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Year 12

Area of Study
DISCOVERY
Section 1 Practise
Do Now Booklet

This booklet has been created to help you prepare for the HSC
Area of Study exam.
Inside are a range of texts that explore the concept of
discovery. Responding to unseen texts quickly and accurately is
an essential skill needed for this section in the exam. You need
to be able to read & view texts, comprehend them and identify
and explain what messages theyre conveying about Discovery.
For each text, there are 2-3 questions and a criteria to make
sure your answers are quality. You can
also highlight the areas in the rubric
that the text addresses. This will
help you prepare for a range of
possible questions they could ask you
in the HSC.
These texts can also be used as your
related text/s for your
Discovery essay. Check with your
teacher before deciding which one you
will use.

Area of study: discovery Rubric


This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of
discovery is represented in and through texts.
Discovery can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time or
rediscovering something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed. Discoveries can be
sudden and unexpected, or they can emerge from a process of deliberate and careful
planning evoked by curiosity, necessity or wonder. Discoveries can be fresh and intensely
meaningful in ways that may be emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual.
They can also be confronting and provocative. They can lead us to new worlds and values,
stimulate new ideas, and enable us to speculate about future possibilities. Discoveries and
discovering can offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and
others.
An individuals discoveries and their process of discovering can vary according to
personal, cultural, historical and social contexts and values. The impact of these
discoveries can be far-reaching and transformative for the individual and for broader
society. Discoveries may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different
perspectives and their worth may be reassessed over time. The ramifications of
particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds.
By exploring the concept of discovery, students can understand how texts have the
potential to affirm or challenge individuals or more widely-held assumptions and beliefs
about aspects of human experience and the world. Through composing and responding to a
wide range of texts, students may make discoveries about people, relationships, societies,
places and events and generate new ideas. By synthesising perspectives, students may
deepen their understanding of the concept of discovery. Students consider the ways
composers may invite them to experience discovery through their texts and explore how
the process of discovering is represented using a variety of language modes, forms and
features.
In their responses and compositions, students examine, question, and reflect and
speculate on:
their own experiences of discovery
the experience of discovery in and through their engagement with texts
assumptions underlying various representations of the concept of discovery
how the concept of discovery is conveyed through the representations of people,
relationships, societies, places, events and ideas that they encounter in the prescribed
text and other related texts of their own choosing
how the composers choice of language modes, forms, features and structure shapes
representations of discovery and discovering
the ways in which exploring the concept of discovery may broaden and deepen their
understanding of themselves and their world.

Criteria for Quality Short Answers


In section 1, you will be required to answer questions on unseen texts. To
help guide your responses, a helpful hint is to look at how much the
question is worth. This is a general suggestion:
1 mark = 2 quality sentences
3 marks = A quality STEEL paragraph
5 marks = A minimum of two STEEL paragraphs.
The language of the question can also help you to determine the length and
detail needed in your answer. For example, a question that asks you to
analyse, assess or evaluate needs more discussion than a question that asks
you to identify or describe. Your teacher will explain this to you in more
detail.

Criteria:
Have you:
1)
2)
3)
4)

Used the language of the question/rubric?


Written your response in full sentences?
Provided evidence or examples from the text?
Discussed the impact of at least ONE
How does this technique highlight
technique?
discovery?

5) Developed a thesis or your own perspective? This must be clear


and detailed. (Have you actually answered the question?)

Print Article and


Cover Image
Cartoon
Cartoon
Song Lyrics
Poem

Rachel Macy
Stafford

Richard Stengel

Bill Watterson

Bill Watterson

Richard Thompson

William Blake

Bill Watterson

Melissa Shultz

The Teacher Who


Ran

Whats Hard to
Look At

Infinity

People Believe what


they See

Cold Kisses

London

No Smoking

My Mums Secret
Life

Print Article

Cartoon

Print Article

Feature Article

Julia Baird

Its love, actually

TEXT TYPE

COMPOSER

TEXT TITLE

August 2011

N/A

1794

April 1996

N/A

N/A

August 9, 2010

The Readers Digest

N/A

Songs of Experience

Capitol Records

N/A

N/A

Time Magazine

The Readers Digest

Good Weekend

February 1, 2014
August 2014

SOURCE

DATE OF
COMPOSITION

Poem

Prose Extract
Poem

Peter Goldsworthy

Anne Deveson

Peter Carey

Dorothy Hewett

Darwin

Tell Them Im
Here

The Writer and


the City

Wanderlust

Painting

Pawel Kuczynski

Edvard Munch

Unknown

Venice & Facebook

The Scream

Lost

Photographs/Memes

Digital Image

Tourism Malaysia

Endless Colour
Print Advertisement

Short Story

TEXT TYPE

COMPOSER

TEXT TITLE

N/A
Sadanduseless.com
Sourced October
2014

Pawelkuczynski.com

The Readers Digest

Wheatlands,
Hewett & Kinsella

Rogers, Coleridge &


White Ltd

Penguin Australia

If, then

SOURCE

1893

2014

August 2014

2000

2001

1998

1996

DATE OF
COMPOSITION

2012

2013

2006

Graffiti Image

Movie Poster

Excerpt from
Picture Book

Banksy

N/A

N/A

Shaun Tan

Gaza Strip

Into the Wild

The Secret Life of


Walter Mitty

New Land

DVD Cover

2007

2005

Print Advertisement

Australian Tourism
Advertising
Campaign

Uluru

The Arrival

Samuel Goldwyn
Films

River Road Entertainment

N/A

Australian Tourism

Time Magazine

November 9, 2009

Print Advertisement

InterContinental
Hotels & Resorts

Time Magazine

July 26, 2010

Favourite Place

Print Article

Bryan Walsh

SOURCE

DATE OF
COMPOSITION

About Face

TEXT TYPE

COMPOSER

TEXT TITLE

Do Now - Its love, actually


feature article

Do Now - Its love, actually


feature article

Do Now - Its love, actually


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the feature article carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

What is one idea about DISCOVERY presented in this text?

2.

We were trying to find another life. Explore how the speaker and her
friend discover a different world outside of school.
4 marks

10

1 mark

Do Now - THE TEACHER WHO RAN - print


article

11

Do Now - THE TEACHER WHO RAN - print

12

Do Now - THE TEACHER WHO RAN - print


article
Section 1 questions
Read the article carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Explain how the article represents the idea of self-discovery.

2.

...A young teacher got a lesson in life outside the classroom. Explain
what the speaker discovers about herself, others and her profession?
3 marks

13

2 marks

Do Now - whats hard to look atprint ARTICLE & cover image

14

Do Now - whats hard to look atprint ARTICLE & cover image

15

Do Now - whats hard to look atprint ARTICLE & cover image


Section 1 questions
Read the article and view the cover image carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Explain how the two texts invite the responder to make their own
discoveries.
4 marks

16

Do Now - infinity cartoon

17

Do Now - infinity cartoon


Section 1 questions

Read the cartoon carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Identify ONE visual feature and explain how it represents the concept of
discovery.
2 marks

2.

How has the speakers attitude towards discovery been conveyed in the
text?
3 marks

18

Do Now - people believe what they see


cartoon

19

Do Now - people believe what they see


cartoon
Section 1 questions
Read the cartoon carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Identify ONE technique (either language or visual) that is used to represent the concept of discovery.
2 marks

2.

What ideas about discovery are being conveyed by the cartoonist?


3 marks

20

Do Now - cold kisses


Song lyrics
Cold Kisses Richard Thompson
Here I am in your room going through your stuff
Said you'd be gone five minutes, that's time enough
Here in your drawer there's lacy things
Old credit cards and beads and bangles and rings
Well I think I've found what I'm looking for
Hidden away at the back of the drawer
Here's the life that you led before
Old photographs of the life you led
Arm in arm with Mr X Y and Z
Old boyfriends big and small
Got to see how I measure up to them all
There is a place we all must start, love
Who were you holding in that fond embrace
I've found a door into your heart, love
And do you still feel the warmth of cold kisses?
Here I am behind enemy lines
Looking for secrets, looking for signs
Old boyfriends big and small
Got to see how I measure up to them all
This one's handsome, not too bright
This one's clever with his hands alright
Tougher than me if it came to a fight
And this one's a poet, a bit of a wet
Bit of a gypsy, a bit of a threat
I wonder if she's got over him yet
Old passions frozen in the second
Who were you holding in that fond embrace
Hearts have a past that must be reckoned
And do you still feel the warmth of cold kisses?
Time to put the past away
That's your footstep in the street I'd say
Tie the ribbon back around it
Everything just the way I found it
And I can hear you turn the key
And my head's buried when you see me
In a Margaret Miller mystery
21
And do you still feel the warmth of cold kisses?
Do you still feel the warmth of cold kisses?

Do Now - cold kisses


Song lyrics
Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the song lyrics carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Describe what the speaker discovers for the first time.

2.

Explain how the composer uses TWO techniques to highlight the significance of
this discovery.
4 marks

22

2 marks

Do Now - london
Poem by William blake
London
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
I wander thro' each charter'd street,
Near where the charter'd Thames* does flow.
And mark in every face I meet
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
In every cry of every Man,
In every Infants cry of fear,
In every voice: in every ban,
The mind-forg'd manacles** I hear
How the Chimney-sweepers cry
Every blackning Church appalls***,
And the hapless Soldiers sigh
Runs in blood down Palace walls
But most thro' midnight streets I hear
How the youthful Harlots curse
Blasts the new-born Infants tear
And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse
*Thames - longest river in England.
**manacles - shackles, handcuffs
***appalls - greatly dismays or horrifies
23

Do Now - london
Poem by William blake
Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the poem carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

How do the opening lines convey a sense of physical discovery?

2.

The speaker discovers a very negative side to this landscape. Explain how the
composer uses TWO techniques to highlight this discovery.
4 marks

24

2 marks

Do Now - no smoking
cartoon

25

Do Now - no smoking
Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the cartoon carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Provide ONE reason why the character wants to try smoking.

2.

Explain what the character discovers about smoking and the consequences of
this discovery.
3 marks

26

1 mark

Do Now - my mums secret life


Print article

27

Do Now - my mums secret life


Print article

28

Do Now - My mums secret life


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the article carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Describe ONE discovery the writer makes about her mother.

2.

Explain how these discoveries lead the speaker to new understandings and/or
values.
3 marks

29

1 mark

Do Now - Darwin
Poem by peter goldsworthy
Arriving again after twenty-five years
I step nose-first into falling Wet,
dragging my body behind:

landfill of the past, a ghostly methane,


bringing back to the odourless present
its most sacred site:

a heavy tail, wagged by a thousand


scent-trails that point back
into the fragrant invisible past.

a slatted stilt-house that still waits


in the sudden tropical night at the end
of each adventure, lit from within

Nothing has changed except the visible:


my childhood Galapagos of stilt-houses
and louvres and rusting tin roofs

like a home: a beacon,


a ribbed and shining lantern
held above the dark and above the green.

redecorated by a famous cyclone,


become the newest suburb of the South,
fitter to survive, but more interior,

This is the travel-gift I choose for myself,


wrapped in a moist nostril-pocket, tucked
against the warm underbelly of the brain

smelling only of the absence of smell,


or the scent-sachets of hire cars
and deodorised motel rooms.

as I step backwards onto the plane


dragging my nose behind me,
and this quicksilver Beagle detaches

For years I have travelled everywhere


except back, travelled to postpone many things,
not least boredom, travelled to avoid meeting

from the sticky gravity of my precious island


and I would glance back once more
but cannot, for the Wet is falling again

myself, travelled also to narrow the mind,


to reconfirm each disappointing destination
including, finally, this.

outside the cabin. Inside, perfumed women


distribute scented steaming towels
to wipe the face clean, and the nose

Yet the town somehow survives the city.


It fills the nose like a childhood dunked
in scented tea, it seeps from the thick-ply

is overwhelmed by the freshness


of the here and now, and the past which was
present is obscured, nearly completely.

30

Do Now - darwin
Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the poem carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

How do the first three stanzas establish a sense of re-discovery?

2.

Analyse how the poet re-discovers his home town and the feelings he has towards it.
4 marks

31

1 mark

Do Now - tell me Im here


Short story

32

Do Now - tell me Im here


Short story

33

Do Now - tell me Im here


Short story

34

Do Now - tell me Im here


Short story

35

Do Now - tell me Im here


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the story carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Provide an example of ONE discovery made by the speaker.

2.

This is a story about a journey into madness. Analyse the discoveries made by
the speaker and the ramifications/consequences of these discoveries.
4 marks

36

1 mark

Do Now - The writer and the city


Practise Section 1 Questions
Sheridan, I asked, are you OK?
He turned off the engine and, in the silence,

where you could see the marks where Austral-

bestowed upon me a sweet strained smile.

ia tore itself away from New

Home sweet home, he said.

Zealand.

But there was no sign of any home and what

The cattle pad swung to the left along the

sweetness there was in the overgrazed pad

contour of a hill but we continued upwards,

dock was not immediately obvious.

and there it was the cave.

Stuff to carry, he said.

It did not look like a cave but a garden

I was soon loaded up with wine bottles and

shed buried in a hillside. There were

books and a very bloody leg of lamb around

plastic buckets everywhere around, and

which the flies immediately clustered.

spades and hoes leaning against its

Wheres the cave?

windows. It was a cave, of course, with

Its here.

sandstone walls and a great slab of sand

Now I followed Sheridans broad back through a

stone across its roof. Sheridan with his

landscape quite unlike the one I had

typical industry had framed out the mouth,

expected. Mind you, it suited him. It was a perfect

building a wall, windows and a door. The

habitat for an old hippie plenty of sedge, thriving

result was a big rock-walled room that you

blackberry patch with wattles growing through its

could only call cosy. It was a little musty,

centre, rusted-out water tank, fenced dam with

true, but he quickly laid a fire in his stove. He

four-year-old blue-gum saplings growing around

lit the gas lamp and the refrigerator. He

its edge, and beside the cattle pad we walked

a kettle on the primus stove. There were two

along, signs of

over-stuffed armchairs but I chose to sit on

Sheridans considerable energy fenced plantings

the straight-backed wooden chair behind the

of hakeas, grevilleas, eucalypts. It was not what I

desk and looked out through the dusty glass.

had pictured when I imagined a cave in the

Far in the distance the light caught the

mountains. I had thought of something deep into

escarpment at Katoomba.

the escarpment, a place


This is where you write?
from PETER CAREY,
The Writer and The City Series

37

set

Do Now - the writer & the city


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the story carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

What does the speaker discover about Sheridans home sweet home?

2.

Analyse the techniques used by the writer to convey this.

38

1 mark

4 marks

Do now - Wanderlust
Poem
on her sled with the silent runners

Wanderlust

powdering the snow

When I was but thirteen or so

she outstripped the wolf pack

I went into a golden land

looking down from the tops of the Andes

Chimbarazo Cotopaxi*

the black forest spread

Took me by the hand.

like smudges of ink

W J TURNER

on white cartridge paper.

She wanted to travel


to the edge of the world

She put the books back on the shelf

past the timberline

and walked to the front gate

saw herself dancing to jazz

the moon was up she could smell

in a flimsy dress on an ocean liner

the orchard in the cold

taking off in a Gypsy Moth

the shorn ewes like ghosts

first stop Karachi

in the home paddock

in the London to Sydney Air Race.

stopped chewing to stare at her


the squint of their yellow eyes

Reading Richard Halliburton**

remote and alien cold as snow leopards.

in the dim-half light of the playroom


she swam in the Blue Grotto***

DOROTHY HEWETT

till her arms and legs


were washed in azure

*Chimborazo Cotopaxi - A volcano in South


America.
**Richard Halliburton - A travel writer
***Blue Grotto - a sea cave on the island of
Capri, southern Italy

digging in the ruins embedded in gold dust


she rifled the Pharaohs bones

39

Do Now - wanderlust
Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the poem carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Explain how the title reflects the ideas in the poem.

2.

Explain how the poets final stanza impacts on the poem as a whole and supports
the notions around discoveries.
3 marks

40

2 marks

Do Now - Gaza Strip - graffiti image


by banksy

41

Do Now - Gaza Strip - graffiti image


by banksy
Section 1 questions
View the image carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Identify ONE idea about discovery shown in the image.

2.

How does Banksy use visual techniques and location to convey his
message?
4 marks

42

2 marks

Do Now - into the wild - dvd cover

43

Do Now - into the wild - dvd cover


Section 1 questions

View the DVD cover carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

Explain the connection between the title of the film and the images on
the DVD cover.
2 marks

2.

How does the text convey ideas about physical discoveries?

44

4 marks

do now - painting
Edvard Munchs The Scream

45

Do Now - The Scream


Practise Section 1 Questions
View the painting carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Identify the personas feelings about discovery in the text.

2.

Analyse how the composer uses visual techniques to convey the personas
feelings.
4 marks

46

1 mark

do now - memes

Lost

47

Do Now - lost - memes


Practise Section 1 Questions
View the memes carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Identify the type of discovery implied in the visual texts.

2.

Get wonderfully lost. Analyse how the composer has used TWO
techniques to convey their ideas about discovery.
3 marks

48

1 mark

Do Now - about face - print article

49

Do Now - about face - print article


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the article carefully and then answer the following questions:
1. What is the purpose of this text?

1 mark

2. Explain how the visuals support the written text.

2 marks

3. That revelation prompted the two journalists to begin researching


Explain what the researchers discovered and the consequences of their
discoveries.
3 marks

50

Do Now - favourite place - print advertisement

51

Do Now - favourite place - print advertisement


Practise Section 1 Questions
Read the print advertisement carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

What does this text reveal about the notion of discovery?

1 mark

2. ...discover for yourself why this island is so truly magical How does the
composer persuade the responder to engage in their own discovery?
3 marks

52

Do Now - uluru - print advertisement

Text says:

ARRIVED PLANNING TO SEE THE WHOLE COUNTRY.


DEPARTED STILL TRYING TO GET OVER ULURU.
Its true what they say, to find yourself sometimes you need to lose
yourself. In Australia they call this going walkabout. And with Ulurus
magical presence, sacred history and spectacular natural colour show at
sunrise and sunset, its no wonder people are finding themselves here
every single day.
Visit Australia.com to find out how you can go walkabout.

53

Do Now - uluru - print advertisement


Read the advertisement carefully and then answer the following questions:
1. Comment on the significance of landscapes and settings during the process
of discovery.
2 mark

2. Explain how the composer creates this significance in their text.

54

3 marks

Do Now - the secret life of walter


mitty - movie poster

55

Do Now - the secret life of walter


mitty - movie poster
Section 1 questions
View the movie poster carefully and then answer the following questions:

1.

How does the movie poster evoke the experience of discovery?

2.

How does the text use layout and symbolism to convey ideas about
discovery ?
4 marks

56

2 marks

Do Now - New Land


from the picture book, the
arrival by shaun tan

57

Do Now - New Land


Practise Section 1 Questions
View the image carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

Describe how the image depicts discovery of a place or landscape.

2.

Analyse how the composer uses TWO visual techniques to depict the personas
discovery of this new place/landscape.
4 marks

58

2 marks

Do Now - endless colour - print


advertisement

59

Do Now - endless colour - print


advertisement Practise Section 1
Questions
View and read the print advertisement carefully and then answer the following
questions:
1.

What aspect of Discovery is represented in this text?

1 mark

2.

Explain how the use of visuals support the written text.

3 marks

60

Do Now - Venice & Facebook Pawel Kuczynski: Digital Image

61

Do Now - venice & facebook - print


advertisement Practise Section 1
Questions
View and read the digital image carefully and then answer the following questions:
1.

What comment about discovery is the composer trying to make?

2. Explain how the composer uses visual techniques to convey this idea.

62

1 mark

3 marks

Area of Study Rubric


Highlight the aspects of the rubric this text addresses.
Check your response against the criteria to ensure your answer is quality.

This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of discovery is
represented in and through texts.
Discovery can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time or rediscovering something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed. Discoveries can be sudden and unexpected, or they can emerge from a process of deliberate and careful planning evoked by curiosity,
necessity or wonder. Discoveries can be fresh and intensely meaningful in ways that may be emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual. They can also be confronting and provocative.
They can lead us to new worlds and values, stimulate new ideas, and enable us to speculate about
future possibilities. Discoveries and discovering can offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others.
An individuals discoveries and their process of discovering can vary according to personal,

cul-

tural, historical and social contexts and values. The impact of these discoveries can be farreaching and transformative for the individual and for broader society. Discoveries may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives and their worth may be reassessed
over time. The ramifications of particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds.
By exploring the concept of discovery, students can understand how texts have the potential to
affirm or challenge individuals or more widely-held assumptions and beliefs about aspects of human experience and the world. Through composing and responding to a wide range of texts, students may make discoveries about people, relationships, societies, places and events and generate
new ideas. By synthesising perspectives, students may deepen their understanding of the concept
of discovery. Students consider the ways composers may invite them to experience discovery
through their texts and explore how the process of discovering is represented using a variety of
language modes, forms and features.

Criteria:
Have you:
1)
2)
3)
4)

Used the language of the question/rubric?


Written your response in full sentences?
Provided evidence or examples from the text?
Discussed the impact of at least ONE
How
technique?

5)

Developed a thesis or your own perspective? This must be clear and


detailed. Have you actually answered
the question?
63

does this technique highlight


discovery?

Area of Study Rubric


Highlight the aspects of the rubric this text addresses.
Check your response against the criteria to ensure your answer is quality.

This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of discovery is
represented in and through texts.
Discovery can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time or rediscovering something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed. Discoveries can be sudden and unexpected, or they can emerge from a process of deliberate and careful planning evoked by curiosity,
necessity or wonder. Discoveries can be fresh and intensely meaningful in ways that may be emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual. They can also be confronting and provocative.
They can lead us to new worlds and values, stimulate new ideas, and enable us to speculate about
future possibilities. Discoveries and discovering can offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others.
An individuals discoveries and their process of discovering can vary according to personal,

cul-

tural, historical and social contexts and values. The impact of these discoveries can be farreaching and transformative for the individual and for broader society. Discoveries may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives and their worth may be reassessed
over time. The ramifications of particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds.
By exploring the concept of discovery, students can understand how texts have the potential to
affirm or challenge individuals or more widely-held assumptions and beliefs about aspects of human experience and the world. Through composing and responding to a wide range of texts, students may make discoveries about people, relationships, societies, places and events and generate
new ideas. By synthesising perspectives, students may deepen their understanding of the concept
of discovery. Students consider the ways composers may invite them to experience discovery
through their texts and explore how the process of discovering is represented using a variety of
language modes, forms and features.

Criteria:
Have you:
1)
2)
3)
4)

Used the language of the question/rubric?


Written your response in full sentences?
Provided evidence or examples from the text?
Discussed the impact of at least ONE
How
technique?

5)

Developed a thesis or your own perspective? This must be clear and


detailed. Have you actually answered
the question?
64

does this technique highlight


discovery?

Area of Study Rubric


Highlight the aspects of the rubric this text addresses.
Check your response against the criteria to ensure your answer is quality.

This Area of Study requires students to explore the ways in which the concept of discovery is
represented in and through texts.
Discovery can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time or rediscovering something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed. Discoveries can be sudden and unexpected, or they can emerge from a process of deliberate and careful planning evoked by curiosity,
necessity or wonder. Discoveries can be fresh and intensely meaningful in ways that may be emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual. They can also be confronting and provocative.
They can lead us to new worlds and values, stimulate new ideas, and enable us to speculate about
future possibilities. Discoveries and discovering can offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others.
An individuals discoveries and their process of discovering can vary according to personal,

cul-

tural, historical and social contexts and values. The impact of these discoveries can be farreaching and transformative for the individual and for broader society. Discoveries may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives and their worth may be reassessed
over time. The ramifications of particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds.
By exploring the concept of discovery, students can understand how texts have the potential to
affirm or challenge individuals or more widely-held assumptions and beliefs about aspects of human experience and the world. Through composing and responding to a wide range of texts, students may make discoveries about people, relationships, societies, places and events and generate
new ideas. By synthesising perspectives, students may deepen their understanding of the concept
of discovery. Students consider the ways composers may invite them to experience discovery
through their texts and explore how the process of discovering is represented using a variety of
language modes, forms and features.

Criteria:
Have you:
1)
2)
3)
4)

Used the language of the question/rubric?


Written your response in full sentences?
Provided evidence or examples from the text?
Discussed the impact of at least ONE
How
technique?

5)

Developed a thesis or your own perspective? This must be clear and


detailed. Have you actually answered
the question?
65

does this technique highlight


discovery?