You are on page 1of 15

Pilot

Favourite

Overview

Add to Portfolio

Workplace

Outlook

Share

Requirements

96% Match

Career Spectrum

Resources

Overview

Description
Many aircraft use two pilots. The most experienced pilot, known as the captain or pilot in
command, supervises all other crew members and has primary responsibility for the flight.
The copilot, often called the first officer or second in command, shares flight duties with
the captain. Some older planes require a third pilot, known as a flight engineer, who
monitors instruments and operates controls. New technology has automated many of
these tasks, and new aircraft do not require flight engineers.
Pilots must have good teamwork skills because they must work closely with other pilots on

the flight deck, as well as with air traffic controllers and flight dispatchers. They need to be
able to coordinate actions and provide clear and honest feedback.
Pilots plan their flights carefully by making sure the aircraft is operable and safe, that the
cargo has been loaded correctly, and that the weather conditions are acceptable. They file
flight plans with air traffic control, which they may modify in flight because of weather
conditions or other factors.
Takeoffs and landings can be the most difficult parts of the flight and require close
coordination between the pilot, copilot, and flight engineer, if present. Once in the air, the
captain and first officer usually alternate flying activities so each can rest. After landing,
pilots must fill out records that document their flight and the status of the aircraft.
Sample Job Titles: Airline Captain, Co-Pilot, First Officer

Provincial Outlook

Estimated Salary

$35,119 - $164,430
Learn More

Education Level
Secondary School
On-the-job Training
College/Apprenticeship

Learn More

Compatibility

96%
Match

Related Occupations

Airfield Operations Specialist

University

Learn More

Learn More

Learn More

Related Videos

How To Become An
Airline Pilot

Career Choices Helicopter Pilot

What age can I start flight

Get a bird's eye view when

training, what ratings do I...

he flies along with a
helicopter...

Workplace

Work Environment
Pilots must learn to cope with several work-related hazards. For example, airline pilots

assigned to long-distance routes may experience fatigue and jetlag. Weather and the
condition of the aircraft can also pose unique hazards. In addition, flights can be long and
flight decks are often sealed, so pilots must be able to work in small teams for long periods
in close proximity to one another.
Commercial pilots face other types of job hazards. For example, aerial applicators, also
known as crop dusters, may be exposed to toxic chemicals, typically use unimproved
landing strips, and are at a higher risk of collision with power lines and birds than many
other pilots. Helicopter pilots involved in rescue operations regularly fly at low levels
during bad weather or at night. These pilots also often land in areas surrounded by power
lines or other obstacles, such as highways. Pilots also face the risk of hearing loss resulting
from prolonged exposure to engine noise.
Although flying may not involve unusually high levels of physical effort, the high-level of
concentration required to fly an aircraft and the mental stress of being responsible for the
safety of passengers can be fatiguing. Pilots must be alert and quick to react if something
goes wrong, particularly during takeoff and landing. As a result, federal law requires pilots
to retire at age 65.
Pilots work all over the country, but most are based near large airports.

Main Duties

Steer aircraft along planned routes, using autopilot and flight management
computers.
Respond to and report in-flight emergencies and malfunctions.
Monitor gauges, warning devices, and control panels to verify aircraft performance
and to regulate engine speed.
Contact control towers for takeoff clearances, arrival instructions, and other
information, using radio equipment.
Start engines, operate controls, and pilot airplanes to transport passengers, mail, or
freight, adhering to flight plans, regulations, and procedures.
Use instrumentation to guide flights when visibility is poor.

Work as part of a flight team with other crew members, especially during takeoffs and
landings.
Inspect aircraft for defects and malfunctions, according to pre-flight checklists.
Monitor engine operation, fuel consumption, and functioning of aircraft systems
during flights.
Meet with flight dispatchers and weather forecasters to keep up to date with flight
conditions.

Important Skills

Communication skills. Pilots must speak clearly When conveying information to air
traffic controllers. They must also listen carefully for instructions.
Observational skills. Pilots must regularly watch over screens, gauges, and dials to
make sure that all systems are in working order. They also need to maintain
situational awareness by looking for other aircraft or obstacles. Pilots must be able to
see clearly to judge the distance between objects, and possess good colour vision.
Problem-solving skills. Pilots must be able to identify complex problems and figure
out appropriate solutions. When a plane encounters turbulence, for example, Pilots
may assess the weather conditions and request a route or altitude change from air
traffic control.
Quick reaction time. Pilots must be able to respond quickly and with good judgment
to any impending danger because warning signals may appear suddenly.

Career Cluster

This cluster involves the movement of people, materials, and
goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water. It also includes
different areas of work such as transportation operations,
planning and management services, warehouse and

Transportation, Distribution
and Logistics

distribution centre operations, facility and mobile equipment
maintenance and transportation system regulations.

Outlook

Job Outlook

Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Ontario

Prince Edward Island

Not Available

Quebec
Saskatchewan
Yukon

Job Outlook based on NOC 2271 (Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors)

View Regional Data

Salary Ranges

Canada

$35,119 - $125,201

Alberta

$35,119 - $164,430

British Columbia

$32,114 - $108,340

Manitoba

$37,623 - $103,541

New Brunswick

$37,435 - $117,710

Newfoundland and Labrador

$48,369 - $117,960

Nova Scotia

$35,307 - $109,342

Northwest Territories

$40,628 - $150,950

Nunavut
Ontario
Prince Edward Island

Not Available
$40,127 - $150,491
Not Available

Quebec

$34,701 - $109,133

Saskatchewan

$59,199 - $177,201

Yukon

Not Available

Salary Ranges are based on hourly rates for NOC 2271 (Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors) and an estimated 2086 hours
per year

View Regional Data

Employment Growth

2012

25,894

2013

26,186

2014

26,389

2015

26,582

2016

26,728

2017

26,804

2018

26,876

2019

26,957

2020

26,976

2021

27,017

2022

27,071

Employment Growth based on Stats Canada Occupation Group 227

Requirements

Education Level

Secondary School

On-the-job Training

College/Apprenticeship

University

Requirements

Graduation from a certified flying or aviation school are required.
A university degree or college diploma may be required.
A commercial pilot's licence or an air transport pilot's licence is required.
Additional licences or endorsements to fly different types of aircraft are required.

Subject Areas

Technical & Trades

Related Programs

Automotive Service
Technician...

Truck and Coach PreApprenticeship

Automotive Collision
Repair and...

Kwantlen Polytechnic

Centennial College of

University of the Fraser

University

Applied Arts and Technology

Valley

Career Spectrum

Interests

Your Interest Type is

This occupation is a

THE TACTICIAN (CE)

GOOD MATCH

Match Results

Your Results

Occupation Results

Conventional

Enterprising
96%

88%

72%

33%

Realistic

Investigative
65%

56%

100%

56%

Artistic

Social
50%

38%

6%

11%

Knowledge

Your top subject area is

This occupation is a

TECHNICAL & TRADES

GOOD MATCH

Match Results

Your Results

Technical & Trades

Occupation Results

Computers
100%

89%

58%

56%

Business

Physical Education
89%

83%

36%

32%

Mathematics

Social Science
72%

72%

47%

46%

Science

Creative Arts
67%

67%

41%

28%

Languages

English
56%

50%

31%

30%

Motivations

Your top motivation factor is

This occupation is a

WORKING CONDITIONS

GOOD MATCH

Match Results

Your Results

Working Conditions

Occupation Results

Support
75%

69%

81%

89%

Independence

Recognition
58%

56%

89%

78%

Achievement

Relationships
50%

42%

78%

67%

Compatibility
Steer aircraft along planned routes, using autopilot and flight management
computers.

Definitely

Respond to and report in-flight emergencies and malfunctions.

Definitely

Monitor gauges, warning devices, and control panels to verify aircraft
performance and to regulate engine speed.

Definitely

Contact control towers for takeoff clearances, arrival instructions, and other
information, using radio equipment.

Definitely

Start engines, operate controls, and pilot airplanes to transport passengers,
mail, or freight, adhering to flight plans, regulations, and procedures.

Definitely

Use instrumentation to guide flights when visibility is poor.

Definitely

Work as part of a flight team with other crew members, especially during
takeoffs and landings.

Definitely

Inspect aircraft for defects and malfunctions, according to pre-flight checklists.

Definitely

Monitor engine operation, fuel consumption, and functioning of aircraft
systems during flights.

Definitely

Meet with flight dispatchers and weather forecasters to keep up to date with
flight conditions.

Definitely

Resources

Related Occupations

Airfield Operations
Specialist

Air Traffic Controller

Flight Attendant

Air traffic controllers

Flight attendants provide

Airfield operations

coordinate the movement of

personal services to ensure

specialists ensure the safe

air traffic to ensure that...

takeoff and landing of

the safety and comfort of
airline...

commercial and...

Job Search

Pilot
Canadian Armed Forces
environment depends on the military role assigned to the Pilot. Search and Rescue Pilots are
deployed anywhere in ... salary may be higher. Related Civilian Occupations * Airline pilot * Medical
evacuation pilot * Flight...

Dec 11, 2015

Medical Technology
U.S. Navy
Here they learn about the military structure of the U.S ... of traditions and customs, leadership
development and military etiquette. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but
competitive and based on performance. Navy...

Dec 19, 2015

Medical Technology (Reserve)
U.S. Navy Reserve
Here they learn about the military structure of the U.S ... of traditions and customs, leadership
development and military etiquette. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but
competitive and based on performance. Navy...

Dec 19, 2015

Helpful Links
Ontario:
Transport Canada
www.tc.gc.ca/eng/pacific/menu.htm
British Columbia:
Transport Canada
www.tc.gc.ca/eng/pacific/menu.htm
Alberta:
Transport Canada
www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/personneltraining-licensing-menu.htm
Saskatchewan:
Transport Canada
https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/personneltraining-licensing-menu.htm
Prince Edward Island:
Transport Canada
https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/personneltraining-licensing-menu.htm

Disclaimer
We work hard to ensure the information on this page is up-to-date. However, myBlueprint will not be
liable for the accuracy of the information. Please contact us if you notice any errors or would like to
share your feedback.