Introduction

For the past couple of years, you've bided your time with silly illegal street racing and stupidly forgiving arcade physics. It's time to step up and play with the big boys. This is Gran Turismo 4. So you're probably out of practice. Years of careless drifting and lazy wall-riding can do that to you. Unforunately, Gran Turismo 4 isn't here to hold your hand; the series has always produced the most challenging and complex racing games available. With 51 different tracks, hundreds of vehicles to choose from, and over 80 different license tests, Gran Turismo 4 upholds the tradition of relentless challenge. Whether you're a returning GT vet or a simulation racing neophyte, we understand that this game isn't easy. But no matter where you're stuck, we've got you covered. In this complete Gran Turismo 4 strategy guide, you'll find: Racing 101: Everything you need to know about proper racing technique, including explanations of weight distribution, different vehicle drivetrains, and general racing knowledge you'll carry with you throughout your Gran Turismo career. Race Track Analysis: Every one of Gran Turismo 4's race tracks—51 in all—disected for your benefit, with maps showing apexes and tips on problem turns. License Tests: Plenty of strategy and tips to get you through the 80+ license tests and back on the road, racing where you should be. Advanced Tuning: Unlock the hidden power inside your vehicle, and get the most out of your engine. Special tips on tuning for different course types will give you the edge you need to beat the pack. Simulation Walkthrough: Detailed chronicles of the massive simulation mode with tips and vehicle recommendations for every race. Prize Cars: A complete list of the prize cars of Gran Turismo 4 and the requirements for unlocking them. Need a new ride? Don't got the cash? Check out our list of unlockables to get what you need for free. Guide by: Mark Ryan Sallee This PDF Guide is property of IGN Entertainment. Any unlawful duplication or posting of this document without the consent of IGN Entertainment will result in legal action.

Racing 101
Street Racing Off-Road Racing Vehicle Types General Tips

Basic Turn Philosophy — For just about every turn on each race course, the same core philosophy applies: Slow in, fast out. This idea is based on the simple fact speed out of a turn gives you speed beyond the turn. Think of it this way. Imagine a fairly sharp turn, and a super long straight-away that immediately follows. Because the turn is sharp, you can't help but have to slow down for the corner. However, the long straight-away that follows the turn is your chance to get your vehicle to maximum speed. Since you know that you have to be slow for the corner and you know that have to be fast in the straight, it only makes sense that you should focus all your efforts on maximizing your speed in the straight. To do that, you must sacrifice some speed in the corner. If you head into a corner at full speed and try to whip around the turn, you'll end up slowing down anyway. And when you go to exit the turn (and head into the straight), you'll find that you won't have the accelerating power necessary to get you up to speed quickly. In this instance, you sacrificed speed in the straight so that you could keep your speed in the corner. But because speed in the straight is more important than speed in the corner, this sacrifice is a bad choice, and will lead to slower lap times. Slow in, fast out. It's a motto of sorts. If you're slow going into a turn, you'll be more able to direct your car along the perfect racing line. If you stick to the perfect racing line, you'll be able to start your acceleration out of the turn much sooner than if you had gone into the turn too quickly. This head-start on your exit accerlation will directly affect Fast in, slow out. BAD the top speed you reach in the straight that follows. If another car powers through the corner at a higher speed, they won't have the same advantage in acceleration. So even if they do happen to go through the corner faster than you do, your car will catch up and pass them in the straight. This philosophy applies to all types of turns, including gradual sweeping turns, hairpins, and even s-turns and chicanes. For s-turns, you've basically got two corners that are connected before you reach the straight-away. Because the first corner does not open up into a straight, it's more important to get your acceleration speed out of the second corner of the s-turn. Sacrifice speed around the first corner of the s-turn to allow yourself plenty of control heading into the second corner. This will let you line up a perfect apex to maximize your exit speed.

Slow in, fast out. GOOD

Hitting Apexes — The slow in, fast out philosophy may be great, but it still doesn't give you the whole formula for taking turns properly. Another component to every turn is the apex of the turn. The apex is the point on the inside of the curve that you want to aim for, and is usually the point where you start your acceleration out of the turn. For almost every turn, you will have to drive at reduced speeds in order to maintain traction and control. The purpose of targetting an apex is to get your car moving in a straight line as soon as possible, even before you've fully exited the turn.
Red dot = apex. Aim for it!

Again, imagine a sharp turn that leads into a straight. The turn curves, sort of like the letter U, and the straight line of the course doesn't start until after you've passed through the curve of the U. However, because all turns have depth—because the road is wider than your vehicle—you don't have to drive in the exact direction that the curve moves. Take that same U-shaped turn, and imagine driving through in a line that more closely resembles a V. Because the exit line of a V is straighter than the curve of a U, you'll be able to accelerate sooner and more effectively heading into the straight that follows the curve. Of course, you don't want to transform every corner into a perfect V. It's not effective for Straight lines through curves. your speed (since making the instant switch from moving down to up is impossible for a car), and that's not the point of this lesson (the point also is not to confuse you, but we apologize if we did). The point you need to get from this is that it is possible to form a straight exit line, even through a curved turn. How does this relate to an apex? The apex of a turn should be a part of that straight exit line. After you've navigated the meat of the turn, you cut in to target your apex and get on the gas to accelerate in as straight a line as possible. You want that straight line to extend beyond the apex and continue into the straight-away without curving. This will maximize your acceleration out of the turn, and give you the most speed possible out of a turn.

The Beauty of Straight Lines — If you've kept up with the reading, you likely know by now how beautiful straight lines are when you're accelerating. We'll go into the details of the reasons why a little later, but it's important that you understand this simple concept: your vehicle will accelerate more quickly if your car is moving in a perfectly straight line. However, this isn't the only beauty of straight lines. Even more important than straight lines for accelerating is keeping straight lines when braking. When you're speeding into a tight turn, you want to start braking before you actually enter the turn. This will allow you to brake in a straight line. If you wait too long before braking, you'll enter the meat of the turn and will still have to brake, forcing you to brake while turning. The problem with braking through turns is that your car becomes much more likely to slide. If you're sliding, you're not moving as quickly as possible, which means you're losing speed unnecessarily. If you limit your braking to straight lines, you'll avoid any unnecessary sliding, and you'll slow down in the fastest possible manner.

Weight Distribution — Another important aspect of proper racing (and in particular, turning) is weight distribution. Every action you perform if your vehicle affects weight distribution, and these changes in weight distribution can drastically affect the way your vehicle handles and responds. When you accelerate, the quick forward movement of your vehicle shifts the weight to the back tires. Your rear tires have the most grip during instantaneous acceleration, which is a huge bonus for rear-wheel-drive vehicles. With this added grip, the actions of the rear tires (in the case of a rear-wheel-drive vehicle, pushing the car forward) has more affect than usual. However, at the same time that your rear tires are getting more grip, the weight of your vehicle is shifting away from your front wheels. Consequently, the actions of your front wheels—turning—has a reduced effect on the car. Under instantaneous acceleration, control of your vehicle's steering is reduced because the front tires have less grip. Conversely, braking shifts the weight of your car to the front tires. This is part of the reason why you have much more control of your vehicle at lower speeds; the added weight on the front tires gives those tires more grip on the road, and their action—turning—has more effect on the vehicle as a result.

Left: The car brakes, shifting the weight to the front tires. Notice that the rear end rises. Right: The car accelerates, shifting the weight to the rear tires. Notice that the rear end dips lower.

As you can imagine, turning also affects the weight distribution of your vehicle. Turning left will shift the weight of your vehicle to the right wheels, and turning right will shift the weight to the left. More important than the increase in traction to certain wheels is the loss of grip to the opposite tires. As certain tires lose traction, the actions of those tires are diminished. The most obvious effect of this phenomenon is a decrease in acceleration. Because certain tires lose their traction while turning, your vehicles loses some of its accelerating power during cornering. And while this doesn't mean that you should never accelerate while turning (that's just silly), it does mean that you should keep your lines as straight as possible when exiting turns.

Left: As the car turns left, notice how this indicator shows the weight shifting right. Right: Likewise, as the car turns right, the weight of the vehicle shifts to the left wheels.

Tire Grip — Now that you understand weight distribution, you can start applying your knowledge to help your racing performance. An obvious use of this knowledge is maximizing the tire grip when you need it. Think about which tires you want to have the most grip in a given situation, and apply your knowledge of weight transfer to give those tires the proper grip. Another aspect of tire traction is the grip threshold. Even under optimal conditions, the grip of your tires has a definite limit. This is obvious when accelerating from a complete stand-still; if you just lay into the gas at the start of the race, you'll hear your tires squeal as they try to push your car forward. Also, if you try to go around a turn too quickly, you'll often hear your tires squeal, or may even see your vehicle slide out of control. These are examples of exceeding the grip threshold of the tires. This is almost always a bad thing. If a tire is exceeding its grip threshold, the tire is spinning without doing anything. If you're trying to accelerate, a spinning tire will lose its accelerating effect, resulting is reduced acceleration speeds. If you're trying to turn, a loss in grip from your tires means that those tires won't be able to steer the vehicle very well. Even though burnouts may sound and look cool, because they exceed the grip threshold of tires burnouts actually greatly reduce acceleration times. Similarly, exciting powerslides around corners are actually not very effective. The loss in tire traction during a power slide just means that the tires are neither accelerating nor turning the vehicle as well as they possibly could. Moral of the story: Don't slide around turns, and don't do burnouts at the starting line. Neither will help you.

Street Racing

Off-Road Racing

Vehicle Types

General Tips

Many of the same basic driving philosophies of street racing apply to off-road racing. The slow in, fast out approach still applies, weight distribution still matters, and straight lines still rule the course (in fact, they're even more important in offroad racing). However, no matter how skilled you are on the asphalt, once you take your wheels off-road you'll feel like a green racer. Things in the dirt and snow are decidedly different. The Powerslide — Unlike in street racing, sliding your vehicle is actually beneficial on off-road surfaces. That is, of course, assuming you can control the slide for optimal performance. Just like in street racing, a bad slide can severely damage your lap times. But learn the art well, and you'll soon be flying around corners faster than you before imagined. A couple of elements determine the quality of the slide. First, you must get the approach and exit angles correct. When approaching a typical turn, stay wide outside before you begin to corner. When you get near the corner—but before you actually reach it—turn into the bend, aiming for the very inside of the corner as you adjust your car to be semi-parallel with the road at the other end of the corner. During the beginning portion of this slide, it's alright to get on the Left to right: Turn early, slide, straighten, accelerate. gas to push the car around the bend. However, you need to moderate your throttle to avoid spinning the vehicle out of control. Too much gas during a slide can send the tail sliding uncontrollably. Save the bulk of your acceleration for when you get past the actual corner—when your vehicle is finally parallel with the outsides of the track, keep your wheels straight and get back on the gas to accelerate out of the corner.

You can use the width of the track to keep moving outside just slightly, but you need to remain in control of the vehicle.

Left: Stay wide outside the turn as you approach it. Right: Turn early into the corner, setting the car up to be parallel with the road beyond the turn.

The most challenging part of the powerslide is to control the slide out of the corner while maintaining your speed. When you go into a corner sliding (and still have a lot of speed behind you), it's easy to let to car keep sliding out of the corner, all the way across the track on the other end of the corner, and into the outside wall as you exit. This is bad. What you need to do is regulate your speed and, most importantly, let your tires regain traction before you get back on the gas. If you let the tires regain traction—by regulating your throttle and stabilizing the vehicle's direction—you'll both avoid slamming into the outer wall and get the most bang from your acceleration out of the corner.

Left: Slide around the inside of the corner, keeping the car straight. Right: With the car straight, accelerate out of the turn. You can let the car keep moving to the outside of the track, but you must regain control before hitting the wall.

Traction — If you read the above, then you already know that good traction is vital to both proper turning and to acceleration. It should be obvious, then, that good tire traction should be the focus of your off-road racing. You must relinquish some control to the road and the flow of racing, but you still can do a number of things to retain grip on the road. A number of things affect the traction your tires have. For details on the specifics of weight distribution, read the Street Racing section of this guide. The same rules of weight distribution in street racing apply to off-road racing, though their effects are somewhat different. Because off-road racing takes place on much more volatile road surfaces, changes in your vehicle's weight distribution will drastically affect the amount of traction your tires have. Thus, you can somewhat control the traction of your tires by controlling the weight distribution. More simply, you can control your traction with two main techniques. 1) Keep your car as straight as possible, as long as possible. 2) Moderate the amount of gas you give the car while in turns. Keeping your wheels pointed straight ahead will dramatically improve the tires' traction. All tires are pointing in the same direction, all attempting to push the car in the same direction. When all of the tires are doing the same thing, the grip is improved. Add in the elements of weight distribution and you can even further improve the traction of the tires. When the vehicle is moving in a perfectly straight line, both rear tires have equally more traction than the front tires. Controlling wheelspin by moderating your accelerator is also very important to maintaining traction. If you're accelerating

through a turn, the weight of the car will shift to the outside rear tire. That leaves this lone tire with the bulk of the responsibility to keep the car in control. If you give the vehicle too much gas and induce excessive wheelspin in that tire, the loss in traction will likely cause the vehicle to slide out of control. This is why it is so important to be gentle with the throttle when you're still inside turns.

Too much gas in the turns—especially while sliding—will result in nasty spinouts. Keep the front and rear wheels moving around the corner at the same speed. If the rear tires outrun the front tires, this spinout is what you get.

There's another element at play in this same scenario. As you accelerate through a turn, your front tires lose a lot of traction because the weight of the car shifts away from them. The added traction to the rear tires gives them the ability to push the car through the turn, but it's important that you don't push too hard. If you do give the car too much gas, the rear tires will essentially outrun the front tires in the corner. The end result of this mess is a nasty spinout, where the rear end of the car swings around the turn before the front tires can keep up.

Street Racing

Off-Road Racing

Vehicle Types

General Tips

FR - Front Engine, Rear Wheel Drive — The FR drivetrain is the design of choice for many of the most powerful vehicles available, including the Dodge Viper, Chevrolet Corvette, and the Mazda RX-7. It's a very solid design because of a couple distinct advantages. Because the engine is in the front of the vehicle, the front tires benefit from the weight of the engine. This added weight pressing down on the front tires gives these wheels added grip that's especially useful while turning. And because the vehicle is rear-wheel driven (the rear wheels handle the acceleration), the vehicle benefits from the natural effects of acceleration. If you recall the rules of weight distribution, acceleration of a vehicle shifts the car's weight to the back tires. This added push on the rear tires will result in added grip, which increases the effectiveness of the rear-wheel-drive power.

FR vehicles are great in the straights, but uncontrollable monsters in the corners. Beginners beware!

The FR drivetrain is a solid choice for performance, but it's not the easiest to master. When pulling through tight corners, too much gas can easily send an FR vehicle's tail end sliding. During tight corners, the car's weight naturally shifts towards the front of the car as you brake. With no weight to hold them down, the back tires become more prone to slipping, resulting in a fishtail maneuver that can be very costly. Because of this effect (known as oversteer), it is especially important to reserve your acceleration to straight lines when driving an FR vehicle. But as long as you can maintain control in the corners, you'll find that the FR drivetrain's advantages outweigh its shortcomings.

FF - Front Engine, Front Wheel Drive — The popularization of the FF drivetrain is a somewhat new phenomenon. And while the most high-end vehicles around typically do not use it, the FF design still has its advantageous. Most importantly, the FF drivetrain is good for those that are new to racing. And since it's used often with cheaper vehicles, it's great for beginner Gran Turismo fanatics. Because the engine rests over the same wheels that provide the acceleration, FF cars are very controllable through corners. Unlike real-wheel-drive vehicles, a front-wheel-drive car doesn't have to worry about a lack of weight pushing down on the tires that drive the car. The front tires always have weight from the engine, which gives them plenty of traction and keeps the car from sliding inside corners.

FR vehicles are very controllable in corners, making them ideal for beginners.

The downside to the FF design is apparent during acceleration. As the car accelerates, the vehicle naturally shifts its weight to the rear tires. But since the rear tires of an FF vehicle are not responsible for the acceleration, this increased grip is a waste. And because the weight shifts away from the front tires, the wheels that actually push the car forward lose some traction, resulting in weaker acceleration. Also, front-wheel-drive vehicles are often prone to understeer in corners. Because the rear tires don't have any push of their own, they're essentially being dragged by the front of the vehicle. During a turn, this dead weight can keep the car from turning as tightly as desired (where as a rear-wheel-drive vehicle would have some push from the rear tires to keep up with the turn).

MR - Mid Engine, Rear Wheel Drive — A design choice for a few exotic sports cars (including the Acura NSX and Opel Speedster), the MR drivetrain has its own set of unique advantages. Balancing somewhere between other drivetrains in design, MR vehicles benefit from weight balance and control. Because the engine is placed close to the center of the car, the vehicle's center of gravity is nicely balanced. Both the front tires and rear tires benefit from the weight of the engine, though the rear tires get more of the weight. And that's a good thing, considering the rear-wheel-drive setup that spits out the power from the back tires. This added weight on the rear tires is great for acceleration, making MR vehicles great coming out of corners.

With a solid center of gravity, MR vehicles have grip both in and out of turns.

Another element of the MR design that adds to their cornering ability is that the rear tires always have some weight on them, even during tight cornering. Whereas FR vehicles lose some cornering ability because their accelerating tires

have so little grip in corners, MR vehicles are more controllable because the rear tires have more traction. Since their still rear-wheel-drive vehicles, MR cars are still prone to oversteer, but the effects are usually not nearly as obvious (or detrimental) as in an FR vehicle.

RR - Rear Engine, Rear Wheel Drive — Not many cars feature the RR drivetrain, but the few that do are pretty impressive vehicles (including Porches and RUFs). Rear engine vehicles share some of the benefits of mid engine cars, but differences still exist, giving RR vehicles their own disadvantages. Like mid engine vehicles, RR cars benefit from having a lot of weight push down on the rear tires. This added weight gives the rear tires more traction for acceleration and cornering. Rear engine vehicles are great in the straights, and while the added weight to the rear tires can theoretically help fight oversteer, the same weight can pose a slight problem if you're not careful with your car's power.

Though they usually have good handling, RR vehicles can wear out tires on turns due to extra weight.

Because all of the weight of the car is in the back of the vehicle, RR cars still have a tendency to oversteer. The oversteer of an RR vehicle isn't as uncontrollable as that of an FR car, but can still be a problem. As you travel around corners, the weight of the car shifts to the outside tires. With so much weight placed on the back tires, RR vehicles have a tendency break loose. Also, this added pressure on the tires can often result in early wear. Long races may be difficult to tackle using stock tires and an rear engine vehicle because of this added wear.

4WD - Four Wheel Drive — The 4WD distinction doesn't specify where the engine is placed in a vehicle, though in almost all cases the engine is in the front of the vehicle. 4WD vehicles have numerous benefits and really no inherent downsides, making them great beginner and mid-level vehicles. Vehicles such as the Subaru STi and the Mitsubishi GTO are great mid to high-end vehicles that are easy for unexperienced drivers to handle. What gives 4WD vehicles such a nice advantage is that all of their wheels are capable of pushing the car forward. This means that no matter where the weight of your vehicle has shifted, there's always a tire capable of accelerating the vehicle that has traction. This makes 4WD vehicles very controllable in corners, and also gives them an advantage in situations where traction is hard to come by.

Since 4WD vehicles have the best all-around grip, they're great in adverse conditions, including off-road.

4WD vehicles are great in off-road races. Whereas a normal two-wheel-drive vehicle could easily lose acceleration power by losing traction to just two tires (or sometimes even just one), 4WD vehicles are capable of putting down power wherever traction is available. If one or two tires slip, a 4WD vehicle can still effectively accelerate, giving them a distinct advantage over non-4WD vehicles. This same advantage can apply to regular street courses with rainy conditions. Just as dirt can often break a tire's traction, wet asphalt can be difficult to grip. 4WD vehicles are much less likely to spin their tires than their two-wheel-drive counterparts, and that's always an advantage.

Street Racing

Off-Road Racing

Vehicle Types

General Tips

Good Practice

Practicing tracks in the game's time trial mode is great for learning tracks. The only problem with this is that it's hard to tell if you're actually doing any good—with no opponents to race against, there's nothing to show that you're racing well or if you're doing poorly. However, this can be rectified! Before starting your own time trial, head into the race and start a B-Spec time trial. Allow the B-Spec computer to run the car through a trial, creating an example ghost. If you exit the B-Spec, you can go right back into an A-Spec time trial, and the ghost from the B-Spec will be there for you. You can then race against the B-Spec ghost until you beat its time.

Outpower Your Opponents

If you can't beat them, outpower them! Though not every race series will allow this, you can very often beat your opposition simply by outpowering them. If you're having trouble winning a certain race, go back to previous races to win some easy cash. When you've got the cash to do so, buy some turbo upgrades for your vehicle, giving yourself a huge boost in horsepower. Even if you aren't very good at a given course, you can tear your opponents apart in the straights and often win races that are otherwise too challenging.

B-Spec Is Your Friend

Though A-Spec racing is by far the best way to have fun with Gran Turismo 4, the game's built-in B-Spec mode can be a great way to earn some easy cash. If you know of a race series that your vehicle can easily win, head into it and enter B-Spec mode. Set your car to speed level 3 and then press R1 to enter the race monitor. From within the race monitor, hold L1 and tap right on the d-pad twice. This will set the race to progress at 3x speed. Just sit back, relax, and watch your car do the work for you. In no time at all, you'll earn the winnings from the race.

Change Your Oil

The more you drive your vehicle, the dirtier the oil gets. Once the oil reaches a certain level of uncleanliness, your vehicle's horsepower takes a hit, and it can sometimes be a considerable drop in power. From time to time, make sure you take your car to the shop and change the oil to keep it maintained. Also, change the oil of any used car you purchase. Used cars always have hidden horsepower you can unlock simply by changing up the oil.

One Car Kills Two Birds

When you start considering the purchase of a new vehicle, keep in mind the uses for the car. If you need a Japanese vehicle to compete in some Japan-only races, look for a Japanese vehicle that also fits the requirements for some other races. If you can focus your money on one car that's good for multiple events—such as a Japanese vehicle with a 4WD drivetrain, or a German vehicle with a boxer engine—you'll get the most bang for your buck.

License Tests

Passing the license tests of Gran Turismo 4 is arguably the most difficult aspect of the game, which is why anything that makes them easier is A-OK in our book. Luckily, the game includes a helpful crutch. As you enter an individual portion of the test, choose the second option instead of going straight into the driver's seat. You'll be able to spectate a replay that demonstrates the correct way to perform the test in order to pass.

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Floor the gas before the the timer starts and stay on it as you head down the course. Don't touch the steering at all, and slam the brakes as the nose of the vehicle reaches the center of the "100." Floor the gas before the the timer starts and stay on it as you head down the course. Don't touch the steering at all, and slam the brakes after the vehicle's back tires cross the white line before the "200." Floor the gas before the timer starts. As you start heading into the corner, slowly merge right to reach the outside of the track. Stay on the gas until you pass under the "Polyphony" banner. Once you do, aim your car slightly inward (left) and hit the brakes to slow down to speed. Turn towards the inside of the corner and feather the throttle as you keep along the inside. When you see the course start to straighten out, floor the gas again and let your speed pull you to the outside of the course. Keep on the gas to finish. Floor the gas before the timer starts. As you start heading into the corner, slowly merge right to reach the outside of the track. Stay on the gas until you pass under the "Polyphony" banner. Once you do, aim your car slightly inward (left) and hit the brakes to slow down to speed. Turn towards the inside of the corner and feather the throttle as you keep along the inside. When you see the course start to straighten out, floor the gas again and let your speed pull you to the outside of the course. Keep on the gas to finish. Because the car is pretty slow, you'll have to make the most of your speed around the course. Be sure to hit your apexes correctly, and don't brake unless you need to (consult the Tsukuba Circuit course analysis). You especially want to keep up your speed around the final turn. Stay wide left heading into the turn and cut in early. Tap the brakes lightly before turning and then feather the throttle around the corner. Get on the gas early and don't let your tires lose traction before crossing the finish. Floor the gas before the the timer starts and stay on it as you head down the course. Don't touch the steering at all, and slam the brakes just before the nose of the vehicle crosses the last white line before the "500." Floor the gas before the the timer starts and stay on it as you head down the course. Don't touch the steering at all, and slam the brakes as soon as the vehicle's rear tires cross over the "800." Keep on the gas and slowly merge to the left side of the course as you approach the corner. Once you start heading into the corner, turn just slightly right (into the apex) and get on the brakes for a moment. When you're down to speed, feather the throttle as you push around the inside of the corner and then get on the gas to exit with the most speed possible, using the entire width of the track as your speed pulls you left. Watch the example run of this test for the best route through the cones. If you don't care about your medal, you can take your time through the course. You don't have to beat any certain time to earn a bronze. Keep on the gas and slowly merge to the left side of the course as you approach the corner. Once you start heading into the corner, turn just slightly right (into the apex) and get on the brakes for a moment. When you're down to speed, feather the throttle as you push around the inside of the corner and then get on the gas to exit with the most speed possible, using the entire width of the track as your speed pulls you left.

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Consult the Laguna Seca Raceway analysis for details on tackling this track. As long as you brake early before turns, you can get on the gas early as you exit, letting you easily make the lap in time. Get on the gas before the timer begins. You can go around the first corner without letting off the throttle, though you don't want to hug inside too tight. Stay outside the corner for the better part of it and then cut in closer just before the track straightens out, letting you get a longer straight for acceleration. As you approach the second turn, brake early and hard, and then very lightly feather the throttle as you twist around the turn. Get on the gas as soon as possible (staying in a straight line) and go for the finish. Get on the throttle and slowly make your way to the left side of the course. You don't need to brake for the turn—just turn in tight and early to slide around the corner. As long as you stay on the throttle and avoid slamming into the outer wall, you'll make it to the finish in time. Floor it down the straight and stick to the far left side of the track. As you enter the corner, aim slightly right towards the inside of the turn and brake for just a moment. When you're down to speed, steer far right and feather the throttle to stick to the inside of the track. Just before the course straightens out, get back on the gas hard and let your speed pull you to the outside of the track before crossing the finish. Floor it into the corner, keeping far left on the track. Brake early before the turn and then turn sharply into it, staying just barely outside of the inside of the course. Aim for a late apex and get on the gas to exit out of the turn with the most speed possible. Because the vehicle is so slow, you can afford to brake later into most of the turns, but don't sacrifice any exit speed for this. The one turn you definitely don't want to brake late for is the very last turn. The hairpin is very sharp, so slow down early and stay wide left until you cut in for a late apex. Stay wide left for the first turn and just barely tap your brakes before taking the turn sharply (an early apex is okay). As you approach the last turn, brake late to slow down to speed. Once you're done braking, pull hard right to aim for a late apex into the straight.

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Floor the gas towards the turn, keeping wide left on the track. As you approach the turn, turn slightly inwards towards the inside of the track and brake hard (just briefly). Once down to speed, turn hard right and feather the throttle, slowly moving inward to reach the apex. Just before the course straightens out, get back on the gas and use the enitre width of the track to accelerate without losing traction. Stay wide right as you approach the first bend, and keep flooring the gas. You can get around this first bend without letting off the accelerator, but you need to pull in tight for an early apex on the turn. As you head downhill into the second corner, stay left and brake late. Brake hard in a straight line towards the inside of the track and then quickly get back on the gas once you reach the apex. The track is pretty wide at the end of the corner, letting you accelerate outward and across the finish. You can keep tight inside around the first righthand bend to set up for the real meat of this test. The long turn is actually a two-part deal. As you head into the turn, brake late and hard, and turn in for an early apex before getting back on the throttle (but not too hard). You can let the car pull you to the outside of the track, at which point you should brake really quickly and lightly and then turn into the

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second part of the turn. Take a second apex and get back on the gas to floor it across the finish. Test 4
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Get on the gas early and stay wide left. Cut into the first turn early, straighten out, and quickly tap the brakes to slow the vehicle down. Feather the throttle through the first turn, letting the car pull you left as you exit the tunnel. Keep left over the next crest and, as the road bumps, hit the brakes quickly and turn sharply left. Feather the gas around the corner and let your car pull wide right as you approach the last turn. As you approach the last turn, cut in for your apex on the inside of the turn. If you get the right angle, you can get around the turn without braking (though you may need to lightly let off the accelerator). Consult the Costa di Amalfi track analysis for more details on racing this course. The main thing to worry about here is the possibility of ramming into the back of the pace car, which will end your run. Especially be careful once you reach the hairpin turns on the east side of the track. The first hairpin, at the bottom of a long hill, is especially dangerous. The trick to getting through this test is moderation of your accelerator. Right off the line, floor the gas, and stay very tight as you pull around the first sets of cones. As the cones get tighter together, lay off the gas a bit and try to hold it at about halfway to full throttle. Also be sure that you don't get too much swing in your vehicle. The rapid weight transfer can push the car off course and make it difficult to get through without hitting any cones. Using the rooftop camera view can be a big help. The trick to getting through this test is moderation of your accelerator. Right off the line, floor the gas, and stay very tight as you pull around the first sets of cones. As the cones get tighter together, lay off the gas a bit and try to hold it at about halfway to full throttle. Also be sure that you don't get too much swing in your vehicle. The rapid weight transfer can push the car off course and make it difficult to get through without hitting any cones. Using the rooftop camera view can be a big help. You'll go through a series of ninety degree turns here, and while they're all pretty sharp, the turns are also deep, allowing you to get on the accelerator early if you brake early. Brake early when going into the turns and cut in for an early apex to get back on the throttle as early as possible and rocket into the straights. At the very easy side of the course is a pair of lefthand ninety degree turns. Take the first turn somewhat slowly to allow the vehicle plenty of time to set up for the second turn. You'll need some steady steering to get the gold and silver medals in this course. Feather the throttle and try to keep the line of cones directly in the center of your car so that any slight errors you make won't force you to miss cones. You may need to blip the brakes just slightly if you get pulled out too far left, and if you move too far inside you'll have to get on the accelerator a bit more. Use your speed to steer the vehicle. As you get closer towards the center cones, you'll have to slow down the vehicle considerably to stay along the path. Stay wide right, hugging the wall as you approach the first turn. Before entering the turn, brake quickly and lightly, and turn in early. If you turn in early, you can get back on the throttle early without nailing the walls. Brake hard and early for the second turn to take your speed into the straight that follows. For the next turn, brake hard and early so you can take the chicane slowly and easily. Feather the throttle through it and get back on the gas once out of the s-turn. Blip the brakes just barely around the last couple of turns to finish the course. Consult the Hong Kong track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is very prone to oversteer, so be careful when powering out of the corners (try not to touch the steering as you get on the throttle). Also watch your speed as you enter the hairpin at the northend of the longest straight in the course. If you're not careful, you can ram into the back of the pace car by accident. Floor it down the straight and try to keep control along the right side of the track. As you approach the turn, brake early and lightly, just slightly pitching out the back

Test 5
More Help Street Racing basics Costa di Amalfi

Test 6
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Test 7
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Test 8
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Coffee Break
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Test 9
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Test 10
More Help Street Racing basics Hong Kong

Test 11
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end of the car. As soon as you've made it around the bulk of the turn, straighten out the tail end and stick to the left wall as you approach the second turn. Again, flick the back end out early (this time left) to make it around the turn, and straighten out to get back to accelerating as soon as possible. Test 12
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Gas it around the first lefthand bend and let off the gas just slightly to make it around the second bend without sliding. Brake early heading into the first hairpin and hug the inside of the turn. Give the car enough gas to flick the tail end out just slightly, but don't make your tires slip too much. You want to retain control for the second hairpin that follows immediately. For the final turn, stay wide right when approach it and turn into the corner very early, letting your tail end slide out a bit. You can slip through an early apex and use the width of the course to accelerate across the finish. Swing wide left approaching the first turn. Brake heading into it while you aim for the edge of the course. Feather the gas lightly through the turn for a late apex and get back on the gas heading into the straight. As you approach the next right-hand bend, let off the gas just lightly as you swing early across the turn. You won't have to brake through the turn, though you'll have to blip the brakes before taking the last corner. Get down to speed for the last turn and then feather the throttle hard to avoid squealing your tires. Let your speed pull you outside and carry it through to the finish. Consult the El Capitan track analysis for more details on the course. You can make it through the first lefthand bend without braking (just let off the gas slightly and turn in early). Brake hard and early for the next turn to get the most speed out of the straight that follows. The next pair of turns can be taken pretty quickly, though you'll need to get a perfect line through them to avoid spinning out of control on the downhill section. Consult the Citta di Aria track analysis for details on driving the course. Watch out especially for the hairpin on the far west end of the track. Brake very early before you reach it (befor passing under the archway) to avoid a nasty problem in the corner. Also watch out for the vehicle's tendency to oversteer through the tight corners. You need to brake early for the first chicane of this turn if you want to make it out alive. Just as the front end of the car passes under the "Gran Turismo" banner above, nail the brakes and continue slowing down as you pass under the archway. Navigate the chicane and get back on the gas as you go uphill, only to hit the brakes again. Take the hairpin wide to cut in for a late apex while accelerating into the last part of the track.

Test 13
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Test 14
More Help Street Racing basics El Capitan

Test 15
More Help Street Racing basics Citta di Aria

Test 16
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b License Test 1
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Stay wide left as you approach the turn and start turning into the inside of the corner before braking. Brakely lightly before taking the turn and feather the throttle to push the car around the corner. Don't swing out too far left, as you need to approach the second turn from the right side of the track. Again, feather through and let your speed pull you outside of the turn as it straightens out. Stay wide left as you approach the turn and start turning into the inside of the corner before braking. Brakely lightly before taking the turn and feather the throttle to push the car around the corner. Don't swing out too far left, as you need to approach the second turn from the right side of the track. Again, feather through and let your speed pull you outside of the turn as it straightens out. Stay on the gas through the first couple of bends, as you won't need to slow down at all. As you approach the final turn, stay wide right and just blip the brakes lightly as you get close to the turn. Turn in and take an early apex, letting your speed pull you to the outside of the course as you accelerator up hill and across the finish. Stay on the gas and hug the right side of the track as you approach the turn. Blip the brakes lightly pretty early before the turn and pull in for a somewhat early

Test 2
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Test 3
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Test 4
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apex. You can feather the gas through the first part of the turn before flooring it out of the corner. Let your speed pull you to the outside of the track, but don't use so much speed that you go out of control. Test 5
More Help Street Racing basics Grand Valley East Section

Consult the Grand Valley East Section track analysis for details on driving the course and watch out for the first turn (brake early and take a late apex).

Test 6
More Help Street Racing basics Twin Ring Motegi Road Course

Stay far right as you approach the first turn and brake early before cutting in to the inside of the turn. Feather the gas around it and treat the next turn the same way. As you head down the straight that follows, keep far right on the course and brake early before cutting across the tight turn. Take a late apex and get on the gas as soon as possible, letting your speed pull you to the outside of the track before crossing the finish. Keep far right on the track as you approach the first bend. Just before you turn into the first curve, let off the gas lightly. Turn in early and keep on the throttle, but not all the way until you're sure you can make the turn. You shouldn't have to brake for the first turn, but you will need to brake hard before entering the next. Brake early and then get back on the gas to make a late apex. Feather the gas around the first sweeping turn, using the full width of the course to get the most of your acceleration out. You don't need to brake for the last curve— just keep wide right and pull into the turn for a late apex. You won't have to let up off the gas at all if you get the angle right. You'll need some steady steering to get the gold and silver medals in this course. Feather the throttle and try to keep the line of cones directly in the center of your car so that any slight errors you make won't force you to miss cones. You may need to blip the brakes just slightly if you get pulled out too far left, and if you move too far inside you'll have to get on the accelerator a bit more. Use your speed to steer the vehicle. As you get closer towards the outer cones, you'll want to speedup the vehicle considerably to stay along the path. Stay wide right while approaching the first turn. You won't have to brake, though you'll likely need to let off the accelerator just a bit to make sure you can line yourself up for the second turn. Feather the throught through the second turn, taking an early apex. Again, feather the throttle around the third turn (you can push it harder here than for the previous corner) and keep your tires steady across the finish. Consult the Suzuka Circuit track analysis for details on driving the course. Be careful especially to monitor your speed through the switchback turns near the beginning of the course, and brake early for the s-turn chicane at the very end. If you can nail those two corners, you should be able to make the course in time. Keep left as you approach the first corner. Flick your tail out early and slide around the first part of the turn, but don't let your slide out too far. YOu need to regain control of your back tires early so you can accelerate through the rest of the turn, using the full width of the course to form the straightest line possible to the finish. Stay wide left approaching the first turn and come in early, flicking your tail end out to slide around the bulk of the turn. Just before the road straightens out, get your back tires in check to accelerate into the next corner. Repeat the process for the next pair of hairpins, but with a touch less speed to avoid sliding into the walls. As you approach the last turn, cut in early and let your tail in slide out just slightly before accelerating across the finish. As you gas towards the first turn, veer just slightly right and then pull in for an early apex. Let off the gas just slightly before hitting the apex and then get back on it to feather around the corner. Be sure that you don't push the car too far in order to keep a good line going into the next turn. Brake early for the second turn and pull in for a late apex to get some speed in the next straight. Brake early for the next right-hand turn and hug the inside as you enter the tunnel. As you exit the tunnel, blip the brakes and cut to the inside of the course. Stay far inside to hit a late apex

Test 7
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Test 8
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Coffee Break
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Test 9
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Test 10
More Help Street Racing basics Suzuka Circuit

Test 11
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Test 12
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Test 13
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and then use the width of the corner's exit to accerlate down the last stretch. Test 14
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You can drive through the first two kinks in the road without braking at all, though you should let off the accelerator just slightly before turning early into the first bend. As you approach the first real turn, brake early and feather the throttle around the turn, keeping your speed even as you make the bend. After coming out of the turn, keep wide left. You can brake pretty late heading into the next chicane, though you'll need to slow down considerably to make the right-hand turn. Feather the throttle through the turn and get back on the gas as soon as possible to fly down the straight. Consult the Trial Mountain Circuit track analysis for details on driving the course. You can keep the gas floored through the first few bends of the course (because the car isn't that fast), though be prepared to brake for the first hard turn inside the tunnel. Also be sure to watch your speed as you come off the long straight on the south end of the track. If you can keep control through these two corners, you'll pass the test. You can get around the first bend without slowing down at all (though you might need to let off the accelerator just slightly) if you stay wide right and pull in left for an early apex. Watch your speed as you go over the next crest and into the second turn—brake early and pull in tight around the turn. For the next few turns, slow down enough so that you can keep on the inside of the turn while still pushing your car forward. And for the final turn, brake early on the downhill slope before cutting in for an early apex to accelerate across the finish.

Test 15
More Help Street Racing basics Trial Mountain Circuit

Test 16
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b License Test 1
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Almost as soon as the trial begins, turn into the corner and brake hard for just a moment. Get back on the gas and push the car around the turn and into the straight. As you approach the sweeping left-hander, stay far right and swoop in towards the center as you lightly brake. Stay away from the far inside of the corner until you're ready to take a late apex, giving you the most speed in the straight. You only need to brake lightly next right-hand bend, but you'll need to brake hard to make the left hairpin. Watch your traction as you accelerate out of the turn (it's easy to induce oversteer) and finish the test. Consult the Suzuka track analysis for details on driving this stretch of course. Brake early for the switchback turns and feather the gas around them to avoid getting pulled outside the turn too far. If you do get pulled outside too far, the car won't be properly set up for the following turns. Watch especially for the second to last turn; you'll have a lot of speed heading into the corner, and you can carry a lot of that through, but you need to brake early and cut in for an early apex to avoid sliding off the track. Stay wide left as you approach the first turn and brake very early and hard. When you're slowed down, turn in early and you can cut the corner just slightly to keep a straight line into the next. Accelerate out of the turn but don't mash the gas too hard—you need to keep away from the left side of the track until you're ready to cut in for a late apex. When you do, get back on the gas and don't let up as you finish the course. Floor the gas through the first couple of slight bends without letting up. As you head into the first real turn, stay wide right and brake late and hard. Feather the gas while sticking inside the corner to line yourself up for the s-turn that follows. Focus on getting your speed out of the s-turn, and stay wide right as you approach the last turn of the test. You can get through the turn without braking, but you'll need to come in from the right and cross over the track for a late apex. You may need to let off the gas just slightly as you turn into the corner, but be sure to get back on the gas quickly and use the full width of the track to accelerate across the finish. Consult the El Capitan track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is prone to understeer, so take that into consideration when entering the sharper corners of the track. Focus on maximizing your speed out of corners

Test 2
More Help Street Racing basics Suzuka Circuit

Test 3
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Test 4
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Test 5
More Help Street Racing basics El Capitan

that precede long straights. Test 6
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The vehicle you're given is pretty tail happy, so be careful of putting down too much power while you're still in the turns. As soon as you've got control of the car, swing right just slightly and quickly pull back in to cut the first corner tightly. You won't have to brake, though you may need to let off your accelerator just slightly. Approach the second corner from wide left and again cut it early to avoid braking. As soon as you're through that corner, blip the brakes lightly and feather the throttle through the next turn. The last turn before the straight is pretty wide, though you'll want to brake early before the turn, stay wide left, and then cut in early to hit a late apex on the turn. Brake early for the final hairpin, letting you accelerate out of the corner early and finish the test. As you head down the straight, merge to the right side of the track. When you're near the turn, aim towards the inside of the corner and get on the brakes early to avoid a nasty spinout (the vehicle is pretty tail-happy in the corners). Feather the throttle through the turn, using the entire width of the course as you accelerate out. You can make it around the next right-hand bend without letting off the gas, though you'll want to start braking before taking the next left-right corner. Brake hard and stay inside the track before powering out of the corner. As you approach the last turn, stay wide right and brake early. Turn in early and use the lip on the inside of the track to cut across and get the best speed through the turn. Consult the Hong Kong track analysis for details on driving the course. You won't take the entire course, but you will drive over most of it. You start out on the longest straight in the course, so watch your speed as you reach the end and enter the very tight turn at the end. Brake somewhat early and hard, slowing down considerably to make the turn. Brake early for the ninety-degree turns in the track and cut them early, using the wide course to accelerate out. It's a good idea to watch the demonstration video to get an idea of what you're supposed to do on this course. Take it easy through the first sets of cones, braking early and cutting in early to make the sharp turns. It's probably a bit easier if you use the rooftop camera view while navigating this part of the course and others. The rest of the course is a bit easier—just stick inside the turns and feather the gas to steer the car (you won't have to worry about oversteer). For the last stretch of course, start braking just as you enter the row of cones to come to a stop within the designated spot. Stay right as you approach the first chicane and blip the brakes early before turning into the corner. After passing the left-hand corner, blip the brakes again the swing around the right-hander and keep on the accelerator as you swing around the next turn and into the straight. While on the straight, merge left and brake lightly (early) before taking the slight right. Keep wide right and brake again (this time harder) to slow down for the sharp corner, and cut in for a late apex. Stay right again as you approach the hairpin, brake early, and feather the throttle while hugging the inside of the turn. As soon as you can, get back on the gas and keep it floored as you cross through the last turn (take it wide and cut in sharply to avoid braking) and over the finish. Consult the Fuji Speedway 2005 GT track analysis for details on driving the course. In general, you want to brake early with the vehicle you're given in order to maximize your speed coming out of the corners. Since nearly every corner in the course opens up into a straight-away, it's important to come out fast and carry your speed through. Most important is the final turn of the course. It's pretty sharp, so brake plenty early and cut in for a late apex. Though the road is pretty narrow, you still want to use the entire width as you accelerate out of the corner and into the final straight. Stay far left down the straight. Just after taking the small jump, start turning into the first corner by kicking your tail end out and sliding towards the apex. You won't need to brake for this turn, though immediately after you pass the apex you'll want to get on the brakes a bit for the next turn. Again, kick out your tail end and slide around the inside of the left-hander, easing your throttle to make sure you don't spin out. When you see the road start to straighten, get your rear tires back in check and star to accelerate out of the turn. Stay far right as you approach the next corner and turn into it early, letting your tail end slide out just slightly as you hug the inside of the turn. Use the full width of the course to regain your grip and accelerate out of the turn and across the finish.

Test 7
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Test 8
More Help Street Racing basics Hong Kong

Coffee Break
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Test 9
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Test 10
More Help Street Racing basics Fuji Speedway 2005 GT

Test 11
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Test 12
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Stay left around the first turn and start sliding into the corner early to get through without letting off the gas. You may need to brake lightly (or just let off the gas) for the next bend and again slide early to keep your parallel with the exit angle. Brake early for the next hairpin before balancing your tail end slide. When approaching the turns of the course, turn into the corner and start sliding early. By the time you reach the end of the corner, you'll be able to regain control of the back tires and accelerate into the straights. Stay on the gas hard through the entire downhill section of this track. As you approach the bend at the bottom of the hill, stay wide right and turn left early to avoid losing any speed at all. As you head uphill, stay far right and brake lightly and early. You can make the turn at the top of the hill with a lot of speed if you turn into it very early (before you even see it) and get back on the gas. You'll have to brake again almost immediately after exiting the turn to slow down for the next one. As you come out of the right-hander, stay wide right and brake late to cut in for a very late apex on the left-hand turn. Feather the throttle around the next couple of bends and gas it to the finish. Stay wide right approaching the first corner. Let off the gas just slightly before turning early and sharply into it while getting back on the gas. Keep right when coming up on the next left-hand turn, blip the brakes very early, and cut the corner just slightly. Almost immediately after cutting the corner, get on the brakes and quickly turn right around the next turn. Get on the gas early and use the full width of the course to get out of the corner and across the finish. Consult the Nürburgring track analysis for details on driving the course. The car you're given is pretty fast, especially on the long straights, so be careful when coming off the straights and entering corners. Even slight corners can yield messy results if you don't retain control of the vehicle at all times. The car is a little prone to oversteer, so be especially careful when powering out of corners (keep the lines as straight as possible). Also be careful that you brake early enough for the tighter turns that you don't slam into the back of the pace car. Brake before heading into the first turn and cut the corner just slightly. Quickly get back on the gas and use the entire width of the course—including the reddish shoulder beyond the lip—as you accelerate into the straight. Floor it down the straight and don't let up off the gas for a moment until you reach the end and need to brake. As the course starts to veer slightly right, get on the brakes fast and hard to slow down for the turn. Accelerate out of the turn, and be careful not to spin your tires as the massive power from the engine can easily make you lose traction if you don't regulate the throttle. Again, keep the gas down through the straight and don't let off until you need to brake again. You'll need to brake for the very last right-hand bend. Just blip the brakes once or twice before the turn, then accelerate through the turn and quickly get back on the brakes hard to make the left-hander. Again, regulate your throttle to avoid excessive tire spin through the turn and repeat the process around the last corner and across the finish.

Test 13
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Test 14
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Test 15
More Help Street Racing basics Nürburgring Nordshschleife

Test 16
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b License Test 1
More Help Street Racing basics Twin Ring Motegi Road Course

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Consult the Twin Ring Motegi Road Course track analysis for details on driving the course. The track is made up of a lot of straights, making it especially important that you nail your apexes on the exit corners to maximize your speed. On the first turn of the track, brake early for the first turn and take it easy around the corner to make sure you can easily line up the car to go around the second part of the turn. The vehicle you're given is pretty capable in the corners and is very good at braking, so feel free to brake pretty late when heading into the turns. Consult the Citta di Aria track analysis for details on driving the course. The car you're given is sort of a slug, so you'll be driving at pretty low speeds throughout the course. This allows you to brake a bit later for some turns, though you definitely do not want to brake late when you get to the tight corners just before the straight-away that leads to the nasty northwest corner of the track. On the same straight, you can brake later than noromal, though you still don't want to push the car too hard—over-braking is significantly less damaging to your lap time than under-braking.

Test 2
More Help Street Racing basics Citta di Aria

Test 3
More Help Street Racing basics Special Stage Route 5

Consult the Special Stage Route 5 track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is very capable on the road, both in the straights and in the corners. Feel confident in braking somewhat late, but be sure that you don't sacrifice your exit speeds. So long as you stick to your lines and floor the gas when appropriate, you shouldn't have a problem here. Consult the Costa di Amalfi track analysis for details on driving the course. The car you've given is very fast in the straights, but is also very tail-happy in the corners. Brake early for the turns and try to keep the car as straight as possible when you start accelerating out of the turn to avoid needless wheelspin. The twin switchbacks at the end of the course are pretty sharp, so don't hesitate to slow down considerably before taking the turns. Also watch your accelerator through this sharp turns—too much power can get your tires spinning very easily, costing you time at the last part of the course. Consult the Seattle Circuit track analysis for details on driving the course. The car you're given is very fast on the straights, and fairly prone to oversteer in the longer corners. Brake very when coming off of the pair of long straights in the course to be ready for the nasty turns at the end, and moderate your acceleration out of the turns until you've got the car pointing straight. Also, the vehicle will get airborn in a number of spots on the track. Be sure to keep the car pointing perfectly straight when you hit these jumps. Otherwise, the vehicle will likely spin out of control as you land. Consult the Ice Arena track analysis for details on driving the course. Most of the turns in the course require you to come in at them wide and start a slow slide early, aiming to slide past the apex and straighten out for the exit. When cornering, be very gentle on the throttle so as to not throw the car into a spin, and make sure that the rear tires have regained their grip before you try to accelerate out of the turn. If you put on the gas too early, you'll slide into the walls and lose valuable time. Consult the Trial Mountain Circuit track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is great on the course, and very fast, meaning that you'll have to brake for some of the slight bends that you'd otherwise power through. This includes the first set of bends that lead uphill. You'll need to let off the gas and even blip the brakes to slow down enough to avoid sliding off course. Otherwise, feel free to push the car, braking somewhat late for turns and getting on the gas early to carry your speed into the straights. Consult the Tokyo R246 track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is very steady in the corners, letting you take some slight bends without slowing down like you might normally have to. Brake early for the very first turn and cut in from wide left to get the best acceleration out of the turn. This single turn can set the pace for the rest of the course. If you really want to complete this test in the best time possible, watch the demonstration run of the course and copy its path exactly. You need to be extremely gentle on the throttle throughout, and don't be afraid to switch into reverse to nail some cones behind you, or just to take certain turns. Consult the El Capitan track analysis for details on driving the course. The viper you're given is very fast, and prone to oversteer on a few key corners (though surprisingly steady out of the tighter turns). Watch your speed and angle as you take the first annotated turn (check the analysis). Also, you'll need to brake lightly heading into the second annotated turn, tapping the brakes as you head uphill and being easy on the throttle as you take the following right. If you get too throttle happy, the Viper will spin out of control. Consult the Grand Canyon track analysis for details on driving the course. The course is pretty narrow, preventing you from starting slides as early as you might normally during an off-road race. This means you'll have to slow down considerably heading into turns. Be sure to moderate your throttle through the turns so that you don't send the car sliding late in the turn, and watch your speed as you come over the jump at the very end of the course. Take it slowly to line up the last few hairpins and ensure better times.

Test 4
More Help Street Racing basics Costa di Amalfi

Test 5
More Help Street Racing basics Seattle Circuit

Test 6
More Help Off-Road Racing basics Ice Arena

Test 7
More Help Street Racing basics Trial Mountain Circuit

Test 8
More Help Street Racing basics Tokyo R246

Coffee Break
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Test 9
More Help Street Racing basics El Capitan

Test 10
More Help Off-Road Racing basics Grand Canyon

Test 11
More Help Street Racing basics Opera Paris

Consult the Opera Paris track analysis for details on driving the course. The vehicle you're given is, of course, very grippy, letting you take some turns at higher speeds than you're used to. However, you don't want to push the car too hard. Focus on braking early for the corners, staying wide outside, and cutting in early to get back on the gas. As soon as you start, swing left a bit and cut through the first turn while staying on the gas. Blip the brakes quickly before taking the second turn and get back on the gas to continue the run through the rest of the chicane. After that, be mindful of the high speeds you'll reach on the straights, and brake early for the turns. Consult the Suzuka Circuit track analysis for details on driving the course. You can take a lot of turns very quickly because of how stable the car is in the turns. The vehicle also has excellent stopping power, letting you wait longer than usual to put on the brakes as you head into sharp turns. You may not even need to brake for some turns that you're used to, including the sweeping turn just before the chicane at the end of the course. You can push the car very far, so do so in order to get the best times. Consult the Infineon Raceway track analysis for details on driving the course. Of course, the vehicle you have to drive is very fast, which means you should brake early for the corners. You can still move pretty fast through the turns, but you'll need to brake early in order to line yourself up properly and get back on the acclerator as soon as possible. On the last turns of the course (the few before the final hairpin), try to take the turns without braking. Let off the accelerator as you head into them, but don't brake—you can swing through with a lot of speed if you hug the insides tight. Consult the Chamonix track analysis for details on driving the course. You need to be especially aware of the changes in driving surfaces as the course—at least in the beginning—switches from asphalt to snow and back again. You don't need to slide when on the asphalt, but when driving around the tight turns in the snow, be sure to kick out your tail end early as you feather the throttle to push the car through the turn. Be especially careful of the long hairpins. As you're sliding around them, it's easy to send the car into a full spin if you put on too much throttle. Regulate the gas and straighten the car out as soon as possible. Consult the Circuit de la Sarthe track analysis for details on driving the course. Because the car is so fast, you'll need to brake early for turns after coming off the straights of the course. In any series of turns that precedes a straight, be sure that you take the first turns slower to allow yourself plenty of maneuverability in the last turn to score a perfect line and accelerate out of the corner as fast as humanly possible. Also be especially wary of the last stretch of road. There are two tight chicanes that can ruin a perfectly good run if you're not careful. Take them slowly and get out of them as quickly as possible to finish the course. Consult the Nürburgring Nordshschleife track analysis for details on driving the course. As you'll soon find out, this race is fast. You'll reach some insane speeds on the straights, which makes it very important that you keep your wheels firmly planted on the asphalt. When you're flying down the straights, avoid touching the outside of the course at all. If your wheels hit the red-white lip of the course, they can easily pop up, sending the car out of control. To make the best times, you'll need to push the car as far as you can. Memorize the turns, especially the turns that you don't need to slow down for. If you can keep up your speed in these semistraights, you'll make up a lot of time.

Test 12
More Help Street Racing basics Suzuka Circuit

Test 13
More Help Street Racing basics Infineon Raceway

Test 14
More Help Off-Road Racing basics Chamonix

Test 15
More Help Street Racing basics Circuit de la Sarthe

Test 16
More Help Street Racing basics Nürburgring Nordshschleife

Advanced Tuning
Engine and Transmission Suspension Tires and More

Turbochargers — Dropping a new turbo kit into your vehicle can drastically increase the horsepower, giving you a ton of extra power. And while the performance change will be a bonus all around, there are some things you need to understand about turbo-powered vehicles in order to get the most out of them. Because a turbocharger kicks in at high RPMs, vehicles that rely on turbo are typically weaker at low revs. This weakness is low RPMs can result in slower acceleration times, especially coming out of wrecks. This makes it important to consider boosting your vehicle's acceleration by any means possible when trying to get the most of the car (installing new clutch and flywheel parts will help). You also should adjust the the gear ratios so that the engine keeps pushing the optimum RPMs for the turbo. To make the most of the turbo, you don't want the RPMs to drop dramatically between gears, as you'll fall out of the powerband and have to rely on the vehicle's low torque to push it back into higher RPMs where the turbo can help out. Remember: · Turbochargers kick in at high RPMs, but lag at low RPMs. · Change your vehicle settings to improve accerlation at low RPMs to make up for turbo lag.

Gear Ratios — Installing the Full Customize Transmission will allow you to alter the gear ratios of your vehicle. This change in ratios will affect two separate things: 1) Acceleration, and 2) Top speed. As a general rule, tightening the gear ratio will improve acceleration. However, tightening the ratio will also decrease top speed. Conversely, loosening the gear ratios will improve top speed while diminishing acceleration. For most cars, there is no single setting that will be the best for you across all races; you'll have to fine tune your gears before each racing to get the most out of them.

Left: Looser gear ratios mean higher top speeds. Right: Tighter gear ratios mean better acceleration.

For races with lots of tight corners, you'll definitely want to improve the vehicle's acceleration. Higher acceleration will get you out of the corners faster, a huge bonus through twisty roads. Another thing to consider is that many tight courses lack long straight-aways that allow for top speeds. If you keep your gear ratios too loose, you may be aiming for a top speed that's impossible to reach on a given course. You're just sacrificing acceleration for a top speed that you won't even be able to attain. However, on courses with long straights—such as Circuit de la Sarthe and Fuji Speedway—it is beneficial to increase your vehicle's top speed. If you hit a long straight and reach your top speed, you'll stop accelerating while your competition continues to accelerate past you. In these cases, it's worth sacrificing some acceleration speed to increase your overall top speed. However, you'll have to guage the importance of those straights. If a course still has a number of tight turns, you don't want to give up too much acceleration for raw speed, as you'll still need to come out of the corners quickly. Another thing to consider is the powerband of turbocharged vehicles. As mentioned above, turbo vehicles get their optimal performance when the engine is pushing higher RPMs. Because of this, it's important to keep your engine pushing revs within the powerband as often as possible. When adjusting the gears, focus on keeping them operating at higher RPMs. If the vehicle dips into lower RPMs during normal acceleration, you'll lose the power of the turbocharger, resulting in lagging acceleration.

Remember: · Tight gear ratios mean better acceleration. Loose gear ratios mean better top speed. · For turbocharged vehicles, tune gears to keep revs high and minimize turbo lag. Engine and Transmission Suspension Tires and More

Sprint Stiffness: Hard vs. Soft — You can adjust the stiffness of your suspension when you upgrade to the racing set, letting you alter the way your vehicle responds to the roads. Harder suspension will, generally, improve your cornering ability, as it stabilizes the vehicle in turns and improves its responsiveness. However, stiffening the springs too much will cause the vehicle to be less stable on rough roads (especially off-road courses). Thus, it is important to consider the course you're driving before committing to any settings. If you're going to drive more stable courses, including most city courses, you can go ahead and stiffen the springs for a bit more control in the corners. However, if the course you're driving has lots of bumps and dips (such as Leguna Seca and off-road courses), loosen up the springs to allow for more stability over the course. Remember: · Stiffer suspension for more control on smooth street racing courses. · Softer suspension for a more stable ride, especially on off-road courses.

Ride Height — Adjusting the ride height of the vehicle is very similar to adjusting the stiffness of the suspension. Lowering the ride height of your vehicle with make it all-around more stable on the course, giving you more control in the corners and a stabler ride in the straights when you hit high speeds. However, the vehicle can bottom out if the car is too low. On smoother surfaces, you can lower the ride height quite a bit to maximize stability. However, on rougher courses (again, the off-road courses especially), you'll want to raise the ride height to avoid bottoming on the road and losing control.

Left: Lower ride height? Right: Make sure you stiffen up the springs to avoid bottoming out.

One thing to keep in mind is how intertwined the ride height and spring stiffness are. If you lower the ride height of your car, you'll want to also increase the spring stiffness. The stiffer springs will keep the car from moving too much on the road, which makes it less prone to bottoming out as the car dips. Conversely, if you raise the ride height of a vehicle you'll want to also loosen up the springs to keep the car stable on rough roads. Remember: · Lower ride height means more control on smooth courses. Avoid bottoming out. · Higher ride height is best for off-road and rough road courses.

Shock Absorbers — You won't typically need to adjust the dampening ratio of your vehicle, though certain cars can definitely benefit from it. By softening the dampers, you'll increase the car's ability to grip the road when exiting turns. This is especially helpful for lighter vehicles that often lose traction when you try to accelerate out of corners (squealing tires). If you soften up the dampers, you'll give the vehicle more traction as you accelerate out of the corner, resulting in better speeds out of the corners and into the straights. However, over-softening the dampers can adversely affect your vehicle's handling. Too-soft dampers will over-react to bumps in the road and lead to more body roll as you go through turns. Because of this, it's generally best to avoid

messing with the dampers unless you need to. Remember: · Lighter cars benefit from softer dampers when exiting corners. · Too-soft dampers will increase body roll through turns. Engine and Transmission Suspension Tires and More

Tires: Hard vs. Soft — While you don't have much of a choice when it comes to off-road racing (you're stuck with either dirt or snow tires), your tire selection for street races can have a dramatic effect on your vehicle's performance. In general, your choice in tires is between hard and soft tires. A softer tire will give your vehicle considerably more grip on the road, improving both acceleration and cornering abilities. For brief races, there is no downside to choosing softer tires for your vehicle. However, softer tires wear out considerably more quickly than hard tires. This comes into play when tackling longer races, as softer tires will force you to pit way more frequently. When you enter any race that's more than five laps, consider using harder tires to avoid unnecessary pitting. And especially when taking on the endurance races of the game, throw on some hard tires to keep pitting to a minimum. Remember: · Soft tires grip better, but wear out faster. · Hard tires last longer, and are ideal for endurance races.

Brakes — You can adjust the strength of the brakes for the front and rear separately. If you increase the power of the front brakes, you'll make the car more susceptible to understeer. You can use this to counter-act nasty oversteer in some FR vehicles. On the other hand, pushing the brake balance towards the rear of the car will give the vehicle a tendency to oversteer. This will let you make a vehicle more tail-happy if you want, which is often beneficial during offroad races. You can adjust the brakes to make a car handle how you want, counter-acting the innate effects of its drivetrain. If the car doesn't slide enough, increase the rear brake power. If the car slides too much, increase the front brake power. Remember: · More front brakes leads to understeer. · More rear brakes leads to oversteer.

Downforce — Increasing the downforce effectively makes the vehicle heavier. By aerodynamically pushing down on the vehicle, you increase the traction the tires get. Push down on the front of the vehicle and the front tires will get more traction the faster you're going. And as you can guess, pushing down on the rear tires will increase the grip the rear tires get. In general, more downforce results in a more stable ride at high speeds. However, downforce also has an effect on the top end performance of your vehicle. Because it is effectively heavier in the straights, the car's top speed will be somewhat hindered. Also, downforce directed at the front tires can induce oversteer, while downforce focused on the rear tires can induce understeer in the corners. You can use downforce to correct imbalances in vehicles, giving a tail-happy vehicle a bit of extra downforce in the rear tires to keep it tamed in the corners. Consider the drivetrain of your vehicle (FR, FF, MR, RR) before making any adjustments to downforce, and tweak accordingly. Remember: · Downforce gives you more stability, but less top-end performance. · Use focused downforce to correct for drivetrain imbalances.

Simulation Walkthrough
General Tips American Beginner European Professional Japanese Extreme Special Condition Endurance One-make

Your First Car

When you start the game, you've only got a very limited bit of cash to spend on a new vehicle. You can participate in the license tests to earn cars for free, but if you want to get into racing right away you'll want to buy a car with whatever you've got. The best bang for your limited buck is the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution GSR '92, which can be found in the Used Car Showroom I. It boasts the more horsepower you can buy for under Cr.10,000, and can be suped up to over 450 horsepower when maxed out. And because it's a 4WD vehicle, it's easy to ride and push to the limits.

Fast Cash

It can take a while to build up a fortune by just plowing through events and collecting the earnings. One thing you can do to expedite your riches is to compete in events that reward you with expensive cars. You can then sell these cars for a lot of money, and redo the race event to earn the vehicle again and again. One event that's great for this is the Easy Rally Costa di Amalfi in the Special Condition Events hall. There are just two short race events to compete in, and winning them is pretty easy (a semi-souped-up Lancer Evo GSR '92, mentioned above, will win the event easily). After completing both races at just two laps a piece, you'll be rewarded with the RSC Rally Raid Car. Not only is this vehicle a great car to use in any event it can fit into (it's got 423 HP), but it can be sold for a whopping Cr.265,624. You can compete in the event as many times as you want to earn the vehicle over and over.

Weaker Competition

When you enter a race event, the competing racers are randomly placed in the game. Some opponents will be always be significantly faster than others, making them the hardest to beat in races. If you're having a hard time against a certain car, you can simply exit the race event and reload it to have the game randomly assign your competition. With any luck, you won't have to race against the hardest opponents.

Horsepower Boost

Either when you buy a used car or win a car as a prize, the first thing you should do is take it in for an oil change at GT Auto. For only Cr.50, you'll see an instant boost in horsepower that's sometimes pretty dramatic. As you use the vehicle to race, the oil will get dirty again, so keep an eye on your horsepower numbers. If your HP starts falling, take the car in for an oil change for instant and satisfying results.

Outpower Your Opponents

If you can't beat them, outpower them! Though not every race series will allow this, you can very often beat your opposition simply by outpowering them. If you're having trouble winning a certain race, go back to previous races to win some easy cash. When you've got the cash to do so, buy some turbo upgrades for your vehicle, giving yourself a huge boost in horsepower. Even if you aren't very good at a given course, you can tear your opponents apart in the straights and often win races that are otherwise too challenging.

B-Spec Is Your Friend

Though A-Spec racing is by far the best way to have fun with Gran Turismo 4, the game's built-in B-Spec mode can be a great way to earn some easy cash. If you know of a race series that your vehicle can easily win, head into it and enter B-Spec mode. Set your car to speed level 3 and then press R1 to enter the race monitor. From within the race monitor, hold L1 and tap right on the d-pad twice. This will set the race to progress at 3x speed. Just sit back, relax, and watch your car do the work for you. In no time at all, you'll earn the winnings from the race.

One Car Kills Two Birds

When you start considering the purchase of a new vehicle, keep in mind the uses for the car. If you need a Japanese vehicle to compete in some Japan-only races, look for a Japanese vehicle that also fits the requirements for some other races. If you can focus your money on one car that's good for multiple events—such as a Japanese vehicle with a 4WD drivetrain, or a German vehicle with a boxer engine—you'll get the most bang for your buck.

License Tests

Passing the license tests of Gran Turismo 4 is arguably the most difficult aspect of the game, which is why anything that makes them easier is A-OK in our book. Luckily, the game includes a helpful crutch. As you enter an individual portion of the test, choose the second option instead of going straight into the driver's seat. You'll be able to spectate a replay that demonstrates the correct way to perform the test in order to pass.

General Tips American Sunday Cup
More Help Autumn Ring Mini Beginner Course High Speed Ring Clubman Stage Route 5 Twin Ring Motegi West

Beginner European

Professional Japanese

Extreme Special Condition

Endurance One-make

Any vehicle with even an inkling a power should have no problem dominating this event. The recommended starting vehicle, the Lancer Evo GSR '92, is more than enough to topple any other competitor in this race. The only vehicles that might put up a fight are the Mazda Miata or Peugeot 206 that often show up for Sunday Cup races. Otherwise, you're home free.

FF Challenge
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FF vehicles aren't known to be high-performers, so the competition in this event is pretty weak. However, this makes finding an FF vehicle of your own somewhat challenging. The Pontiac Sunfire GXP Concept that you win for earning an A license can compete here, but you'll need to beef up its horsepower a bit to keep up with some of the competition in the straights. Also, the Dodge SRT-4 is a reasonably priced FF vehicle that still packs some power (230HP). The SRT-4 can win the FF Challenge without any enhancements, though you'll still need to watch the competition from other SRT-4s, the Mitsubishi Eclipse, and the Peugeot 206. Lots of the best cars in the world fall within the FR category, so don't be surprised to see some heavy hitters in this event. Luckily, you'll be racing against mostly stock vehicles, so you'll only need a couple hundred horses under your own hood to compete. Watch out for the Chrysler Crossfire, which is surprisingly quick in the straights. You can win this competition with pretty much any FR vehicle that's got some power, including old RX-7s, Supras, and even the Nismo 270R that you win for earning the International A license. If you've got the money, a Viper or Vette will absolutely crush the competition. If you took our advice and picked up the Lancer Evo GSR '92 as your first vehicle, you can pump it up and compete in this event quite easily. You'll be up against some semi-tough competition, like stock Audi TTs and Subaru Imprezas, but it won't take too much to best them. A Lancer or Impreza of your own—even old used ones—can compete with just a bit of money dumped into them for extra power. Most MR vehicles are pretty sporty, making this competition relatively tough. You'll be facing a lot of NSXs and Lotus cars, so you'll need to come into this event prepared. You can win the event using the Honda NSX-R Concept that you win by completing the Race of NA Sports in the Professional Events hall. Otherwise, you're best off with a powered up NSX, Lotus, or Opel Speedster. If you want to go the cheap route, you can win the MR Challenge with a Toyota MR2, but you'll need to dump a lot of money into it to get it up to snuff. Take the Autobianchi Abarth that you win in the Sunday Cup and equip it with a level one turbo upgrade. By itself, the Abarth isn't quite capable of winning this cup, but with just a few more horses you can do it pretty easily. Your biggest competition will come from the likes of the Daihatsu Mira, and some other random

FR Challenge
More Help Seattle Circuit Tsukuba Circuit Special Stage Route 5 Laguna Seca Motor Sports Land II

4WD Challenge
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MR Challenge
More Help Beginner Course Autumn Ring New York Fuji Speedway 90's El Capitan

LightWeight Cup
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small cars. As long as you drive well and avoid unnecessary braking—you need to make the most of any speed you get—you shouldn't have a problem winning the cup. Spider & Roadster
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You won't get away with skimping on your vehicle in this event. You'll need to fork out around Cr.35,000 to get something that can compete, such as a Honda S2000, Lotus Elise, or Opel Speedster. If you purchased a Toyota MR2 Spyder for the MR Challenge event, you can use that here but you'll need to throw some more cash into it to keep up with the competition. Your toughest rivals will be the Opel Speedster and Lotus Elise, both of which are very quick in the straights. However, you can catch up with them in the corners if you go in with a stock S2000, and win the cup without having to pour any extra cash into your car. The list of vehicles that can compete here is pretty small. The best stock vehicle is probably the Ford SVT Lightning, but for about the same price you can get an even better ride. Pick up the Toyota Tacoma X-Runner for about Cr.24,000 and then throw in a supercharger (another Cr.13,000) to pump up its horsepower. The HP rating will still be lower than the Ford and the Dodge, but the X-Runner is significantly lighter, giving it a better power-to-weight ratio. In the races, your toughest challenge will be the Chevy Silverado SST Concept, which you can't buy. Luckily, an X-Runner with a supercharger can outrun it in both the straights and, especially, the corners.

Sports Truck Race
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General Tips American Clubman Cup
More Help Apricot Hill Raceway Twin Ring Motegi East Seoul Central Clubman Stage Route 5 Deep Forest Raceway

Beginner European

Professional Japanese

Extreme Special Condition

Endurance One-make

The competition isn't too steep here, but you'll definitely need a well tuned and souped-up vehicle to clean up. The Lancer Evo GSR that we recommend you start out with can win these races quite handily, but you'll need to put some money into beefing it up. The competition is a hodge-podge of all sorts of vehicles, and none of them stand out too much.

Tuning Car Grand Prix
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You'll want some serious power to compete with the guys in this series. If you've got the cash, we recommend upgrading to a new supercar and start beefing it up for future races. You can get by with a fully powered Lancer Evo GSR (the one we recommended as your first car), but you'll need to avoid a few key competitors. The RUFs that participate in these races are tough, as well as the Opera S2000 that shows up from time to time. If you've got the means, we still suggest picking up something extra beefy, like a Dodge Viper, Ford GT, or a Vette. You'll need one in future events anyway, and it'll make getting through this series a bit easier. If you upgraded to an American car for the Tuning Car Grand Prix, chances are you can reuse that vehicle for this event. Cars like the Viper, Vette, and Camaro can do well here, but you'll need to make sure you've got more than a few hundred horses under the hood (over 450 is preferrable). The competition is pretty tough, especially the Nissan 350Z. Also, don't underestimate the Mustang and Camaro pony cars—some of them are pretty quick. The Lancer Evo GSR can still compete here, but you'll need to have the car pretty decked out. Strangely, none of the competition in this event is very fierce, though you will want to watch out for the Mazda RX-7 Type R. If you feel like upgrading your car, check into getting an RUF, Nissan Skyline, or Ford GT. They'll all clean up quite handily in this event.

Race of NA Sports
More Help Infineon Raceway Apricot Hill Raceway Twin Ring Motegi Road Course Special Stage Route 5 Trial Mountain Circuit

Race of Turbo Sports
More Help Fuji Speedway 80's Tokyo R246 High Speed Ring New York Midfield Raceway

Boxer Spirit
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The roughest competition here will come from the monster RUFs. They'll outrun anything else, so they should be your main concern. You can avoid racing the altogether if you can't quite match them, which isn't a bad choice altogether. Or, you can pick up a used Impreza on the cheap, take it to the tuning shop, and dump in a bunch of money to get it up to speed. A tuned Subaru Impreza can keep up with the RUFs, but it isn't exactly easy. A lot of the competition in this event is extremely weak, but that doesn't mean it'll be easy. Two cars—the AC Cars 427 and the Buick Special '62—are extremely

World Classics
More Help Fuji Speedway 80's

El Capitan Nürburgring Nordshschleife Côte d'Azur Laguna Seca

quick cars, and will smoke everything else. These guys are very tough to beat with older vehicles. Your best bet is to exit and re-enter the event to get new competition, hoping that neither of them shows up. If you compete in the American Muscle Car event in the American hall, you'll be rewarded with a powerful Chevelle that can smoke everything in this competition (except for the two aforementioned beasts). Throw a few thousand dollars into the car to beef it up, and you'll have a serious competitor on your hands. However, if you want blow away the competition no matter who you're facing, you can fork out a lot of cash for the Chaparral 2J Race Car (an American vehicle). No, it's not really fair, but it works! You can win this event pretty easily for just Cr.13,000, assuming you've alread won the Ginetta G4 from the Lightweight Cup in the Beginner hall. Take the Ginetta G4 you won and slap on a Cr.13,000 level two turbo. You'll bump the horsepower to nearly 200, giving you plenty of power to take out the competition is this relatively slow field.

World Compact
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Supercar Festival
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The competition in these races is pretty tough, so you'll need some serious horsepower to keep up. If you purchased a new vehicle for either the NA Sports or Turbo Sports events, go back to the shop and dump in some more cash to make the car even faster. We recommend the Ford GT if you've got the funds to buy and upgrade it. Fully upgraded, the Ford GT can pretty easily beat everything in this event, though the Pagani Zonda and other Ford GTs are still pretty tough. Also, the races are pretty long, so you'll be pushing soft tires to the limit. If your car's a bit tail-happy, you may consider putting slightly harder tires on, though you likely won't need to as long as you keep control of your car. If you haven't already, it's time to fork out the big bucks for a new car. You'll need some seriously awesome wheels to keep up with the pack in this series, so start making some money. We've detailed a good way to make money (you'll need about Cr.4,500,000) in the General Tips section of the walkthrough. Alternatively, if you're feeling confident, you can try to win the last five missions in the Driving Missions hall to earn a car that can definitely compete in this event. But honestly, earning the cash is probably easier, letting you purchase the Toyota GT-One. Make sure you upgrade it as much as possible, and buy some hard and super hard racing tires. The races in this event are very long, and all of your opponents will pit at least once per race. You can probably get through most races without pitting if you use your super hard tires on the rear and hard tires on the front. However, if your performance takes too big a hit, soften up the tires just slightly and don't worry about pitting. Since everyone else will pit, you'll be on equal footing (though if you can get away without pitting, you'll be even better).

Gran Turismo World Championship
More Help Tokyo R246 Twin Ring Motegi Super Speedway Hong Kong Seoul Central El Capitan New York Opera Paris Suzuka Circuit Grand Valley Speedway Circuit de la Sarthe I

General Tips American Gran Turismo All Stars
More Help High Speed Ring Fuji Speedway 80's Laguna Seca Raceway Autumn Ring Test Course Grand Valley Speedway Suzuka Circuit Infineon Raceway Circuit de la Sarthe I Nürburgring Nordshschleife

Beginner European

Professional Japanese

Extreme Special Condition

Endurance One-make

You had to have beaten the Gran Turismo World Championship to get to this event, so you should already be set with a solid car to race (we still recommend the Toyota GT-One). The races in this event are semi-long—they're not endurance races by any means, but you will want to slap on a set of hard tires (at least on the rear) to avoid having to pit in the middle of the race. None of the competitors will pit during the event, so you need to be sure you can last the entire race. The competition here isn't quite as fierce as the competition in the World Championship, so relax, take your time, and race solid to win easily.

Dream Car Championship
More Help Opera Paris Tokyo R246 Deep Forest Raceway Seoul Central Hong Kong Test Course Beginner Course Circuit de la Sarthe II El Capitan Côte d'Azur

Again, the Toyota GT-One will be your saving grace in this event. The car will demolish all competition pretty easily in all races, so you needn't buy anything else. Of course, similar racing cars will all fair well in the event, but if you've got the GT-One there's no reason to use anything else. The only other thing we can recommend is to equip your vehicle with hard tires in the back and medium tires in the front. The races aren't exactly short, but you'll get through them all without having to pit at all, a necessary feat to get you through these races in first.

Polyphony Digital Cup
More Help Twin Ring Motegi Road Course Seattle Circuit Infineon Raceway Tokyo R246 Fuji Speedway 2005 Motor Sports Land II Circuit de la Sarthe I El Capitan Suzuka Circuit Nürburgring Nordshschleife

The competition in this event is made of mostly semi-super cars, such as the Lotus Esprit, Honda S2000, Toyota Supra, and Subaru Impreza STi. The Lotus is the fastest of the bunch, but can be easily overpowered with a number of cars you've probably already got in your garage. There are no restrictions on the cars you can use (feel free to bring in a Toyota GT-One if you feel like mopping up). The only restriction you need to worry about is putting sports tires on your car. Some of the races are pretty long, so you might consider putting medium sports tires on your rear tires instead of soft tires. Otherwise, you know everything you need to know to dominate this event.

Like the Wind
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Take your fastest car. Slap some hard racing tires on the back wheels. Enter the race. Press the gas button. Don't let go of the gas button. You'll need to outrun the awesome Toyota GT-One race car, a task that's made easiest by using a GT-One of your own, souping it up as much as possible, and slamming the gas. If you find your car can't keep up in the straights, fine tune your gearing to maximize your top speed. By stretching the gears wider, you'll be able to reach a higher top speed, though you will sacrifice a bit of acceleration. To be able to compete in this event, you'll need a Formula race car of your own. And the only way to get a Formula race car of your own is to win it in a race. Thus, competing and winning in the Nürburgring 24-Hour Endurance event is a prerequisite for this Formula GT event. You need to make the most of your pits and be very steady with your racing because your car will be 100% equal with all the other cars. You've only got your own racing skills to rely on. You won't be able to buy any upgrades for your vehicle, which means you won't be able to buy harder tires or any extra horsepower. If you plan on B-spec'ing the event, you'll have a tough time winning because of the vehicle equalities. Your best bet is to A-spec the race event until the first pit stop. Since you can drive a lot more aggressively than B-spec'ing, you can get out to an early lead. As long as you take your first pit stop around the same time the other competitors do, you can switch to B-spec and let your car finish the racing for you.

Formula GT
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Real Circuit Tours
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As with the other events in the Extreme Events hall, you're going to need a serious race car to compete. The Toyota GT-One we've recommended before is again a great car to use. Your toughest competition will likely come from the Nissan R92CP, but you can easily beat it with a bit of intelligent racing. Most of the races verge on the edge of being long, but you don't need to pit for most of them. Slap on some hard tires in the back and medium up front, and you should be able to get through most events—eight laps and under—without having to pit. The good thing is that your competition will almost always take pit stops. If you can avoid pitting, you'll gain an automatic lead of almost twenty seconds in every race. Compared to the other events in the Extreme hall, this one is pretty easy. All you need is a production car—not a race car—with at least 450-500 horsepower. You've likely still got a car that you used in the Professional hall that can easily take this event, such as a Dodge Viper, BMW M3, Chevy Camaro, or whatever you've got. Consistent racing will win here, and be sure not to put too much pressure on your tires (no excessive sliding). You shouldn't have to pit at all for these races, though they are long enough that tire wear may become a factor if you're not careful.

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The competition in this event is made up of touring cars. That means that if you head into the race with something like a Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP, you'll absolutely blow away the competition. If you want to race and still get some Aspec points, go into the event with a touring car of your own, such as the Opel Astral Touring Car or the Mercedes-Benz AMG 190E Evolution II. Throw on a set of super hard tires on the back and hard tires on the front, and you shouldn't have a problem beating the competition in this event.

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Even though there are no vehicle restrictions for this even, you'll be racing against pretty weak competition. The pack is made up of stock sports cars, such as the Ford GT and Chevy Corvette. The pack can be beaten pretty easily with any sports car of your own choice as long as you've got 300-500 horsepower. Be sure to equip your car with super hard racing slicks if you haven't already, as this 90-lap race will put a lot of wear on your tires. If you want an easy win, you can even tackle the event with a race car or F1 car—however, given the level of competition, it's hardly necessary. You'll need a Mazda roadster for this even, which pretty much means "Miata." The racers in the event are nothing but stock Miatas, though the MX-5 Miata 1800 RS that shows up can put up quite a fight. Buy your own 1800 RS and you can win the event completely stock...but it won't be easy. You're better off putting in a few dollars to up your horsepower a bit, as well as to buy some harder sports tires (to avoid pitting too often). You'll be racing against touring car-level competition here, though you can head into the event with any vehicle you want. If you've got a race car like the Toyota GT-One or Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win this event no problem. If, however, you want a challenge, go into it with a touring car like the Opel Astra and throw on some super hard slicks to to avoid unnecessary pitting. The event is pretty long, but you can get away with pitting only a handful of times if you pace yourself correctly. The high-powered race cars in this event require equally powered racers to compete. Bring in a souped-up Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP and you shouldn't have a problem winning the event. Be sure to throw on super hard slicks on the rear tires and hard slicks on the front to keep your pitting to a minimum. Because the course is so simple, you won't see much of a difference in performance with the harder tires, so there's no reason not to take advantage of them. If you've got the Formula GT car, you can easily win this event without even letting off the gas. Just floor the throttle and keep it down as you take the turns at maximum speed. You'll be racing against touring car-level competition here, though you can head into the event with any vehicle you want. If you've got a race car like the Toyota GT-One or Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win this event no problem. If, however, you want a challenge, go into it with a touring car like the Opel Astra and throw on some super hard slicks to to avoid unnecessary pitting. You'll need to pit roughly every 4-5 laps (2-3 if you choose softer tires), though you'll want to watch more than just your tire wear. Your fuel level will come into play on this race, so keep an eye on all your gauges as you race. You can take any car into this event, but you'll need to be equipped with a pair of sports tires (hard recommended). Because of the weak tires, excessive power isn't necessarily your best friend, especially for an endurance race such as this. The competition is made up of stock sports cars like Vette's, Imprezas, and Camaros, so you don't need to have more than a few hundred horsepower in order to dominate the event. Take it easy (especially considering the cruddy tires) and pace your pitting to win this event easily. You'll be racing against touring car-level competition here, though you can head into the event with any vehicle you want. If you've got a race car like the Toyota GT-One or Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win this event no problem. If, however, you want a challenge, go into it with a touring car like the Opel Astra and throw on some super hard slicks to to avoid unnecessary pitting. The event is very long, so you'll need to pace your pitting to make the most of your tires. You'll be racing against highly tuned sports cars, though you can head into the event with any vehicle you want. If you've got a race car like the Toyota GT-One or Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win this event no problem. However, you can only enter the event with sports tires, making excessive power somewhat detrimental for the event (long race + inferior control = problems). You can easily win the event with any car that's got 400 horsepower or more. Throw on a pair of hard sports tires to keep pitting to a minimum, and you'll have no problem winning the event.

Roadster 4h Endurance
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Tokyo R246 300 km
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Super Speedway 150 miles
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Nürburgring 24h Endurance
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Nürburgring 4h Endurance
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Suzuka 1000 km
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Motegi 8h Endurance
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Tsukuba 9h Endurance
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You can take any car into this event, but you'll need to be equipped with a pair of sports tires (hard recommended). Because of the weak tires, excessive power isn't necessarily your best friend, especially for an endurance race such as this. The competition is made up of stock sports cars like Lancer Evos, Audis, and Alfa Romeos so you don't need to have more than a few hundred horsepower in order to dominate the event. Take it easy (especially considering the cruddy tires) and pace your pitting to win this event easily. You'll need a serious race car for this competition, such as a Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP. The Formula GT car can also compete pretty well here, though because of the course's long straights you may run into a limit on your top speed. Gear your vehicle more towards max speed for this course to avoid peaking in the straights, and be sure to go in with a set of super hard tires on the back. If you use the Formula GT car, you'll be forced to stick with medium tires, and while you can definitely gain a sizable lead over the competition you'll likely have to take to the pits before everyone else. You'll need a serious race car for this competition, such as a Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP. The Formula GT car can also compete pretty well here, though because of the course's long straights you may run into a limit on your top speed. Gear your vehicle more towards max speed for this course to avoid peaking in the straights, and be sure to go in with a set of super hard tires on the back. If you use the Formula GT car, you'll be forced to stick with medium tires, and while you can definitely gain a sizable lead over the competition you'll likely have to take to the pits before everyone else. You should also implement some drafting techniques, especially when on the super long straight of the course. You can boost your top speed by a good 10-20MPH if you draft correctly, letting you get a jump on anyone ahead of you. If you fall back too far, you can hop-scotch-draft (take turns drafting) with a nearby car to catch up to the other opponents quite quickly. The high-powered race cars in this event require equally powered racers to compete. Bring in a souped-up Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP and you shouldn't have a problem winning the event. Be sure to throw on super hard slicks on the rear tires and hard slicks on the front to keep your pitting to a minimum. The high-powered race cars in this event require equally powered racers to compete. Bring in a souped-up Toyota GT-One or Nissan R92 CP and you shouldn't have a problem winning the event. Be sure to throw on super hard slicks on the rear tires and hard slicks on the front to keep your pitting to a minimum. The Fomula Gran Turismo car can take a commanding lead early on in the race, but since you can't put on harder tires you'll likely have to pit more often than the other racers. However, the car is so quick that you should still win the even easily. You can take any car into this event, but you'll need to be equipped with a pair of sports tires (hard recommended). Because of the weak tires, excessive power isn't necessarily your best friend, especially for an endurance race such as this. The competition is made up of stock sports cars like Corvettes and TVRs so you don't need to have more than a few hundred horsepower in order to dominate the event. Take it easy (especially considering the cruddy tires) and pace your pitting to win this event easily. You can take any car into this event, but you'll need to be equipped with a pair of sports tires (hard recommended). Because of the weak tires, excessive power isn't necessarily your best friend, especially for an endurance race such as this. The competition is made up of stock sports cars like Vipers and TVRs so you don't need to have more than a few hundred horsepower in order to dominate the event. Take it easy (especially considering the cruddy tires) and pace your pitting to win this event easily.

Circuit de la Sarthe 24h I
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Circuit de la Sarthe 24h II
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Fuji 1000 km
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Infineon World Sports
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El Capitan 200 miles
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New York 200 miles
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This is easily the most challenging race series in the American Event hall, and accordingly you'll need a very powerful vehicle to keep up. The Chaparral 2J Race

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Car, Panoz Esperante GTR, and Ford GT LM Race Car are the most difficult competition in the event, so you'll either need to avoid them or out-power them. If you've completed the Grand Turismo World Championship, you can use the Ford GT LM prize car in this event. Bump up its horsepower and it can easily keep up with the opponents in this event, and even outrun them. You should also pick up a set of hard racing tires and equip them on your back wheels. The races here are fairly long, and as long as you've got hard tires on the back and medium tires up front you can avoid having to pit. If you aren't able to get the Ford GT LM from the GT World Championship, you can spend a lot of money to buy the Chaparral 2J Race Car and use that. It's a bit unwieldy, but it's very fast and can trounce everything else. You'll need a few hundred horses to take down the likes of the Shelby Series 1, Dodge Viper GTS, and Chevy Corvette in this series. Luckily, any US car will work as long as it's a production car, which means you can probably use any car you've used in previous events. If you've got a Viper or Ford GT of your own, you should have no problem dominating this event. Even lesser powered vehicles, like the Chevy Camaro, can keep up with the pack by adding just a few horses. The Chevy Chevelle that's won in the Hot Rod Competition can also sweep up this series of events without much trouble at all, and without any necessary upgrades. You can use any American vehicle in this event, and the competition isn't even that tough. If you purchased an American vehicle to compete in the Race of NA Sports in the Professional hall, chances are that you can use it here. Any American vehicle with some muscle can win this event, such as a Dodge Viper or Ford GT. Even lesser vehicles, when souped-up, can keep up as long as you avoid the Dodge Viper SRT10 and Shelby Series 1. If you want to win this event without spending too much money, go win the Hot Rod Competition to be awarded with the Chevy Chevelle SS. Completely stock, the car can win this event pretty easily, save for one opponent. The Buik Special '62 is wickedly quick in the straights, and while you'll be able to catch up with the car in most corners, you'll have to play dirty to stay ahead when the road opens up. If you want, you can throw in a Cr.13,000 supercharger into the Chevelle to make the car faster than the Buick, or you can deal with the car as is. If winning the Chevelle isn't an option for you right now, we recommend picking up the Buick Special '62 from the Buick shop. It's a bit pricey, but can easily win this event. If you want to spend less cash, you can get a lesser vehicle, but you'll want to avoid any head-to-head with the aforementioned Buick beast.

Stars and Stripes
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Hot Rod Competition
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Muscle Car Competition
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The competition in this event isn't too tough, so you can easily win with any decent powered Euro car. If you go into the Professional Event hall and win the Boxer Spirit event, you'll be rewarded with the RUF CTR Yellow Bird, a vehicle more than capable of taking down the competition in this event. As some of the events are relatively long, watch your tire wear and consider putting some harder tires on your rear wheels to avoid some ugly last laps. This event is much like the Pan Euro Championship in that none of the pack is particularly hard. The opponents are consistently good vehicles—such as the Lotus Esprit V8 and TVR Cerbera—but they're all stock and easily out-powered. If you completed the Pan Euro Championship, you were awarded with the Jaguar XJ220 which will easily win this event. You'll only need to buy a set of soft street tires and you'll be set. The competition in this event is surprisingly weak, despite the presence of the Lotus Elise. If you've already completed the LightWeight Cup in the Beginner Event hall, then you've won the Ginetta G4, a car more than capable of winning this competition. Fit the Ginetta vehicle with a level two turbo upgrade and you should have no problem beating out the competition. You can make any other upgrades you want, but they're totally unnecessary.

British GT Series
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Deutsche Touring Car Meisterschaft
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This event has probably the steepest entry requirements of any other event in the European hall. You'll likely need to go out and purchase a touring car for the event, which can be pretty spendy. We recommend the Opel Astra Touring Car. Stock, it's got just over 450 horses, but for an extra Cr.90,000 you can bump that up to 772. For just over Cr.600,000, you'll have a car that can easily win this event. If you don't have the cash, you can go compete in a couple of One-make races, such as the Mercedes-Benz Legend of Silver Arrow, or Opel Speedster Cup (the Mercedes is better). Those both will compete quite well, especially if you put a few more horses into them. The stock Cizeta V16T that you win in the Supercar Festival of the Professional Event hall can easily clean up this event. The low-rung Alfa Romeo's that litter these races are pretty easily beaten with the Cizeta's power, though you'll need to watch the car in the corners as it's not exactly graceful. If you don't have that car and would rather just fork out some cash, bum around the Italian set of cars, pick up something cheap, and throw in a turbo to get it up to speed. Most of the competition in this event is pretty weak, which means you can get away without having to invest much money and still win the races. If you want to get a free car that can compete, head to the Special Condition Event hall and compete in the easy Tahiti race. You'll be rewarded with the Renault 5 Turbo, a car that's not exactly fast but is capable of winning this cup without having to improve. If you want, you can throw in Cr.13,500 to get a stage two turbine kit, bumping up your horsepower and making this an easy event to win. The only car that might give you some problems is the Hommell Berlinette R/S Coupe. It's pretty consistently quick (at least relatively), so you'll need to be pretty sharp on your racing lines to keep up with it. For this event you can use the Jaguar E-Type Coupe that you win in the British GT Series. Most of the competition will be blown away by this stock Jaguar, though you'll have to watch out for a couple of key competitors. The AC Cars 427 shows up from time to time, and will absolutely destroy your Jaguar in a race. Also, other Jaguar E-Type Coupes will show up in the races. And while you can definitely beat them, you'll have to perfect your racing or soup-up your own car a bit to outrun them in the courses. Like the Tous France Championnat, the competing racers are generally pretty weak here. You'll need some sort of hatchback to compete, and you can luckily use the same Renault 5 Turbo (won in the easy Tahiti race in the Special Condition Event hall) to clean up. You'll want to slap on a stage two turbine kit to boost the power, but otherwise you won't need to spend any more money to win this cup. The toughest competition is the Clio Renault Sport V6, which might give you some trouble. Fortunately, the car is still pretty sluggish, so steady racing will beat him handily. As with other classic car races, the majority of the competition in this event is made up of a bunch of pushovers. And as with other classic races, the AC Cars 427 shows up to spoil your party. It's easily the toughest car in this competition, though you can match it by picking up an American muscle car (you can use cars from any region in this event). You can win the Chevy Chevelle SS from the American Event hall's American Muscle Car race event. This car, stock, can quite handily compete in this 1000 Miles! event, though you'll need to buy some hard sports tires. Because the races are so long, you'll want to stick to hard tires to avoid unnecessary pitting. You'll need a German production car with between 200 and 300 horsepower for this event. If you don't have anything that fits the bill, we recommend purchasing either the Audi S3 or BMW 330i. They've got plenty of power and cornering ability to pretty easily beat the competition in all three races of the event. If you haven't already, go into the Professional Event hall and win the Boxer Spirit event to earn the RUF Yellow Bird. The stock Yellow Bird will demolish the competition in this event, though you'll have to stay sharp to keep ahead of the BMW M3 and Mercedes CLK 55 AMG. If you're just interested in forking out some cash to win the event, go purchase a BMW M3. Beef it up and win.

La Festa Italiano
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Tous France Championnat
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Europe Classic Car League
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Euro Hot Hatch League
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1000 Miles!
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Schwarzwald Liga B
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General Tips American Japan Championship
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You'll be dealing with mostly stock sports cars here, including the Subaru Impreza STi, Mazda RX-7, and Toyota Supra. There are no restrictions on which cars you can bring in, though you'll have to have a set of sports tires. Any well-tuned sports car should fair well here—a Subaru, RX-7, or Supra of your own can easily win the event as long as you invest some cash to power up your vehicle.

All Japan GT Championship
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There are no restrictions on the cars you can bring into this event, which in this case means you're up against some pretty serious racing vehicles. The opposition is mostly touring car-level stuff, so you'll need to match them. The Nissan Option Stream Z '04 that's won in the Tuning Car Grand Prix of the Professional Events hall can compete here, but you'll need to soup it up with some extra horsepower and tweak the gearing to keep within its powerband (the default gearing sucks). Otherwise, you can expect to fork out some serious cash to purchase a race car that can keep up with these guys (Nissan is a good place to look).

Japanese 70's Classics
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If you don't already have a vehicle for this event, you'll likely need to go out and buy one. However, you can earn the Nissan Fairlady 240ZG (HS30) '71 in the 'Z' Club Nissan race if you've got another Nissan Z that can win the event. Otherwise, your money is best spent on a Nissan Fairlady Z 280Z-L or Mitsubishi Galant GTO MR '70. For your buck, the Galant can give you the most power as you can buy the car and a stage two turbo upgrade for about the same price as the stock 240Z. You'll be able to win the event, though you'll have to race pretty consistently while watching out for the 240ZG '71—it's the toughest competition in the pack. You'll have to bum around the Historic Used Car Showroom to find a vehicle that can compete in this race. Perhaps the best vehicle to pick is a used Nissan Skyline GT-R. You can find some used Skylines with over 250 horsepower, and pretty cheap to boot. Stock, these gems will beat everything in the event quite handily, and you'll only be set back about Cr.15,000 or so.

Japanese 80's Festival
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Japanese 90's Challenge
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If you purchased the Lancer Evo GSR as we recommended at the start of the game, dust that puppy off and take it here. If you've tuned it at all, it should have no problem competing with the weak competition of this event. And if you don't yet have a car that fits the requirements, head into one of the Used Car Showrooms and take your pick of RX-7s, Skylines, and GTOs.

Japanese Compact Cup
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There are some pretty cruddy cars here as competition, but since you're limited to buying something small you'll likely end up with a car that's just as cruddy...unless you look to Mazda. The Mazda MX-5 Miata 1800 RS is relatively affordable and useful for other racing events. Grab it stock and you'll have no problem dominating the competition.

General Tips American Umbria Rally
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On the Easy level, this event is very easy to win. The competition is usually a stock Lancia that can be out-powered by anything with more than a couple of hundred horses under the hood. And since there are no restrictions on the car you use, you'll have no problem picking out something that can destroy the competition. The same applies for the Normal difficulty race, though you'll definitely need something powerful to compete in the Hard event. A rally car of your own—like the Toyota RSC Raid Rally car you win in the first Capri Rally event—will suffice, though you can even take in a high powered sports car (Ford GT, BMW M3, etc.) if you want. Because the course is so narrow, you'll need to time your passing carefully. If you can, throw on a NOS upgrade to boost ahead of the competition at the first straight-away you reach.

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On the Easy level, this event is very easy to win. The competition is usually a stock Lancia that can be out-powered by anything with more than a couple of hundred horses under the hood. And since there are no restrictions on the car you use, you'll have no problem picking out something that can destroy the competition. The same applies for the Normal difficulty race, though you'll definitely need something powerful to compete in the Hard event. A rally car of your own—like the Toyota RSC Raid Rally car you win in the first Capri Rally event—will suffice, though you can even take in a high powered sports car (Ford GT, BMW M3, etc.) if you want. The most important thing to have is a good set of brakes. You'll need to watch your speed as you reach the end of the course's many straights, as they're often followed by wide hairpin turns. Also watch your speed as you head over the few crests of the track that can get you airborn. Be sure to keep your car pointed straight before you hit the jump, or you'll end up in the wall. The first pair of races on the Grand Canyon—Easy and Normal—are pretty easy if you've got something to out-power the competition (read: the Toyota RSC Raid Rally). However, the Hard event is actually quite challenging. You'll need to watch your slides as you power through the turns, and avoid penalties at all cost. If you're sliding towards a wall too quickly, let your backend swing out to touch the wall first. You will not incur a penalty if the rear of the car smashes into the wall, letting you take the hit and get on with the race. The first pair of races in the Ice Arena—Easy and Normal—are pretty easy if you've got something to out-power the competition (read: the Toyota RSC Raid Rally). However, the Hard event is actually quite challenging. The key to keeping control of your vehicle is to be very easy on the throttle. In the snow, it's very easy to extend your slides way longer than they need to be for turns. Just stay very easy on the throttle, espeically as you come out of turns, and brake early to avoid unnecessarily lengthy slides in the many hairpins of the course. The first pair of races in the event—Easy and Normal—are pretty easy if you've got something to out-power the competition (read: the Toyota RSC Raid Rally). However, the Hard event is actually quite challenging. The key to keeping control of your vehicle is to be very easy on the throttle. In the snow, it's very easy to extend your slides way longer than they need to be for turns. Just stay very easy on the throttle, espeically as you come out of turns, and brake early to avoid unnecessarily lengthy slides in the many hairpins of the course. Also be mindful of the changes in terrain, as the track goes from asphalt to snow and back. You won't be able to slide well on the asphalt, so slow down considerably to make the turns. You can floor the gas when coming out of turns on the asphalt, but be very gentle when on the snow—you shouldn't floor the gas out of a snow turn until after the car has started moving straight. On the Easy level, this event is very easy to win. The competition is usually a stock Lancia that can be out-powered by anything with more than a couple of hundred horses under the hood. And since there are no restrictions on the car you use, you'll have no problem picking out something that can destroy the competition. The same applies for the Normal difficulty race, though you'll definitely need something powerful to compete in the Hard event. A rally car of your own—like the Toyota RSC Raid Rally car you win in the first Capri Rally event—will suffice, though you can even take in a high powered sports car (Ford GT, BMW M3, etc.) if you want. The course is slightly wet, which shouldn't be much of a factor if you're sporting 4WD. Also, the relatively low speeds of the track minimize any effects of the wet asphalt, so race it as you would any normal track: aggressive and quick. All levels of this race are pretty easy if you've got a decent understanding of offroad racing along with a good car to race. You'll want something like the Toyota RSC Raid Rally Car, Subaru Impreza, or Mitsubishi Lancer rally car to compete in the Hard race, but just about anything with a set of dirt tires can handily win the easier events. The course is very wide, allowing a lot of room for slidng and high speeds. Just watch your throttle when heading around the tighter turns—too much gas before your car straightens out can lead to a spinout if you're not careful. The first two levels of this event—Easy and Normal—are pretty easy if you've got a decent rally car already. However, the Hard Tahiti tour is pretty challenging. You'll need to be pretty ginger around the many hairpins of the course, lightly

Grand Canyon Rally
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Whistler Ice Race
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Chamonix Rally
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George V Rally
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Swiss Alps Rally
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Tour of Tahiti
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feathering the throttle to push the car around as you slide. You need to keep light on the gas to keep your sliding to a minimum, braking early for turns and just lightly gassing it through the inside of hte turn (keep the car pretty straight). You want to have plenty of traction left when you reach the corner's exit, letting you get back on the throttle hard until you reach the next bend. Tsukuba Wet Race
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Since you can take any car into these races, the Easy and Normal events are a cakewalk. The wet asphalt will mean you'll have to slow down a bit earlier than you're used to on Tsukuba, and you'll even have to brake for a few slight bends that you'd otherwise disregard since the water will keep your wheels from gripping as tightly. The Hard version of the race will have you up against a serious race car, so you'll need to head into the event with something seriously powerful to keep up. If you've got a Toyota GT-One, you're in good shape. You'll also want to be sure to equip super soft tires if you've got them. Since this is a Special Conditions event, tire wear is not a factor, and you might as well take advantage of the extra grip. You shouldn't have a problem on the Easy and Normal versions of this race— you'll be up against stock cars, like old Celicas and new Subaru Impreza STis. As long as you've got a decent rally car, the early events should be easy, but the Hard race is still a good challenge. There's plenty of room for low-speed sliding through most of the turns on the course, but watch your throttle when heading through the quick switch-back hairpins in the center of the course (spinouts are tough to avoid). Also, be mindful of the changes in terrain. You can push your car a bit harder when on the asphalt, giving you a quick bit of track on which it's easy to make up time. You shouldn't have a problem on the Easy and Normal versions of this race— you'll be up against stock cars, like old Celicas and new Subaru Impreza STis. As long as you've got a decent rally car, the early events should be easy, but the Hard race is still a good challenge. There's plenty of room for low-speed sliding through most of the turns on the course, but watch your throttle when heading through the quick switch-back hairpins in the center of the course (spinouts are tough to avoid).

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Yosemite Rally II
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Professional Japanese AMERICAN MAKES

Extreme Special Condition

Endurance One-make

Chevrolet: Vette! Vette! Vette!
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There are a number of Corvettes in the game, but there's unfortunately nothing competition worthy that you can win through other events. The best Corvette you can buy (production) is the Corvette Z06 in Chevrolet's main showroom. Pick it up, beef it up, and you're gold.

Chevrolet: Camaro Meeting
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Any Camaro with a few hundred horsepower can win this event. If you've won the American Events Stars and Stripes race, you were awarded with the Camaro LM Race Car. And while it's not exactly fair to the competition (they're just stock cars), you can bring this race car into this Camaro Meeting and clean up shop. Since there's only one model of Crossfire in the game, you'll be exactly even with the competition if you go in with a stock car. You can win the event stock, but you might have a hard time, especially on the Super Speedway. If you want to make things easy on you, throw in just a little money to get some more power from your engine—for just Cr.12,000 you can bump up your horsepower by more than 50. Since there's only one model of S7 in the game, you'll be exactly even with the competition if you go in with a stock car. You can win the event stock, but you might have a hard time if your racing isn't perfect. If you want to make things easy on you, throw in just a little money to get some more power from your engine—for just Cr.14,000 you can bump up your horsepower by more than 150 with a supercharger.

Chrysler: Crossfire Trophy
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Saleen: Saleen S7 Club
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Shelby: Shelby Cobra Cup
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Even though the series name says "Cobra," you can enter the race with a Shelby Series 1 car if you can't afford the classic roadster. The Cobra 427 is the better car for this race, boasting way more horsepower that's necessary for keeping up with the competition. If you want to out-power your opponents, invest Cr.13,500 in a supercharger for yoru Cobra. You'll gain almost 150 horsepower, more than enough to give you an edge.

EUROPEAN MAKES Alfa Romeo: GTA Cup
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There's only one car you can purchase to compete in the event, though you'll potentially be racing against another sort of vehicle. Don't worry about the unattainable classic Alfa Romeo—it's definitely slower than the stock 147 GTA you can buy. However, you'll likely want to give your 147 GTA a cheap ugprade. Since everyone else in the pack is equal with you, you'll have a hard time playing catchup unless you beat them in power. You'll have to win the Alpine A310 in the Special Condition hall, Easy George V Paris race. The race is an easy win, though you'll want to beef up your A310 once you get it. You can win the event stock, but it'll be a lot easier if you spend Cr.13,000 on a stage two turbo.

Alpine: Renault Alpine Cup
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Aston Martin: Aston Martin Carnival
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Thankfully, the best Aston Martin you can buy is also the cheapest. Pick up the DB9 Coupe for this event and you should be able to win the races with a stock car. There's some cheap horsepower you can buy if you need it, but with the DB9 you likely won't. There are a couple of Audi TTs you can pick up, and the TT Coupe 3.2 is the better one you can buy. It's got quite a bit more horsepower, letting you tackle this event with a stock car and still come out on top pretty easily.

Audi: Tourist Trophy
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Audi: A3 Cup
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You'll have to pick up an A3 from the Audio shop for this event, though you can thankfully win pretty easily even with a stock vehicle. You can, of course, make it easier on yourself by souping-up your A3 with a couple of cheap engine upgrades.

BMW: 1 Series Trophy
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There are two 1 Series BMWs you can buy, and the better one is just a couple thousand credits more expensive. Definitely go for the more expensive BMW 120d. It's got a lot more horsepower and can win the event stock.

BMW: Club "M"
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There are a couple of BMW M3s you can buy, and the cheaper one is probably the better bargain. It's got comparable horsepower, and for the same price as the more expensive M3 you can tune up the cheaper CSL to out-power its brother. The series is pretty easy if you've got more than 400 horsepower in your car.

Citroen: 2HP - 2CV Classics
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The only way to get the car that can compete in this event is to win the Tous France Championnat in the European Events hall. The car will come stock, just like the other racers, but you'll want to invest a few thousand credits to make the engine a bit stronger. Because the race is so slow, it'll be difficult to catch up to any opponents that start ahead of you during a rolling start, unless you've got some power that they don't. There are a few Elises you can buy, and the most expensive definitely has the best power. However, for about the same price you can pick up the cheaper Elise and throw on a stage two turbo kit to beef it up even beyond the stock Elise 111R.

Lotus: Elise Trophy
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Lotus: Lotus Classics
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The Lotus Europa Special that you win in the British Light Weight Car Race (European hall) is more than enough tackle this challenge. The Elans in the race will be easy to stomp all over, though you may need to worry about other Europa Specials in the event. You can bump up your horsepower a bit, but you really shouldn't need to if you've got driving down to a science.

Mercedes: Legends of the Silver Arrow
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There are no restrictions on which Mercedes you bring into this race, letting you easily smash the competition if you've got anything good. The most competition will come from the SLR McLaren that partakes in these races, but you can easily outrun the car with the Mercedes CLK-GTR you win in the Deutsche Touring Car Meisterschaft (European Events hall). There are many Mercedes SLs you can buy, and there's one that absolutely destroys the competition. The SL 65 AMG (R230) outpowers its closest cousin by over 100HP, and it's not even that much more expensive. We recommend picking up this car if you want to destroy the competition, though you can likely get away with using one of the lesser models. But for the money you save, it's not really worth it unless you live for the challenge. You can purchase the MG TF160 in the MG shop, and it's the best car you can get for the event. You'll want to soup it up a bit for the races—the other cars are equally as slow as you, but with rolling starts you'll have a lot of catching up to do.

Mercedes: SL Challenge
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MG: MG Festival
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Mini: Mini Mini Sports Meeting
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The best Mini you can buy for the event is the Mini Cooper-S. If you get into a race that doesn't have any other Cooper-S cars, you'll easily win the race. However, other Cooper-Ses will give you some trouble, so you'll likely want to throw in just a few thousand credits to get the horsepower slightly higher than your opponent's.

Opel: Speedster Trophy
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The best Opel Speedster you can buy is the Opel Speedster Turbo. However, the stock car isn't enough to keep up with the pack in this event. You'll need to invest some money into the car to get it going faster—a stage four turbo upgrade is a good place to start.

Peugeot: 206 Cup
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If you've got the Peugeot 206 Rally Car, you can use it here and clean up the competition quite handily. You can either buy the car or win it in the Special Conditions hall (George V Paris Hard race). However, you can get away with picking up a lowly Peugeot 206 RC and souping-up the engine a bit. The cars you'll race against are a bit better than stock, so you'll need a few extra horses to keep up. The best Clio you can buy is only going to be the start of what you'll need to win this cup. You'll be up against a pack of race cars, so you need to dump some serious cash into a Clio Sport V6 Phase 2 to get it up to speed. We don't think there's any way to unlock the race car for yourself, so you'll have to make do with the production vehicle and hope for the best!

Renault: Clio Trophy
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Renault: Megane Cup
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The Megane 2.0 16V is the only car you can get for this event, and it's plenty vehicle enough to win the races stock. You don't have to spend many credits in order to get the Megane fast enough to make this event super easy—in fact, you don't need to do any souping-up if you don't want to and you're confident in your racing skills.

Triumph: Spitfire Cup
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You don't have any options when it comes to buying Spitfires, so you'll have to make do with the one car they make available. Luckily, it's able to not only compete but actually win the races purely stock. You don't need to purchase any engine upgrades, but you can make your life a lot easier by investing a few

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thousand credits. Any TVR is fair game in this race, which means you can pick up the Cerbera Speed 12 (if you've got the cash) and mop up the competition. You can get away with spending a bit less money if you want, by picking up a T350c and beefing it up.

TVR: Black Pool Racers
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Volkswagen: Beetle Cup
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There are a couple of Beetles you can buy that can compete here: the New Beetle Cup Car and the New Beetle RSi. The Beetle Cup Car is quite a bit cheaper and actually better in the race—even though its horsepower is less than the RSi, it's lighter and quicker. You may need to still throw in a few thousand credits to get some extra power out of your engine since all of the competition will be driving the exact same car, and playing catch-up is easier when you've got more horses. The only Lupo you should consider buying is the Lupo GTI Cup Car. All of your competitors will be driving this vehicle, so you've got to at least match them in power. Stock, the car can win the event, but you'll have to be very precise with your racing lines to keep up your speeds (the race is slow). If you want, throw in just a little extra horsepower and you should be able to win with ease.

Volkswagen: Lupo Cup
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Volkswagen: GTi Cup
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If you want to easily win this cup and not spend a lot of money, pick up the VW Golf V GTI. It's not very powerful, but even stock it can defeat the competition in this event with relative ease.

JAPANESE MAKES Daihatsu: Copen Race
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Both versions of the Copen that you can purchase are identical in performance, so pick whichever you prefer. You'll want to soup-up the engine a bit to keep up with the competition—though everyone in the race is your equal, you'll have to play catch-up after the rolling starts, a task that's much easier if you've got a few extra horses over your competition. The only car you can purchase to compete in this event is found in the Used Car Showroom II. Unfortunately, the cars in the Used Car Showrooms change every week (game time). The cycle lasts 700 game days, and the Daihatsu Midget II DType that you need shows up on Day 50 (it stays around for a total of seven days). If you're past Day 50, you can wait another cycle...until Day 750 for the car to appear again. And if you're past that? Wait until day 1450. Cheers! You can win this event easily if you first take the time to win another event. The Race of NA Sports in the Professional Events hall will reward you with the Honda NSX-R Concept, a car that can destroy the competition in this event. Win the car, enter this race, and you'll have no problem placing first.

Daihatsu: Midget II Race
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Honda: Type R Meeting
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Honda: Civic Race
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For relatively cheap, you can pick up a Civic Type-R. Even stock, the car can destroy everything else in this event so you don't even need to worry about upgrading your engine. Just be mindful of your FF drivetrain (you'll get some understeer in a Civic) and you'll be good to win.

Isuzu: Isuzu Sports Classics
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You can enter and win this race for very little money if you know where to look. Head into the Historic Used Car Showroom and pick up the Isuzu Piazza XE. You won't need to put any extra money into the car to win the races in the event— stock, it can clean up all the competition.

Mazda: Club "RE"
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You'll need some sort of a Mazda RX-7 or RX-8 for this event. If you don't already have one, you can get an RX-7 on the cheap by visiting one of the Use Car Showrooms. We picked up the RX-7 Type RZ for about Cr.13,000 and were able to win the event easily with just a few engine upgrades (stage two turbine works). Alternatively, you can go into the Special Condition Hall and win the Easy Tsukuba Wet race. You'll be rewarded with the RX-8 Concept, a car which should be able to win this event stock. The best new Mazda you can buy for this event is the Miata MX-5 RS. However, for about half the price you can pick up a used Miata in the Used Car Showroom I and use the money you saved to soup it up for the event. Even the stock MX-5 RS isn't quite enough to keep up with the competition in the event—since you'll need to invest in upgrades anyway, you're probably best off starting out with a used car, changing the oil, and investing your cash in the used engine. You'll need an RX-8 for this event, and you can get one for free if you know where to look. Go into the Special Conditions hall and compete in the Easy Tsukuba Wet event. You'll be rewarded with the RX-8 Concept car which has more than enough horsepower, stock, to win this event.

Mazda: NR-A Roadster Cup
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Mazda: NR-A RX-8 Cup
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Mitsubishi: Evolution Meeting
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If you bought the Lancer Evolution GSR that we recommended in the beginning of the game, then you've already got what you need to win this event. You'll definitely need to invest some money in your used Lancer in order to keep up with the competition, but it doesn't take too much to get you up to speed. There's just one Mirage available for purchase in Mitsubishi's showroom, and it's not exactly a world class performer. With only 82 horsepower, the Mirage 1400 GLX can't compete with the opponents in the race, but you can invest a few credits to get it up to speed. A cheap stage two turbo upgrade should get you started.

Mitsubishi: Mirage Cup
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Nissan: Race of the Red "R" Emblem
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Any Skyline with a few hundred horsepower should have no problem competing in this event. There are a number of Skylines that you can win as prizes, including the GT-R Concept LM Race Car that's won in the Dream Car Championship of the Extreme Events hall. If you head into this Skyline event with any sort of race car, you'll destroy the competition with no trouble.

Nissan: March Brothers
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If you don't want much hassle for this race, head into Nissan's main showroom and pick up the Cube EX. It's pretty weak as a stock car, but you might barely be able to squeak out some wins with it. However, to make things easier for yourself you'll want to pick up a cheap stage two turbine kit—you'll nearly double your horsepower, giving you plenty of push to win the event. There are some cheap Nissan Silvias that you can buy in the Used Car Showrooms, all of which can compete in this event. We picked up the Silvia K's (S13) for under Cr.8,000, and the car was ready to easily win the competition stock. Of course, you can invest in a few small engine upgrades to completely blow away the pack if you choose, but it is by no means necessary. There are a couple of Nissan Zs you can win in events, and they'll pretty much take this competition without a sweat. The Option Stream Z you win in the Tuning Car Grand Prix (Professional Events hall) is good, but the Concept LM Race Car won in the Japanese Championship (Japanese Events hall) is even better. It'll tear through the competition in this event quite easily (and it's fun to drive, too!).

Nissan: Silvia Sisters
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Nissan: Club "Z"
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Subaru: Subaru 360 Race
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All cars in this competition are exactly alike, so you'll need to out-power your competition to catch up with them. Pick up the Subaru 360 from the Subaru showroom and slap on a cheap turbo upgrade. You can easily double or triple your horsepower, which is good enough for this slow competition.

Subaru: Stars of Pleiades
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Any Subaru can enter this event, but you'll need something that can compete with the more expensive Impreza STis and such. Of course, if you want to tear apart the competition, there are a few Subaru rally cars that you can win in the Special Conditions hall Hard races (Capri Rally, Chamonix, Cathedral Rocks trail I).

Suzuki: Suzuki K-Car Cup
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Probably the best car you can buy for this event is the Suzuki Kei Works. And though it doesn't have much power, it is pretty lightweight and is easily upgraded with some cheap engine enhancements. With just a few extra horses, this car can win the event but you'll need to keep up your speed as much as possible, avoiding any unnecessary braking. To get a Suzuki concept car that can compete in this event, you'll have to enter and win the Suzuki K-Car event first. You'll be rewarded with the Concept-S2, a car that definitely needs to see an engine upgrade before being able to compete in this event. The other Concept-S2s you'll race against are easy to beat—they're equally matched with your vehicle, but you can out-corner them. However, the GSX-R/4s that show up are significantly quicker in the straights, and they'll be your main rivals in this event. To compete in this event you'll actually need to head to the American car showrooms and pick up a Lexus! You'll want to get the Lexus IS300 Sport Cross, which has enough punch that it can win this event without any engine upgrades. You'll be racing against other identical cars, which might make it difficult to catch up, but you shouldn't have too much of a problem out-doing the opponents in the corners. There are a few Vitzes you can pick up, and it's worth going for the best one. The Vitz RS Turbo isn't very expensive and it can beat everything else in the race pretty handily. You don't even need to invest any cash in upgrading the vehicle!

Suzuki: Suzuki Concepts
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Toyota: Altezza Race
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Toyota: Vitz Race
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Race Track Analysis
Real Circuit Nürburgring Nordshschleife Laguna Seca Raceway Tsukuba Circuit Tsukaba Circuit - WET Fuji Speedway 90's Fuji Speedway 80's Fuji Speedway 2005 GT Fuji Speedway 2005 Infineon Raceway - Sports Car Course Infineon Raceway - Stock Car Course Twin Ring Motegi Road Course Twin Ring Motegi East Short Course Twin Ring Motegi West Short Course Twin Ring Motegi Super Speedway Suzuka Circuit Suzuka Circuit East Course Suzuka Circuit West Course Circuit de la Sarthe I Circuit de la Sarthe II Dirt & Snow Ice Arena Grand Canyon Cathedral Rocks trail I Cathedral Rocks trail II Swiss Alps Tahiti Maze Chamonix Original Course El Capitan High Speed Ring Trial Mountain Circuit Grand Valley Speedway Grand Valley East Section Apricot Hill Raceway Autumn Ring Autumn Ring Mini Deep Forest Raceway Motor Sports Land II Midfield Raceway Test Course Beginner Course City Course Costa di Amalfi George V Paris Opera Paris Hong Kong Citta di Aria New York Tokyo R246 Côte d'Azur Special Stage Route 5 Clubman Stage Route 5 Seattle Circuit Seoul Central

The slight turns in this stretch of track set the pace pretty well for what you'll see for the rest of the track. You'll need to mash the gas between turns but don't hesitate to brake (and sometimes hard) before heading into the turns. Because the course is so narrow in most spots, you're best off going into a turn too slow rather than too fast. However, since most of the turns are pretty simple, steady lines and proper apexes should yield high speeds throughout.

This wide hairpin comes at the end of a long straigh, which means you'll have tons of speed when you reach it. You don't want to brake too early, but you will need to drop a lot of speed before you start taking the turn. Because the turn leads downhill, you'll have to resist the natural urge to build more speed, otherwise you'll end up in the dirt track outside of the curve.

Just after the above-mentioned hairpin turn, the course opens up into another straight. You'll build up a lot of speed, making this set of turns particularly easy to screw up. Brake early as you approach the first hill crest, and take the first left pretty causually. As the road sweeps back right, floor it and then quickly get on the brakes again to slow down for the last part of the turn. The road switches back left, and pretty sharply—you'll need to keep a pretty low speed in order to avoid sliding into the grass on the outside of the turn.

Coming off this relatively short straight, you'll have easily built up quite a bit of speed. Right at the bottom of the hill is this sharp righthand turn, preceded by a nasty bump in the road. In most vehicles, you want to start your braking just before the bump in the road, but it is vital that you keep perfectly straight when you hit the bump. If your car goes airborn without being straight, you'll lose control of your car just before this pivotal turn.

You'll build up a lot of speed on the preceding straight, so don't be afraid to brake early heading into this turn. You want to hit two apexes in this turn—the first should be early, sending you deep into the turn and letting you cut back for a second apex very late in the turn. Nail it right and you'll get an early lead on the pack.

Just before this turn is a long straight that ends as the hill crests. While on the straight, hug the left side of the course. As you get close to the crest, point your car straight towards the apex on the right wall and brake hard, lining up your car perfectly to take the dense s-turn just ahead.

This long sweeping turn can give you a lot of speed into the straights ahead, or it can suck the life out of your run. Be sure to keep your speed up as you exit this turn to set up a great time on the last part of the track.

The very first turn is a tricky one to take, but nailing it right can get you off to an early lead. Brake somewhat late to head deep into the turn, and then cut back to hit a late apex as you speed into the following straight.

You can go around this corner faster than you may think, thanks to a good camber and a wide road outside the turn. Be sure to nail the apex very tightly and you'll be able to rocket out of the turn with plenty of speed for the straight ahead.

The set up for this turn is almost more important than the turn itself. You'll have a lot of speed going into the turn, so it's important to stay straight while braking into the corner. Hug the inside of the turn and nail the gas at the apex to shoot yourself out into the super-long straight beyond.

The very first turn is a tricky one to take, but nailing it right can get you off to an early lead. Brake somewhat late to head deep into the turn, and then cut back to hit a late apex as you speed into the following straight.

You can go around this corner faster than you may think, thanks to a good camber and a wide road outside the turn. Be sure to nail the apex very tightly and you'll be able to rocket out of the turn with plenty of speed for the straight ahead.

The set up for this turn is almost more important than the turn itself. You'll have a lot of speed going into the turn, so it's important to stay straight while braking into the corner. Hug the inside of the turn and nail the gas at the apex to shoot yourself out into the super-long straight beyond.

Because this turn is at the end of a very long straight, you'll need to watch your speed as you head into it. However, the corner is pretty deep, giving you plenty of room to brake into it and cut back for an exit apex. As soon as you're pointing in the right direction, floor the gas.

Your speed will likely pull you to the left side of the course as you approach this wide hairpin turn. That's okay, but you'll need to aim for the right side of the track as you brake into the hairpin, letting you cut back for a late apex that gives you plenty of acceleration into the long stretch of road beyond.

Keep left on the track as you approach this corner, and brake late but hard. Cut in for a late apex on the first bit of the s-turn (a righthand bend) and feather the gas to position yourself correctly for the second part of the turn. It's important to get the second part of this turn absolutely right, as you'll need the speed for the last part of the course.

Because this turn is at the end of a very long straight, you'll need to watch your speed as you head into it. However, the corner is pretty deep, giving you plenty of room to brake into it and cut back for an exit apex. As soon as you're pointing in the right direction, floor the gas.

The course gets narrow on this stretch of track, and the combination of bad camber and high speed can make it easy to get off track. Stay on the outside of the turn and cut in as you start heading downhill—depending your vehicle's power, you may or may not have to let off the gas in order to make it around without losing grip.

The last turn of the course is a very long, high-speed curve that ends in a long straight. You can keep up your speed through the first couple of bends in the turn, but you'll likely have to apply just a touch of brake to make it around the last corner without losing grip from your back tires.

The subtle changes in this turn over time have made it a significantly faster corner to take. Brake hard and aim for the apex early. Once past the apex, turn hard and floor it—your speed should pull you through the turn and into the following straight.

After a long sweeping turn, you can cut this corner a bit short by skipping through the grass with your right wheels. You can get through the turn with an extra boost of speed, though you don't want to go in with too much. It's not hard to lose control and slide into the outer ring.

This series of three consecutive tights turns can completely make or break your run through the course. You can take the first turn pretty loosely, hitting an early apex at low speeds, but the last two corners will have to be taken pretty wide in order to cut back and get up to speed for the straight that leads to the finish line.

The subtle changes in this turn over time have made it a significantly faster corner to take. Brake hard and aim for the apex early. Once past the apex, turn hard and floor it—your speed should pull you through the turn and into the following straight.

You'll need to brake hard and early as you approach this tight turn, staying wide left and cutting in early to nail your apex. Braking late here is not an option, as you'll end up sliding into the grass oblivion outside the track if you're not careful approaching this turn.

This series of three consecutive tights turns can completely make or break your run through the course. You can take the first turn pretty loosely, hitting an early apex at low speeds, but the last two corners will have to be taken pretty wide in order to cut back and get up to speed for the straight that leads to the finish line.

If you get the angle right, you can blast through this s-turn with a lot of speed behind you. Of course, messing it up could very easily send you sliding into the grass on the outside of the turn. Stay fast through the first part of hte s-turn and brake just slightly while going uphill. Stick to the left side of the course and then quickly cut back in to nail your apex on the second part of the s-turn and bolt out down the straight. If you go in with too much speed (or at the wrong angle), it'll be hard to avoid hitting the grass.

This long sweeping turn may not look like much, but doing poorly here can lose a lot of time. Remember the adage "slow in, fast out" and lightly tap your brakes at the beginning of the turn. Once you're down to speed and on the outside of the turn, you'll be able to point yourself towards the apex and floor the gas to get the maximum speed out of the corner and into the long straight ahead.

This series of slight turns can be dangerously non-threatening. But because of the narrow path and the quick changes in direction, it can be hard to keep control of your vehicle while keeping up to speed. Lightly tap the brakes before turning to avoid losing traction during the curves.

Brake early while heading into this final hairpin turn, and ride along the inside of the turn to nail your apex. You can floor the gas when you reach about the middle of the turn, shooting your car out down the final stretch with plenty of power behind it.

If you get the angle right, you can blast through this s-turn with a lot of speed behind you. Of course, messing it up could very easily send you sliding into the grass on the outside of the turn. Stay fast through the first part of hte s-turn and brake just slightly while going uphill. Stick to the left side of the course and then quickly cut back in to nail your apex on the second part of the s-turn and bolt out down the straight. If you go in with too much speed (or at the wrong angle), it'll be hard to avoid hitting the grass.

This series of slight turns can be dangerously non-threatening. But because of the narrow path and the quick changes in direction, it can be hard to keep control of your vehicle while keeping up to speed. Lightly tap the brakes before turning to avoid losing traction during the curves.

Brake early while heading into this final hairpin turn, and ride along the inside of the turn to nail your apex. You can floor the gas when you reach about the middle of the turn, shooting your car out down the final stretch with plenty of power behind it.

You'll need to stay at pretty low speeds in order to get through the first part of this turn. However, as soon as you nail the apex, floor the gas and you'll be able to accelerate through the rest of the turn and into the following straight.

Depending on the power and grip of your vehicle, you may be able to fully accelerate throughout this entire turn. Stay wide left at the first part of the curve and slowly inch your way towards the right edge of the track. This will allow you to maintain a smooth line into the next straight.

Watch your speed as you approach this corner, but don't be overly cautious. Stay wide left and quickly cut into the apex to get a healthy bit of speed down into the next set of turns. With the right angle, you can go through this turn faster than you might think.

A good racing line can do you some real good in this small s-turn, but a bad line can tack on burdensome seconds and even send you into the grass on the outside of the turn. Because there's a long straight at the end of the turn, it's especially important to accelerate as soon as possible. Keep left during the first part of the s-turn while cruising at a low speed. As soon as you see the last part of the s-turn, floor the gas and pull into the apex to get a shot of speed as you run down the straight.

Watch your speed as you approach this corner, but don't be overly cautious. Stay wide left and quickly cut into the apex to get a healthy bit of speed down into the next set of turns. With the right angle, you can go through this turn faster than you might think.

This chicane can cost you a lot of speed if you don't get it right, but nail your line and you can pull through it with a lot of muscle behind you. As you gas it around the uphill slight-left that follows the second turn of the course, keep on the left side of the track and lightly brake as you reach the crest of the hill. Quickly pull right and floor it, taking a straight line through the chicane and into the next straight.

This pair of corners can be a problem if you go into the stretch with too much speed. Tap your brakes before entering the first corner (lefthand turn) and stay along the left side of the track. As you hit the apex, nail the gas and you should be able to pull your vehicle through the second turn with plenty of speed.

You don't need to brake too early when heading into this chicane, though you do need to brake hard before turning. Slow your car down and cut the first righthand corner just slightly. As you start heading downhill, apply full gas and shoot through the rest of the turn.

Because this course is so short, and because the straights make up the vast majority of the roadway, you absolutely must get the most of your acceleration when exiting the corners just before the straights. For this corner, brake early and hard, and stay at about the center of the track before cutting in to hit the apex and fly out into the long straight.

This high speed circuit is 100% about controlling your speed. Pure power will get you ahead in the straights, but it's important to control your speed through the long sweeping turns so that you don't lose traction. You'll likely need to let off the gas just slightly as you head into the first turn. As you do, pull left towards the inside of the track while keeping a steady light touch on the gas. You want to stay along the slope of the course, but keep towards the left as far as possible without losing the advantage of the camber. As you hit the apex, floor the gas and let your power pull you to the outside of the course.

As before, it's very important that you don't let your wheels lose traction here. If you hear your tires squealing, you're pushing too hard. Watch your speed and keep it constant after you lightly brake into the turn. Once you've slowed down, inch towards the inside of the course and don't start accelerating until you hit the apex.

The first turn of the course is a two part deal. Brake late but hard for the first part of the turn and quickly get back on the gas, aiming for the left side of the track beyond the apex. Once you're near the edge of the track, brake hard again and pull right to nail the second apex. You should be able to floor the gas pretty early, giving you a nice boost out into the next portion of the track.

This set of switchback turns can be taken with a decent speed, but you've got to get your entry and exit angles just right to avoid unnecessary braking. Slow down early for the turns and keep wide until you sharply aim for the apex. Feather the gas towards the next turn and repeat the process. The last turn in this series of curves (a sweeping lefthander) can be taken with more speed than the other turns, so don't be afraid to nail the gas as you head into the following straight.

You'll pick up a lot of speed before heading into this turn, and though you may be tempted to smash the brakes you can actually keep up your speed. Head into the turn and brake hard and late. Let off the brakes before turning and aim straight for the apex.

This tight hairpin is one of the trickiest turns in the course. Just before the hairpin, the road bends right just slightly. Before this bend, stay on the left side of the course and then quickly cut to the right side of the course to follow the bend. Brake hard as you do this, and as you hit the outside edge of the track, pull in hard to nail the apex. You can lightly feather the gas through the hairpin, though don't get over-zealous—just stay steady and get through the turn slowly to set up the next long straight.

A quick and nasty chicane marks the end of the course, and getting it right is important to keeping up your speed in the last straight-away. During the preceding straight, keep on the left side of the track. As you approach the chicane, brake very hard while staying outside. When you've slowed down to a decent speed, pull in tight to hit a late apex on the first curve of the chicane, and lightly feather the throttle around the last bit of the corner.

The first turn of the course is a two part deal. Brake late but hard for the first part of the turn and quickly get back on the gas, aiming for the left side of the track beyond the apex. Once you're near the edge of the track, brake hard again and pull right to nail the second apex. You should be able to floor the gas pretty early, giving you a nice boost out into the next portion of the track.

This set of switchback turns can be taken with a decent speed, but you've got to get your entry and exit angles just right to avoid unnecessary braking. Slow down early for the turns and keep wide until you sharply aim for the apex. Feather the gas towards the next turn and repeat the process. The last turn in this series of curves (a sweeping lefthander) can be taken with more speed than the other turns, so don't be afraid to nail the gas as you round it.

At the top of the crest here, the course quickly turns right. You can take the first part of the turn with a good amount of speed behind you, but you'll have to brake quickly thereafter. You need complete control of your car around the rest of the turn—don't let your rear tires lose traction, as you absolutely need to have the acceleration for the following straight.

You'll need to brake hard and early for this turn, slowing your car down considerably while staying on the left side of the track. As you approach the corner, cut in sharply to nail the apex and feather the throttle lightly to approach the second part of the turn. You can cut the corner of the second part of the turn with your right wheels. Just make sure to line yourself up before nailing the gas.

You'll pick up a lot of speed before heading into this turn, and though you may be tempted to smash the brakes you can actually keep up your speed. Head into the turn and brake hard and late. Let off the brakes before turning and aim straight for the apex.

This tight hairpin is one of the trickiest turns in the course. Just before the hairpin, the road bends right just slightly. Before this bend, stay on the left side of the course and then quickly cut to the right side of the course to follow the bend. Brake hard as you do this, and as you hit the outside edge of the track, pull in hard to nail the apex. You can lightly feather the gas through the hairpin, though don't get over-zealous—just stay steady and get through the turn slowly to set up the next long straight.

Either side of the track at this sharp corner is bordered by a wide reddish shoulder. Not only should you feel free to drive on the shoulder, but you are encouraged to do so. You can make your turns wider if you use the full width of the track including the shoulder, letting you move through the turn at a much higher speed.

You'll build up a lot of speed on these straights, and while the slight turns in the road aren't very sharp you will need to slow down for them considerably. Stay wide left as you approach the first kink in the straight, brake early, and pull in towards the apex. You want to maximize your exit speed out of the second part of the kink (the left-hand bend), so brake early so you can get back on the gas as soon as possible.

This long semi-straight is pretty narrow, but you can get through the first two bends without having to let off the accelerator. However, you will need to brake for the last right-hand bend. Brake early and somewhat hard before the bend to avoid losing control on the narrow track. You can still keep up a lot of speed, but you need to be ready to brake hard for the following sharp left-hand corner.

There's a pair of left-right chicanes right before the end of the course that you need to be ready for. You can get up to pretty high speeds preceding the chicanes, and you'll need to brake very hard (and early) in order to get through the s-turns without flying off the track. The second chicane is a bit tighter than the first, so be ready to slow down early to maximize your exit speed across the finish.

Either side of the track at this sharp corner is bordered by a wide reddish shoulder. Not only should you feel free to drive on the shoulder, but you are encouraged to do so. You can make your turns wider if you use the full width of the track including the shoulder, letting you move through the turn at a much higher speed.

Because of this super-long straight-away, you'll want to gear your car especially for this track. When tinkering with your gear ratios, spread the gears farther apart to get more top-end performance. You'll see noticeable lap time improvements if you maximize your speed for this straight. You can also implement some sly drafting techniques on this stretch of road. If an opponent is driving right in front of you, stick right behind them and you'll notice a quick boost in speed. Use this boost to slingshot yourself past the opponent and down the rest of the straight.

This long semi-straight is pretty narrow, but you can get through the first two bends without having to let off the accelerator. However, you will need to brake for the last right-hand bend. Brake early and somewhat hard before the bend to avoid losing control on the narrow track. You can still keep up a lot of speed, but you need to be ready to brake hard for the following sharp left-hand corner.

There's a pair of left-right chicanes right before the end of the course that you need to be ready for. You can get up to pretty high speeds preceding the chicanes, and you'll need to brake very hard (and early) in order to get through the s-turns without flying off the track. The second chicane is a bit tighter than the first, so be ready to slow down early to maximize your exit speed across the finish.

Right at the start of the course, the track bends slightly to the right. You don't need to brake for the pseudo-turn, but you do need to enter the corner properly to avoid smashing the walls. From the starting line, keep wide left and then pull in slightly towards the right as the course curves. After hitting the inside of the course, line yourself up for the turn that follows the straight.

This last chicane in the course can slow you down considerably if you don't go into it correctly. To prepare for the chicane, take the preceding turn (a long sweeping lefthander) slowly, sticking to the inside of the track. As the turn opens up into the chicane, keep wide left and pull right, tightly hitting the apex. From there, let off the gas just slightly as you traverse the chicane and then get back on the throttle when you pass the last notch.

Because this first stretch of track bends just slightly, it's easy to mess up and slam against the walls. Stay wide right as you start the straight and quickly merge left. You can keep up your speed if you shift sides correctly, though you'll still need to brake pretty early in order to take the first turn of the course.

As you make your way towards this corner at the edge of the canyon, stay wide left and brake early and lightly. The crest of the hill can send your car airborn if you go over it too quickly, which will ruin your chance of taking the following turn properly.

You'll pick up some speed heading down this straight. When you reach the slight kink in the road, the course rises and dips slightly. Let off the gas as you traverse this kink in the road, then get on the gas just barely before braking again for the following hairpin.

You'll want to take this early chicane very slowly to start out the course. And while you'll need to be pretty careful through the chicane, you can push your car a bit around the first corner because of the quick run over the wooden bridge. The hard bridge will give you an added boost in grip for just a moment, so feel free to push your slide onto the bridge. You should regain your grip once you hit the wood, letting you line up for the second part of the chicane.

When driving on the asphalt portion of the track, be cautious of the amount of understeer you'll feel. A typical 4WD course will experience some serious understeer when throttling through a corner like this, so be light on the gas be sure to let off a bit if the car starts to pull outside too quickly. You shouldn't need to brake when you start feeling understeer—just let off the throttle. You should regain enough control to put your car back on the desired race line.

This slight kink in the road may make you want to brake or slow down, but you don't need to! If you take an early apex on the corner you can blast through without losing any speed. Just be cautious of the oversteer you'll likely feel in a 4WD car, forcing you to cut into the corner pretty early.

There's a pretty long straight that precedes this sharp and downhill chicane. Be sure to slow down early before you start your slide around the right-hand corner. You'll need to be moving pretty slowly to make the first right turn, letting you cut back left for the second part of the chicane.

After coming off the first tight turn, you'll take a jump and enter a semi-straight. As the road heads downhill and begins to curve left, stay wide ride and cut in left very early. You can let your back tires swing out slightly to make the turn while holding down the throttle, keeping in tight on the left side of the course. This will get you around the corner with speed, and set up your vehicle to make the next turn.

This set of tight corners at the base of the hill needs to be taken with pretty low speed. Most important is the quality of your exit as you head into the short straight beyond. As the road starts to head back uphill and curve just slightly to the right, you'll reach a crest that's difficult to see over. Stay far right as you head over the crest, avoiding the wall to the left to keep up your acceleration into the straight.

These tight hairpins are pretty difficult to take without losing control. You'll need to stay at pretty low speeds to avoid excessive sliding around the corners, and you want to stay very tight inside the corners. Feather the throttle to get through the turns while keeping your back tires in check and you should be able to get out of the turns with good time.

Coming off the preceding straight, you'll have a lot of speed as you head into this slight s-turn. You should take both parts of the s-turn pretty much the same way, staying wide and cutting in for an early apex as you feather the throttle and let your back tires slide out just slightly. You especially want to stay on the inside of the second part of the sturn, allowing you to line up the turn that's just after the start line.

The first slight chicane likely won't be a problem on your first lap, but once you come back around with more speed you'll need to be a bit more cautious. Let off the gas as you approach the first bend (left) and cut in early and close. As the turn opens up to the right-hander, get back on the gas, aim for the apex, and turn just slightly so that you avoid losing traction on your back tires. You can let your rear tires slide out just slightly, but you want to keep as much grip as possible as you head into the straight.

Stay very wide left as you approach this corner. The road bumps and will likely send your car airborn a bit—as soon as you land from the pseudo-jump, get on the brakes early. Don't turn while braking, as you'll only brake the traction of your rear tires. Instead, get down to speed and then quickly take aim at a late apex deep inside the turn. Get back on the gas and keep a straight line through the turn.

This sweeping turn isn't very sharp but you still don't want to head into it with too much speed. Stay slow and steady as you round the curve on the far right side of the course (inside the turn), feathering the throttle lightly to push your traction to its limits. Avoid breaking traction on your rear tires, letting you get back on the throttle early and carry your acceleration through into the straight.

As you head down this straight, keep wide left and brake early for the turn ahead. Once you're down to speed, you can cut across the track to hit the apex and take a perfectly straight line across the turn and into the next hairpin. Once in the hairpin, feather the throttle lightly as you hug the inside of the corner, and line yourself up (wide left) for the last turn of the course.

After coming off this sweeping turn, get on the gas but don't push your car too hard. The course continues to turn slightly to the left, and because of the downhill you'll continue to gain speed (too much, if you're not careful). Keep along the very inside of the track, hugging the left side as you accelerate. You can let your tail end slide out just slightly, but be sure to maintain complete control as you reach the bottom of the hill for another tight corner.

You need to keep up your speed through this semi-straight, but you need to get a perfect line to do so without nailing the walls. Because the course bends just slightly (and because of the slick surface), it's easy to lose your straight path through the jungle. Stay outside of the turn as you approach it and turn (very lightly) early towards the apex. You don't want to turn your car sideways, but your back tires will break out a bit sa you form the straightest line possible through the turn. As long as you're delicate with the steering, you can keep up your acceleration without breaking beat.

This series of hairpin turns is pretty daunting, and is best taken very carefully. Don't be afraid to slow down considerably when navigating the turns, hugging the turns tightly while feathering the gas to keep your traction. When you accelerate out of the turn, make sure you've got a straight shot. If you get on the gas too early (i.e. before you're done turning), you'll lose traction and slide into the outer wall of the course.

The final section of the track is all asphalt, allowing you to be more aggressive with the corners. Take this opportunity to build up some speed, taking late apexes on the turns to carry the speed into the straights. Just be sure to remember to switch back to delicate mode when you return to the dirt.

On this early asphalt portion of the track, you'll likely notice a good deal of understeer in most 4WD vehicles. Be sure to brake early and turn into the corners sharply and early. If you feel the car pulling outside too quickly, let off the gas and try to avoid braking, but don't hesitate to brake if you think you're going to hit the outer walls.

There are a bunch of sweeping hairpin turns on this course and you need to take all of them very slowly. Watch your throttle as you go through the turn, just barely giving the car enough gas to push around the track. If you lay into the throttle too much you'll push the rear end of the vehicle out and cause a nasty spinout. Another reason to keep it slow is to retain tire grip as you exit the corner. Even after you've gone through the bulk of the turn, just lightly push the gas to get the car going straight. Only when your car is pointing perfectly straight and regained all traction should you really lay into the gas to accelerate towards the next turn.

This last right hand hairpin is one of the nastiest on the course because of how easy it is to screw up. You need to brake very early for the turn and be very soft on the throttle as you move along the inside of the turn. Don't be afraid to slow down to a crawl around the corner in order to avoid a spinout—even just a little too much gas here can spin you around and ruin your lap times.

Coming off the previous straight, you'll have built up some speed as you approach this slight kink in the road. It's safest to lightly tap your brakes a bit to slow down before you approach this narrow turn surrounded by sand, but if you stay wide right and pull in towards the apex early, you can cut through the corner without losing any speed.

This pair of turns should require more braking than is actually necessary. Because the first turn is uphill, you can get away with cutting in tight at high speeds while keeping your traction. You can carry through with this speed into the second corner, but you have to turn right quickly while maintaining control over the bumpy road. Pull in tight and early and you can use the camber of the second turn (righthand) to keep up your speed without any unnecessary braking

It's easy to lose control around this slight bend, as you'll have a lot of speed and momentum. However, stay on the far right side of the track as you approach the corner and then pull in towards the apex early. You should be able to slip in over the bridge without losing control and slamming into the wall, but you've got to be careful with your line.

This tight turn should be taken as two parts for the maximum speed out into the following straight. Take an early apex on the first corner, braking hard as you head into it. Once past the first apex, get on the gas and push your car over the second apex— which should be pretty late in the second part of the corner—to get an early jump on the acceleration into the straight.

Though this turn is wide and sweeping, it's actually more complicated than you'd expect. The first part of the turn is simple enough—just stay on the outside of the track as you power around the sweeping curve. However, near the end of the turn the curve tightens up a bit. As it does, let up off the gas a bit and start pulling left a bit more, inching slightly closer to the inside of the track. You don't want to move left so far that you lose traction, but you'll need to give your vehicle some room on the outside to avoid the wall.

Keep far left on the straight approaching this corner, and brake late as you head into the turn. You can make your way around the corner with a lot of speed, but you need to be sure that your exit angle is just right. If you exit too wide, you'll spoil your chances of taking the next turn as best you can.

Lightly tap your brakes heading into this turn and hug the inside of the curve as you feather the gas to power through. When you reach the apex, slam on the gas and let off your steering just slightly. Let the power pull you to the outside of the turn to avoid losing traction, and you'll be able to carry through the acceleration into the straight.

You'll need to brake very lightly heading into the uphill turn. Once past the apex, gas it again until you near the tunnel entrance at the crest of the hill. Brake hard until you actually enter the tunnel, and then get back on the gas. Your power will pull you through the turn.

This turn may seem obvious, but it's very important that you nail the corner perfectly. Brake early while staying on the right side of the track, and then pull left to nail the apex. Avoid losing traction as you power on into the straight ahead. This is the longest stretch of track, and any lost speed in the corner will directly affect your maximum speed in the straight.

As you speed down the straight, keep on the right side of the course. Approaching this tight turn, aim the nose of your car towards the apex and brake hard to slow down to speed. You'll likely need to brake all the way to the apex, but once you hit your target you can get back on the gas to blast out of the turn.

This series of slight turns through the trees is pretty simple, and you can save yourself some speed by taking a proper racing line. Keep tight through the first two bends (a slight right followed by a slight left), hugging the inside of the curves. As you head towards the crest of the hill just after the second bend, brake and pull hard to the right. You can swing around the last corner to head into the straight with some speed.

This series of slight turns—left, right left—is just enough that you'll have to slow down for one of them. Because of the straight that follows the third bend, make sure you slow down for the second turn—the right—and keep up your speed through the third. You only need to lightly tap your brakes to be able to line yourself up properly for the third turn.

The turn through this tunnel is pretty tight, though you need to keep feathering the throttle throughout it. Hug the inside of the turn and don't go full throttle until you hit the apex very late in the turn. It's important to keep your traction and carry your speed through the straight that goes across the bridge.

This pair of switchback turns is pretty straight-forward, but you need to remember to keep your apexes pretty late in the corner. You especially want to form the straightest line possible when exiting the last switchback to guarantee the most speed possible when heading into the final straight-away.

Depending on your vehicle, you probably don't have to slow down for this slight bend in the road. Even though you'll have built up a lot of speed, you can carry it through into the final straight by staying very wide left and then cutting across the turn early.

Stay hard on the gas as you head towards the corner, but brake early as the course starts to head uphill. Stay on the left side of the track while braking and aim your car just slightly towards the inside. By the time you're down to speed, you should be along the inside of the corner and near the apex. Feather the gas around the bend and nail the throttle as soon as you hit the apex to build up speed for the straight.

After coming off this short straight, you'll have to brake for the next righthand turn. However, you can take the turn a bit faster than you might think. Tap the brake early, but don't mash it—just slow down a touch and quickly cut the corner early to keep up your speed into the next turn.

Again, this turn can be taken faster than you might think. The trick to getting the most speed here is to cut inside the corner very early. Lay off the gas as you do, and then floor the throttle when you hit the apex. You should be able to keep up your speed without losing traction on your back tires, which is very important heading into the long straight at the end of the course.

The first turn of the course is a two-part corner. The first section of the turn is pretty slight, but still requiers a bit of braking. Stay far right as you approach the turn, tap the brakes, and then turn left early to nail the apex. About the time you hit the apex of the first part of the turn, get on the brakes again to slow down for the second part of the turn. Just keep your speed steady by feathering the gas as you go through the last part of the turn, and then power through the last part of the corner.

This series of alternating turns can be taken with a lot of speed, though it's important that you plan for the turns correctly. For the first turn (right), brake lightly and early to get a good aim on the apex as you cut in. As you approach the second turn (left), let off the gas lightly instead of braking and cut in early to make use of the excellent camber of the corner. Get back on the gas early but make sure that you can line yourself up for the last turn. Getting your speed right on the last turn is most important, as you'll need to speed in the following straight.

This sweeping turn may seem pretty simple, but taking it correctly can be oddly challenging. You can keep up a decent speed through the turn, but it's important that you don't exceed the grip of your tires. It's very easy to lose traction on the corner, either resulting in a loss of speed or—even worse—loss of control that'll land you in the grass outside the turn. Slow down early for the corner and just feather the gas as you make your way through the corner. Don't get back on the gas until you see the following straight.

This series of turns is an early setup for the last straight of the course, and can determine how much speed you'll have to your advantage. After coming out of a straight, you'll have to brake early to make the first lefthand turn. Feather the gas and don't push your car too hard as you make your way through the sweeping turn to avoid losing traction. As the track starts to head uphill, you'll reach an s-turn that you need to nail. Hit an early apex on the first (righthand) part of the s-turn and quickly cut back to hit the apex of the second part. As you head uphill around the last turn of the course, keep wide right and pull in gradually to hit the apex. Depending on your vehicle, you probably won't even have to let off the gas as you power uphill.

You'll have a lot of speed coming off the long straight here, and the corner at the end of the straight is surprisingly sharp. You'll need to brake very early for the turn and keep your nose pointed to the inside of the corner. Because of the angle and camber of the corner, it's easy to drift off into the sand if you're not careful.

This turn of the course sets up the second longest straight you have, so it's important to take it right and build up speed early. Stay wide left and brake lightly as you turn right and into the apex. Your apex should be late in the turn, letting you form a straight line to the finish.

Most vehicles will be able to get through this corner without braking or letting off the gas, no matter how fast they are. Approach the bend from the far right side of the course and pull in towards the inside of the corner late, hitting a late apex that should let you continue the turn while nailing the throttle.

After coming off a huge sweeping turn, you'll reach this semi-chicane that precedes a small straight. You want to maximize your speed exiting this bit of turns, so slow down for the first left hand part of the turn and get back on the gas just as you swing the car right again. You should be able to accelerate through the rest of the chicane and into the straight.

This uphill corner can be taken pretty quickly, but it's vital that you get your line right when approaching. You need to be sure that you're going straight while on the far left side of the track—not exactly an easy goal considering the tricky corner just before it. However, if you can get in position correctly you can cut the corner early and avoid unnecessary braking as you power into the next straight.

At about the middle of the track you'll run into this series of sharp-angled corners. You'll need to cut back your speed to take them properly, but once you've set yourself up for the turns you can power through them, steering hard right and staying on the gas while you hit the apex of each of the turns. You may need to let off the gas a bit before you hit each apex, but you shouldn't have to brake much, if at all.

The last turn of the course sets up the longest straight you have, so it's important to take it right and build up speed early. Stay wide left and brake lightly as you turn right and into the apex. Your apex should be late in the turn, letting you form a straight line to the finish.

Brake hard but not too early when heading into this turn. You'll have a lot of speed, but the turn is deep enough that you can afford to brake later than you might feel is safe. Once in the turn, feather the throttle while hugging the inside of the track and then floor it once you hit the apex.

As the course starts heading uphill, you'll reach this pretty wide turn that leads to a tunnel. It's important to execute this turn well as you'll want the speed in the following straight. Keep wide right and brake lightly heading into the turn. You'll want to take a late apex to maximize your exit speed.

The last turn of the course can be dangerous if you screw it up (there's plenty of room to go off course on the outside), but there's a lot of opportunity for speed if you get your line right. Stay very far on the outside of the track as you approach the turn. Brake lightly while staying straight and then point towards an early apex as you get back on the gas. You should be able to let your power pull you through the turn without losing tractioin, keeping up your speed as you go into the straight.

The first sweeping turn of the course is a very long one, and will test the steadiness of your throttle. The long turn is actually two different turns combined—at the end of the first part of the turn, you can get on the gas a bit harder and allow the power to pull you to the outside of the track. After the short straight section, let off the gas again and stay on the inside of the track. Once you're in position, get back on the gas early. Your turning should prevent you from exceeding a speed that'll make you lose traction.

This inner portion of the track features a two-part turn that's easy to mess up. For the first part of the lefthand bend, stay on the throttle as you cross the apex and then brake hard when your vehicle approaches the outside of the track. Once at a low speed, cut left and just barely feather the throttle to get around the bend. Once you hit a late apex, get on the gas again to take off in the straight.

A series of three turns (alternating left, right, left) can be tricky to take when you've got speed behind you, but it's important that you don't brake. Practice your lines and take early apexes as you cut back and forth across the track. You should be able to make it through the turns without letting off of the gas until you need to brake for the last turn of the course.

Fight the urge to brake while going through this slight chicane. You may need to let off the gas just a bit as you round the first righthand bend, but get right back on the gas to continue down the straight. As long as you keep very tight inside the bends you'll be able to blast throughout without braking pace.

Take it slow and easy through this sweeping turn. You can keep a decent speed, but it's important to avoid braking the grip of your tires as you make your way 'round. Brake late early when heading into the turn, line yourself up to drive around the inside of the corner, and feather the gas to get you through. When you reach the apex, nail the gas to the floor and allow your car to start pushing towards the outside of the course as you accelerate.

After a tight corner at the bottom of this hill, nail the throttle. There are two slight bends in the road that would normally pose a concern. However, because you're starting from a relatively low speed after the tight turn, and because you're heading uphill, you can floor the gas and cut the corners tight to keep the straightest line possible into the final stretch of the course.

The course only has two turns, and the two are—for all intents and purposes—identical. You don't need to aim for an apex on these turns. Instead, your goal is to stay in the far right lane, keeping the last yellow line to the left of your car. Keep your gas floored as you won't have to worry about braking or slowing down. Depending on your vehicle, you should be able to maintain 100% of your speed going into the turn, and even possibly gain more speed as you carefully navigate the turn. The key here is to keep your steering super steady. If your car shifts around too much, you'll drop precious speed that'll hurt you in the straights.

Brake late when heading into this corner and then quickly get back on the gas. You need to feather the throttle as you round the turn, hugging the inside part of the track until you hit the apex. When you do, floor the gas and let the power pull you to the outside of the course.

This hump in the course forms an interesting series of turns that's somewhat tricky to tackle. You likely won't have to brake (and if you do, just lightly) for the first righthand curve that goes into the hump. However, before taking the left that forms the second part of the hump, you'll want to brake very quickly and then get back on the gas as you point your vehicle towards the apex. You'll be able to carry your speed through the last part of the hump (a middling right bend) and into the final turn of the course.

You'll need to let up off the gas a bit for this turn, though keep tapping the throttle as you round the turn, pushing the traction of your tires to the edge. You can keep up a lot of speed here but you really need to avoid breaking traction, in order to keep up your speed into the following straight.

In the middle of this straight is a quick rise in the road that will send your car airborn at most speeds. You likely won't need to slow down for the dip, but it is important that you take this jump correctly. Be sure that your car is pointing perfectly straight in the direction you want to go before you hit the jump—you'll have no control of your car in mid-air, so you're going to land pointing in whichever direction the car was facing when you take off. If the car isn't pointed straight when you jump, you'll likely land and spin out of control, slamming into the walls.

This wide U-turn is at the end of a long straight, which is normally a problem. However, the turn is pretty wide, so it's not the turn itself that poses a threat here. What you need to worry about is the slide hump in the road just before the turn. You should slow down very early for the turn to avoid catching air off of the hump. If you do catch air, you'll lose control temporarily, which is long enough to send you slamming into the outer wall. Get on the brakes lightly just before you go over the hump, but save the bulk of your braking for after the bump in the road.

You can take this entire straight without braking or letting off the gas, which will give you a ton of speed heading downhill. However, you'll want to start decreasing your speed well before you reach the sharp hairpin corner at the bottom of the hill. Start braking lightly just before you go around the last right-hand bend of the straight, and then brake hard once you've got the car pointed straight. If you brake too late, you'll have a good chance of inducing oversteer just before the corner, sending you into the outer walls of the course.

This sweeping left turn is very long and relatively sharp. You can keep up your speed by feathering the throtttle through the turn and hugging the inside. Be careful to not exceed the threshold of your tires' grip, though. If you lose traction, you'll lose a lot of speed around the corner.

As you make your way down the preceding straight, stay on the far right. The narrow alley opens up to an intersection and you'll have to make a quick cut left to continue down the next alley. Brake very lightly as you enter the intersection and cut in early to get into the next straight.

This is the sharpest turn in the course, and is pretty easy to mess up if you're not careful. You want to hug the inside of the turn as you round it, but don't get too far on the lip of the corner. If you do, you'll likely hit the inside of the turn and slow yourself down considerably.

The last corner of the course isn't too sharp, but you want to avoid taking it very wide. Brake early before entering the turn and cut in early, moderating your speed so that you don't get pushed out too far. If you take the turn too wide, you'll have to swerve to avoid the narrowing walls on the left.

At the very beginning of the course is this set of turns. You can get away without braking for a couple of the turns, but you'll carry too much speed into the last righthander that leads into the straight, forcing you to brake and lose your acceleration. What you should do is brake lightly for the first turn, and then line yourself up to cut through the last two turns with the straightest line possible. You can power through the turns at full throttle, and carry your speed through into the straight.

This chicane breaks up what would normally be an awesome straight. But because there's still more straight-away on the other side of the chicane, it's especially important to build back as much speed as possible. Brake early when heading into the chicane, and take the first left-right bit slowly. Once you've passed that, line yourself for the next set of turns (a right-left) and get on the gas hard. If you head into the chicane with too much speed, you'll have to brake way later in your turn and won't have the time to accerlerate up to speed.

A slight bend mars an otherwise super long straight-away near the end of the course. And while it's important that you don't lose control here, you still need to keep up your speed in order to compete. As you speed towards the bend, stay far right on the track. Brake early and lightly, just enough to slow down your vehicle a touch. Cut into the corner semi-early (not too early) so that you can swing through the turn and avoid the jutting wall on the right side of the track beyond the turn.

The first turn of the course can get you to an early lead if you take it right. Follow the curve as it bends left and start braking early. Once you're wide left of the turn, cut in quickly and aim for the apex, lightly pressing the gas to get you there. Once you reach the apex, floor the gas and your power will pull you out of the turn and into the straight.

You'll have a lot of speed behind you for this turn, and you can keep most of it if you aim your car right. Stay far left along the outside of the track and brake lightly and early. Once you're down to speed, cut inward for an early apex and get back on the gas. You should be able to cut through the turn without losing much speed.

Proper braking is very important for this hairpin. Because it's at the end of a long straight, you'll need to brake somewhat early to slow yourself down sufficiently. Once you're slowed down, pull in tight from the outside of the track and feather the gas very lightly around the bend. When you see the straight ahead, nail the throttle.

There's a set of quick turns just before the finish line, and you'll need to slow down for all of them. Slow down especially for the second-to-last turn (a right-hander) so that you can line yourself up for the best possible exit line on the very last turn. Execute this correctly and you'll rocket out of the last corner and carry that speed into the straight.

The first stretch of course has a couple of left hand kinks in the road. The first one you can get by without braking or letting off the gas as long as you're sure to stay outside and cut inside at the bend. The second kink in the road you'll need to brake lightly for, but you can still keep up most of your speed. However, almost immediately after going around the bend you'll need to brake hard for the first left-hand turn of the course.

At the bottom of the first hill is this doozy of a corner. The turn sweeps right somewhat gradually at first—after you slow down for the turn, you can feather the throttle to get through it. However, near the end of the turn it tights dramatically. You'll want to stay wide left, brake hard, and then cut inside the corner to nail the apex and carry your speed into the straight that follows.

At the end of a very long straight is this tight hairpin. You'll need to brake pretty early to avoid smashing into any walls. As you approach the gateway that separates the straight from the hairpin turn, start braking just after passing under the "Gran Turismo" banner. You should slow down enough to make the first set of turns easily, and set up for a slow and steady run around the inside of the hairpin.

At the end of the first long straight is the first tight corner. Brake plenty early while heading into the turn, but don't be afraid to let your speed pull you deep into the corner. There's plenty of room to move around deep in the turn, letting you cut back for a late apex as you exit the turn.

You'll need to brake plenty early in order to avoid slamming into the wall on this turn. Stay far left as you approach the turn and aim your car slightly towards the apex as you brake. Make sure you're done braking before you start turning harder around the corner, and get on the gas as you hit the apex (you can cut the corner just barely) to speed off down the straight.

A few of the ninety-degree turns of the course can be cut slightly by hopping onto the lip on the inside of the course. This corner specifically—a right-hander before you double back and start going west—can be cut considerably, but you don't want to enter at a bad angle. You still need to stay wide left and cut in sharply towards the apex.

This semi-circle turn can be taken with some speed, but you need to avoid breaking the traction of your tires. Feather the throttle as you round the corner, letting your speed pull you outside just slightly. As you approach the apex, let off the gas for moment so that you can cut back in towards the inside of the corner, hitting the apex. This will let you get on the gas early and still have a viable shot of rounding the last bit of turn without losing speed.

You need to brake very early for the first turn on the course. Because of the straight before it, you'll have a lot of speed behind you and a ton of momentum. Stay along the far left side of the track as you brake and, as you start running over the red and white lip, turn hard in towards the apex and get back on the gas.

These two turns aren't identical, but your approach to them should be about the same. As you head into each corner, brake very lightly to get your car down to speed. Stay along the inside of the turns and feather the gas to push yourself along without causing your tires to squeal. If your tires start squealing, you're probably losing speed, so be easy on the gas until you can see the straight-away ahead of you.

As the road leads under a bunch of trees, it starts heading downhill. At the very base of the hill is this slight kink in the road, and it's easy to lose grip while making your way around it. You probably don't need to brake for the turn, but you do need to drop a bit of speed in order to retain traction. Let off the gas just before heading into the slight chicane and feather the gas through. Once you've passed the worst of it, get back on the gas to continue your drive.

This downhill bend may not seem like much, but it's pretty easy to lose control and slide into the walls of this narrow part of the course. As you approach the corner, tap the brakes lightly. You don't want to brake while you're in the turn, so let off them as you start turning, coasting around the first bit. Once you see the straight track ahead, get back on the gas.

After building up a lot of speed on this uphill ride, you'll have to brake early to make the sweeping turn that follows. Stay on a straight line as you make the incline and start braking just as the course begins to crest. This will ensure that you have plenty of time to slow down, letting you feather the gas through the turn to avoid losing traction.

This is quite possibly the slowest turn on any of the courses in the game. Stay wide left and brake pretty early for the turn, letting you (quite slowly) sharply turn in towards the apex. Don't be afraid to slow down to a crawl around the corner. Don't even get on the gas except for very light taps to push your car around until you can see the end of the corner.

This chicane isn't terribly challenging, but getting it just right will ensure better lap times. As you head over the crest of the hill before it, stay wide right and brake early. Once you're down to speed, cut left through the first part of the turn and then just barely feather the throttle as you swing the car back right. If you give it too much gas too early, you'll have a hard time pulling right and into the following straight. Take it slowly at first, though, and you can line yourself up to get back on the accelerator very early.

You should already be at pretty low speeds when you approach this chicane, but you'll still need to implement some braking. The first part of the chicane is a right-hand bend, and while it's not very sharp you still need to slow down for it. Slowing down for the first part of the turn will let you keep wide right as you approach the second part (a lefthander) of the chicane. Once you've rounded the first corner and stuck to the right wall, cut in towards the apex and get on the gas early to build up speed into the following straight.

Get this corner right and you'll carry some extra speed into the semi-straight that follows. Stay far right on the course as you approach the turn and brake early, but don't turn early. Instead, hold out and turn very tight in towards a late apex on the turn. You can get back on the gas pretty early and pull through the turn with a lot of speed while still avoiding the outer wall at the other end of the corner.

This left-right chicane is pretty wide, letting you breeze through without braking if you get your lines right. Keep wide right as you approach the first corner and pull left for a tight apex on the corner. For the second part of the chicane, take an early apex and let your speed pull you to the outside of the turn (left). You'll line up perfectly for the next turn.

This hairpin is pretty sharp, and you can waste a lot of time by taking it too slowly. However, if you stay very wide right when approaching the turn, brake early, and then cut in very sharply for your apex, you can get through the turn with a lot of speed and carry into the next turn (which you don't even need to brake for).

Get this corner right and you'll carry some extra speed into the semi-straight that follows. Stay far right on the course as you approach the turn and brake early, but don't turn early. Instead, hold out and turn very tight in towards a late apex on the turn. You can get back on the gas pretty early and pull through the turn with a lot of speed while still avoiding the outer wall at the other end of the corner.

This left-right chicane is pretty wide, letting you breeze through without braking if you get your lines right. Keep wide right as you approach the first corner and pull left for a tight apex on the corner. For the second part of the chicane, take an early apex and let your speed pull you to the outside of the turn (left). You'll line up perfectly for the next turn.

This is one of the most important corners in the course because how well you take it vastly affects the top speed you'll reach in the long straight beyond. Stay wide ride heading into it and brake semi-late. You don't need to slow down completely, but the corner is pretty sharp. As you're slowing down, steer your way towards the inside of the corner and pump the gas a bit to push you through the turn. When you see the course straighten out, get back on the gas and carry your speed into the straight, letting the power pull you to the outside of the track.

Keep wide left as you approach this corner and cut in somewhat early, letting your speed pull you far outside. Don't get heavy on the gas until you line yourself up for the following corner. When you're lined up, you can floor the gas around the second righthand bend and take your speed down the short straight.

This sharp corner preceeds a very long straight, making it dire that you get out of the corner with as much speed as possible. Stay wide right and brake semi-late as you approach the turn. When you're down to speed, cut inside quickly and you can aim for a late apex. Once you're pointed in the right direction, nail the gas and you can blast into the straight.

You need to slow down for this series of tight turns, and while you can take the first few kinks (a pair of right-handers) pretty quick it's actually better to take it easy. You especially want to lay off the gas a bit as you round the second right. If you take it easy, you can get on the gas right after hitting the apex and you won't have to let off as you round the next left-hand turn.

Just before the finish line is this small chicane, and while you may be pressed to brake, fight the urge! If you swing in wide from the right heading into the first left kink in the road you can continue through the chicane without braking at all. You'll likely need to let off the gas just slightly at the moment you enter the turn, but after that you can get back on the gas and let your speed carry you down the straight.

At the end of the first long straight is this sweeping hairpin. As you approach the turn, stay wide left and merge right as you brake into the corner. Brake late, letting your momentum pull you deep into the turn as you start steering your car right. Once you're down to speed, get back on the gas and muscle through the rest of the turn.

Slow down a lot for the first turn out of this straight. If you take a late apex and get on the gas, you can correctly aim your vehicle so that you take the next turn (a left) without braking or slowing down a bit. It's important to hit a late apex on the first turn (the right) in order to line up correctly for the second turn, giving you a lot of extra speed into the straight that follows.

This turn comes up a bit sooner than you might expect. Don't hesitate to brake early, starting from the right side of the course and slowly merging to the left side as you approach the apex of the corner. Keep on the brakes all the way to the apex and then quickly hit the gas again, using the wide road to let your vehicle swing out as you accelerate.

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American Championship Stars and Stripes American Muscle Car Championship Classic Muscle Car Championship Chevrolet Corvette Convertible (C1) '54 Chevrolet Camaro LM Race Car '01 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 '70 Plymouth Super Bird '70

European Hall
European Championship British GT Cup British Light Weight Car Race German Touring Car Championship Italian Festival French Championship European Classic Car Championship European Hot Hatch Car Championship 1000 Miles Schwarzwald League A Schwarzwald League B Jaguar XJ220 LM Edition '01 Jaguar E-Type Coupe '61 Lotus Europa Special '71 Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK-GTR Race Car '98 Alfa Romeo 155 2.5 V6 TI Race Car '93 Citroen 2CV Type-A '54 Mercedes-Benz Benz Patent Motor Wagen '1886 Volvo 240 GLT Estate '88 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale '63 BMW M3 GTR Race Car '01 Mercedes-Benz AMG 190E 2.5 16V Evolution II (DTM) '92

Japanese Hall
Japanese Championship Japanese GT Championship Japanese 70's Classic Japanese 80's Festival Nissan Fairlady Z Concept LM Race Car '02 Nissan Motul Pitwork Z (JGTC) '04 Nissan Skyline Hard Top 2000GT-R (KPGC10) '70 Mitsubishi HSR-II Concept '89

Japanese 90's Challenge Japanese Compact Car Cup

Nismo 400R (R33) '96 Honda Life Step Van '72

Special Condition Hall (easy)
Rally d' Umbria Rally d' Capri Grand Canyon Ice Arena Chamonix George Paris Swiss Alps Tahiti Tsukuba Circuit Cathedral Rocks (Trail I) Cathedral Rocks (Trail II) Cadillac CIEN '02 Toyota RSC Rally Raid Car '02 Ford RS200 '84 Toyota RSC '01 Infiniti FX45 Concept '02 Alpine A310 1600VE '73 Mitsubishi CZ-3 Tarmac '01 Renault 5 Turbo '80 Mazda RX-8 Concept (Type-I) '01 Land Rover Range Stormer Concept '04 Hyundai HCD6 '01

Special Condition Hall (normal)
Rally d' Umbria Rally d' Capri Grand Canyon Ice Arena Chamonix George Paris Swiss Alps Tahiti Tsukuba Circuit Cathedral Rocks (Trail I) Cathedral Rocks (Trail II) Lancia Delta HF Integrale Rally Car '92 Subaru Impreza Rally Car Prototype '01 Mitsubishi CZ-3 Tarmac Rally Car '02 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution IV Rally Car'97 Subaru Impreza Rally Car '01 Renault 5 Maxi Turbo Rally Car '85 Toyota Celica GT-Four Rally Car (ST205) '95 Ford Escort Rally Car '98 Mazda Atenza Touring Car '02 Subaru Impreza Rally Car '99 Toyota Celica GT-Four Rally Car (ST185) '95

Special Condition Hall (hard)
Rally d' Umbria Rally d' Capri Grand Canyon Ice Arena Chamonix George Paris Swiss Alps Tahiti Tsukuba Circuit Cathedral Rocks (Trail I) Cathedral Rocks (Trail II) Lancia Delta S4 Rally Car '85 Ford RS200 Rally Car '85 Mitsubishi Straion 4WD Rally Car '84 Nissan Bluebird 1600SSS Rally Car (510) '69 Lancia Stratos Rally Car '77 Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 Evolution 2 Rally Car '86 Nissan Silvia 240RS Rally Car '85 Mitsubishi Pajero Rally Raid Car '85 Ford GT Concept '02 Suzuki Escudo Dirt Trial Car '98 Mitsubishi Pajero Evolution Rally Raid Car '03

Alfa Romeo Manufacturer's Race Event
GTA Cup Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 1600 '65

Alpine Manufacturer's Race Event
Renault Alpine Cup Alpine A110 1600S '73

Aston Martin Manufacturer's Race Event
Aston Martin Festival Aston Martin DB9 Coupe '03

Audi Manufacturer's Race Event
Tourist Trophy A3 Cup Audi Le Mans Quattro '03 Audi Quattro '82

BMW Manufacturer's Race Event
BMW 1 Series Trophy 'M' Club BMW 2002 Turbo '73 BMW M3 GTR '03

Chevrolet Manufacturer's Race Event
Corvette Festival Camaro Meeting Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Coupe (C2) '63 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z Concept '88

Chrysler Manufacturer's Race Event
Crossfire Trophy Dodge Viper GTSR Concept '00

Citroen Manufacturer's Race Event
2HP-2CV Citroen 2CV Type-A '54

Daihatsu Manufacturer's Race Event
Copen Race Midget II Race Daihatsu Storia X4 '00 Daihatsu Midget '63

Honda Manufacturer's Race Event
Type R Meeting Civic Race Honda HSC (Honda Sports Concept) '03 Honda Civic Si (Mugen Motul Race Car) '87

Hyundai Manufacturer's Race Event
Hyundai Sport Festival Hyundai Clix '01

Isuzu Manufacturer's Race Event
Isuzu Classic Sport Isuzu 117 Coupe '68

Lotus Manufacturer's Race Event
Elise Cup Lotus Classic Cup Lotus Elise Type-72 '01 Lotus Elan S1 '62

Mazda Manufacturer's Race Event
'RE' Club Roadster Cup RX-8 Cup Mazda Cosmo Sport (L10A) '67 Mazda Eunos Roadster J-Limited (NA) '91 Mazda RX-8 Concept LM Race Car '01

Mercedes-Benz Manufacturer's Race Event
Legend of Silver Arrow SL Challenge Mercedes-Benz CLK Touring Car (D2 DTM) '00 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Coupe '54

MG Manufacturer's Race Event
MG Festival MGF '97

Mini Manufacturer's Race Event
Mini.Mini Battle Marcos Mini Marcos GT '70

Mitsubishi Manufacturer's Race Event
Evolution Meeting Mirage Cup Mitsubishi Lancer 1600 GSR Rally Car '74 Mitsubishi I Concept '03

Nissan Manufacturer's Race Event
Race of Red Emblem March Brothers Silvia Sisters 'Z' Club Nismo Skyline GT-R LM Road Going Version (R33) '95 Nissan mm-R Cup Car '01 Nissan Sileighty '98 Nissan Fairlady 240ZG (HS30) '71

Opel Manufacturer's Race Event
Speedster Cup Opel Calibra Touring Car (DTM) '94

Peugeot Manufacturer's Race Event
206 Cup Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 Rally Car '85

Renault Manufacturer's Race Event
Clio Trophy Megane Cup Renault Lutecia Renault Sport V6 24V Race Car '00 Renault Avantime '02

Saleen Manufacturer's Race Event
Saleen S7 Club Nike One 2022

Shelby Manufacturer's Race Event
Shelby Cobra Cup Shelby Mustang G.T.350R '65

Subaru Manufacturer's Race Event
Subaru 360 Race Race of Pleiades Subaru Subaru 360 '58 Subaru Impreza Super Touring Car '01

Suzuki Manufacturer's Race Event
Suzuki K Cup Suzuki Concept Car Suzuki Concept-S2 '03 Suzuki GSX-R/4 '01

Toyota Manufacturer's Race Event
Altezza Race Vitz Race Toyota Altezza Touring Car '01 Toyota Vitz RS Turbo '02

Triumph Manufacturer's Race Event
Spitfire Cup Triumph Spitfire 1500 '74

TVR Manufacturer's Race Event
Blackpool Racer TVR Cerbera Speed 12 '00

Volkswagen Manufacturer's Race Event
Beetle Cup Lupo Cup GTI Cup Volkswagen Beetle 1100 Standard (Type-11) '49 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Coupe (Type-1) '68 Volkswagen Golf I GTI '76

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