obama: Tackle the Number-One Public
Health Crisis. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
Article Body: Patrick Donohue, founder of the Sarah Jane Brain Foundation wrote a
letter to President Obama regarding the increase of mTBI in non-sports related cases such as car
accidents. He presents astonishing facts and comparisons to stress the importance for brain injury
research funding and awareness. Donohue stresses the dangers of children’s concussions and the
extreme health risks these injuries present.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/9/14
Article Review: What Happens When Brain Hits Skull
Stix, G. (2012, February 12). Inside Story: What Happens When Brain Hits Skull. Retrieved
September 9, 2014.
Article Body: This article stimulates and describes what physically happens to the brain
after a “coup” or hit. Essentially, there are different directions the brain can shake (forward, back
and forth, twist). And each time the brain crashes into the skull, it is considered a concussion
regardless of the direction. This article also stresses that a concussion is not necessarily a
contusion of the brain.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/10/14
Article Review: Brain Injury Research Leads to Better Protection for Athletes, Soldiers
Mukerji, K. (2012, September 14). Brain Injury Research Leads to Better Protection for Athletes,
Soldiers. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
Article Body: Research findings point to the correlation between sports/military
concussions and CTE (Brain Degeneration due to Tsau proteins of the brain becoming tangled
after mTBI). This can leads to the failure of neuron functions. An experiment involving mice
being exposed to a blast (simulating a soldier in warfare) shows that when the mouse’ head was
supported, they did not show signs of the pathology of CTE.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/10/14
Article Review: Rethinking the Handling of Mild Concussions
Blakeslee, S. (1995, August 1). Rethinking the Handling of Mild Concussions. Retrieved
September 11, 2014.
Article Body: Patients who are given a set time frame for the duration of symptoms
lingering often end up being left in frustration or even believing that they are making up what
they’re feeling. This difficulty of diagnostics makes it difficult for doctors to decipher symptoms
of the actual concussion or anxiety/depression resulting from the injury itself. This is important
for clinicians to know to not put a deadline on mTBI, but to stress that concussions will gradually
get better over time.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/11/14
Article Review: War Concussions Linked to Stress
Carey, B. (2008, January 30). War Concussions Linked to Stress. Retrieved September 11, 2014.
Article Body: Military concussions generally are linked to a variety of symptoms
especially in the first few months of returning home. Soldiers are often likely to develop PTSD
(Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Scientists stress that soldiers should not be led to believe that
their injuries are permanent. This is important because it shows that mild traumatic brain injuries
may link to psychological problems.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/12/14
Article Review: Back to School: Preventing Concussions on the Playing Field
Bodner, N. (2014, September 5). Back to School: Preventing Concussions on the Playing Field.
Retrieved September 12, 2014.
Article Body: This article stresses the uprise of concussions in youth sports and how this
is not only a health risk, but also an economic risk. The author recommends that in order to
prevent these injuries from occurring in the youth, consequences must be in place for any player
or coach who allows use of head plays in sports such as soccer to occur.

Isabelle Seward
Mr. Yagid
9/16/14
Article Review: The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
McKee, A. (2013, January 29). The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.
Retrieved September 16, 2014.
Article Body: A study was performed on post mortem brains with a history of repeat
mild traumatic brain injuries. Most of the subjects had been athletes, whose brains showed
entanglement of Tau proteins, known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This research
exposes the surprising numbers of how common this degenerative disease is in many athletes and
soldiers. It is important to realize how repeat injury to the head can create complications to the
brain later in life.

Isabelle Seward