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University High School

2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

AP English Language and Composition Syllabus


Course Overview
The objectives for this course are drawn from the College Boards AP English Course
Description. This introductory college-level class uses both non-fiction and fiction prose
selections with the central instructional focus of familiarizing students with rhetorical
strategiesdiction, imagery, tone, and syntax. Because our AP English Language and
Composition course traditionally is taught to students in their junior year, American writers
are emphasized so as to enhance possible parallels to AP U.S. History, offered the same
year of study at our school. We do wish to familiarize our students with canonical pieces of
American literature while teaching reading and writing skills; our course, however is not
structured around thematic units or chronology, but on a balance of writing style,
presented recursively. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their
ability to work with language and text with greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their own
composing abilities. Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of
authors and historical contexts. Students examine and work with essays, letters, speeches, journal articles, images, short
stories, plays, novels, and current event editorials. Summer reading and writing assignments are required. Students prepare
for the AP English Language and Composition Exam and may be granted advanced placement, college credit, or both as a
result of satisfactory performance.
Course reading and writing activities help students gain textual power, making them more alert to an authors purpose, the
needs of an audience, the demands of the subject, and the resources of language: syntax, word choice, imagery and tone. By
early May of the school year, students will have nearly completed a course in close reading and purposeful writing. The
critical skills that students learn to appreciate through close and continued analysis of a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction
texts will serve them in their own writing as they grow increasingly aware of these skills and their pertinent uses. During the
course, a wide variety of texts (prose and image based) and writing tasks also provide the focus for an energetic study of
language, rhetoric, and argument. Over the course of the year students collect their own writing, creating a portfolio
showcasing their best drafts while preserving their steps of the writing process. Final drafts are stapled atop all previous
drafts to preserve evidence of the learning process.
As this is a college-level course, performance expectations are appropriately high, and the workload is challenging. Students
are expected to commit to a minimum of five hours of course work per week outside of the classroom. Often, this work
involves long-term writing and reading assignments, so effective time management is important. Because of the demanding
curriculum, students must bring to the course sufficient command of mechanical conventions and an ability to read and
discuss prose.
It should be noted that our high school offers American Literature in the students junior year, which is when AP English
Language is also offered. Therefore, all core literature texts are drawn from the American Literature cannon.

Course Objectives:
Students will:

learn to write in a variety of forms including, but not limited to, analytical, argumentative, expository, and narrative
styles. Essay topics will address a variety of issues including personal experience, popular culture, and public policies.
The assigned topics will represent a variety of prose styles and genres.
analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an authors use of rhetorical strategies and
techniques.
apply effective strategies and techniques in writing.
create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or personal experience.
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University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

learn the process of drafting and revision along with peer editing procedures. A focus of this process will be to
develop reflective skills and apply these strategies to their own individual writing, addressing strengths and
weaknesses and determining what comprises quality work.
demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English, as well as stylistic maturity in writing.
keep journals for the purpose of informal responses to both the literature we read as well as their own writing,
focusing on the process and the techniques of writing, bearing in mind the relationship between the authors style
and purpose.
be exposed to a variety of fiction and non-fiction readings with the purpose of analyzing the relationship between
style and purpose. Students will examine and discuss writers choices of rhetorical strategies in an effort to
understand the correlation between these selections and the intent.
be shown a wide variety of graphic and visual images which will serve as alternative text and will further reinforce
the techniques and styles of each particular rhetorical mode.
practice the analysis of a variety of visual images in an effort to understand the importance of visual literacy in
todays world.
work collaboratively to conduct research culminating in the synthesis of various collected data and the relationship
of this data to a given position on an issue of social or historical relevance. A focus of this research will be on the
collection and proper citing of sources consistent with the Modern Language Association.
revise writing assignments, with teachers assistance and input, as they continue to hone their skills in a variety of
writing techniques including, but not limited to, the following:
a. Vocabulary enhancement
b. Sentence structure variety
c. Use of transitions and repetition
d. Use of both general and specific support to create a balanced and well organized argument
e. Diction, syntax, tone, and voice

Pre-Course Assignment
Students are required to complete a summer reading assignment, which includes one classic work (Uncle Toms Cabin) and a
contemporary work (Breath, Eyes, Memory). Students are to read and make annotations of the text and complete a written
assignment based upon the themes and central ideas of the novels. For Uncle Toms Cabin, students write a critical analysis
responding to Alfred Kazins essay defending Harriet Beecher Stowes intentions when writing her novel (Publisher: Bantam
Books). The assignment for Breath Eyes Memory consists of a dialectical journal, highlighting passages that compare and
contrast how the characters deal with both physical and cultural rape. This dialectical journal leads to another analytical
essay.
To further students analysis of the novels, they read and discuss contemporary journal articles written by academic scholars
( Silences Too Horrific to Disturb: Writing Sexual Histories in Edwidge Danticats Breath, Eyes, Memory by Donette A.
Francis, A Homeward Journey: Edwidge Danticats Fictional Landscapes, Mindscapes, Genescapes, and Signscapes in Breath,
Eyes, Memory by Patrick Samway, S.J., and Up to Heavens Gate, Down in Earths Dust: The Politics of Judgment in Uncle
Toms Cabin by Joshua D. Bellin) and work on analyzing the authors purpose and audience, while being introduced to the
task of creating a counter-argument.
In addition, students consider the source as a text that has a particular audience and purpose in mind; they sort through
disparate interpretations before analyzing, reflecting upon, and writing about a topic.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Required Writing Units:


Note: These correspond with the various writing modes that students are expected to master on the AP English Language and
Composition Exam. Former AP prompts and teacher-created prompts will serve as models for student practice. Teachers will
provide instructional hand-outs to aid students in mastering these various AP modes. When appropriate, selections will be
taken from the various literature covered in this course for further reinforcement of key concepts.

Analytical
o Essential Question: What various styles do authors employ to achieve different purposes in writing?
Comparison
o Essential Question: What similarities and differences exist between short passages that distinguish them as
unique in both style and purpose?
Argumentative
o Essential Questions: Why is it important to recognize that there are often two sides to every issue? Why is
it important to be able to take a stand (defend, challenge, or qualify) on a given issue?
Synthesis
o Essential Questions: How can one synthesize various pieces (often in history or science) to come to an
informed position on an issue (defend, challenge, or qualify)?

Composition
1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

Informal writings, such as ungraded free-writes, reaction papers, and journal entries, will provide regular and
frequent opportunities to engage in informal exploratory writing. They also allow for reflective writing that connects
reading to personal experience and enables students to examine the process of their own writing. Composition
books (in-class journals that will remain in the classroom) will be used for frequent free-write responses to
prompts related to class reading. Students will also use these journals to analyze and reflect on weekly quotations
and visual texts (cartoons, paintings, graphs, and illustrations) that are often related to thematic reading.
Special writing assignments coordinated with writing workshops will enable students to practice rhetorical
strategies, sentence combination, subordination/coordination, paragraph organization, and the use of transitions.
Particular emphasis in these workshop activities will be placed on balancing generalization and specific illustrative
detail and incorporating direct quotes. These components of effective composition will also be reinforced in regular
peer-revision activities and instructor feedback response. The analysis and effective use of voice and tone will often
be reviewed and practiced through in-class journal exercises from Voice Lessons (Nancy Dean) and other activities.
Students will complete Reading Logs (RLs) for each novel and play. Each RL requires students to engage in analysis,
reflection, and evaluation. Students examine structure, style, tone, characterization, plot, theme, imagery,
symbolism and other rhetorical strategies. Students are also expected to explain biographical, social, and historical
concerns and values that are relevant to the novel/play. The final sections of the RL require students to select and
comment on important quotes and evaluate the work and its significance.
During each semester students will write a minimum of four essays, some of which will be timed, in-class essays. At
least two of these per semester will be composed in conjunction with a writing workshop and will be revised
following peer-editing and instructor feedback. These essays will include expository, analytical, and argumentative
assignments. Scores for all essays, with the exception of the formal researched essay, will be based upon the general
AP rubric provided.
Students are required to write one formal MLA-format extended essay that is persuasive in nature and answers a
question at issue by synthesizing researched support.

Timed Writings
During the year, students complete timed essay questions. Integrating timed writings helps students to build their
confidence and expertise. It also helps to prepare them for the timed writing component on the AP Exam. When students
have the chance to practice their time-writing skills, they begin to learn how to focus themselves towards the task at hand.
Timed writing opportunities begin with the course, so that students can see their own improvement and develop selfconfidence as the year progresses.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Individual Conferences and Essay Writing


Following timed writings, students will submit initial rough-drafts to the teacher for purposes of designing and facilitating
both individual and whole class instruction for improvement. Students will be allowed to continue the revision process with
requested teacher input prior to final assessment.
Teacher feedback will include various instructional strategies related to sentence structure including subordination
and coordination found in A Writers Reference (Hacker)
Teacher feedback will include instruction on specific techniques to increase coherence such as repetition,
transitions, and emphasis found in A Writers Reference (Hacker) and A Pocket Style Manual (Hacker).
Teacher feedback will include instruction on effective use of rhetoric, including maintaining tone, establishing and
maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure found in Critical
Thinking Reading and Writing: A Brief Guide to Argument (Barnet, Sylvan and Hugo).

Further Writing Instruction


Further writing instruction will include the following:
Samples of model student essays will be presented as a basis for citing strengths along with areas for remediation in
order for students to ascertain what constitutes a given level of effectiveness.
Additional examples from previous AP exams will also be used for small and large group analysis and discovery.
Provided with the specific rubric, students will be given the opportunity to score these essays based on their current
level of understanding.

Style:
One of the facets of the AP English Language class which delineates it from the AP English Literature course on our campus is
the emphasis on specific elements of writing style. Instead of focusing on academic terms for the analysis of fiction, we focus
on syntax, tone, diction, and imagery for the achievement of writers purpose. Students review syntax, including periodic and
loose sentences, parallel structure, coordination and subordination, and apposition to learn how writers use structure as a
tool for persuasion.
Controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction is also emphasized
from the beginning of the course until the end. Students are asked to identify these elements in the texts presented during
the course and learn to incorporate and control the same strategies in their own writing.

Writing About/Responding to/Teaching Visuals:


As a method for teaching visual image and graphic analysis, we will utilize Walter Pauks identified strategy (How to Study in
College):
Overview-Parts-Title-Interrelationships-Conclusion (OPTIC)
O is for overviewwrite down a few notes on what the visual appears to be about.
P is for partszero in on the parts of the visual. Write down any elements or details that seem
important.
T is for titlehighlight the words of the title of the visual (if one is available).
I is for interrelationshipsuse the title as the theory and the parts of the visual as clues to
detect and specify the interrelationships in the graphic.
C is for conclusiondraw a conclusion about the visual as a whole. What does the visual mean?
Summarize the message of the visual in one or two sentences.
Sample visuals will be obtained from supplemental sources such as The New Yorker, newspaper articles, advertisements, and
political cartoons.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Ordered / Logical Reasoning


As a way to enhance all writing styles, the teacher will provide explicit instruction in the use of ordered reasoning. The
teacher will take the students step-by-step through examples of the use of ordered reasoning both anecdotally and through
literary examples. The teacher will explain how to incorporate both general and specific support to create a balanced and
well-organized argument as well as provide additional support through the revision process. Exercises and graphic organizers
will be used to aid in this instruction.

In-Class Discussion Opportunities


The course offers many opportunities for students to collaboratively practice the skills of critical thinking, collaborative
learning, and recursive writing. Students work collaboratively to improve their comprehension of text while characterizing
writers styles; they provide peer feedback on papers-in-progress, and they work to gain consensus for AP practice multiple
choice questions. The instructors of both sections of AP Language on our campus share the belief that learning can only
occur if students have opportunities to check their understanding and clarify their thinking.

Vocabulary
1) Students will maintain a vocabulary journal in their Reading Logs, defining and correctly using in sentences at least five
unfamiliar words from reading selections each week. Word root discussions and mnemonic stories will be used to enhance
vocabulary awareness and usage skills.
2) Each week ten terms (a combination of student-submitted words and instructor-provided relevant rhetorical terms and
words commonly appearing on AP and SAT exams) will be added to vocabulary journals. These lists will be the basis for
vocabulary quizzes (mostly sentence completion and paragraph composition) administered every Friday.
3) Various handouts and excerpts will be provided. Through participation in exercises related to this content, students will
develop a wide-ranging vocabulary to apply to their own communication, both orally and in writing.
4) Appropriate word choice and correct use of vocabulary is expected in written assignments. The use of wide-ranging
denotative and richly connotative language is rewarded.

A. Fall Semester:
Identifying/Examining Rhetoric with the Lenses of Fiction and Non- Fiction
The main focus of the first semester is for students to move beyond their comfortable ability to analyze literary
themes being able to identify rhetoric, both written and visual. We focus specifically on diction, syntax, imagery
and tone. To begin these concepts, students read The Scarlet Letter with particular focus on the chapter The
Custom House. Through close reading, students identify the elements mentioned above.
Short fiction texts (such as The Yellow Wallpaper, The Jilting of Granny Wetherall, A Rose for Emily, The
Black Cat, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Ministers Black Veil, Young Goodman Brown, The Story of
an Hour, and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty) help to provide students with the opportunity to look at a variety
of manageable chunks of text and make connections between the authors purpose and audience. Imitation
writing by the students is used for assessment of their abilities to identify and practice rhetorical strategies, such
as diction, syntax, imagery, and tone.
During the first semester literature texts may include Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Huckleberry Finn,
The Crucible and The Great Gatsby. Various other short stories and articles will be used to supplement instruction.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Editorials
The weekly editorial assignment is also initiated during the course to serve as a bridge from the analysis of literature to
the analysis of non-fiction texts. The editorial assignment provides short readable texts which offer an easy way for
students to identify the tools of rhetoric, including such basic elements as thesis and evidence. The assignment is as
follows: Once a week, students are to closely examine an editorial from the newspaper or a popular news magazine
(such as Time or Newsweek). Students are to identify the authors thesis, discuss and analyze the writers argument
and purpose, identify and explain the rhetorical strategies and techniques used by the author, discuss a counterargument to the authors point of view, and relate the topic of the editorial to previous knowledge the student has
learned in school. These assignments help students with the argumentative aspects of the courses writing component.
These editorials also provide excellent opportunities for collaborative learning, for students meet in small groups to
share their work and to check for understanding. Whole class discussion follows. Dates TBA.

A. Fall Semester Papers/Projects:


Advertising Research Project: Students are to take three print advertisements, discuss and analyze what the
advertisers are appealing to while also examining the rhetorical strategies used in the advertisements. Students must
provide an original thesis (an argument of their own) and include an analysis and synthesis of ideas from an array of
sources using MLA Format.
Students are prepared for this project through a variety of sources such as political cartoons, video advertisements and,
print ads from the newspaper, magazines, and local junk mail. As noted in our textbook list, America Now provides
the main instructional background to this project. Students read and examine the arguments made by the individual
authors as to why America is caught up in the culture of consumerism. When writing their papers, students must use
these articles as part of their Works Cited page.

B. Spring Semester: Applying Rhetoric


Our spring semester begins in early January, and students are now expected to already have demonstrated their ability
to identify and apply elements of rhetoric. American literature is still incorporated into the curriculum; however the
focus, until after Mays AP testing, is on non-fiction texts, such as speeches, letters, expository texts, descriptive pieces,
and personal essays. Works may include Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Lither King, Jr., Resistance to Civil
Government by Henry David Thoreau, Speech to the Virginia Convention by Patrick Henry, and a variety of other
representative non-fiction pieces.
Our curriculum culls some of the fine examples of writing from a variety of sources (see textbook list), including Cliffs
AP English Language and Composition, 40 Model Essays and Patterns for College Writing, which provides students with
valuable examples of gradations of writing in response to prompts. Technology is used via an LCD projector, to display
samples of student work for both small and whole class critique. It is during these lessons that students have the
opportunity to fine tune their understanding of the deconstruction of essay prompts and the subtleties of what
constitutes good writing. Some of the most valuable examples of student writing come from our own classes.
Individual students offer to type their own work for the LCD screen in order to receive constructive feedback from
peers and instructor.
During the second semester literature texts may include Death of a Salesman, Their Eyes Were Watching God, A Raisin
in the Sun and The Awakening. Various other visual images, short stories and articles will be used to supplement
instruction.
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University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Research Papers
Students are given two major research projects to complete during the school year.

B. Spring Semester Papers / Projects:


Literary Criticism Research Paper: Students choose any of the fiction texts read throughout the year and
research published critical text. The main focus of this assignment is to create and support a thesis which
attempts to correlate the events of the authors life with the creation of that specific text. This assignment is
extremely challenging as students must take risks while interpreting their facts of both text and biography. The
paper is not excessively longthree or four pages of discussion is sufficient to make the point with evidence. As
many of our students are experiencing formal independent research for the first time, emphasis is placed on the
validity of source material and MLA format. It is our experience that students often attempt to rely on one critical
text for their material and must be guided through the pitfalls of invalid credibility.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Reading Log Guidelines


For each novel and drama we read in class, you will keep a Reading Log (RL). It is important to read each work of literature
with pen and/or highlighter in hand to take notes in the text or in your log. Your RL will be used for class discussions and
writings, but they will also come in handy as review material to use prior to the AP Exam. Each log should have the following
13 numbered and labeled sections:
Section I: Warm ups
Copy and respond to warm up questions provided by teacher. Warm ups may include themed questions related to topics to be covered for
the day or related visual images to analyze a stimulate discussion prior to reading
Section II: Significance of Title
Briefly discuss the significance of the title. Is it an allusion to an event or another work? How is the title thematically connected to the body
of the work? Does it have multiple meanings? Explain.
Section III: Author
Briefly discuss the author and how the work reflects the concerns of its creator. Who is the author? What are his/her major themes issues?
How does the work demonstrate concerns important to the author and the social issues, values, and culture of his/her time?
Section IV: Setting
Describe the time and place in which the action occurs. How is it related to the time period in which the work was written? What is
significant about the setting? How is the setting connected to thematic concerns?
Section V: Plot
Briefly summarize the plot, using standard formats of basic plot structure as they may apply: exposition, initial incident, rising action,
turning point, climax, falling action, and resolution. Discuss conflict and any other devices that significantly impact plot.
Section VI: Point of View
From what perspective is the story told? From what perspective does the author approach the story? How does point of view affect your
understanding of the work? How does the choice of narrator impact the theme(s) of the work?
Section VII: Characterization
Identify the characters in order of importance (starting with protagonist and antagonist) and describe them and their roles in the work.
Discuss any characters that have a significant impact on the work. Be sure to include physical and psychological details in your descriptions.
Section VIII: Theme
What are some of the issues presented? Identify and discuss any important messages and ideas the author communicates in the work.
Remember that themes are important ideas conveyedin order for an idea to be important (and, therefore, thematic) it must be repeated.
Be sure to express theme as a complete statement not as a topic like love.
Section IX: Symbols & Literary Devices
Identify and discuss symbols and literary devices used in the work. How did these affect your understanding of the work? How are they
important in their connection to theme and meaning in the work? You should consider such devices as symbolism, diction, metaphor,
imagery, irony, and humor whenever they have a meaningful impact on any part of the work.
Section X: Quotes
Select and list three to five quotes that illustrate an important theme or idea in the work. Discuss the element of theme, plot, setting, or
literary device connected to each quote. Be sure to use quotation marks and include a page number.
Section XI: Worksheets / Discussion Questions
Keep all completed worksheets and discussion questions provided by the teacher
Section XII: Vocabulary
Keep a chart of all unknown vocabulary words from the text. You must include the word, sentence that it was used in from the text, the
part of speech and a synonym for the word that you may be more familiar with. Many of these words will become part of the weekly
vocabulary tests.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Section XIII: Response


Discuss your response to this work. Did you enjoy it? Why/Why not? What elements of the book did you enjoy/not enjoy? What is your
appraisal of the work and its place within the canon of world literature? Would you recommend it to someone else? What type of person
would enjoy this work most? Most importantly, what connections are there between this work and the world that you live in?

Other Projects and Assessments


1)
2)

3)

4)

Homework will usually consist of reading and informal writing assignments, including SOAPStone analyses, journal
entries, and reaction papers.
Students should expect regular reading checks and quizzes that require a working knowledge of textual details from
assigned reading. Quizzes will often provide opportunities answer multiple choice questions that require students to
answer reading passage questions similar in approach and format to those on the AP English Language exam.
Tests, administered at the end of each unit, will be similar in format to the AP English Language examination and will
include multiple choice passage analysis items and in-class essay response. The Reading Logs will be a valuable
resource to aid in studying for these exams.
Students will occasionally prepare projects and presentations to enhance class experience and foster greater
appreciation of reading selections and their historical, social, and cultural significance. Students are encouraged to
incorporate technology (power point presentations, digital photography, and digital video) and art (illustration,
music, and, dramatic performance) into projects when appropriate.

Student Evaluation
Students grades are based on an accumulated-point system. Each graded assignment or activity is assigned a certain number
of points based on its complexity and overall importance to the objectives of the course. Typically each assessment within
each quarter equates to about one-eighth of the total average for that marking period. At the end of each quarter, a
students quarter grade is determined by dividing the number of points earned by the number of points possible.
Students are mostly assessed on major assignments, such as out-of class essays, timed writings. Socratic seminars, grammar
exercises, annotated readings, practice on multiple-choice questions based on reading passages, informal writings, and class
participation.

The percentages figured, using the accumulated-point system, translate into the following grades:

90% - 100 =
80% - 89% =
70% - 79% =

A
B
C

60% - 69% =
50% and below =

D
F

A Students working at this level engage fully in every assignment and demonstrate a willingness to examine their own
thinking and assumptions. All work reflects a level of thinking far beyond the obvious and the superficial. Students come to
class fully prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. All assignments are
submitted on time and all make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion. Obviously, all work is the
students own.
B - Students working at this level competently engage every assignment and consistently attempt to examine their own thinking
and assumptions. The majority of the students work reflects a level of thinking beyond the obvious and the superficial.
Students come to class fully prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. Most
assignments are submitted on time and most make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion. All work
is the students own.

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

C Students working at this level do not yet engage in every assignment and inconsistently demonstrate a willingness to
examine their own thinking and assumptions. Only a minor portion of the students work reflects a level of thinking beyond the
obvious and the superficial. Students are reluctant to challenge themselves beyond what they have already accomplished in
reading and writing and, thus, show little or no growth in those areas. Students come to class minimally prepared to discuss
assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. A majority of assignments are submitted on time and
most make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion.
D Students working at this level seldom engage in any assignment and consistently demonstrate an unwillingness to examine
their own thinking and assumptions. The students work reflects a level of thinking that is obvious and superficial. Students
come to class ill-prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in the course. Several assignments are
submitted late; some assignments may be missing completely. Make-up work from authorized absences may be missing or
seriously late.
F This level of work is obviously unacceptable. Work is often submitted, or the student may completely ignore the
requirements of the assignment, or the student is in violation of the schools Academic Policy.

10

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Plagiarism Policy:
I take plagiarism & cheating very seriously. Using someone elses words as your own is immoral,
unethical, and does nothing to further your education. With the availability of search engines
like Google that search in-text for documents, it is easy to catch someone if they have bought or
copied information from the Internet.

My definition of plagiarism is:

Buying or borrowing a paper from someone and turning it in as your own work.
Extracting the exact words from a document without placing the text in quotation marks and
citing the author.
Using someone elses published ideas without giving them proper cited credit.
Having a parent, friend, etc. write part or all of your paper for you.

If you are caught violating my rules on plagiarism, you will receive an automatic zero (0) on the
assignment and be referred to the proper authorities. Make sure your work is your own!

Materials Needed
4 report covers with three-hole metal clasps for unit reading logs, 3 ring binder to hold extra paper(NO
SPIRAL NOTEBOOKS PLEASE), paper (lined and white computer paper), colored pencils or crayons, black or
blue pens, red pen (for grading only), #2 pencils, flash drive or Dropbox or some other cloud storage.

CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS
All school rules are in effect in the classroom. No exceptions.
Students are expected to:

Pay attention to the teacher/speaker/presenter.


Use common courtesy at all times (i.e., treating others with respect, no interruptions,
etc.).
Maintain a positive attitude and a solid work ethic.
Turn all assignments in on time. Late work will not be accepted.
Cause no distractions to the learning environment.
Refrain from using foul language.
Have ALL ELECTRONIC DEVICES turned off cell phones, iPods, etc.
Come in QUIETLY, sit and begin warm up activity.
Come to class on time. (excessive tardiness will result in excessive detention, and will
adversely affect your grade)

***Please be aware that timeliness is of the utmost importance. Tardiness may affect
your grade by causing you to miss assignments given at the beginning of the period.

11

University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

Textbook List
Books on Rhetoric
Barnet, Sylvan and Hugo Bedau. Critical Thinking Reading and Writing: A Brief Guide to Argument.
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2005.
Hephzibah Roskelly and David A. Jolliffe. Everyday Use: Rhetoric at Work in Reading and Writing. Boston:
Pearson Education, Inc, 2005.
Kennedy, X.J., (include other authors). The Bedford Guide for College Writers. Boston: Bedford/St.
Martins, 2005.
Yagelski, Robert P. and Robert K. Miller. The Informed Argument. Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2005. 6th
Edition.

Readers
Aaron, Jane E. Ed. 40 Model Essays: A Portable Anthology. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2005.
Atwan, Robert Ed. American Now: Short Readings from Recent Periodicals. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins,
2005.
Cohen, Samuel, Ed. 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology. New York: Bedford/St. Martins,2004.
Kirszner, Laurie G. and Stephen R. Mandell, eds. Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and
Guide. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2004.

Handbook and Style and Study Guides


Hacker, Diana. A Pocket Style Manual. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2004.
Hacker, Diana. A Writers Reference. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2003.
Swovelin, Barbara V., Ed. Cliffs AP English Language and Composition. New Jersey: Wiley Publishing, Inc.,
2006.

Core Literature Texts


Elements of Literature, Fifth Course Holt
Rinehart Winston
A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hainsberry
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan
Poe
The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe


The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins
Gilman
Uncle Toms Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner
The Jilting of Granny Weatherall by Katherine
Anne Porter
Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat
The Awakening by Kate Chopin

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University High School


2015-2016

Ms. K. Mitchell
Kdm4952@lausd.net
Class website: http://msmitchellsclasses.weebly.com

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