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Agrokid 210 ->20001

Agrokid 220
->ZKDS2102V0MD20001
Agrokid 220
->ZKDS2902V0MD20001
Agrokid 230
->ZKDS2202V0MD20001
Agrokid 230
->ZKDS3002V0MD20001

Workshop manual

CONTENTS
0 - Introduction
0.1 - Introduction
0.1.1 - Safety notes
0.1.2 - General safety rules
0.1.3 - Safety precautions for removal and refitting operations
0.1.4 - Lifting instructions
0.1.5 - Tightening torques
0.1.6 - Threadlockers, adhesives, sealants and lubricants
0.1.7 - Conversion factors

0-2
0-2
0-2
0-3
0-4
0-5
0-8
0-10

10 - Technical characteristics
10.1 - Transmission
10.1.1 - Transmission
10.1.2 - Rear PTO and Mid PTO
10.2 - Rear axle
10.2.1 - Brakes and rear axle assembly
10.3 - Front axle
10.3.1 - Front axle
10.4 - Hydraulic system
10.4.1 - Gear pump
10.4.2 - Differential lock control assembly
10.4.3 - Steering circuit
10.4.4 - Power steering valve
10.4.5 - Remote control valve

10-2
10-2
10-8
10-13
10-13
10-14
10-14
10-17
10-17
10-18
10-20
10-22
10-23

20 - Calibrations and electronic diagnosis


20.1 - Diagnostic tool screens
20.1.1 - Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch
20.1.2 - Operator seated sensor ECU (p/n 2.8519.106.0)

20-2
20-2
20-8

30 - Method of intervention
30.1 - B0 - Engine
30.1.1 - PREPARATION FOR DISASSEMBLY
30.1.2 - Engine - Separation from the transmission
30.1.3 - Engine
30.1.4 - Compression test
30.1.5 - engine block, crankshaft, pistons and sump
30.1.6 - Inspection of the engine monobloc
30.1.7 - Inspection of the crankshaft
30.1.8 - Fan - alternator drivebelt
30.1.9 - A/C fan - compressor drivebelt
30.1.10 - Crankshaft pulley
30.1.11 - Flywheel bearing
30.1.12 - Timing gears and flywheel
30.1.13 - Inspection of the flywheel and ring gear
30.1.14 - Inspection of the pistons, piston rings and gudgeon pins
30.1.15 - Inspection of the connecting rods
30.1.16 - Inspection of the camshaft

30-2
30-2
30-3
30-10
30-11
30-13
30-23
30-23
30-26
30-29
30-32
30-33
30-33
30-44
30-45
30-47
30-48
III

CONTENTS
30.1.17 - Inspection of the camshaft
30.1.18 - Inspection of the idler gear
30.1.19 - Inspection of the valves, valve guides and valve seats
30.1.20 - Valve clearances
30.1.21 - Inspection of the rocker arms and rocker shaft
30.1.22 - Cylinder head and valve train components
30.1.23 - Inspection of the cylinder head
30.1.24 - Inspection of the valve springs
30.1.25 - Inspection of the valve pushrods
30.1.26 - Renewal of the jets
30.1.27 - Lubrication System
30.1.28 - Inspection of the lubrication system
30.1.29 - Fuel System
30.1.30 - Inspection and adjustment of the fuel system
30.1.31 - Inspection of the fuel lift pump
30.1.32 - Injection pump
30.1.33 - Inspection of the fuel injection pump camshaft
30.1.34 - Inspection of the fuel injection pump camshaft
30.1.35 - Fuel injection nozzle
30.1.36 - Maintenance of the injector nozzles
30.1.37 - Governor
30.1.38 - Cooling system
30.1.39 - Inspection of the cooling system
30.1.40 - Engine air intake pipe
30.1.41 - Intake and exhaust systems
30.1.42 - Inspection of the air intake and exhaust system
30.2 - C0 - Engine accessories
30.2.1 - Engine cooling system radiator
30.2.2 - Expansion tank
30.2.3 - Fan
30.2.4 - Air cleaner assembly
30.2.5 - Fuel filter
30.2.6 - Fuel tank - Fuel tank float switch
30.2.7 - Auxiliary fuel tank
30.2.8 - Engine stop keyswitch
30.2.9 - Exhaust pipe - tractor with cab
30.2.10 - Engine stop keyswitch
30.2.11 - Alternator
30.2.12 - Alternator
30.2.13 - Starter motor
30.2.14 - Starter motor
30.2.15 - Disassembly of the starter motor
30.3 - D0 - Transmission
30.3.1 - Clutch plate
30.3.2 - Checking clutch plate wear
30.3.3 - Clutch release bearing
30.3.4 - Clutch release forks
30.3.5 - Clutch housing
IV

30-49
30-50
30-50
30-53
30-55
30-55
30-62
30-62
30-62
30-62
30-63
30-65
30-66
30-69
30-71
30-71
30-78
30-79
30-80
30-82
30-83
30-85
30-87
30-89
30-90
30-91
30-93
30-93
30-96
30-97
30-98
30-99
30-99
30-103
30-104
30-106
30-107
30-109
30-112
30-116
30-118
30-120
30-127
30-127
30-128
30-128
30-129
30-131

CONTENTS
30.3.6 - Disassembly of the gearbox input shaft
30.3.7 - Disassembly of the main shaft
30.3.8 - Disassembly of the secondary shaft
30.3.9 - Gearbox and shuttle assembly - complete unit
30.3.10 - Gearbox and shuttle assembly - complete unit
30.3.11 - Range gearbox and differential assembly - complete unit
30.3.12 - Gearbox input shaft - oil seal renewal
30.3.13 - Bevel gear pair
30.3.14 - Disassembly of 4WD output shaft and groundspeed PTO
30.3.15 - Creeper - synchronizer renewal
30.3.16 - PTO output shaft.
30.3.17 - Disassembly of the PTO output shaft.
30.3.18 - Removal of the PTO output shaft
30.3.19 - Parking brake
30.3.20 - Adjustment of the bevel gear pair
30.4 - E0 - Rear axle
30.4.1 - Left-hand rear axle
30.4.2 - Disassembly of LH/RH rear axle
30.4.3 - Rear differential
30.4.4 - Disassembly of the rear differential
30.4.5 - Rear axle brake discs
30.5 - F0 - Front axle
30.5.1 - Front support
30.5.2 - Front axle - complete assembly
30.5.3 - Steering cylinders
30.5.4 - Steering cylinders disassembly
30.5.5 - Steering knuckle housing and axle shaft
30.5.6 - Disassembly of the bevel gear pair
30.5.7 - Propeller shaft - Front axle drive shaft
30.5.8 - Planetary reduction gear
30.5.9 - Disassembly of the planetary reduction gear
30.6 - G0 - Bodywork - Cab - Platform
30.6.1 - Cab
30.6.2 - Hood and side panels
30.6.3 - Cab access steps
30.6.4 - Adjustable front fenders
30.6.5 - Cab door lock - tie-rod
30.6.6 - Instrument panel
30.6.7 - Left-hand rear cab pillar - screenwash reservoir
30.6.8 - Right-hand console
30.6.9 - Left-hand console
30.6.10 - Instrument panel
30.6.11 - Centre console
30.6.12 - RH rear cab pillar trim
30.6.13 - A/C system air intake filters
30.6.14 - Cab roof
30.6.15 - Seat
30.6.16 - Air conditioning system - Standard roof version

30-135
30-137
30-138
30-141
30-142
30-146
30-148
30-149
30-153
30-155
30-157
30-158
30-158
30-160
30-162
30-166
30-166
30-168
30-172
30-175
30-176
30-178
30-178
30-182
30-184
30-186
30-188
30-190
30-198
30-199
30-200
30-205
30-205
30-212
30-216
30-217
30-217
30-219
30-220
30-221
30-222
30-223
30-224
30-225
30-225
30-226
30-230
30-231
V

CONTENTS
30.6.17 - Air conditioning compressor
30.6.18 - Condenser
30.6.19 - Receiver-dryer
30.6.20 - Evaporator assembly
30.6.21 - Air conditioner fan
30.6.22 - Bistable pressure switch for compressor clutch engagement/disengagement
30.6.23 - Steering wheel
30.6.24 - Adjustment of the lift control valve levers
30.6.25 - Remote valve control levers
30.7 - H0 - Hydraulic system
30.7.1 - Pump for hydraulic lift and auxiliary services and power steering system
30.7.2 - Transmission oil filter assembly
30.7.3 - Power steering valve - Complete assembly
30.7.4 - Power steering disassembly
30.7.5 - Pressure relief valve - lift control valve
30.7.6 - Lift locking shut-off valve
30.7.7 - Remote control valve
30.7.8 - Remote control valve
30.7.9 - Control rods
30.7.10 - Double/single acting conversion valve
30.8 - L0 - Electrical system
30.8.1 - Battery
30.8.2 - Fuse and relay assembly
30.8.3 - Electrostatic unit
30.8.4 - Parking brake switch
30.8.5 - Adjustment of the parking brake switch
30.8.6 - Brake lights switches
30.8.7 - Adjustment of the brake light switches
30.8.8 - Steering column switch
30.8.9 - Control buttons - RH console
30.9 - M0 - Front PTO
30.9.1 - Pump - clutch assembly - brake
30.9.2 - PTO output shaft
30.9.3 - Solenoid valve
30.10 - N0 - Front lift
30.10.1 - Front lift - version with front PTO -
30.10.2 - Cylinder
30.11 - R0 - Rear lift
30.11.1 - Rear lift - complete assembly
30.11.2 - Rear lift - complete assembly
30.11.3 - Adjustment of the rear lift
30.11.4 - Lift cylinders
30.11.5 - Lift cylinders
30.11.6 - Renewal of the rear lift bush
30.11.7 - Lift arms
30.11.8 - Hydraulic lift control valve
30.11.9 - Disassembly of the lift control valve
VI

30-233
30-235
30-236
30-237
30-238
30-239
30-240
30-241
30-243
30-244
30-244
30-245
30-246
30-248
30-260
30-261
30-262
30-262
30-264
30-265
30-267
30-267
30-268
30-269
30-270
30-271
30-272
30-273
30-273
30-273
30-276
30-276
30-279
30-281
30-283
30-283
30-285
30-287
30-287
30-289
30-294
30-296
30-297
30-298
30-299
30-301
30-302

CONTENTS
30.11.10 - Three-point linkage with mechanical adjustment
30.12 - S0 - Wheels
30.12.1 - Front wheels
30.12.2 - Rear wheels
30.13 - V0 - Ballast - towing hitches
30.13.1 - Support and towing hitch

30-307
30-309
30-309
30-309
30-310
30-310

40 - Wiring diagrams
40.1 - Introduction
40.1.1 - Structure of the unit
40.1.2 - Wiring and components index
40.1.3 - Introduction
40.1.4 - Basic electronics for mechanics (1/2)
40.1.5 - Basic electronics for mechanics (2/2)
40.1.6 - Electrical and electronic components (1/2)
40.1.7 - Electrical and electronic components (2/2)
40.2 - Components
40.2.1 - Components
40.3 - Systems
40.3.1 - Earthing points
40.3.2 - Starting
40.3.3 - Control unit - Fan
40.3.4 - Steering column lights switch
40.3.5 - Instrument panel
40.3.6 - Cab
40.3.7 - Aereo cab
40.3.8 - PTO
40.3.9 - Front axle differential lock
40.3.10 - Brakes
40.4 - Wiring harnesses
40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses
40.4.2 - Positions of front wiring connectors
40.4.3 - Front PTO wiring - 0.014.2645.4
40.4.4 - Positions of front PTO wiring connectors.
40.4.5 - Front lights wiring - 0.014.7599.4
40.4.6 - Positions of front light wiring connectors
40.4.7 - Compressor wiring - 0.014.7601.4
40.4.8 - Positions of compressor wiring connectors
40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab
40.4.10 - Positions of front wiring connectors with cab
40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012.6949.4
40.4.12 - Positions of central wiring connectors
40.4.13 - Solenoid valve wiring - 0.014.1482.4
40.4.14 - Positions of solenoid valve wiring connectors
40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.1452.4/10
40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiring connectors
40.4.17 - Remote valve wiring - 0.012.6955.4

40-2
40-2
40-6
40-6
40-9
40-11
40-18
40-26
40-31
40-31
40-35
40-35
40-37
40-39
40-40
40-43
40-45
40-48
40-51
40-53
40-55
40-57
40-57
40-58
40-61
40-61
40-63
40-64
40-65
40-65
40-66
40-68
40-71
40-75
40-80
40-81
40-82
40-84
40-86
VII

CONTENTS
40.4.18 - Rear lights wiring - 0.014.7602.4
40.4.19 - Positions of rear light wiring connectors
40.4.20 - Aereo cab wiring - 0.014.7593.4
40.4.21 - Positions of aereo-cab wiring connectors
40.4.22 - Cab power supply - 0.014.7594.4
40.4.23 - Positions of cab power supply wiring connectors
40.4.24 - Air conditioning system - 0.014.7596.4
40.4.25 - Position of air conditioner wiring connectors
40.4.26 - Cab earth wiring - 0.015.0031.4
40.4.27 - Positions of cab earth wiring connectors
40.4.28 - Worklights-number plate light- flashing light - 0.014.7595.4
40.4.29 - Positions of worklight, number plate and flashing light wiring connectors
40.4.30 - Flashing light wiring - 0.014.7591.4
40.4.31 - Positions of flashing light wiring connectors
40.4.32 - Windscreen wipers - 0.014.7598.4
40.4.33 - Positions of windscreen wiper wiring connectors
40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7600.4
40.4.35 - Positions of radio-loudspeaker wiring connectors

VIII

40-86
40-87
40-89
40-91
40-92
40-93
40-94
40-95
40-96
40-97
40-98
40-99
40-101
40-101
40-102
40-103
40-104
40-105

0 - Introduction

0-1

Introduction
0.1 - Introduction

The purpose of this workshop manual is to provide instruction for repair technicians and a practical guide to improving the quality
of repairs. This manual enables repair technicians to acquire a thorough knowledge of the machine, indicating the correct methods
for fault diagnosis, for working in safety and for accurate dimensional checks and visual inspections. The instructions also indicate
the products to use, the tightening torques and the adjustment data. The technical material contained in this manual is reserved to
Authorised Dealers and Service Centres who will be duly informed of any technical changes to the machines in question through the
issue of documents regarding modifications, updates and supplements for optional equipment. All technicians and their colleagues
are expressly forbidden from reproducing any part of this manual in any form or from communicating the contents to third parties
without the express written permission of the Manufacturer, who remains the sole owner of this document with all rights reserved in
accordance with applicable laws.

0.1.1 - Safety notes

To ensure that machines entrusted to Authorised Service Centres for repair or overhaul continue to function correctly, it is very important that all repair work is carried out in the prescribed manner. The procedures for checks and repairs indicated in this manual are
safe and effective. Some of the operations described require the use of special tools and equipment; these tools have been specifally
designed for the intended purpose and may be ordered directly from the Manufacturers. DO NOT USE MAKESHIFT TOOLS; not
only is there a risk of personal injury, but such tools are rarely suited to the purpose for which they are used. In potentially hazardous
situations, always give priority to personal safety and take the necessary actions to eliminate the danger

0.1.2 - General safety rules


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0-2

Even if you have a thorough knowledge of the machine as regards its components, operation and controls, always take special care when carrying out the following operations; Remember that the machine you are working on is in need of repair or
overhaul and consequently may not always behave as expected.
Before starting work, clean the tractor thoroughly to remove all mud, dust and road dirt. Also clean the cab to remove all traces
of oil, snow and ice from the access steps and grab rails.
When climbing up to or down from the cab, always ensure you maintain three points of contact at a time (foot or handholds)
in order to keep your balance and prevent accidental falls.
Always take special care when carrying out fault diagnosis operations; these operations often require two persons, who must
never stand in front of the wheels when the engine is running.
When carrying out checks and repairs, wear close-fitting clothing, safety goggles and protective gloves that are suitable for
the task (cleaning, draining fluids, repairs). When working near moving parts, long hair should be gathered up and tied back
safely under a cap to prevent the risk of entanglement and severe injury.
Do not allow anyone who is not directly involved in the work to come near the tractor; ensure that they remain at a safe distance.
Keep well clear of moving parts; when the engine is running, some moving parts are not easily visible and therefore present a
risk of entanglement, even if protected by safety guards.
Ensure that the area is well ventilated before starting the engine in order to avoid the formation of dangerous concentrations
of toxic gases; always connect suitable fume extraction equipment to the exhaust pipe.
Do not start the engine with the safety guards removed under any circumstances; all repair and adjustment operations must
be carried out with the engine stopped.
Do not top up fuel, oil or coolant levels when the engine is running.
Never smoke and ensure there are no naked flames nearby when topping up fuel or oil. Always remove the battery from the
machine before recharging.
Before checking or removing the battery, stop the engine and remove the key from the starter switch.
Remove the battery and recharge in a well-ventilated area where the temperature exceeds 0C.
When checking or recharging the battery, do not smoke or allow naked flames in the vicinity as the hydrogen gas given off by
the battery is highly explosive.
The liquid (electrolyte) contained in the battery is very harmful if it comes into contact with the skin and the eyes; for this reason, always wear gloves and safety goggles with side shields when checking or topping up the battery. Should any electrolyte
accidentally come into contact with your skin, wash the affected areas immediately with plenty of fresh water; if electrolyte
comes into contact with your clothing, this should be removed as soon as possible. In case of accidental ingestion of electrolyte, drink copious amounts of water, milk or vegetable oil and take antacids such as magnesium, bicarbonate, etc. and seek
medical attention immediately.
Before working on the electrical systems, always disconnect the battery terminals.

Introduction
DANGER
Always disconnect the negative lead (--) before the positive lead (+); when re-connecting the battery on completion of
the work, first connect the positive terminal (+) and then the negative (--).
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Before carrying out any arc welding (permitted only on implements attached to the machine) always disconnect the battery
terminals and unplug all the connectors of the electronic control units and the alternator.
When topping up lubricants, always wear suitable protective gloves.
Do not wear clothing contaminated by engine or hydraulic oil; prolonged contact with the skin can be harmful and may cause
allergic reactions.
Used engine oil and hydraulic oil must be disposed of properly; recover used lubricants and dispose of them in accordance
with the applicable regulations.
Before carrying out any work on the hydraulic or pneumatic systems, discharge all residual pressure from the circuits.
Before carrying out any work on the hydraulic system or engine, allow the oil and engine coolant to cool down.
When removing and refitting certain assemblies, it will be necessary to support the tractor; use stands, jacks or blocks capable
of supporting the weight and arrange them in a triangular pattern to prevent the machine from overturning.
To lift heavy components, use a hoist or crane. Check that wire ropes, chains or fibre slings are not worn and that hooks are
not damaged.
Always use lifting equipment of suitable capacity for the weight of the components to be removed. Ensure lifting equipment is
attached correctly.
When lifting or supporting an assembly or component, manoeuvre the parts slowly and carefully to avoid swinging movements
or collision with other components.
Never work on components suspended from a hoist or crane.
When removing the retaining bolts of a component that could fall, always leave two opposing bolts in place for safety; before
removing these last two bolts, attach the component to suitable lifting equipment or position support blocks.
Any oil or fuel spilled during removal or dismantling operations should be cleaned up as soon as possible to prevent the risk
of slipping and fire.
When refitting electrical wiring looms and wires, ensure that they are properly secured with their original retaining straps or
brackets to prevent the possibility of damage caused by vibration.
Never insert your fingers or hands to check the alignment between fixing holes in components; always use a suitable dowel
of soft material.
When refitting assemblies or components, always use the specified tightening torques; the tightening torques indicated in the
paragraphs regarding assembly/refitting operations have been determined through experimentation and must be scrupulously
adhered to.
When refitting parts that are subject to vibration or that rotate at high speed, take particular care when carrying out final installation checks.

0.1.3 - Safety precautions for removal and refitting operations


When removing or refitting parts, always take the following safety precautions.

Precautions for removal operations


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Unless otherwise indicated, lower the lifting equipment until it the component or assembly rests on the ground.
After disconnecting hydraulic and fuel system pipes, always fit plugs to the open ends of the pipes to prevent ingress of dirt.
Before removing a cylinder, fully retract the piston and secure it in this position using a retaining strap.
Use containers of sufficient capacity when draining oil, coolant or fuel.
Before removing a part from the machine, check for alignment markings indicating the correct assembly position. If necessary,
make new markings to ensure correct assembly.
When unplugging electrical connectors, always grip the connectors firmly to avoid pulling on the wires.
Where necessary, label wires and pipes before removal to avoid confusion when reconnecting.
Check the number and thickness of any shims removed and keep them together in a safe place.
To lift the tractor or any of its main components, use lifting equipment of suitable capacity.
When using eyebolts for lifting components, first check that they are not deformed or damaged; screw them fully home and
then turn the bolt so that the eye is aligned with the lifting hook.
Before removing a part, clean the surrounding area and, after removing the part, cover it to protect it from dirt and dust.

0-3

Introduction
Precautions for refitting operations
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Tighten nuts and screws to the specified tightening torques.


When refitting flexible pipes and cables, take care not to twist or tangle them.
Always fit new seals, O-rings, split pins and safety stop rings; make sure that the ends of the cotter pins are separated and
bent back so that the pin cannot be withdrawn from the hole.
Ensure that circlips are correctly installed in their seatings.
When applying threadlocking compound, first clean the part to remove all oil and grease, then cover the thread evenly applying a few drops of the compound.
When applying sealant, first clean the surface removing all traces of oil and grease and check for dirt or indentations, then
apply the sealant evenly making sure that it forms a continuous film around any fixing holes.
Clean all parts, removing dirt, oxidisation, carbon deposits, burrs and indentations.
Coat all moving parts with a thin film of engine oil.
When reconnecting electrical wiring connectors, first remove all traces of oil, dust and water from the inside of the connector
and then push the two halves together firmly; connectors with locking tabs should be pushed together until the tab engages
the keeper.
Bolt down flanged fittings evenly, tightening the screws gradually in a crosswise pattern.

Precautions to be taken on completion of removal/refitting operations


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If coolant has been drained from the engine, refit the drain plug and pour in new coolant to the correct level. Start the engine
to circulate the coolant and then check the level again and top up.
After removing hydraulic components, top up the hydraulic oil to the specified level. Start the engine to circulate the oil in the
hydraulic circuits and then recheck the level and top up as necessary.
After having removed a variable displacement pump, connect the drain pipe and fill the pump casing with oil through the filler
hole provided.
Grease stub axle housings, cylinder pivot mountings and drive shafts thoroughly after assembly.

0.1.4 - Lifting instructions


DANGER
Components weighing over 25 kg or of significant size must be supported and removed using suitable lifting equipment with wire rope or polyester slings.

Wire ropes - slings


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Use wire ropes or polyester slings of suitable capacity for the parts to be lifted, referring to the following tables:

Table 1
WIRE ROPES (standard twisted S or Z type)
rope mm Capacity (kg)

POLYESTER SLINGS (eye-and-eye - simple loop)


Width (mm) Capacity (kg)

8
10
12
14
16
18

25
50
62
75
100
150

650
1000
1450
2000
2600
3300

620
1740
2500
3460
4500
5710

500
1420
2050
2820
3670
4660

500
1000
1250
1400
2000
2500

400
800
1000
1120
1600
2000

860
1730
2160
2420
3460
4330

700
1410
1760
1980
2820
3530

Lifting capacities are calculated with a safety coefficient.

0-4

The lifting hook should be attached to the central part of the rope or sling; if the hook is attached near the ends of the rope/
sling, this could cause the load to slip during lifting.
Never lift a heavy load using a single rope; always use two or more symmetrically arranged ropes.

Introduction
DANGER
Suspension of a load from a single rope could cause the load to start rotating and consequently cause the rope
strands to untwist or the load to slip; this could lead to serious injury.
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Never lift a heavy load when the two legs of the ropes form a wide angle. the permitted load (kg) decreases in inverse proportion to the angle of suspension; the table below indicates how the permitted load varies according to the angle of suspension
for two 10 mm ropes each with a load capacity of 1000 kg.

Fig. 1

0.1.5 - Tightening torques


Bolts and nuts

DANGER
The tightening torques for certain specific components and special tightening methods are indicated in the relative
assembly paragraphs.
The tightening torques indicated below refer to screws and nuts assembled without lubrication and, where applicable, with anaerobic
threadlocking compound. the values apply to tightening on steel or cast iron components; for soft materials such as aluminium, copper, plastic, sheet metal or panels, the indicated tightening torques must be reduced by 50%.

Table 2
BOLT SIZE
M6x1
M8x1.25
M10x1.5
M12x1.75
M14x2
M16x2
M18x2.5
M20x2.5
M22x2.5
M24x3
M27x3

BOLT CLASS
8.8
Nm
8.0 8.8
19.4 21.4
38.4 42.4
66.5 73.5
106 117
164 182
228 252
321 355
441 487
553 611
816 902

lb.ft.
5.9 6.5
14.3 15.8
28.3 31.2
49.0 54.2
78.1 86.2
120.9 134.1
168.0 185.7
236.6 261.6
325.0 358.9
407.6 450.3
601.4 664.8

10.9
Nm
11.8 13.0
28.5 31.5
56.4 62.4
96.9 107
156 172
241 267
334 370
472 522
647 715
812 898
1198 1324

lb.ft.
8.7 9.6
21.0 23.2
41.6 46.0
71.4 78.9
115.0 126.8
117.6 196.8
246.2 272.7
347.9 384.7
476.8 527.0
598.4 661.8
882.9 975.8

12.9
Nm
13.8 15.2
33.3 36.9
67.4 74.4
115 128
184 204
282 312
391 432
553 611
751 830
950 1050
1419 1569

lb.ft.
10.2 11.2
24.5 27.2
49.7 54.8
84.8 94.3
135.6 150.3
207.8 229.9
288.2 318.4
407.6 450.3
553.5 611.7
700.2 773.9
1045.8 1156.4

0-5

Introduction
FINE

M8x1
M10x1.25
M12x1.25
M12x1.5
M14x1.5
M16x1.5
M18x1.5
M20x1.5
M22x1.5
M24x2

20.8 23.0
40.6 44.8
72.2 79.8
69.4 76.7
114 126
175 194
256 282
355 393
482 532
602 666

15.3 17.0
29.9 33.0
53.2 58.8
51.1 56.5
84.0 92.9
129 143
188.7 207.8
261.6 289.6
355.2 392.1
443.7 490.8

30.6 33.8
59.7 65.9
106 118
102 112
168 186
257 285
375 415
523 578
708 782
884 978

22.6 24.9
44.0 48.6
78.1 87.0
75.2 82.5
123.8 137.1
189.4 210.0
276.4 305.9
385.5 426.0
521.8 576.3
651.5 720.8

35.8 39.6
71.2 78.6
126 140
121 134
199 220
301 333
439 485
611 676
821 908
1035 1143

26.4 29.2
52.5 57.9
92.9 103.2
89.2 98.8
146.7 162.1
221.8 245.4
323.5 357.4
450.3 498.2
605.1 669.2
762.8 842.4

Fittings
The tightening torques indicated below refer to fittings assembled on any material.

Table 3
METRIC

Straight end fittings

Thread size Wrench


M10x1.25
M12x1.25
M14x1.5
M16x1.5
M18x1.5
M20x1.5
M22x1.5
M26x1.5
M27x2
M33x2
M42x2
M48x2
G 1/8
G 1/4
G 3/8
G 1/2
G 3/4
G 1
G 1 1/4
G 1 1/2

17
19
19
19
22
24
27
30
36
36
41
50
60
17
19
19
22
24
27
30
36
41
46
50
60

T end fittings

Torque Nm Wrench
10%
14
14
14
17
30
17
40
19
48
22
58
24
65
27
73
30
95
36
100
36
160
41
250
50
305
60
13
14
13
37
19
37
53
24
73
27
73
100
36
160
41
160
250
50
305
60

L end fittings

90 end fittings

Torque Nm Wrench
10%
14
14
14
17
30
17
40
19
48
22
58
24
65
27
73
30
95
36
100
36
160
41
250
50
305
60
13
14

Torque Nm Wrench
10%
14
14
14
30
17
40
19
48
22
58
24
65
27
73
30
95
36
100
36
160
41
250
50
305
60
13
14

Torque Nm
10%
14
30
40
48
58
65
73
95
100
160
250
305
13

37

19

37

19

37

53
73

24
27

53
73

24
27

53
73

100
160

36
41

100
160

36
41

100
160

250
305

50
60

250
305

50
60

250
305

Plugs

Table 4
Hex plugs

Thread size
0-6

Wrench

Threaded plugs with hex socket head

Torque Nm 10%

Wrench

Torque Nm 10%

Introduction
METRIC

M6x1
M8x1
M10x1
M10x1.25
M10x1.5
M12x1.25
M12x1.5
M12x1.75
M14x1.5
M14x2
M16x1.5
M16x2
M18x1.5
M18x2.5
M20x1.5
M22x1.5
M24x1.5
M24x2
M27x2
M28x1.5
M30x1.5
M32x1.5
M35x1.5
M40x1.5
G 1/8
G 1/4
G 3/8
G 1/2
G 5/8
G 3/4
G 1

10
13
13
13
13
17
17
17
19
19
22
22
17
17
19

22
22
22

22

14
19
22
19
22
22
22

10
12
14
14
14
30
30
30
40
40
48
48
58
58
65

80
80
100

130

13
37
53
73
85
100
160

10

12
12

17

19
22
24

14

30

40

48

58

73
80

110

150
180
225

Fittings with seal at 37


Table 5

Thread size
7/16 - 20
1/2 - 20
9/16 - 18
3/4 - 16
7/8 - 14
1 1/16 - 12
1 3/16 - 12
1 5/16 - 12
1 5/8 - 12
1 7/8 - 12
2 1/2 - 12

Wrench
14
16
17
22
27
32
36
36
38
50
60
75

Torque Nm 10%
13
19
28
47
76
110
110
138
155
215
290
345

0-7

Introduction
Fittings for pipes with banjo union
These tightening torques refer to tightening the fitting with new copper sealing washers.

Table 6
Unions for one-way fittings

Thread size

Wrench

M8x1
M8x1.25
M10x1
M10x1.25
M12x1.25
M12x1.5
M14x1.5
M16x1.5
M18x1.5
M20x1.5
M22x1.5
M24x1.5
M26x1.5
M28x1.5
M30x1.5
M35x2
M38x1.5
M42x2
M45x1.5
M50x2
M52x1.5
M65x2

13

13
17

19
22
22
27

32

36

41

50

60

Torque
10%
14

20
30

40
48
58
65

80

110

180

250

320

Unions for three-way fittings Unions for four-way fittings

Nm Wrench
12

Torque
10%
14

14

17
19
22
24

27

32

36

46

55

60
75

20

30
40
48
58

73

95

130

200

280

320
450

Nm Wrench

Torque
10%

14

17
19
22
24

27

32

36

46

55

60
75

20

30
40
48
58

73

95

130

200

280

320
450

Nm

0.1.6 - Threadlockers, adhesives, sealants and lubricants


Table 7

FUNCTION
THREADLOCKER

0-8

NAME
DESCRIPTION
Loctite 222 Colour: opaque fluorescent Anaerobic product suitable for low-strength locking of retaining,
purple
adjustment and precision fasteners. All traces of lubricant must
first be removed using the specific activator.
Loctite 242 Colour: fluorescent blue
Anaerobic product that prevents loosening of all types of nut and
bolt; used in place of conventional mechanical locking systems.
Used for medium-strength locking. All traces of lubricant must
first be removed using the specific activator.
Loctite 243 Colour: opaque fluorescent Alternative product to 242 ; oil tolerant and so can be used on
blue
lightly lubricated surfaces without prior use of activator.
Loctite 270 Colour: fluorescent green
Anaerobic product for high-strength locking of bolts and studs
that do not normally require disassembly. Parts must be heated
to approximately 80C for removal. All traces of lubricant must
first be removed using the specific activator.

Introduction
DEGREASERS
Loctite 703
AND ACTIVATORS

SEALANTS
(for
faces and fittings)

INSTANT
SIVES

ADHE-

SEALANTS
CONE

SILI-

SEALANTS
URETHANE

POL-

Product used for degreasing and cleaning parts prior to application of Loctite anaerobic products; after drying, promotes uniform
curing of threadlockers
Loctite 747
Product used specifically for treatment of passive metals prior to
use of slow-cure anaerobic threadlockers (series 5 and 6). Can
also be used to increase cure speed at low temperatures or in applications where there are large gaps between the parts.
Loctite 510 Colour: red
Super-rapid anaerobic sealant for sealing between rigid metal
faces; can eliminate the need for conventional gaskets as it can
fill gaps up to 0.4 mm. Does not shrink and therefore fasteners
do not need re-tightening to specified torque values after curing.
Loctite 542 Colour: Brown
Anaerobic product used as a liquid sealant for threaded fittings
up to 3/4 gas; rapid curing and parts may be disassembled with
ordinary tools.
Loctite 554 Colour: red
Anaerobic sealant and locking compound used for sealing cooling and industrial fluid circuits. Slow curing, also suitable for use
on non-ferrous alloys
Loctite 572 Colour: White
Anaerobic sealant and locking compound used for sealing pipes
and threaded fittings up to 2 in diameter. Very slow curing on
most metal surfaces.
Loctite 573 Colour: green
Thixotropic anaerobic product used for sealing joints between
metal faces. Ensures total contact between surfaces with maximum tolerance of 0.10 mm, filling microvoids caused by flatness
errors. Very slow curing on most metal surfaces and requires
prior application of an activator.
Loctite 576 Colour: brown
Anaerobic product used as a liquid thread sealant for large diameter threaded fittings (up to 2). Very slow curing; also suitable for
non-ferrous alloys and parts requiring subsequent removal.
Loctite 401 Colour: colourless
Cyanoacrylate instant adhesive suitable for bonding a wide range
of acidic and porous materials including, ceramics, wood, rubber and plastic (excluding polyolefin). Curing takes place in a few
seconds as an effect of the condensed humidity present on the
surfaces to be bonded, and is independent of environmental conditions.
Loctite 495 Colour: colourless
Cyanoacrylate instant adhesive suitable for bonding a rubber,
plastics and metal in any combination.
Silastic 738 (Dow Corning) Colour: milky One-part silicone adhesive/sealant, non dhrinking, ready for use.
white
Cures on exposure to air to form a rubbery solid and obviates the
need for conventional seals on flexible joints, filling gaps greater
than 1 mm.
Dirko Transparent Colour: transparent
One-part silicone adhesive/sealant, shrinking, ready for use.
Cures rapidly when exposed to humidity in the air to form a rubbery solid; resistant to high temperatures.
Betaseal HV3 (Gurit Essex) Colour: black Polyurethane prepolymer based adhesive/sealant, high viscosity,
suitable for permanent, high-strength flexible bonding. Slow curing, used for bonding glass to frames, wire mesh, metal plates,
etc. surfaces must be degreased with primer.

0-9

Introduction
RETAINING COM- Loctite 601 Colour: fluorescent green
POUNDS

LUBRICANTS

Anaerobic, fast-curing, high-strength adhesive. Suitable for sealing and retaining cylindrical assemblies with gap clearances of
up to 0.10 mm; used for retaining rotors, gears, bearings, pulleys,
bushes etc. on shafts.
Loctite 638 Colour: fluorescent green
Anaerobic structural adhesive, quick-curing, very high strength;
suitable for bonding cylindrical parts in non-ferrous alloys.
Loctite 648 Colour: fluorescent green
Anaerobic structural adhesive, quick-curing, high-strength; suitable for bonding cylindrical parts, permanent retention of threaded parts, sealing of refrigeration systems, retention of bearings,
etc. Alternative to Loctite 601 in high-temperature applications.
Loctite 986/AVX Colour: Fluorescent red Anaerobic sealant/retaining compound for metal cylindrical parts.
Slow-curing, high-strength, heat-resistant and resistant to chemical attack. Parts must be first treated with an activator.
Grease (NLGI 2 EP ASTM D217: 265/295) Multi-purpose Lithium grease used for lubrication of seals, to prevent oxidization and to facilitate assembly operations.
Molikote (Dow Corning)
Anti-wear compound, contains Molybdenum bisulphate, used
neat or diluted with engine oil for assembly of main engine bearings.
Vaseline
Neutral pH compound used to protect battery terminals against
oxidization and corrosion.
Engine oil 10W - 30
Used to dilute Molikote anti-wear lubricant during assembly of
main engine bearings.

0.1.7 - Conversion factors


Conversion from British to metric units

Table 8
inch x 25.40
foot x 0.305
yard x 0.914
Eng.miles x 1.609
Sq.in. x 6.452
Sq.ft. x 0.093
Sq.yard x 0.835
Cu.in. x 16.39
Cu.ft. x 28.36
Cu.yard x 0.763
Imp.gall. x 4.547
US gall. x 3.785
pint x 0.568
quart x 1.137
US.gpm x 3.785
oz. x 0.028
lb. x 0.454
lb.ft. x 0.139
lb.in. x 17.87
psi x 0.070
lb./Imp.gall x 0.100
lb./US.gall x 0.120
lb./cu.ft. x 16.21
lb.ft. x 1.356
psi x 1.379

= mm
=m
= km
= cm
= m
= cm
= m
= litres

= ,/min
= kg
= kgm
= kg/m
= kg/cm
= kg/,
= kg/m
= Nm
= bar

Conversion from metric to British units

Table 9
mm x 0.0394
m x 3.281
m x 1,094
km x 0.622
cm x 0.155
m x 10.77
0-10

= inch
= foot
= yard
= Brit.miles
= Sq.in.
= Sq.ft.

Introduction
m x 1.197
cm x 0.061
m x 0.035
m x 1.311
litres x 0.220
litres x 0.264
litres x 1.762
litres x 0.880
,/min x 0.2642
kg x 35.25
kg x 2.203
kgm x 7.233
kg/m x 0.056
kg/cm x 14.22
kg/, x 10.00
kg/, x 8.333
kg/m x 0.062
Nm x 0.737
bar x 14.503

= Sq.yard
= Cu.in.
= Cu.ft
= Cu.yard
= Imp.gall.
= US gall.
= pint
= quart
= US.gpm
= oz.
= lb.
= lb.ft.
= lb.in.
= psi
= lb./Imp.gal.
= lb./US.gal.
= lb./cu.ft.
= lb.ft.
= psi

0-11

Introduction

PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK

0-12

10 - Technical
characteristics

10-1

Technical characteristics
10.1 - Transmission
10.1.1 - Transmission
Introduction
l

The tractor in this series are equipped with a 4-speed transmission with forward/reverse shuttle and three speed ranges. The
main gearbox and the forward/reverse shuttle are synchronised, while the 3-speed range gearbox is not synchronised.
The rear transmission casing also houses the drive train for the rear PTO, which is supplied in a single version (540-1000-groundspeed). The rear PTO is of the mechanical type with non-synchronised gears. The PTO can also be supplied with a midmounted output shaft that is only enabled when the 1000 rpm PTO speed is selected.

Fig. 2 - Main assemblies


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Clutch housing
Shuttle gearbox assembly
Range gearbox and differential assembly
Rear PTO
Mid PTO

Description
l

10-2

The transmission receives drive from the engine and transmits it through the dual clutch assembly (1) (main drive clutch (1a)
and rear PTO clutch (1b)), the main gearbox (3), the shuttle (2) and the range gearbox (4) to the bevel drive gears (5). Drive is
then transmitted to the final drive units (6) which mount the brake assemblies providing both service brake and parking brake
functions.

Technical characteristics

Fig. 3 - Power flow diagram

Drive transmission

Fig. 4 - 1st gear, forward drive and high range (H) selected

10-3

Technical characteristics

Fig. 5 - 1st gear, reverse drive and low range (L) selected

Fig. 6 - 3rd gear, forward drive and medium range (M) selected

10-4

Technical characteristics
Clutch housing

Fig. 7 - Clutch housing


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Flywheel
Rear PTO clutch plate
Main clutch plate
Rear PTO clutch sleeve
Main clutch sleeve
Sleeves support
Main clutch release fork return spring
PTO clutch release bearing
PTO clutch thrust plate
Main clutch thrust bearing
Main clutch control fork
Main clutch control shaft
PTO clutch release fork
PTO clutch control shaft
PTO clutch release forks return spring

10-5

Technical characteristics
Gearbox and shuttle assembly

Fig. 8 - Gearbox and shuttle assembly


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

10-6

Forward driving gear


Forward/reverse gear synchronizer
Reverse driving gear
Input shaft
Main shaft
4th speed driven gear
3rd-4th speed synchronizer
3rd speed gear
2nd speed driven gear
1st-2nd speed synchronizer
1st speed driven gear
Secondary shaft
1st-2nd speed selector fork
3rd-4th speed selector rod
1st-2nd speed selector rod
3rd-4th speed selector fork
Forward/reverse drive selector fork
Forward/reverse drive selector rod
Ball
Spring
Spacer

Technical characteristics
4WD - Range gears assembly

Fig. 9 - 4WD - Range gears assembly


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Secondary shaft
Driven gear
L and M range driving shaft
Pinion
Groundspeed PTO driving gear
Groundspeed PTO drive shaft
4WD driven gear
4WD engagement sleeve
4WD output shaft
L and M range driven gear
4WD drive gear
4WD engagement control shaft
Bush
Shoe
2nd speed driven gear
1st speed driven gear
1st speed synchronizer

10-7

Technical characteristics
Pinion and differential assembly

Fig. 10 - Pinion and differential assembly


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Pinion
Nut
4WD drive gear
Pinion bearing
Differential lock sleeve
Differential carrier
Differential crown wheel
Planet gear
Side gear
Differential housing

10.1.2 - Rear PTO and Mid PTO


Description
l
l

1000 rpm (with engine at 2733 rpm)


2000 rpm (with engine at 3052 rpm)

The mid PTO rotation speed is selected via the rear PTO speed selection lever and the drive is taken directly from the rear PTO
driven gear.

10-8

Technical characteristics
540 PTO

Fig. 11 - 540 PTO


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

PTO control shaft


Sleeve.
PTO driving shaft
540 PTO driven gear
PTO output shaft

10-9

Technical characteristics
540-750 PTO

Fig. 12 - 540-750 PTO


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

10-10

PTO control shaft


Sleeve.
PTO driving shaft
540 - 750 PTO driven gear.
PTO output shaft

Technical characteristics
540-750 PTO and Mid PTO dt1

Fig. 13 - 540-750 PTO and Mid PTO dt1


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

PTO control shaft.


Sleeve.
PTO driving shaft
540 - 750 PTO driven gear.
PTO output shaft
Mid PTO intermediate gear
Mid PTO driven gear.
Mid PTO output shaft.

10-11

Technical characteristics
540-750 PTO and Mid PTO dt2

Fig. 14 - 540-750 PTO and Mid PTO dt2


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

10-12

PTO control shaft


Sleeve
PTO driving shaft
540 - 750 PTO driven gear
PTO output shaft
Mid PTO intermediate gear
Mid PTO driven gear.
Mid PTO output shaft.

Technical characteristics
10.2 - Rear axle

10.2.1 - Brakes and rear axle assembly

Fig. 15 - Brakes and rear axle assembly


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Drive shaft
Driven gear
Axle shaft
Final drive housing
Steel disc
Braking device
Friction discs
Gaiter

10-13

Technical characteristics
10.3 - Front axle
10.3.1 - Front axle

Characteristics and components

Fig. 16 - Characteristics and components


Table 10
Tractor

Version

Track width (X)

Toe-in (X-Y)

55 HP
45 HP
35 HP

Standard
Standard
Standard
Narrow

1200
1050
1050
1016

+0/-2
+0/-2
+0/-2
+0/-2

10-14

Maximum steering
angle (Z)

max. 57
max 57
max 57
max 50

Technical characteristics
Steering cylinder

Fig. 17 - Steering cylinder


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Cylinder end cap


Spacer (standard version)
Cylinder
Piston
Spacer (narrow version)

Differential - pinion - final drive unit

Fig. 18 - Differential - pinion - final drive unit


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Axle shaft
Input bevel gear pair
Hub support
Oil seal
Axle casing
10-15

Technical characteristics

Fig. 18 - Differential - pinion - final drive unit


6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

10-16

Flange
Output bevel gear pair
Steering knuckle housing
Shaft
Spacer
Differential lock engagement fork
Differential lock engagement piston
Pinion
Spacer
Differential carrier
Side gear
Planet gear
Differential crown wheel
Differential lock engagement sleeve
Lever return spring
Shoe

Technical characteristics
10.4 - Hydraulic system
10.4.1 - Gear pump

Fig. 19 - Gear pump


Table 11
Characteristics

Displacement
Maximum operating pressure
Maximum flow rate

Pump A

11 cc/rev
180 bar
33.0 l/min.

Pump B

5.5 cc/rev
100 bar
16.5 l/min.

Notes

at 3000 rpm engine revs

10-17

Technical characteristics
10.4.2 - Differential lock control assembly

Fig. 20 - Differential lock control assembly


Key
1.
2.
3.
4.

Differential lock control solenoid valve


Pressure reducing valve spring
Pressure reducing valve spool
Filter (25 m)
l
l
l
l

10-18

P -Supply to assembly
L - Lubrication of gearbox/shuttle assembly
U - Differential lock control
T - Return to transmission housing

Technical characteristics

Fig. 21 - Cross-sectional views of the differential lock control assembly


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Differential lock control solenoid valve


Pressure reducing valve spring
Pressure reducing valve spool
Filter (25 m)
Cap
l

T - Return to transmission housing

Function
The differential lock control serves to direct the oil pressure from the power steering to the front differential control piston. In order to
limit the oil pressure sent to the differential lock piston, the control assembly incorporates a pressure relief valve set to 12 bar. The
excess oil not used by the solenoid valve is used for lubrication of the gearbox/shuttle assembly.

10-19

Technical characteristics

Fig. 22 - Function
Operation
l

The pressurised oil from the power steering reaches chamber P and chamberA through passage B. If there is no demand from
the actuators, the oil stays in chamber P where the pressure starts to increase. When the force exerted on the spool (1) by
the oil pressure in chamber A exceeds the force of the spring (2), the spool shifts downwards, thereby connecting chamber
P with chamber L and regulating the pressure in chamber P1 to 12 bar. Surplus oil is thus directed through chamber L to the
gearbox/shuttle assembly where it is used for lubrication
If the solenoid valve (3) is not energised, the oil stops in chamber P1 and chamber U is connected to chamber T and the oil
is returned to tank.
If the solenoid valve (3) is energised, (as shown in the drawing), chamber P1 is connected to chamber U and oil is sent to the
control piston of the front differential lock.

10.4.3 - Steering circuit

10-20

Technical characteristics
Function
The steering circuit sends oil to the power steering, which in turn, according to the request from the operator, sends oil pressure to
the steering circuit.

Fig. 23 - Function
Operation
Gear pump (1) draws in oil (through filter (2)) from the transmission casing and sends it to the power steering (3). The excess oil not
used by the power steering (3) is sent to the differential lock control (5) and used to operate the front axle differential lock piston (6)
and for lubrication of the gearbox and shuttle assembly (7). When the operator turns the steering wheel, part of the oil supplied from
the pump (1) is sent to the the steering cylinder (4) which steers the tractor.

10-21

Technical characteristics
10.4.4 - Power steering valve

Fig. 24 - Hydraulic diagram

Operation
l

The power steering system consists of a directional control valve with a rotary spool; these components feature hydrostatic
operation.
When the steering wheel is turned, the rotary spool control valve sends the oil from the pump to one side or the other of the
steering cylinder. The rotary spool ensures that that the volume of oil delivered to the cylinder is proportional to the angle
through which the steering wheel is turned.
In the event of a malfunction of the power steering pump, the rotary spool valve automatically functions as a manual pump to
ensure emergency steering.

Characteristics
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10-22

Pressure relief valve setting: 100105 bar


Displacement: 80 cm/rev

Technical characteristics
10.4.5 - Remote control valve

Fig. 25 - Remote control valve (4-way)

10-23

Technical characteristics

Fig. 26 - Remote control valve elements (4-way)


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

10-24

Ball
Spring
Cap
Remote valve spool n2
Spool return spring
Pin
Detent device
Bush
Screw
Spool return spring
Remote valve spool n1

Technical characteristics
Hydraulic lift control valve

Fig. 27 - Hydraulic lift control valve


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P- Control valve supply


T - Drain
L - Lubrication of gearbox/shuttle assembly
A - Lift control

Fig. 28 - Remove lift control valve elements


1.
2.
3.

Cap
Rate of drop control valve spool (Valvematic)
Plunger
10-25

Technical characteristics

Fig. 28 - Remove lift control valve elements


4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.

Rate of drop regulator valve spring


Spacer
Lift control spool return spring
Lift control spool
Lift control piston
One-way valve actuator piston
Valve stem
One-way valve
Inlet valve
Pilot/enabling valve
Pilot/enabling valve spring
Spacer
Enabling valve spring
Enabling valve
Lubrication pressure control valve
Lubrication pressure control valve spring
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P - Control valve supply


T - Drain
L -Lubrication of gearbox/shuttle assembly
A - Lift control

Function
The function of the lift control valve is to direct oil pressure to the lifting cylinder, thereby allowing the implement to be raised and
lowered. It incorporates the following valves:
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10-26

One-way valve (1)


Rate of drop control valve (Valvematic) (2)
Inlet valve (3)
Enabling valve (4)
Pilot/enabling valve (5)
Lubrication pressure control valve (6)

Technical characteristics

Fig. 29 - Function
Operation
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The lift is in neutral position when the the oil pressure from pump (1) reaches line A. As all the passages are closed, the pressure increases and when the force exerted on the enabling valve (2) overcomes that of the spring (3), the valve (2) shifts to the
right to allow oil to flow in line B and on to the gearbox/shuttle assembly where it is used for lubrication (4). To prevent sudden
changes in pressure, a pressure control valve (5) is installed on line B, to limit the lubrication oil pressure.

10-27

Technical characteristics

Fig. 30 - Neutral Position


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10-28

When the spool (6) is shifted to the right, the lift lowering operation begins, which can be divided into two stages. Stage 1:
m When the spool (6) shifts, line C is connected to line line D; this allows the piston (8) to move to the right thereby connecting line F with line I (drain), thereby allowing the pressure to reduce in line F.

Technical characteristics

Fig. 31 - Lowering stage 1


l

And in stage 2:
m When the piston (8) moves to the right, the ball (9) is also moved to the right to connect chamber M of the check valve
(10) with line F. Consequently the pressure in chamber M is decreased and the force exerted on the piston (8) by the
pressure in chamber N pushes the valve (10) to right, thereby connecting line P with line F and allowing the oil to flow
and the lift to be be lowered. Valve (11) is used to regulate the rate of drop; when moved downwards, it limits the flow
of oil between port T and line P.

10-29

Technical characteristics

Fig. 32 - Lowering stage 2


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10-30

When the raise control is operated, spool (6) is shifted to the left; this opens the connecting passages between lines C and E,
G and H, A and F. When the forces exerted by the pressure in line F overcome the force exerted by the pressure in chamber
M, the valve (10) is shifted to the right and oil can flow into line P and from there, through valve (11), to port T and the lifting
cylinder (12). To increase the lifting speed i.e. the flow of oil to the lifting cylinder (12), a one-way valve (13) is installed in parallel with the spool (6); this ensures that oil is only supplied during the lifting stage.

Technical characteristics

Fig. 33 - Raising

10-31

Technical characteristics

PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK

10-32

20 - Calibrations and
electronic diagnosis

20-1

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
20.1 - Diagnostic tool screens

20.1.1 - Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch


Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch control unit
Introduction
This control unit is an integral part of the system used to reduce the noise level of the tractors. The main characteristics of the control
unit are:
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Automatic operating mode


Coolant temperature control
Air temperature control
Coolant thermostat

Description
The Baruffaldi system is comprised of the following elements:
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Electromagnetic clutch
Sensor to measure ambient temperature sensor inside the control unit
Coolant temperature sensor
Coolant thermostat
Connection to alarm warning light on instrument
Electronic control unit
Wiring

The electronic control unit uses the following inputs/outputs to control the electromagnetic clutch:
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Analogue input for coolant temperature sensor signal


Digital input for coolant thermostat signal
Digital input for alarm 4 enabling signal
An output for control of the electromagnetic clutch
1 output for control of the alarm warning light

Below is the electrical control diagram of the electronic control unit 2.8519.035.0.

20-2

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis

Fig. 34

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Instrument alarm warning light


Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch
(*) Connect to +12 V to enable display of alarm 4
Coolant temperature sensor
Coolant thermostat

Below is a view of the control unit connector 2.8519.035.0.

Table 12
Pin 17 - NC

Pin 16 - NC

Pin 9 - Diag

Pin 8 - NC

Pin 15 - Re- Pin 14 - NC


lay 1
Pin 7 - NC
Pin 6 - NC

Pin 13 - NC
Pin 5 -NC

Pin 4 - NC

Pin 12 - Tem- Pin 11 - Ther- Pin 10 - V


perature
mostat
Bat Pin 3 - NC
Pin 2 - NC
Pin 1 - NC

The NC pins are not connected.

Below is the electrical control diagram of the electronic control unit 2.8519.056.0.

20-3

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis

Fig. 35

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Instrument alarm warning light


Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch
(*) Connect to +12 V to enable display of alarm 4
Coolant temperature sensor
Coolant thermostat

Below is a view of the control unit connector 2.8519.056.0.

Table 13
A8 - Thermo- A7 - CFG1
stat
B8 - Coolant B7 - CFG2
temperature
C8 - NC
C7 - Diag
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A6 - NC

A5 - NC

A4 - NC

A3 - NC

B6 - NC

B5 - NC

C6 - NC

C5 - NC

B4 - L indica- B3 - NC
tor light
C4 - NC
C3 - NC

A2 - NC

A1 - NC

B2 - Relay 1

B1 - V Bat +

C2 - NC

C1 - V Bat -

The NC pins are not connected.


IMPORTANT
Pins A7 and B7 should be interconnected on the connector. The absence of this connection will cause an incorrect
interpretation of the coolant temperature.

20-4

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
Operation
The operation of the control unit is based mainly on two temperature sensors. The air temperature sensor reading is used to determine which coolant temperature threshold to apply.
Below is the operating flow chart.

Fig. 36
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E Off = electromagnetic clutch off


E On = electromagnetic clutch on
Po = power on
Se = summer thresholds
Si = winter thresholds
20-5

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
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S Off = warning light off


S On = warning light on
Ta = air temperature
T On = thermostat on
Tw = coolant temperature
Twl = threshold off
Twh = threshold on

The following graph shows the threshold values used by the control unit.

Fig. 37
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T1 = coolant temperature
T2 = ambient temperature
T3 = winter temperature for non-intervention of control unit
T4 = winter temperature for intervention of control unit
T5 = summer temperature for non-intervention of control unit
T6 = summer temperature for intervention of control unit
T7 = low ambient temperature
T8 = high ambient temperature

The thermostat ensures safety in the event of a malfunction of the coolant tempearture sensor. If the thermostat is tripped both the
electromagnetic clutch and the alarm warning light will be activated. If the electromagnetic clutch is activated due to the coolant temperature being above the threshold value, then the alarm warning light is not activated. In this application the oil temperature sensor
is not used. As an option, the air temperature sensor located inside the control unit can be used to check that the unit is operating
within its limits. If the temperature exceeds 80C, an alarm is signalled (see diagnostics). The option can be enabled by connecting
pin 9 (DIAG) to 12V.
Tolerance limits
Below are described the maximum tolerance limits calculated for the temperature sensors used.
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Air temperature sensor

The sensor in question is an NTC decvice installed inside the control unit. The NTC sensor has a specific tolerance of 2% while the
pull-up resistor has a specific tolerance of 1%. The sum of the tolerances makes for a maximum error of 3%, which in terms of
the temperatures in consideration, is equivalent to a maximum error of 0.5C.
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20-6

Coolant temperature sensor

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
This sensor, which is installed on the engine, has a maximum error of 1C . The pull-up resistance in the control unit has a specific
tolerance of 1%. The following table indicates the minimum and maximum threshold values in accordance with the tolerance limits
obtained with an 8 bit converter (2.8519.035.0).

Table 14
Nominal thresholds (C)

82
87
90
95

Minimum thresholds (C)

81
85
89
93

Maximum thresholds (C)

83
88
92
96

The temperatures detected by the control unit will always between contained within the minimum and maximum threshold values
according to tolerance trends. It is necessary to add 1C to these thresholds due to the error of the microprocessors analogue/digital
converter. Consequently the maximum possible error is 3C.
The use of a microprocessor with 10-bit converter will improve sensor tolerance limits, bringing them to within -1.5C +1C. The
following table indicates the minimum and maximum threshold values in accordance with the tolerance limits obtained with an 10 bit
converter (2.8519.056.0).

Table 15
Nominal thresholds (C)

82
87
90
95

Minimum thresholds (C)

80.5
86
89
94

Maximum thresholds (C)

83
88
91
96

The error caused by the converter increases the total by 0.5C, bringing the maximum error to -2C +1.5C.
Diagnostics
The control unit monitors the coolant temperature sensor connection and its own operating temperature. If a fault is detected in the
coolant temperature sensor, the control unit activates the electromagnetic clutch.
The following table lists the various fault conditions that generate alarms.

Table 16
Error code

Notes

Coolant temperature >130C or short to


earth
Coolant temperature <-30C or sensor not
connected

3
4

Control unit temperature >80C

Possible cause of the fault

Short to earth of sensor/control unit connection - Sensor faulty - Control unit faulty
Sensor/control unit connection open - Sensor/earth connection open - Sensor faulty
- Control unit faulty
Temperature in engine compartment high Control unit faulty

IMPORTANT
Alarm 4 is normally disabled, and therefore must be enabled in order to be operational (see Operation).

The condition is considered a fault if it lasts for at least 0.5 seconds. If the cause of the alarm is removed the alarm code will no
longer be displayed.
Faults are signalled by flashing codes on the indicator light. The code comprises a sequence of flashes identifying the type of fault,
with a duration of 0.2 seconds repeated continuously every 1.2 seconds. Below is an example display of alarm code 2.

20-7

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis

Fig. 38

20.1.2 - Operator seated sensor ECU (p/n 2.8519.106.0)


Purpose

The purpose of this document is to describe the functions of the operator seated sensor ECU p/n 2.8519.106.0.

Description of the system


This ECU is designed and built to function continuously, even with the ignition switch OFF.
The function of this ECU is to indicate the status of the handbrake depending on whether or not the operator is seated and on the
ignition switch position. The ECU also has an input for the reverse selected audible warning signal.
To manage these functions, the ECU has the following pins:
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Power (+ direct from battery)


Ground
Operator seated sensor input
Seat sensor type selector input
Handbrake selector
Ignition switch input
Reverse selected signal input
Indicator lamp output

Operator seated sensor


There are two possible types of operator seated sensor:
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digital or
analogue.

The digital sensor consists of a normally open contact (N.O.) which is closed when the operator sits on the seat.
The analogue sensor is practically a digital sensor with the addition of resistors enabling diagnosis of the state of the sensor itself.
This sensor is recognised as a 2 KOhm resistor when the operator is not seated and as a 500 Ohm resistor when the operator is
seated.
A 1 KOhm resistor within the ECU connected to the 5V power line enables accurate diagnosis of the state of the sensor:

Table 17
ADC reading

2-3 V dc (400mV)
1-3 V dc (400mV)
V dc
GND
Any value exceeding the values
indicated above

Condition

Sensor connected, operator not seated


Sensor connected, operator seated
Sensor not connected or short-circuited to battery voltage
Sensor signal short-circuiting to ground
Sensor and/or connection malfunction

Notes

Alarm state
Alarm state
Alarm state

Note: verify values given in relation to hardware configuration.


Operator seated sensor type selection
To allow the ECU to correctly manage the operator seated signal, one of its pins is used to indicate the type of sensor connected to
the ECU itself. If the pin is not connected, an analogue sensor is used, if the pin is connected to +12V, a digital sensor is used.
Handbrake sensor
The state of the handbrake is detected by a normally open switch (N.O.), which closes and forms a circuit to ground when the brake
is activated.
Ignition switch input
The ignition switch input indicates the on/off state of the tractor.
20-8

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
The ECU implements the correct system management strategy in relation to this state.
Reverse input
This input is used to activate an intermittent audible warning signal, with a duty cycle of 0.5 seconds ON and 0.6 seconds OFF,
indicating that reverse is selected.
This input is activated with a 12V signal, and the relative function is only enabled with the ignition ON.
Indicator lamp output
This output is used to indicate the state of the handbrake in relation to the ignition switch state and the seat sensor state.

System function
The ECU is powered directly by the battery and is always on, in two possible modes:
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key OFF mode,


key ON mode.
WARNING
In both modes, the handbrake released state is indicated by a continuous audible warning signal and by the indicator
lamp flashing with a duty cycle of 0.5 seconds ON and 0.5 seconds OFF.
WARNING
If the handbrake released audible warning signal and indicator lamp are active when changing from key OFF to key
ON state and vice versa, both signals continue without interruption unless the conditions necessary for activation no
longer exist in the new ignition switch state.

Key OFF
In this ignition switch state, the ECU monitors the handbrake state only.
The ECU monitors the following two conditions:
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Transitions between key ON / key OFF,


Transitions between handbrake active/deactivated.

In this mode, the ECU implements low power consumption strategies to keep maximum current absorption within 2mA.
Transition from key ON -> key OFF
When the ECU detects a transition in the state of the ignition switch from ON to OFF, it queries the state of the handbrake and,
if the handbrake is not engaged, indicates this condition with an audible warning signal [buzzer] and a visual warning [warning lamp
output] for 10 seconds. The warning signals are stopped if the handbrake is applied.
Key OFF mode
When the machine is switched off, the ECU monitors the state of the handbrake only, and activates the audible/visual warning signals
for 10 seconds whenever there is a transition in the handbrake state from active to deactivated. The warning signals are stopped if
the handbrake is applied.

Key ON
In this ignition switch state, the ECU monitors all input signals. The main function of the ECU in this mode is to verify whether the
operator is seated in relation to the handbrake state.
When the ECU detects that the handbrake is released without the operator seated, it activates the audible [buzzer] and visual [warning lamp] warning signals for as long as the conditions persists - specifically, until the handbrake is applied or the operator sits in
the seat.
The state of the operator seated signal is verified every 200 mS.
The operator not seated state is recognised after a period of 2 seconds.
The handbrake state is always recognised with a latency of 0.5 seconds.
Reverse input management
If the reverse input is activated, the ECU activates the buzzer with priority over any other internal request.
The ECU restores normal buzzer management one second after the signal is deactivated.
If the reverse signal is activated while the audible/visual handbrake released signals are active, the handbrake released warning
sound is stopped and superseded by the reverse warning, while the visual handbrake released warning continues.
The recognition time for the ON/OFF signal is 0.1 seconds.

20-9

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
Sensor type selection input management
The ECU identifies the state of this input to determine the type of sensor connected and manage the relative signal correctly.
If the input is OPEN, an analogue sensor is used, whereas if the input is connected to +12V, a digital sensor is used [see previous
chapter].
This input is monitored continuously with a recognition time of 0.2 seconds.
When the ECU is powered up for the first time, it will not be functional until the type of seat sensor connected has been recognised.
Seat sensor management
The ECU uses the seat sensor signal to verify whether or not the operator is seated. The ECU monitors voltages for both digital and
analogue sensors.
** Digital sensor diagnosis
The ECU recognises an operator seated state if the voltage is 1.0V.
A voltage of 4.0V indicates that the operator is not seated.
Any voltage between these two values is considered a fault and generates an intermittent audible alarm signal consisting of 5 pulses
with a duty cycle of 0.2 seconds ON / 0.2 seconds OFF repeated at 1 second intervals. The audible warning signal remains active
until the fault is rectified.
** Analogue sensor diagnosis
When an analogue sensor is used, if a voltage other than those associated for the operator seated and operator not seated states is
measured, the ECU uses the buzzer to indicate the respective diagnostic code as follows:
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Short circuit to ground [Vin < 0.5v] = 3 pulses of 0.2 seconds ON/ 0.2 seconds OFF + 1 second pause.
Short circuit to +12V or sensor not connected [Vin > 4.5v]: 2 pulses of 0.2 seconds ON / 0.2 seconds OFF + 1 second
pause.
Values not within valid range: 4 pulses of 0.2 seconds ON / 0.2 seconds OFF 1 second pause.

The diagnostic signal is stopped as soon as the seat sensor signal returns within valid ranges.

ECU powered up for first time


When the ECU is connected to the battery for the first time, irrespective of the states of any of the inputs, it produces the following
audible signal sequence:
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0.5 seconds ON

At the end of the sequence, the ECU starts functioning in normal operating mode, in relation to the states of the inputs.
The diagnostic signal is stopped as soon as the seat sensor signal returns within valid ranges.

20-10

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis
Functional diagram

K30

(!) Connect to K15 for digital sensor (!)

SELECT

Hand Brake
Light

Key K15

8
Reverse Speed (N.O.)
3
Analogic
seat sensor
N.O.

1500 ohm
Hand Brake
(N.O.)
500 ohm

5
GND

Fig. 39 - Functional diagram


WARNING
If the handbrake warning lamp is connected to K15, it will not illuminate in key OFF state.

20-11

Calibrations and electronic


diagnosis

PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK

20-12

30 - Method of intervention

30-1

Method of intervention
30.1 - B0 - Engine

30.1.1 - PREPARATION FOR DISASSEMBLY


Precautions

This section outlines basic precautions recommended by Mitsubishi that should always be observed.
Disassembly
1.
2.
3.

Always use tools that are in good condition and be sure you understand how to use them before performing any job.
Use an overhaul stand or a work bench, where necessary. Also, use bins to keep engine parts in order of removal.
Parts must be restored to their respective components from which they were removed at disassembly. This means that all
parts must be set aside separately in groups, each marked for its component, so that the same combination or set can be
reproduced at assembly.
Pay attention to marks on assemblies, components and parts for their positions or directions. Apply marks, if necessary, to
aid assembly.
Carefully check each part or component for any sign of faulty condition during removal or cleaning. Clues as to how well part
is functioning are more easily revealed during removal or cleaning operations.
When lifting or carrying a part too heavy or too awkward for one person to handle, enlist the help of another person and, if
necessary, use a jack or other lifting equipment.

4.
5.
6.

Assembly
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Wash all parts, except for oil seals, O-rings, rubber sheets, etc., with cleaning solvent and dry them with compressed air.
Always use tools that are in good condition and be sure you understand how to use them before performing any job.
Use only good quality lubricants. Be sure to apply oil, grease or sealant to parts as specified.
Be sure to use a torque wrench to tighten parts for which torques are specified.
Each time the engine is re-assembled, new gaskets and O-rings must be installed.

Draining engine oil


1.

DANGER
Hot oil and components can cause serious personal injury.
Do not allow hot oil or components to come into contact with
skin.
To drain the oil, remove the drain plug from the oil sump.

Table 18
Capacity (high level less 0.5 litres S3L / S3L2:
(0.13 U.S. gal) of oil in the filter), li- 5.7 (1.5) (with oversize oil sump)
3.7 (1.0) (with standard oil sump)
tres (U.S. gal)
S4L / S4L2:
7.7 (2.0) (with oversize oil sump)
5.4 (1.4) (with standard oil sump)

Fig. 40

1 - Engine oil drain plug

Draining coolant
1.

Loose the drain plug on the right side of the engine block and allow the
coolant to drain.

Table 19
Capacity, litres (U.S. Gal)

S3L / S3L2: 1.8 (0.5)


S4L / S4L2: 2.5 (0.7)

1 - Coolant drain plug.

Fig. 41

30-2

Method of intervention
30.1.2 - Engine - Separation from the transmission
Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-) and apply the parking brake.

2.

Drain off the coolant.


Disconnect the pipes of the front hydraulic service couplers (1).

Fig. 42

3.

Drain off all the oil from the transmission.


Disconnect front differential lock pipe (2) and the two power steering pipes
(3).

Fig. 43

4.

Disconnect the front PTO lube pipe (4) on the left-hand side.

Fig. 44

5.

On both sides, remove silent block retaining nuts (5), remove the two lateral
fixing screws and remove footplates (6).

Fig. 45

30-3

Method of intervention
6.

Remove cable support bracket (6) and disconnect throttle cables (7).

Fig. 46

7.

On both sides, remove fixing screws (8) and remove tank frame (9).

Fig. 47

8.

Loosen alternator drivebelt adjustment screw (10).

Fig. 48

9.

Remove alternator drivebelt (11).

Fig. 49

30-4

Method of intervention
10.

Disconnect the two alternator wiring connectors (12).

Fig. 50

11.

Disconnect the outer cable (13) of the positive terminal of the starter motor.

Fig. 51

12.

Remove retaining nut (14) and remove starter motor protection (15).

Fig. 52

13.

Disconnect the cable (16) connected to the positive terminal of the starter
motor.

Fig. 53

30-5

Method of intervention
14.

Remove nut (17) to release the inner cable from positive terminal (18).

Fig. 54

15.

On the left-hand side, remove retaining nut (19) of the bracket of the climate control pipe bracket.

Fig. 55

16.

Disconnect the two oil supply pipes (20) of the hydraulic services pump and
of the rear lift hydraulic pump.
m

Remember to plug the ends of the pipes.

Fig. 56

17.

Remove the two screws (21) and remove bracket (22) supporting the power
steering pipes.

Fig. 57

30-6

Method of intervention
18.

Disconnect front wiring harness (23).

Fig. 58

19.

Disconnect glowplug feed wire (24).

Fig. 59

20.

Disconnect the two throttle cables (25).

Fig. 60

21.

Loosen hose clamp (26) and disconnect fuel suction pipe (27) from the
pump.
m

Remember to plug the end of the pipe.

Fig. 61

30-7

Method of intervention
22.

Release front PTO wiring (28) from the retaining clips.

Fig. 62

23.

Disconnect the two front PTO oil pipes (29).

Fig. 63

24.

Disconnect front differential lock control pipe (30).

Fig. 64

25.

Disconnect the two pipes (31) of the mid-mounted hydraulic couplers.

Fig. 65

30-8

Method of intervention
26.

On th left-hand side, unscrew nut (32), remove fixing screws (33) and remove climate control pipe bracket (34).
m

Recover the spacer and washers.

Fig. 66

27.

Remove the two retaining screws (35), disconnect pipe (36) from front lift
valve and from the strap securing it to the bracket, then remove mid-mounted hydraulic couplers (37) along with the support bracket.

Fig. 67

28.

Position a stand (38) under the engine.

Fig. 68

29.

Remove the seven screws (39) on the engine-clutch housing connection


flange.

Fig. 69

30-9

Method of intervention
30.

Separate engine (40) from the transmission.

Fig. 70

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.1.3 - Engine
Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-)
and apply the parking brake.
Place one stand under the gearbox and one under the engine (1).

Fig. 71

2.

Attach two hooks (2) to the lifting brackets provided on the engine.

Fig. 72

3.

Attach a hoist to the engine and take the strain with the lifting ropes.

Fig. 73

30-10

Method of intervention
4.

Remove the seven screws (3) securing the engine to clutch housing.

Fig. 74

5.

Remove complete engine assembly (4).

Fig. 75

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.1.4 - Compression test


Inspection
1.

Check the engine oil level is correct, that the air cleaner is adequate, that
the starter motor and battery are in good condition and that the engine
temperature is within the normal operating range.

Fig. 76

30-11

Method of intervention
Test
1.

Move the control lever to the position to shut off the fuel supply. Remove all
the glow plugs from the engine. Install the compression test gauge on the
cylinder on which the compression pressure is to be measured. Turn the
engine over with the starter motor and read the pressure on the gauge at
the point the gauge needle stops.
m

If the gauge reading is below the limit, proceed with engine overhaul.

Test the compression on all the cylinders.

The compression pressure varies with the engine rpm. For this reason it is necessary to check engine rpm when testing cylinder compression.

Table 20
Item

Engine speed,
rpm
Compression
pressure, kg/cm2
(psi) [kPa]
Maximum permissible difference
between
average
compression pressure of all cylinders in one
engine,
kgf/
cm(psi) [kPa]

30-12

Standard

290

SL
SL2
3 (42.7) [294]

Limit

30 (427) [2 942] 27 (327) [2 256]


32 (455) [3 138] 25 (356) [2 452]
-

It is important to measure the compression pressure at regular intervals in order to obtain the data on the gradual change in value.

The compression pressure will be slightly higher than standard in


a new or overhauled engine owing to running-in of the piston rings,
valve seats, etc. The pressure decreases as the engine components
wear in.

Fig. 77

Method of intervention
30.1.5 - engine block, crankshaft, pistons and sump

Fig. 78 - Disassembly sequence


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Oil sump.
Mesh filter.
Connecting rod big-end cap.
Big-end shell bearing (lower).
Connecting rod.
Gudgeon pin
Top compression ring.
Second compression ring.
Oil control ring.
Piston.
Big-end shell bearing (upper).
Main bearing cap
Main bearing shell (lower)
Crankshaft
Main bearing shell (upper)
engine block
If the engine block is to be discarded, remove from the block the components (pressure relief valve, etc) that can be reutilised.

Disassembly
1.

Removal of the sump.


Turn the engine upside down. Tap the bottom corners of the sump with a
rubber mallet to help separate it from the engine block.
m

Do not attempt to prise the sump off the engine block using a screwdriver as this could damage the components.

Fig. 79

30-13

Method of intervention
2.

Removal of the gauze oil filter


Loosen the nut securing the gauze filter and remove the filter.

Fig. 80

3.

Measuring thrust clearance for connecting rod big end.


Install the connecting rod to its cranking and tighten the cap nuts to the
specified torque. Measure the thrust clearance with a feeler gauge. If the
clearance exceeds the limit, replace the connecting rod.

Table 21
Item

Standard

Limit

Thrust clearance for From 0.10 mm to 0.35 0.50 mm (0.0197 in)


connecting rod big end mm (From 0.0039 in to
0.0138 in)
Fig. 81

4.

Removal of the big-end bearing cap


Lay the engine block on its side; mark the connecting rods and big-end
bearing caps in pairs so they can be refitted to their original positions, then
remove the big-end bearing caps.

Fig. 82

5.

Removal of the piston.


Turn the crankshaft to bring the piston to top dead centre. Push the piston
and connecting rod away from the crankshaft with the handle of a hammer
or similar tool until the piston rings are clear of the cylinder, then remove the
piston and connecting rod. Repeat the above operations for the remaining
pistons.

Fig. 83

30-14

Method of intervention
6.

Measuring crankshaft end float.


Position a dial gauge in contact with the end of the crankshaft and measure
the end float. If the end float exceeds the limit, replace No. 3 flanged bearing.

Table 22
Item

Crankshaft end float

Standard

Limit

From 0.050 mm to 0.50 mm (0.0197 in)


0.175
mm
(From
0.00197 in to 0.0689 in)
Fig. 84

7.

Removal of the main bearing caps.


Lay the engine block with the underside (sump) facing upwards. Remove
the bolts securing the main bearing caps, then remove the main bearing
caps. Remove the front and rear bearing caps with a slide hammer puller.

Fig. 85

8.

Removal of the crankshaft


Remove the crankshaft.
m

Take care not to damage the bearings.

Mark the main bearing shells so they can be refitted to their original
positions.

Fig. 86

9.

Separating the piston from connecting rod.


Separate the piston from the connecting rod using the specific gudgeon
pin tool.

Fig. 87

30-15

Method of intervention
10.

Insert the push rod of the tool into the small-end bearing bore in the piston
and, using an arbor press, drive out the gudgeon pin. Use the same gudgeon pin tool to refit the connecting rod to the piston.
1 - Gudgeon pin.
2 - Arrow mark.
3 - Piston.
4 - Tool
5 - Connecting rod.
6 - Identification mark.
7 - Tool holder.
Fig. 88

11.

Do not attempt to drive out the gudgeon pin by hitting it. A gudgeon
pin which can only be removed using a greater force should be renewed.

Fig. 89

Inspection

Fig. 90 - Inspection points


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

30-16

Lubricate the entire surface with engine oil.


Lubricate the bearing (inside) surface with engine oil.
Coat the front and rear bearing cap contact surfaces with Three Bond 1212.
Tightening torque: 3.55 0.25 kgf x m (25.7 1.8 lbf x ft) [34.8 2.5 N x m].
Coat the entire surface with Three Bond 1207C.
Tightening torque Cast sump: 2.8 0.3 kgf x m (20.3 2.2 lbf x ft) [27.5 3 N x m]. Pressed steel sump: 1.15 + 0.15 kgf-m
(8.3 + 1.1 1bf-ft) [11.3 + 1.5 N m]

Method of intervention

Fig. 90 - Inspection points


7.
8.
9.
10.

Force fit.
Lubricate the bearing (inside) surface with engine oil.
Coat with Three Bond 1212.
Tightening torque: 5.25 0.25 kgf x m (38 1.8 lbf x ft) [51.5 2.5 N x m].

Refitting
1.

Refitting the main bearings.


Install the upper main bearing shells in the engine block and the lower bearing shells in the main bearing caps, ensuring the tabs locate in the corresponding notches in the engine block and the main bearing caps Install the
flanged bearing on the No. 3 journal. Lightly lubricate the internal surfaces
of the bearings with engine oil.

Fig. 91

2.

Refitting the crankshaft.


Clean the crankshaft with cleaning solvent and blow dry with compressed
air. Attach a hoist to the crankshaft and hold it in a horizontal position. Carefully lower the crankshaft in position in the engine block. Lightly lubricate
the crankshaft journals with engine oil.

Fig. 92

30-17

Method of intervention
3.

Refitting the main bearing caps.


Coat the mating surfaces of the rear main bearing cap and the engine block
with Three Bond 1212. Locate the main bearing caps. Make sure the number (arrow) on the main bearing cap is pointing towards the front of the
engine. Tighten down the main bearing cap bolts by hand.

Fig. 93

4.

Install the front and rear bearing caps so their end faces are even
with the end faces of the engine block.
Tighten the main bearing cap bolts gradually to the specified torque.
m

Table 23
Tightening torque

5.25 0.25 kgf x m


(38 2 1bf x ft)
[51.5 2.5 N x m]

Fig. 94

5.

Make sure the crankshaft rotates freely without binding or catching. Measure the crankshaft end float. If the end float is incorrect, loosen the main
bearing cap bolts and then tighten them again.

Fig. 95

6.

Refitting the the side seals.


Coat the side seals with Three Bond 1212. Insert the side seals between
the engine block and the front and rear main bearing caps and push in them
by hand as far as possible, with their rounded side toward the outside of
the engine block.
A - Side seals.
B - Rounded side.

Fig. 96

30-18

Method of intervention
7.

Using a flat plate, push the seals into position, taking care not to bend them.

Fig. 97

8.

Refitting the piston to the connecting rod.


Place the gudgeon pin tool (31A91-00100) in a hydraulic press. Position the
connecting rod on the tool and lubricate the small-end bore with engine oil.

Fig. 98

9.

Position the piston on the connecting rod, making sure the identification
mark on the connecting rod is on the same side as the arrow on the piston
crown. Locate the gudgeon pin.

Fig. 99

10.

Insert the end of the tool into the small-end bore in the piston and install the
gudgeon pin with the press.
m

Observe the gauge of the press when installing the gudgeon pin. If
the force of the press exceeds 50 kgf (110 1bf) [490 N], stop installing the pin and check that the bores in the piston and connecting rod
are properly aligned.

Fig. 100

30-19

Method of intervention
11.

After assembling the piston and connecting rod, make sure the connecting
rod moves freely.

Fig. 101

12.

Refitting the piston rings.


Using a piston ring pliers, install the piston rings on the piston.
The piston rings must be installed with the side marked T toward
the top of the piston.
A - Top marking.
1 - Top compression ring.
2 - Second compression ring.
3 - Oil control ring.
m

Fig. 102

13.

The oil control ring must be installed with the ring gap positioned
180 to the expander spring joint.
A - Expander spring joint.
B - Oil control ring end gap.
m

Fig. 103

14.

30-20

Refitting the piston-connecting rod assembly


Lubricate the piston and piston rings with engine oil. Position the piston
rings gaps so they are staggered from a direction parallel to, or transverse
to, the gudgeon pin. Install the big-end shell bearing (upper) in the connecting rod, making sure the rear tab of the bearing engages the notch in the
connecting rod.
Turn the crankshaft until the crankpin for the piston and connecting rod to
be installed is at top dead centre. Hold the piston and connecting rod with
FRONT mark (arrow) on the the piston crown pointing towards the front
(timing cover side) of the engine.
1 - Oil control ring.
2 - Front of engine.
3 - Top compression ring.
4 - Second compression 2 and oil control ring expander spring joint.

Fig. 104

Method of intervention
15.

Using a piston guide (commercially available), insert the piston and connecting rod in the cylinder from the top of the engine block.
m

Do not hit the piston with a mallet to install the piston and connecting
rod. This will put force on the piston and connecting rod and cause
damage to the piston rings and crankpin.

Fig. 105

16.

Refitting the big-end bearing cap.


Push the piston into position until the big end of the connecting rod is locates on the crankpin, then rotate the crankshaft through 180 while simultaneously pressing down on the piston crown. Install the lower big-end
bearing shell in the big-end bearing cap, making sure the tab on the rear of
the bearing shell engages the notch in the bearing cap. Finally, fit the bigend the bearing cap on the connecting rod.
m

Check that the identification number on the bearing cap matches the
number on the connecting rod.

Check that the identification number on the bearing cap matches the
number on the connecting rod.
A - Notches.
B - Cylinder number.
m

17.

Fig. 106

Tighten the big-end bearing cap nuts gradually to the specified torque.

Table 24
Tightening torque

3.55 0.25 kgf x m


(25.7 2 lbf x ft)
[34.8 2.5 N x m]

Check the thrust clearance for the connecting rod big end.

Fig. 107

18.

Refitting gauze oil filter.


Lay the engine block with the underside (sump) facing upwards. Position
the gauze oil filter.
m

The gauze oil filter must be positioned so that remains below the oil
level and clear of the sump.

Fig. 108

30-21

Method of intervention
19.

Refitting the oil sump.


Clean the mating surfaces of the sump and engine block and coat them
with Three Bond 1207C.

Fig. 109

20.

Squeeze out a 4 mm (0.2 in.) bead bar of sealant (Three Bond) from
the tube and apply to the flange of the oil sump as shown.

Fig. 110

21.

To obtain a 4 mm (0.2 in.) bead of sealant, cut the nozzle of the tube (A) as
shown in the figure.

Fig. 111

22.

Tighten the bolts securing the sump to the engine block in a crisscross pattern to the specified torque.

Table 25
Tightening torque

30-22

Cast sump:
2.8 0.3 kgf x m
(20.3 2.2 lbf x ft)
[27.5 3 N x m]
Pressed steel sump:
1.15 0.15 kgf x m
(8.3 1.1 lbf x ft)
[11.3 1.5 N x m]

Fig. 112

Method of intervention
30.1.6 - Inspection of the engine monobloc
Check
1.

Measure the bore at the top, middle and bottom points on axes A and B with
a cylinder bore gauge as shown in the figure.
m

If the measured values are outside the specified limit, hone the cylinder bores for oversize pistons.

Table 26
Piston and piston ring

Dimensions
Standard

Size code
STD

0.25 mm (0.0098 25
in.) oversize
0.50 mm (0.0197 50
in.) oversize
Taper and out of round
2.

Bore

Standard
78 (from 0 to
0.03) mm (3.07
(from 0 to 0.0012)
in
78.25 (from 0
to 0.03) mm
(3.0807 (from 0
to 0.0012 in)
78.50
(from
0 a 0,03) mm
(3.0905 (from 0
to 0.0012 in)
0.01 mm (0.0004
in) maximum

Limit
Standard +0.2
mm (+0.008 in)

Fig. 113

Using a heavy and accurate straight edge and a feeler gauge, check the
top face for warpage in two positions lengthwise, two crosswise and two
widthwise, as shown in the figure. If warpage exceeds the limit, reface the
top face with a surface grinder.
m

The maximum permissible amount of stock to be removed from the


cylinder head and block by grinding is 0.2 mm (0.008 in.) in total.

Table 27
Item

Warpage of
block top face

Standard

Limit

engine 0.05 mm (0.0020 in) 0.10 mm (0.0039 in)


maximum

Fig. 114

30.1.7 - Inspection of the crankshaft


Inspection
1.

Install the bearing shells (upper and lower halves) and cap to the big end
of the connecting rod and tighten the cap nuts to the specified torque. Measure the bore in the bearing for crankpin as shown in the figure (A).

Table 28
Tightening torque

3.55 0.25 kgf x m


(25.7 1.8 lbf x ft)
[34.8 2.5 N x m]

Fig. 115

30-23

Method of intervention
2.

Measure the diameter of the crankpin as shown in the figure to obtain the
clearance between the crankpin and big-end bearing.

Table 29
Item

Normal dimen- Standard


sions

Crankpin diam- 48 mm (1.89 in)


eter (standard)
Clearance be- tween
crankpin and big-end
bearing

3.

from 47.950 mm to 47.965 mm


(from 1.88779 in
to 1.88838 in)
from 0.025 mm to 0.150
mm
0.072 mm (from (0.00591 in)
0.00098 in to
0.00283 in)

If the clearance exceeds the specified limit, install new bearing


shells and check the clearance again.

If the clearance still exceeds the limit, grind the crankpin to 0.25 mm
(0.0098 in.), 0.50 mm (0.0197 in.) or 0.75 mm (0.0295 in.) undersize
and use an undersize big-end bearing.

Fig. 116

Table 30
Item

Crankpin

Undersize

0.25 mm (0.0098 in)

0.50 mm (0.0197 in)

0.75 mm (0.0295 in)

4.

Limit

Finish

47.75 (from 0.035 to


0.050) mm (1.8979
(from
0.00138
to
0.00197) in
47.50 (from 0.035 to
0.050) mm (1.8701
(from
0.00138
to
0.00197) in
47.25 (from 0.035 to
0.050) mm (1.8602
(from
0.00138
to
0.00197) in

Grind all the crankpins of the crankshaft to the same undersize.

Finish the crankpin fillets to a radius of 2.5 mm (0.098 in.)

Fig. 117

Install the main bearing (upper and lower halves) and cap to the cylinder
block and tighten the cap bolts to the specified torque. measure the bore of
the main bearings. as shown in the figure.

Table 31
Tightening torque

5.25 0.25 kgf x m


(38 1.8 lbf x ft)
[51.5 2.5 N x m]

Fig. 118

30-24

Method of intervention
5.

Measure the diameter of the main bearing journal as shown in the figure (A)
to find the clearance between the journal and main bearing.
m

If the clearance exceeds the limit, install a new bearing and check
the clearance again.

If the clearance still exceeds the limit, grind the journal to 0.25 mm
(0.0098 in.), 0.50 mm (0.0197 in.) or 0.75 mm (0.0295 in.) undersize
and use an undersize main bearing.

Table 32
Item

Normal dimen- Standard


sions

Diameter of main 52 mm (2.05 in)


bearing journal
(standard)
Clearance be- tween main bearing journal and
bearing
6.

Limit

Fig. 119

from 51.985 mm to 52.000 mm


(from 2.04665 in
to 2.04724 in)
from 0.030 mm to 0.100
mm
0.077 mm (from (0.00394 in)
0.00118 in to
0.0.00303 in)

Grind all the main bearing journals of one crankshaft to the same
undersize.

Finish the journal fillets to a radius of 2 mm (0.08 in.).

Table 33
Item

Undersize

Crankshaft main bear- 0.25 mm (0.0098 in)


ing journal
0.50 mm (0.0197 in)
0.75 mm (0.0295 in)

7.

Finish

51.75 (from 0 to 0.015)


mm (2.0374 (from 0 to
0.00059) in)
51.50 (from 0 to 0.015)
mm (2.0276 (from 0 to
0.00059) in)
51.25 (from 0 to 0.015)
mm (2.0177 (from 0 to
0.00059) in)

Fig. 120

Support the crankshaft on its front and rear journals in V-blocks or in a lathe
and check runout at the centre journal with a dial gauge, as shown in the
figure. Depending on the amount of runout, repair the crankshaft by grinding or by straightening with a press.
m

If runout exceeds the specified limit, renew the crankshaft.

Table 34
Item

Crankshaft runout

Standard

Limit

0.025 mm (0.00098 in) 0.05 mm (0.0020 in)


Fig. 121

30-25

Method of intervention
8.

Remove the gear from the crankshaft using a gear puller.


m

Do not remove the gear unless the gear or crankshaft is defective.

Fig. 122

9.

Locate the Woodruff key in its seat in the crankshaft, then locate the gear,
aligning the slot with the key as shown in the figure (A).

Fig. 123

30.1.8 - Fan - alternator drivebelt


Removal - version without front PTO
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Loosen alternator tensioner screw (1).

Fig. 124

3.
4.

Loosen lower screw (2) of alternator support.


Remove drivebelt (3).

Fig. 125

30-26

Method of intervention
Refitting - version without front PTO
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Removal - version with front PTO


1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Loosen alternator tensioner screw (1).

Fig. 126

3.

Remove lower screw (2) of alternator support.

Fig. 127

4.

Remove grub screw (4) securing the shaft.

Fig. 128

5.

Remove the three flange fixing screws (5).

Fig. 129

30-27

Method of intervention
6.

Move flange (6) forwards to create the necessary space to remove the
drivebelt.

Fig. 130

7.

Remove drivebelt (3).

Fig. 131

Refitting - version with front PTO


Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Tension adjustment
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).
m

2.

Inspect the drivebelt for signs of wear; renew if necessary.

Turn tensioning screw (1).

Fig. 132

30-28

Method of intervention
3.

Tension the drivebelt to obtain deflection of 10 to 12 mm at the mid-point of


the belt run between the crankshaft pulley and alternator (7).
m

Re-adjust the tension after 50 operating hours if a new drivebelt is


fitted.

Fig. 133

30.1.9 - A/C fan - compressor drivebelt


Removal - version without front PTO
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Loosen tensioner locknut (1).

Fig. 134

3.

Remove drivebelt (2).

Fig. 135

Refitting - version without front PTO


Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Removal - version with front PTO


1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

30-29

Method of intervention
2.

Remove grub screw (3) securing the shaft.

Fig. 136

3.

Remove the three flange fixing screws (4).

Fig. 137

4.

Move flange (5) forwards to create the necessary space to remove the
drivebelt.

Fig. 138

5.

Loosen tensioner locknut (1).

Fig. 139

30-30

Method of intervention
6.

Remove drivebelt (2).

Fig. 140

Refitting - version with front PTO


Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Tension adjustment
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).
m

2.

Inspect the drivebelt for signs of wear; renew if necessary.

Turn tensioner locknut (1).

Fig. 141

3.

Tension the drivebelt to obtain deflection of 10 to 12 mm at the mid-point of


the belt run between the crankshaft pulley and A/C compressor (6).

Fig. 142

30-31

Method of intervention
30.1.10 - Crankshaft pulley
Removal
1.

Remove crankshaft pulley nut (1).

Fig. 143

2.

Remove the alternator-fan drivebelt (2) and A/C drivebelt (3).


m

Remove the crankshaft pulley nut before removing the alternatorfan drivebelt and the A/C drivebelt as the tension of the drivebelts
helps oppose rotation of the crankshaft.

Fig. 144

3.

Remove crankshaft pulley (3).

Fig. 145

30-32

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.1.11 - Flywheel bearing


Removal
1.

Locate punch (1) on flywheel bearing (2).

Fig. 146

2.

Tap the punch with a hammer to drive bearing (2) out of the flywheel.

Fig. 147

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.1.12 - Timing gears and flywheel

30-33

Method of intervention

Fig. 148 - Disassembly sequence


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Flywheel.
Rear cover.
Oil seal carrier; oil seal.
Tappets.
Speedometer drive gear.
Power take-off Gear.
Crankshaft pulley.
Timing cover.
Idler gear.
Camshaft gear
Thrust washer.
Camshaft.
Fuel injection pump camshaft gear.
Bearing.
Fuel injection pump camshaft.
Oil pump.
Front cover.
Measure the backlash before removing gears (A).

Disassembly
1.

Removal of the flywheel.


When working with other persons, use appropriate signals to avoid
possible accidents or injuries.
Ask an assistant to hold the crankshaft pulley with a wrench to prevent the
flywheel from rotating, then remove the flywheel retaining screws.
m

Fig. 149

30-34

Method of intervention
2.

DANGER
When removing the flywheel, wear heavy gloves to avoid
hand injury.
Insert a safety rod (M12 x 1.25) in the threaded hole in the flywheel from
which the screw was removed, then remove the remaining screws.
Grasp the flywheel in both hands and pull it off the crankshaft. Joggling the
flywheel back and forth will facilitate removal.

Fig. 150

3.

Removal of the rear plate.


The rear plate is held in position with a locating dowel. Remove the plate,
keeping it as square as possible to the engine block.

Fig. 151

4.

Removal of the oil seal carrier.


Remove the screws that hold the oil seal carrier in position. Remove the oil
seal carrier from the engine block with a screwdriver or the like.
m

Take care not to damage the oil seal.

Fig. 152

5.

Removal of the tappets.


Remove the tappets from the engine block using a valve pushrod.
m

If the camshaft is removed before the tappets, the tappets will fall
into the sump.

Fig. 153

30-35

Method of intervention
6.

Removal of the speedometer drive gear.


Remove, in order, the locking plate and the speedometer drive gear.
m

Unless the speedometer drive gear is removed, the camshaft cannot be removed.

Fig. 154

7.

Removal of the crankshaft pulley.


DANGER
When removing the crankshaft pulley, be aware that the rod
used to prevent the crankshaft from turning may suddenly
slip, so be ready to stop applying force to the crankshaft
pulley nut immediately in order to prevent possible injury.
Screw two safety studs (M12 x 1.25) into the threaded holes in the rear end
of the crankshaft. Insert a third rod between the studs to hold the crankshaft
against rotation, then remove the crankshaft pulley.
Fig. 155

8.

Removal of the timing cover.


Remove the retaining screws and remove the timing cover.
m

The front plate is fixed to the inside the timing cover with screws.
Do not attempt to remove this plate along with the timing cover by
tapping.

Fig. 156

30-36

Method of intervention
9.

Measuring timing gear backlash.


Measure the backlash between the individual gears, making a note of the
values so they can checked on subsequent refitting. Replace the gears if
the backlash exceeds the prescribed limit.

Table 35
Item

Gear backlash

Crankshaft gear
and idler gear
Idler gear and
camshaft gear
Idler gear and
fuel
injection
pump camshaft
gear
Camshaft gear
and PTO gear

Standard

Limit

From 0.04 mm to 0.30 mm (0.0118


0.12 mm (from in)
0.0016 in to
0.0047 in)

Fig. 157

From 0.08 mm to
0.19 mm (from
0.0031 in to
0.0075 in)
Fuel
injection From 0.07 mm to
pump camshaft 0.20 mm (from
gear and oil 0.0028 in to
pump gear
0.0079 in)

10.

Removal of the idler gear


To remove the idler gear, rotate the gear in a direction of the helix of the
teeth to pull it out of mesh.

Fig. 158

11.

Removal of the camshaft.


Remove the screws securing the thrust plate, then withdraw the camshaft
from the engine block.
m

Take care not to damage the lobes or the bearing journals when
removing the camshaft.

Fig. 159

30-37

Method of intervention
12.

Removal of the fuel injection pump camshaft.


Remove the stop screw.

Fig. 160

13.

Tap the rear end of the camshaft gently with a copper bar in order to drive
it out from the front end of the engine block.

Fig. 161

14.
15.

Removal of the gears.


m Remove the gears only if necessary.
To remove the gears from the camshaft and fuel injection pump camshaft, use an arbor press.
Removal of the oil pump.
Remove the screws securing the oil pump to the engine block and remove
the pump.

Fig. 162

16.

Removal of the front plate.


Remove the four screws securing the front plate. Tap the plate lightly with a
rubber mallet to separate the gasket.

Fig. 163

30-38

Method of intervention
Inspection

Fig. 164 - Inspection points


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Tightening torque: 17.5 2.5 kgf x m (12718 lbf x ft) [172 25 N x m].
Tightening torque: 1.1 0,1 kgf x m( 8 0.7 lbf x ft) [10.8 25 N x m].
Use a new gasket.
Lubricate with engine oil.
Lubricate lip of oil seal with engine oil.
Lubricate bearing journals and lobes with engine oil.
Tightening torque: 6.5 1 kgf x m (47 7 lbf x ft) [64 10 N x m].
Tightening torque: 13.5 0.5 kgf x m (98 4 lbf x ft) [132 5 N x m].

Refitting
1.

Refitting the front plate.


Scrape the old gasket from the engine block and front plate. Coat the gasket contact surface of engine block with adhesive and locate the new gasket, making sure the holes in the gasket are all aligned with the holes in
the engine block. Then locate the front plate, fit the four screws and tighten
them.

Fig. 165

30-39

Method of intervention
2.

Refitting the oil pump.


Make sure the gasket is correctly located on the oil pump. Locate the oil
pump on the engine block. Install the three screws and tighten them evenly.
Make sure the oil pump gear rotates freely.

Fig. 166

3.

Turning over the engine.


Install two screws (M12 x 1.25) in the flywheel screw holes in the crankshaft. Insert a bar between the screws and turn the crankshaft to bring No.
1 piston to the top dead centre, as shown in the figure.

Fig. 167

4.

Refitting the fuel injection pump camshaft


Locate the camshaft (complete with bearing and gear) in the engine block.
Tap the gear with a rubber mallet to seat the bearing; check that the camshaft rotates freely, then tighten the stop screw.

Fig. 168

5.

Refitting the camshaft.


Lubricate the lobes and bearing journals with engine oil; Locate the camshaft (complete with gear) in the engine block.
m

Take care not to damage the lobes or the bearing journals when
inserting the camshaft.

Fig. 169

30-40

Method of intervention
6.

Tighten the screws securing the thrust plate to the specified torque.

Table 36
Tightening torque

1.1 0.1 kgf x m


(8 0.7 lbf x ft)
[10.8 1 N x m]

Make sure the camshaft rotates freely and check the camshaft end float.

Fig. 170

7.

Refitting the idler gear.


Lubricate the idler gear with engine oil. Locate the idler gear in position with
the 3, 2 and 11 marks aligned respectively with the 33 mark on the
fuel injection pump camshaft gear, the 22 mark on the camshaft gear and
the 1 mark on the crankshaft gear.
m

Check the gear backlash.

Fig. 171

8.

Refitting the timing cover.


Coat the gasket with adhesive and locate it on the front plate. Lubricate the
oil seal lip with engine oil. Tighten the screws securing the timing cover.

Fig. 172

9.

Tightening the crankshaft pulley nut.


Fit two screws (M12 x 1.25) in the flywheel screw holes in the crankshaft
and counterhold the crankshaft. Tighten the crankshaft pulley nut to the
specified torque.

Table 37
Tightening torque

17.5 2.5 kgf x m


(127 18 lbf x ft)
[172 25 N x m]

Ensure that the screws and bar used to counterhold the crankshaft
are strong enough.

Fig. 173

30-41

Method of intervention
10.

Refitting the PTO gear.


Locate the PTO gear in the timing cover, with the side without the lubrication hole facing the rear end of the engine.

Fig. 174

11.

Refitting the speedometer drive gear.


Install the O-ring in the groove in the drive gear sleeve. Locate the speedometer drive gear in the engine block while rotating the gear or the camshaft.

Fig. 175

12.

Refitting the tappets.


Lubricate the tappets with engine oil (A) and locate in the engine block.

Fig. 176

13.

Refitting the oil seal carrier.


Locate a gasket on the oil seal carrier; Lubricate the oil seal lip with engine
oil and locate the oil seal in the engine block.

Fig. 177

30-42

Method of intervention
14.

Refitting the rear plate.


Locate a new gasket on the rear plate. Locate the rear plate on the engine
block, aligning the holes with the locating dowels. Tighten the screws securing the rear plate to the specified torque.

Table 38
Tightening torque

15.

6.5 1 kgf x m
(47 7 lbf x ft)
[64 10 N x m]

To facilitate installation of the rear plate, install the starter motor on


the plate before fitting the plate to the engine block.

Fig. 178

Refitting the flywheel.


Insert a stud (M12 x 1.25) in the rear end of the crankshaft. Locate the
flywheel, aligning it with the stud; insert three of the four screws in the
flywheel and tighten them by hand. Remove the stud, then fit and handtighten the remaining flywheel screw.

Fig. 179

16.

Have an assistant hold the crankshaft pulley with a wrench to prevent the
flywheel from rotating; then tighten the four flywheel screws to the specified
torque.

Table 39
Tightening torque

13.5 0.5 kgf x m


(98 4 lbf x ft)
[132 5 N x m]

DANGER
When working with other persons, use appropriate signals
to avoid possible accidents or injuries.

Fig. 180

30-43

Method of intervention
30.1.13 - Inspection of the flywheel and ring gear
Inspection
1.

Place the flywheel on the flat plate. Set a dial gauge at one side of the friction (clutch contact) face and move it over to the opposite side of the face
as shown in the figure to find the flatness error.
m

If the flatness error exceeds the limit, grind the face.

Table 40
Item

Standard

Limit

Flatness error of fly- 0.15 mm (0.0059 in) 0.50 mm (0.0197 in)


wheel
maximum
Fig. 181

2.

Examine the ring gear.


Renew the ring gear it if its teeth are abnormally worn or chipped,
Heat the ring gear evenly with an oxyacetylene torch. Tap the ring gear all
the way around with a rod and a hammer, as shown in the figure, to remove
it from the flywheel.
Heat the new ring gear up to a temperature of 150C (302F) using a piston
heater and install it to the flywheel with its unchamfered side foremost.
m

Fig. 182

30-44

Method of intervention
30.1.14 - Inspection of the pistons, piston rings and gudgeon pins
Inspection
1.

Using a micrometer, measure the diameter of the piston at its skirt in a direction perpendicular to the gudgeon pin (1), as shown in the figure.
If the diameter exceeds the specified limit, renew the piston.
Select a new piston so that the difference between average weight of all
pistons in one engine does not exceed the standard.
m

Table 41
Item

Diameter
piston

Standard

78.00
mm From 77.93
(3.0709 in)
mm to 77.95
mm
(From
3.0681 in to
3.0689 in)
0.25
mm 78.25
mm from 78.18
(0.0098 in.) (3.0807 in)
mm to 78.20
oversize
mm
(from
3.0779 in to
3.0787 in)
0.50
mm 78.50
mm from 78.43
(0.0197 in.) (3.0905 in)
mm to 87.45
oversize
mm
(from
3.0878 in to
3.0886 in)
Maximum permissible difference between 5 mm (0.18
average weight of all pistons in the same in)
engine, g (oz)

2.

of Standard

Nominal
size

Limit

77.80
mm
(3.0630 in)

Fig. 183

78.05
mm
(3.0728 in)

78.30
mm
(3.0827 in)

Measure the piston ring side clearance using a straight edge and a feeler
gauge as shown in the figure.
m

If the clearance exceeds the limit, renew the piston ring.

If the clearance still exceeds the limit after fitting new piston rings,
renew the piston

2.1. Top compression ring side clearance


2.1. Second compression ring side clearance

Table 42
Item

Top compression ring

Standard

from 0.06
mm (from
0.0039 in)
Second compression from 0.06
ring
mm (from
0.0039 in)
Oil control ring
from 0.06
mm (from
0.0039 in)

Limit

Fig. 184

mm to 0.10 0.30 mm (0.0118 in)


0.0024 in to
mm to 0.10 0.20 mm (0.0079 in)
0.0024 in to
mm to 0.10 0.20 mm (0.0079 in)
0.0024 in to

30-45

Method of intervention
3.

Put the piston ring in a gauge or in the bore in a new engine block and measure the gap between the ends of the ring with a feeler gauge as shown in
the figure.
If the end gap exceeds the limit, renew all the rings.
Inside diameter of gauge.
Standards:
78 (from 0 to 0.03) mm; 3.07 (from 0 to 0.0012) in
0.25 (from 0 to 0.03) mm; 0.0098 (from 0 to 0.0012) in
oversize: 78.25 (from 0 to 0.03) mm; 3.08 (from 0 to 0.0012) in
0.50 (from 0 to 0.03) mm; 0.0197 (from 0 to 0.0012) in
oversize: 78.50 (from 0 to 0.03) mm; 3.09 (from 0 to 0.0012) in
m

Fig. 185

Put the piston ring in the gauge or cylinder square with the piston.

Table 43
Item

Standard

Limit

Piston ring end Top compression from 0.15 mm to 1.50 mm (0.0591


gap
ring
0.30 mm (from in)
0.0059 in to
0.0118 in)
Second
com- from 0.15 mm to
pression ring
0.35 mm (from
0.0059 in to
0.0138 in)
Oil control ring
from 0.20 mm to
0.40 mm (from
0.0079 in to
0.0157 in)
4.

Measure the diameter of the gudgeon pin and the small-end bore in the
piston as shown in the figure to find the clearance.
m

If the clearance exceeds the specified limit, renew either the piston
or the gudgeon pin, whichever is most worn.

Table 44
Item

Normal dimen- Standard


sions

Gudgeon pin di- 23 mm (0.91 in)


ameter
Gudgeon pin-pis- ton clearance

30-46

Limit

from 22.994 mm to 23.000 mm


(from 0.90527 in
to 0.90551 in)
from 0.006 mm to 0.050
mm
0.018 mm (from (0.00197 in)
0.00024 in to
0.00071 in )

Fig. 186

Method of intervention
30.1.15 - Inspection of the connecting rods
Inspection
1.

Check the connecting rod for bending or twisting.


Measure dimension (C) and dimension (L).
m

If (C) exceeds 0.05 mm (0.0020 in.) per 100 mm (3.94 in.) of L


straighten the connecting rod with a press.

1.1. Gudgeon pin


1.1. Bend
1.1. Twist
m

Units: mm (in)

Table 45
Item

Fig. 187

Standard

Limit

Bend or twist of con- 0.05/100


mm 0.15/100
necting rod
(0.002/3.94 in) maxi- (0.0059/3.94 in)
mum
2.

mm

Measure the piston ring side clearance using a straight edge and a feeler
gauge as shown in the figure.
m

If the clearance exceeds the limit, renew the piston ring.

If the clearance still exceeds the limit after fitting new piston rings,
renew the piston

2.1. Top compression ring side clearance


2.1. Second compression ring side clearance

Table 46
Item

Top compression ring

Standard

from 0.06
mm (from
0.0039 in)
Second compression from 0.06
ring
mm (from
0.0039 in)
Oil control ring
from 0.06
mm (from
0.0039 in)

3.

Limit

Fig. 187

mm to 0.10 0.30 mm (0.0118 in)


0.0024 in to
mm to 0.10 0.20 mm (0.0079 in)
0.0024 in to
mm to 0.10 0.20 mm (0.0079 in)
0.0024 in to

Check the connecting rod for bending or twisting using a connecting rod
aligner.
m

To check the straightness of the connecting rod, fit the big-end cap
and tighten the cap nuts to the specified torque.

Fig. 188

30-47

Method of intervention
4.

To check the straightness of the connecting rod fitted to the piston, put the
connecting rod and piston on the surface plate as shown in the figure, insert
a round bar of diameter equal to that of the crankpin into the big end bore
and measure (A) and (B) with a dial gauge. Subtract (A) from (B) to obtain
curvature (C).

Fig. 189

30.1.16 - Inspection of the camshaft


Inspection
1.

Measure the diameter of the bearing journal and the bore in the camshaft
bearing to find the clearance, as shown in the figure. If the clearance exceeds the limit, replace the bearing.

Table 47
Item

Standard

Clearance between camshaft jour- 0.15 mm (0.0059 in)


nal and bearing

Fig. 190

2.

Measuring the bore of the camshaft bearing]


m

To renew the camshaft bearings, use the special bearing installation


tool.

Fig. 191

3.

Remove the sump. Using the remover end of the tool, force the bearing
out of the engine block. Crush and remove the bearing from the block.
3.1. Front end of engine block
3.2. Camshaft bearing
3.3. Bearing installer

Fig. 192

30-48

Method of intervention
4.

Install a new bearing, aligning the oil holes with those of the oil gallery.
4.1. Oil holes
4.2. Notch in bearing
4.3. End of bearing

Fig. 193

5.

Measure the cam lobe height and base circle as shown in the figure. Subtract the base circle from the lobe height to find the cam lift. If the cam lift
exceeds the specified limit, renew the camshaft.

Table 48
Item

Cam lobe height

Standard

35.72 mm (1.4063 in)

Limit

34.72 mm (1.3669 in)

Fig. 194

30.1.17 - Inspection of the camshaft


Inspection
1.

The correct contact surfaces of the tappets are shown in (A). Check for
abnormal wear patterns on the individual tappets (B).
m

If the contact surface is incorrect (B), renew the tappet.

Fig. 195

2.

Measure the diameter of the tappet and of the corresponding bore in the
engine block to find the clearance.
m

If the clearance exceeds the specified limit, replace the tappet.

Table 49
Item

Standard

Clearance between tappet and en- 0.15 mm (0.0059 in)


gine block
Fig. 196

30-49

Method of intervention
30.1.18 - Inspection of the idler gear
Inspection
1.

Measure the bore in the idler gear for the shaft and the diameter of the shaft
to find the clearance.
m

If the clearance exceeds the specified limit, replace either the gear
or the shaft, whichever is most worn.

Table 50
Item

Standard

Limit

Clearance
between From 0.03 mm to 0.07 0.20 mm (0.0079 in)
idler gear and shaft
mm (From 0.0012 in to
0.0028 in)
2.

Fig. 197

The new idler shaft should be installed so that it protrudes 26.5 0.5 mm
(1.043 0.020 in.) from the face of the engine block.

Fig. 198

30.1.19 - Inspection of the valves, valve guides and valve seats


Test
1.

Measure the diameter of the valve stem as shown in the figure.


m

If the stem is worn beyond the limit, or if it is abnormally worn, replace the valve.

Table 51
Item

Diameter of Intake valve


valve stem

Exhaust
valve

30-50

Nominal
Standard
dimensions

Limit

6.6
mm From 6.565 6.500
mm
(0.260 in)
mm to 6.580 (0.25591 in)
mm
(from
0.25846 in to
0.25905 in)
6.6
mm From 6.530
(0.260 in)
mm to 6.550
mm
(from
0.25709 in to
0.25787 in)

Fig. 199

Method of intervention
2.

Valve guides wear more rapidly at their ends than at any other part.
Using a bore gauge (A), measure the inside diameter of the valve guides at
both ends to find the clearance between valve stem and valve guide,
m

If the clearance exceeds the specified limit, renew the valve guide or
valve, whichever is most worn.

Table 52
Item

Clearance
Intake valve
between
valve stem
and
valve
guide
Exhaust
valve

Nominal
size

From
0.02
mm to 0.05
mm
(from
0.0008 in to
0.0020 in)
From
0.05
mm to 0.085
mm
(from
0.0020 in to
0.00335 in)
Height to top of valve guide 10 mm (0.39 From 9.5 mm
in)
to 10.5 mm
(From 0.374
in to 0.413 in)

3.

Standard

0.10
mm
(0.0039 in)

Fig. 200

0.15
mm
(0.0059 in)

Before measuring the valve guides, remove all traces of paint and
carbon deposits.
Force old valve guide (1) from cylinder head (2) using a suitable tool and an
arbor press from the underside of the head.
Install the new valve guide (1) in the cylinder head (2) by inserting it with an
arbor press from the upper side of the cylinder head to obtain the specified
stand-out (10 mm 0.5 mm; 0.93 in 0.020 in).
m

Fig. 201

4.

Insert a new valve (3) in the guide (1); make sure the valve slides in the
guide freely.
After renewing the valve guide (1), check the contact between the valve (3)
and its seat (4)
Put a small amount of Prussian blue or read lead on the valve face (5).
Hold valve (3) with a valve lapping tool (6) and press it against seat (4) to
check the contact.

Fig. 202

30-51

Method of intervention
5.

The width of contact (7) must be uniform all the way around both the seat
and the valve (C).
m

If the contact is incorrect (D), reface the valve and seat.

Fig. 203

6.

If the valve margin (8) exceeds the specified limit, renew the valve
(3).

If the valve sinkage (9) exceeds the specified limit, recondition the
valve seat or renew the cylinder head assembly

Table 53
Item

Standard

Valve margin (valve lip 1.0 mm (0.039 in)


thickness)

Limit

0.5 mm (0.020 in)


Fig. 204

Table 54
Item

Standard

Limit

Valve sinkage (dis- 0.5 mm 0.25 mm 1.5 mm (0.059 in)


tance between the top (0.020 in 0.0098 in)
of a closed valve and
the face of the cylinder
head)
7.

Set the valve refacer at an angle of 45 and grind the valve.


The valve margin (8) must be not less than the specified limit.
m

If the margin (8) is below the limit when the valve is refaced, renew
the valve (3).

Fig. 205

8.

Check the clearance between the valve (3) and valve guide (1) before
refacing the valve seat (4).
Renew the valve guide (1) if necessary.
Finish the valve seat (4) using a finishing tool or a valve seat grinder (E).
m

Fig. 206

30-52

Method of intervention
9.

Check the valve face angle (F) and valve seat width (G).

Table 55
Item

Valve face angle (F)


Valve seat width (G)

Standard

Limit

45
From 1.3 mm to 1.8 mm 2.5 mm (0.098 in)
(from 0.051 in to 0.071
in)

Fig. 207

10.

Be sure to lap the valves (3) in their seats after refacing or renewal of the
valves or valve seats (4).
Put a small amount of lapping compound on the valve face.
m

Do not put lapping compound on the valve stem.

Use a 120 - 150 grit lapping compound (H) for initial lapping and a
compound finer than 200 grit for finish lapping.

Mixing the compound with a small amount of engine oil will help
distribute the compound on the valve face uniformly.
Using a lapping tool, hold the valve (3) in its seat (4) and rotate it only a part
of a turn, then raise the valve off its sealing surface to reposition it. Press
the valve against the sealing surface and rotate through another part turn.
Repeat this operation until the compound wears and loses its cutting property.
Wash the valve (3) and valve seat (4) with dry cleaning solvent.
Apply engine oil to the valve (3) and lap it in the seat (4).
Check the valve face contact (7).
m

Fig. 208

30.1.20 - Valve clearances


Maintenance
1.

Adjust valve clearances when the engine is cold.


Slightly loosen the cylinder head screws and retighten them to the specified
torque in numeric order.
m

Table 56
Tightening torque

9 0.5 kgf x m
(65 4 Ibf x ft)
[88 5 N x m]

A - Front of engine
Fig. 209

30-53

Method of intervention
2.

Find TDC on the compression stroke for No. 1 piston using the following
procedure:
- rotate the crankshaft to bring the TDC mark on the crankshaft pulley into
alignment with the mark on the timing cover;
- with No. 1 piston at TDC on the compression stroke, the rocker arms
should not move when the crankshaft is turned approximately 20 in both
directions;
- if the rocker arms move, No. 1 piston is at top dead center on the intake
or exhaust stroke; in this case, rotate the crankshaft through 360 in the
normal direction of engine rotation. No. 1 piston is now at top dead centre
on the compression stroke.
Loosen the lock nut of the adjusting screw. With a feeler gauge inserted
between the rocker arm and valve cap, adjust the valve clearance by turning the adjusting screw.

Fig. 210

Table 57
Item

Standard

Valve clearances (intake and ex- 0.25 mm (0.0098 in)


haust valves)

3.

A - TDC (top dead center) mark for pistons No. 1 and No. 4
B - Mark on timing cover.
C - Injection timing mark.
D - TDC mark for pistons No. 2 and No. 3.
Hold the adjusting screw and tighten the lock nut. After adjusting the valve
clearance on the valves for No. 1 cylinder, rotate crankshaft 180 in the
direction of engine rotation and adjust the valve clearance on the valves for
the remainder of the cylinders in firing order (injection sequence).

Table 58
Firing order (injection sequence)

S3L
S4L
m

30-54

132
1342

Crankshaft rotation angle

240
180

After adjusting the valve clearance on the valves for all cylinders,
rotate the crankshaft two or three times and check that the valve
clearances are still correct.

Fig. 211

Method of intervention
30.1.21 - Inspection of the rocker arms and rocker shaft
Inspection
1.

Measure the inside diameter of the bore in the rocker arm for the rocker
shaft and the diameter of the rocker shaft to find the clearance between
the arm and shaft.
m

If the clearance is on the limit, renew the rocker arm.

If it exceeds the limit, renew both the rocker arm and the shaft.

Table 59
Item

Nominal size

Standard

Bore in rocker 18.9 mm (0.744 from 18.910 mm


arm for rocker in)
to 18.930 mm
shaft
(from 0.74449 in
to 0.74527 in)
Diameter of rock- 18.9 mm (0.744 from 18.880 mm
er shaft
in)
to 18.898 mm
(from 0.74331 in
to 0.74401 in)
CIearance be- from 0.012 mm to
tween rocker arm
0.050 mm (from
and shaft
0.00047 in to
0.00197 in)

Limit

Fig. 212

0.200
mm
(0.00787 in)

30.1.22 - Cylinder head and valve train components

Fig. 213 - Disassembly sequence


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Rocker cover.
Rocker assembly.
Pushrod.
Cylinder head screw.
Cylinder head.
30-55

Method of intervention

Fig. 213 - Disassembly sequence


6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Cylinder head gasket.


Collet.
Valve spring retainer.
Valve spring.
Valve.
Valve stem seal.
Valve cap.

Disassembly
1.

Removal of the rocker shaft assembly.


Remove the screws securing the rocker arms, then remove the rocker shaft
assembly, then remove the valve caps.

Fig. 214

30-56

Method of intervention
2.

Disassembly of the rocker shaft assembly.


Mark each rocker arm with its relative location on the rocker shaft.

Fig. 215

3.

Removal of the cylinder head screws.


Loosen the cylinder head screws gradually in stages in the sequence
shown.
m

If any parts of the cylinder head are faulty, check the tightness of the
cylinder head screws with a torque wrench before loosening them.

Fig. 216

4.

Removal of the cylinder head assembly.


Using a hoist, lift the cylinder head straight up and off the engine.
m

If the gasket is stuck fast and the cylinder head cannot be separated
from the cylinder block, tap around the side of the cylinder head with
a rubber mallet

Fig. 217

5.

Removal of the valves and valve springs.


Compress the valve spring with a valve lifter and remove the collet, the
spring retainer, the spring and the valve.
m

The valves, spring retainers, springs and collets must be set aside
separately in groups, each labelled with the cylinder number, to ensure subsequent installation in the original position.

Fig. 218

30-57

Method of intervention
6.

Removal of the valve stem seals.


Remove the valve stem seals.
m

Do not reuse the valve stem seals.

Fig. 219

Inspection

Fig. 220 - Inspection points


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

30-58

Tightening torque: 1.15 0.15 kgf x m (8.3 1.1 lbf x ft) [11.3 1.5 N x m].
Tightening torque: 1.50 0.50 kgf x m (11 4.0 lbf x ft) [14.7 5.0 N x m].
Tightening torque: 9.50 0.50 kgf x m (65 4 lbf x ft) [88 5 N x m].
Use a new part.
Use a new gasket.
Lubricate stem with engine oil.

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Cleaning the lower face of the cylinder head.


Scrape the old gasket from the lower face of the cylinder head.
m

After scraping off the gasket, remove all residue using an oilstone
smeared with engine oil and thoroughly clean the face.

Fig. 221

2.

Installing the valve stem seal.


Using a box wrench, locate the valve stem seal in the valve guide. After
installation, make sure the seal is in its correct position.
m

Incorrect installation of the seal can cause a failure to seal against


the downward flow of oil along the stem.

Fig. 222

3.

Refitting the valve spring.


Install the valve spring with the white enamelled end (A) uppermost.

Fig. 223

4.

Refitting the valve assembly.


Compress the valve spring with a valve lifter and install the assembly on
the valve tip.
m

Do not compress the valve spring excessively, otherwise the valve


spring retainer could impact and damage the valve stem seal.

Fig. 224

30-59

Method of intervention
5.

Refitting the cylinder head gasket.


Thoroughly clean the top face of the engine block and the pistons, then
insert the two guide screws (A) in the relative holes in the engine block.
Guide screws: M10 x 1.25
Locate a new cylinder head gasket on the engine block, making sure the
guide screws are all aligned with their respective holes in the gasket (A).
m

Do not use any gasket adhesive or other substances on the top face
of the engine block.
Fig. 225

6.

Refitting the cylinder head.


Locate the cylinder head on the engine block, making sure the guide
screws are all aligned with the corresponding holes in the cylinder head (A).

Fig. 226

7.

Tightening the cylinder head screws.


Remove the guide screws and fit the screws that secure the cylinder head
to the engine block, then gradually tighten the screws in a number of stages
and in numeric order to the specified torque.

Table 60
Tightening torque

9 0.5 kgf x m
(65 4 lbf x ft)
[88 5 N x m]
Fig. 227

8.

Refitting the pushrods.


Insert the pushrod in the relative bore in cylinder head, making sure that
the spherical end of the pushrod correctly engages the recess in the tappet.

Fig. 228

30-60

Method of intervention
9.

Refitting the rocker shaft assembly.


Install the rocker arms, pedestals and springs on the rocker shaft. Tighten
screws (A) to secure the rocker pedestals to the shaft.
m

Check that the rocker arms move freely,

Fig. 229

10.

Refitting the rocker shaft assembly.


Locate the valve caps on the tips of the valve stems, then locate the rocker
shaft assembly on the cylinder head. Finally, tighten the rocker shaft assembly retaining screws to the specified torque.

Table 61
Tightening torque

1.5 0.5 kgf x m


(11 4 lbf x ft)
[14.7 5 N x m]
Fig. 230

11.

Adjusting the valve clearances.


Adjust the valve clearances to the specified values.

Fig. 231

12.

Refitting the rocker cover.


Make sure the gasket is fitted to the rocker cover, then tighten the rocker
cover screws to the specified torque.

Table 62
Tightening torque

1.15 0.I5 kgf x m


(8.3 1.1 Ibf x ft)
[11.3 1.5 N x m]

Fig. 232

30-61

Method of intervention
30.1.23 - Inspection of the cylinder head

Checking the gasket face of the cylinder head for warpage


1.

Using an accurate straight edge and a feeler gauge, check the gasket face
for warpage in three positions lengthwise, two crosswise and two widthwise
as shown in the figure.
m

In the case of warpage in excess of the specified limit, regrind the


gasket face of the cylinder head using a grinder for flat surfaces.

Table 63
Part

Standard

Limit

Maximum warpage of the gasket 0.05 mm (0.0020 0.10 mm (0.0039


face of the cylinder head
in) MAX
in)

Fig. 233

30.1.24 - Inspection of the valve springs


Test
1.

Check the squareness and free length.


m

If the squareness and/or free length exceeds the limit, replace the
spring.

Table 64
Item

Free length (A)


Squareness (B)
Test force applied Length under test
Kgf (lbf) [N]
force: 39.1 mm
(1.54 in)
Length under test
force: 30.5 mm
(1.20 in)

Standard

Limit

47 mm (1.85 in) 46 mm (1.81 in)


1.5 maximum
13.9 0.7 (30.6 -15%
1.5 ) [136 7]
29 2 (64 4.4)
[284 20]

Fig. 234

30.1.25 - Inspection of the valve pushrods


Test
1.

Using V-blocks and a dial indicator, check for bend.


m

If the bend exceeds the limit, replace the pushrod.

Table 65
Item

Limit

Bend (dial gauge reading) of push- 0.3 mm (0.012 in) maximum


rod

Fig. 235

30.1.26 - Renewal of the jets

30-62

Method of intervention
Renewal
1.

Renew the jets only if cracked or defective.


To unseat jet (1), insert a 6 mm (0.24 in.) diameter rod (2) through the glowplug bore in the cylinder head.
m

Fig. 236

2.

To install new jet (3), locate it in the cylinder head with its tangential orifice
aligned with the centre of the main chamber and tap it gently with a rubber
mallet.

Fig. 237

30.1.27 - Lubrication System


Disassembly
1.

Removal of the oil filter.


Place a suitable container under the filter to catch the oil, then unscrew the
filter from the engine block using a filter wrench.

Fig. 238

2.

Removal of the pressure relief valve.


Remove the pressure relief valve from the engine block.

Fig. 239

30-63

Method of intervention
3.

Removal of the oil pressure switch.


Remove the oil pressure switch with the specific box wrench.

Fig. 240

Refitting
1.

Refitting the pressure relief valve.


Locate the relief valve in the engine block and tighten it to the specified
torque.

Table 66
Tightening torque

5 0.5 kgf x m
(36 4 lbf x ft)
[49 5 N x m]

Fig. 241

2.

Refitting the oil filter.


Lightly oil the seal with engine oil and screw on the new filter by hand until
the seal is in contact with the base, then tighten to the specified torque.

Fig. 242

3.

Refitting the oil pressure switch.


Apply threadlocker to the thread (A) of the oil pressure switch, then install
the pressure switch using the specific wrench.
m

Apply threadlocker to the threads only.

Do not over-tighten the oil pressure switch.

Fig. 243

30-64

Method of intervention
30.1.28 - Inspection of the lubrication system
Inspection
1.

Oil pump.
Visually check the pump for rough rotation or other defects.
m

Replace the pump assembly if defective.

Fig. 244

2.

Oil pressure switch.


Test for electrical continuity between the terminal and body using an ohmmeter, as shown in the figure.
m

If there is no electrical continuity, the switch must be renewed.

Fig. 245

3.

Insert a small diameter rod into the oil hole in the switch and lightly push it
in to test for electrical continuity, as shown in the figure.
If there is no electrical continuity, renew the pressure switch.
Apply air pressure of 0.5 kgf/cm (7 psi) [49 kPa] to the switch through the
oil hole and test for continuity.
m

If there is no electrical continuity, renew the pressure switch.


Check for air leaks.
m

The presence of air leaks indicates that the membrane is broken, in


which case the pressure switch must be renewed.
Fig. 246

4.

Pressure relief valve.


Check the valve seat contact. Check the spring for damage. Measure the
oil pressure at which the relief valve opens (the oil pressure with engine
running at the rated rpm). The engine oil pressure test outlet is located on
the right side of engine.
m

If the pressure is not correct, remove the cap nut and either increase
or reduce the shim thickness accordingly.

Table 67
Relief valve opening pressure

3.5 0.5 kgf/cm (50 7 psi) [343+


49 kPa]

Fig. 247

1 - Cap nut.
2 - Shims.

30-65

Method of intervention
30.1.29 - Fuel System
Disassembly
1.

Removal of the fuel injection pipes.


Disconnect the fuel injection pipes and fuel leak-off pipe from the fuel injection pump and nozzles.
m

Put plugs or caps on the openings of the injection pump and nozzle
connectors.

Fig. 248

2.

Removal of the fuel injection nozzles.


Loosen the fuel injection nozzles with a wrench. Remove the nozzles and
seals from the cylinder head.
m

Remove the seals from the cylinder head with a screwdriver or similar tool. Discard any defective seals.

Fig. 249

3.

Removal of the governor assembly.


Remove the control rod cover; remove the control spring using pliers, and
disconnect the control rod from the injection pump, then remove the governor assembly.

Fig. 250

4.

Removal of the governor flyweights.


Remove the sliding sleeve, the sliding sleeve shaft and remove the governor flyweights.

Fig. 251

30-66

Method of intervention
5.

Removal of the fuel injection pump.


Remove the control rod cover and remove the control rod spring using pliers; disconnect the control rod from the injection pump.

Fig. 252

6.

Remove the injection pump.


m

Make a note of the thickness of the shims for subsequent installation.

Fig. 253

Refitting
1.

Refitting the fuel injection nozzles.


Fit the seal to the nozzle (A). Locate the nozzle assembly in the cylinder
head and tighten it to the specified torque.

Table 68
Tightening torque

5.5 0.5 kgf x m


(40 4 Ibf x ft)
[54 5 N x m]

Fig. 254

2.

Refitting the fuel injection pump


Locate the pump on the engine block and tighten the screws securing the
pump to the specified torque.

Fig. 255

30-67

Method of intervention
3.

Refitting the flyweight assembly.


Locate the flyweight assembly on the rear end of the fuel injection pump
camshaft and tighten the sliding sleeve shaft to the specified torque.

Table 69
Tightening torque

3.6 0.6 kgf x m


(26 4.3 Ibf x ft)
[35 6 N x m]

Fig. 256

4.

Refitting the sliding sleeve.


Install the sliding sleeve on the sliding sleeve shaft and make sure the
sIeeve moves freely.

Fig. 257

5.

Refitting the governor assembly.


Locate the governor assembly while simultaneously installing the control
rod and spring in the injection pump; attach the control rod to the pin of the
control rack and secure it with the spring, then locate the control rod cover.

Fig. 258

6.

Refitting the fuel injection system pipes.


Locate the fuel leak-off line and connect it to the fuel injection nozzles; then
locate the fuel injection pipes and connect them to the fuel injection pump.
Install the clamps.

Fig. 259

30-68

Method of intervention
30.1.30 - Inspection and adjustment of the fuel system
Maintenance
Preparation
1.

Close the fuel filter valve. Disconnect the fuel injection pipe from the cylinder head and from the injection pump. Remove the delivery valve holder
from the injection pump. Remove the delivery valve and spring from the
holder. Refit the delivery valve holder to the injection pump only. Connect
the pipe to the injection pump. Hold the speed control lever in the low revs
position.

Fig. 260

Inspection
1.

Fuel system.
Open the fuel filter valve. Turn the starter switch key to ON position.
m

Fuel will flow from the injection pipe at high pressure when the starter switch key is turned to the ON position if the engine is equipped
with an electric lift pump. Direct the fuel flow into a container.

Fig. 261

2.

Slowly turn the crankshaft clockwise, while watching the free end of the
injection pipe. The instant the fuel stops flowing represents the fuel injection timing.
m

Rotate the crankshaft in reverse direction just a little and repeat the
operation described above again to recheck the injection timing.

Fig. 262

3.

The fuel injection timing is correct if the timing mark on the crankshaft pulley
is aligned with the mark on the timing cover when fuel stops flowing from
the injection pipe.

Table 70
Fuel injection timing (BTDC)

17 (standard)

A - TDC (top dead center) mark for pistons No. 1 and No. 4
B - Timing mark on timing cover.
C - IT (injection timing) mark.
D - TDC mark for pistons No. 2 and No. 3.

Fig. 263

30-69

Method of intervention
4.

Alternative method.
In the fuel flow method, the delivery valve has to be removed. As a result,
there is a good chance for dirt particles to get inside the fuel injection pump.
In this alternate method, however, it is not necessary to remove the delivery
valve.
Disconnect No. 1 fuel injection pipe at the fuel injection nozzle (cylinder
head). Prime the fuel lift pump. Slowly turn the crankshaft clockwise until
the point where fuel flows freely from the open end of the injection pipe and
then check the position of the timing mark relative to the mark on the timing
cover. The timing is retarded by approximately 1. Take this retard angle of
1 into account when adjusting the shims.

Fig. 264

Adjustment
1.

If the fuel injection timing is incorrect, alter the thickness of shims under the
fuel injection pump. An increase or decrease in shim thickness of 0.1 mm
(0.004 in.) will result in a 1 change in the timing. Increase the thickness of
the shims to retard the timing or decrease it to advance the timing.

Table 71
Adjustment range

2.

standard 1.5

Four shims are available in thicknesses 0.2 mm (0.0079 in.), 0.3 mm


(0.0118 in.), 0.4 m m (0.0157 in.) and 0.8 mm (0.0315 in). These shims
have no identification markings; measure the thickness of each shim with
a calipers before using it.

Fig. 265

Apply sealant to both faces of each shim to prevent oil leaks.


After adjusting the timing, check that the operation was performed correctly.
Close the fuel filter valve and restore the delivery valve and injection pipe
to the original state.
A - TDC mark.
B - Injection advance angle.
C - Mark on timing cover.
D - Injection retard angle.
E - Increase shim thickness.
F - Decrease shim thickness.
G - Retarded.
H - Advanced.
m

Fig. 266

30-70

Method of intervention
30.1.31 - Inspection of the fuel lift pump
Inspection
1.

Examine the exterior of the pump for defects and test its performance.
Do not attempt to disassemble the pump.
Plunger-type fuel lift pump.
m

Fig. 267

2.

Diaphragm-type fuel lift pump.

Fig. 268

30.1.32 - Injection pump


Test on engine
1.

Test the operation injection pump using the methods suggested in the table below. Renew defective parts as necessary.
m Do not attempt to repair by disassembling.

Table 72

Characteristic to be
tested

Idle speed

Exhaust smoke
Spray pattern

Test method

Criteria

Use a tachometer.

Standard agricultural engine:


980 rpm
Rapidly increase engine revs under no-load conditions. Start Moderate emission of black or
under load.
grey smoke
Remove the injection nozzle and reinstall it with orifice point- Good spray pattern.
ing outwards away rom the engine. Crank the engine with the
starter motor and observe the spray pattern.

30-71

Method of intervention
Disassembly

Fig. 269 - Disassembly procedure


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
30-72

Tappet guide pin


Lock plate
Tappet
Tappet adjusting shim
Lower spring seat
Plunger
Plunger spring
Upper spring seat
Control sleeve

Method of intervention
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Control rack
Delivery valve holder
O-ring
Delivery valve spring
Delivery valve gasket
Delivery valve
Plunger barrel
Pump housing

Removal of the tappets


1.

Hold the injection pump in a vice with the tappet side (3) facing upwards.
Using a screwdriver, separate the lock plate from the tappet guide pin.
Rotate the tappet guide pin 180 to release it.

Fig. 270

2.

Remove tappet guide pin (1) with long-nose pliers while pushing down on
tappet (3), then remove the tappet.
Repeat the above procedure to remove all the remaining tappets.
m

The tappet may be expelled from its bore when the tappet guide pin
is removed. Hold the tappet to prevent it from falling Hold the tappet
to prevent it from falling.

Fig. 271

Removal of the plungers


1.

Remove the tappet adjustment shim.


Using pliers, remove lower spring seat (5) and plunger (6).
Remove upper spring seat and control sleeve.
Repeat the above procedure to remove all the remaining plungers, then
remove the control rack.

Fig. 272

30-73

Method of intervention
Removal of the delivery valves
1.

Turn the injection pump upside down and hold it in a vice.


Remove delivery valve holder (11), then remove the spring and the gasket.

Fig. 273

2.

Remove the delivery valve (15) with pliers.


Repeat the above procedure to remove all the remaining delivery valves.
m

The delivery valves are delicate components. Keep them as clean


as possible.

Fig. 274

Removal of the plunger barrels


1.

Remove barrels (16) from their bores.


m

The plungers and barrels are are delicate components. Keep them
as clean as possible.
Keep the plungers with their respective barrels for subsequent installation. Do not use barrels with other plungers.

Fig. 275

2.

When renewing the plungers and barrels or delivery valves, do not


loosen the adjusting plates (A) between the pumping elements.
After renewing components, the injection pump delivery must be
measured. Use the specific tester to measure the injection pump
delivery.
Keep disassembled injection pump parts in clean diesel fuel.

Fig. 276

30-74

Method of intervention
Inspection

Fig. 277 - Inspection points


1.

Inspect delivery valves (15) for signs of wear or damage.

1.

Inspect tappets (3) for signs of wear.

1.

Inspect plungers (6) for wear, rust or scoring.

1.

Check control rack (10) moves correctly.

30-75

Method of intervention
Assembly
To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.
Use the following procedure:

Fig. 278 - Assembly procedure


1.

Tightening torque: 4.5 0.5 kgf xm (32.5 4 lbf x ft) [44 5Nxm]

1.

Use a new O-ring (12).

1.

Use a new lock plate (2).

30-76

Method of intervention
Refitting the barrels
1.

Locate each barrel (16), aligning the groove with locating dowel (A) and
inserting it squarely into its bore.
m

If the groove in the barrel is not aligned with the locating dowel, the
O -ring will not seat correctly (it will still be visible) after the delivery
valve holder has been installed.

Fig. 279

Refitting the delivery valves


1.

Install delivery valve (15), gasket, spring and O-ring in the barrel (16) and
then tighten the delivery valve holder by hand.
Repeat this procedure to refit all the remaining delivery valves.
m

Every time the fuel injection pump is disassembled, a new O-ring


(12) must installed.

Take care not to damage O-rings (12) with the threads of delivery
valve holder (11).

Fig. 280

Refitting the control sleeves


1.

Install each control sleeve with the center tooth (C) aligned with the reference mark on the control rack (D).

Fig. 281

2.

Locate plungers (6) in their respective barrels.


m

Make sure the notch in the plunger is pointing toward the adjustment
plate.

Fig. 282

30-77

Method of intervention
Refitting the tappets
1.

Move the control rack back and forth while pushing down on each tappet
(3) to align the slot in the tappet with the hole in the housing for the tappet
guide pin. Locate lock plates (2) and tappet guide pins (1).
m

Every time the fuel injection pump is disassembled, new lock plates
must installed.

Fig. 283

Refitting the delivery valve holder


1.

Locate the delivery valve holders and tighten them to the specified torque.
m

Do not over tighten the delivery valve holders to avoid applying excessive force on the barrels and preventing free movement of the
plunger. If the holders are not tightened to the specified torque, engine oil leaks may develop in the fuel injection pump.

Delivery valve holders 4.5 0.5 kgf x m (32.5 4 lbf ft) [44 5 N x m]

Fig. 284

Post-assembly inspection
1.

Immediately after reassembling the fuel injection pump, check that the control rack moves freely without any binding or catching.
If the control rack fails to move freely, the possible causes are Pumping
element(s) sticking; Foreign particles lodged between control rack and
sleeves; Over-tightening of delivery valve holder(s).
Disassemble and check the injection pump to locate the cause of the problem.
After reassembly of the fuel injection pump, check the injection timing.

Fig. 285

30.1.33 - Inspection of the fuel injection pump camshaft


Inspection
1.

Measure the lobe height and base circle as shown in the figure. Subtract
the base circle from the lobe height to find the cam lift. If the cam lift exceeds the prescribed limit, renew the camshaft.

Table 73
Item

Standard

Lobe height of fuel in- 44 mm (1.73 in)


jection pump camshaft

Limit

43 mm (1.69 in)

Fig. 285

30-78

Method of intervention
30.1.34 - Inspection of the fuel injection pump camshaft
Test
1.

Measure the lobe height and base circle as shown in the figure. Subtract
the base circle from the lobe height to find the cam lift. If the cam lift exceeds the prescribed limit, renew the camshaft.

Table 74
Item

Standard

Lobe height of fuel in- 44 mm (1.73 in)


jection pump camshaft

Limit

43 mm (1.69 in)

Fig. 285

30-79

Method of intervention
30.1.35 - Fuel injection nozzle
Disassembly

Fig. 286 - Disassembly procedure


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
30-80

Lock nut. Tightening torque: 3.75 0.25 kgf x m (27 1.8lbf x ft) [36.8 N x m].
Fuel injector nozzle assembly. Check for excess carbon deposits on the nozzle or in the nozzle holes.
Item.
Pin. Examine for signs of wear or damage.
Spring. Check the applied force and straightness
Washer. Examine for signs of wear
Body. Tightening torque: 5.5 0.5 kgf x m (40 4 lbf x ft) [54 5 N x m].

Method of intervention
Inspection
1.

DANGER
Wear safety goggles when testing the nozzles. Fuel spraying out from the nozzles under high pressure can perforate
the skin and cause serious lesions. Never direct the nozzle
towards yourself or other persons, always point it in the direction of the collector.
Injection pressure (valve opening pressure) test.
Install the injection nozzle on the tester. Operate the tester handle slowly at
a speed of one stroke per second to make gradually increase the pressure
to the point where the valve in the injection nozzle starts to open.
Read the maximum pressure reading at the instant fluid flows from the tip.

2.

Fig. 287

If the injection pressure is incorrect, disassemble the nozzle and change


the thickness of washer (6).
m

Injection pressure (valve opening pressure) Standard : 140 kgf/cm


(1991 psi) [13729 kPa].

An increase or decrease in the washer thickness of 0.1 mm (0.004


in.) will result in a change in the injection pressure of 10 kgf/cm (142
psi) [981 kPa]. 10 washers are available in thicknesses from 1.25
mm (0.0492 in.) to 1.70 mm (0.0669 in.) in increments of 0.05 mm
(0.0020 in).
Fig. 288

3.

Nozzle hole restriction test.


Observe the pattern of the spray as it leaves the nozzle: the fuel spray
should be straight (A). Any variation in the spray pattern is an indication of
a fault in the nozzle (B).
Operate the tester handle at a speed of one stroke per second to check that
the spray profile is straight.

Fig. 289

30-81

Method of intervention
4.

Washing and renewing the nozzles.


Loosen lock nut (1), and remove tip (2) from the injection nozzle; wash
needle valve (C) and body (D) in clean diesel fuel. After washing, replace
the needle valve in the body with clean diesel fuel.
m

When removing the tip from the injection nozzle, be careful not to
damage it.

Keep the needle valves together with their respective bodies. Do not
use needle valves with bodies of a different type.
After cleaning tip (2), install it in the nozzle and tighten lock nut (1) to the
specified torque.
m

Tightening torque: 3.75 0.25 kgf x m (27 1.8 Ibf x ft) [36.8 2.5
N x m].
If the injection nozzle is still faulty after the tip has been washed, renew tip
(2).

Fig. 290

Do not touch the sliding surface of the needle valve.

When installing the new nozzle tip, remove the synthetic resin film
from the tip and slide the needle valve in the body with clean diesel
fuel to wash off all traces of the protective film.

Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.

30.1.36 - Maintenance of the injector nozzles


Maintenance
1.
2.
3.
4.

Testing the injection pressure (valve opening pressure)


See the following removal operation; Data Module:
See para. 30.1.35 - Fuel injection nozzle - page 30-79
Orifice restriction test.
See the following removal operation; Data Module:
See para. 30.1.35 - Fuel injection nozzle - page 30-79
Nozzle washing and renewal.
See the following removal operation; Data Module:
See para. 30.1.35 - Fuel injection nozzle - page 30-79
Refitting.
Fit the seal on the injection nozzle. Locate the nozzle in the cylinder head
and tighten it to the specified torque.

Table 75
Tightening torque

5.5 0.5 kgf x m


(40 4 lbf x ft)
[54 5 N x m]

Fig. 291

30-82

Method of intervention
30.1.37 - Governor
Disassembly

Fig. 292 - Disassembly procedure and inspection


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Spring
Tie-rod
Speed control lever
Spring pin
Grooved pin
Governor shaft
Governor lever
Starting spring
Tension lever
Governor spring
Governor spring lever
Governor housing

Inspection
1.

Make sure the levers move freely.

Check sliding sleeve for wear or damage. Make sure the sleeve moves freely.

Inspect the governor flyweights for signs of wear.

Examine the shaft for defects.

Check spring for damage.

Inspect sliding sleeve contact face for signs of wear.

30-83

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

Locate levers (3), (7), (9) and (11).


Install the O-ring on governor shaft (6).
Locate shaft (6) in governor housing (12), and install levers (3), (7), (9) and
(11) on the shaft.

Fig. 293

2.

Install grooved pin (5) and spring pin (4) using a hammer.
Locate tie-rod (2) and spring (1).

Fig. 294

3.

Remove the tie-rod cover


Move speed control lever (3) to the high idle position and hold it there.
Move tie-rod (2) in the direction of the arrow to the point where a slight
resistance is encountered.
m

In this position, tie-rod (2) does exert force on governor spring (10).

Torque spring assembly (A) is to be installed and adjusted after having first adjusted the low idle speed and high idle speed, with the
engine not running.
Fig. 295

4.

Rotate torque spring assembly (A), while slightly moving tie-rod (2) until the
reference mark on control rack (B) is aligned with the mark on the pump
body (C).
With these reference marks aligned, secure torque spring assembly (A) in
position by tightening nut (D).
Install sealing cap (E) over the torque spring assembly (A) and stake the
cap in position.

Fig. 296

30-84

Method of intervention
30.1.38 - Cooling system
Disassembly
1.

Removal of the cooling fan.


While holding the fan with one hand, remove the four fan retaining screws
and then remove the fan and the spacers.
m

Keep the spacers with the fan for subsequent refitting.

Fig. 297

2.

Removal of the thermostat housing.


Remove the assembly containing thermostat.

Fig. 298

3.

Removal of the water pump assembly.


Remove the water pump assembly.

Fig. 299

Refitting
1.

Refitting the water pump.


Locate the water pump on the engine block.
m

Renew the water pump flange gasket on reassembly.

Fig. 300

30-85

Method of intervention
2.

Refitting the thermostat.


Locate the thermostat in the thermostat housing, then locate the thermostat
assembly on the cylinder head.
m

Renew the thermostat housing gasket on reassembly.

Fig. 301

3.

Refitting the cooling fan.


Locate the spacers in the fan as shown in the figure; locate the pulley on
the water pump, then locate the fan/spacer assembly on the pulley.

Fig. 302

4.

Refitting the thermoswitch connected to the preheating control unit.


Apply Three Bond 1104 to the threads of the thermoswitch and thermostat
unit (A). Locate the thermoswitch and thermostat unit and tighten it to the
specified torque.

Table 76
Tightening torque

2.3 0.4 kgf x m


(16.6 3 Ibf x ft)
[22.6 4 N x m)
Fig. 303

30-86

Method of intervention
30.1.39 - Inspection of the cooling system
Inspection points

Fig. 304 - Schematic drawing


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Test the thermoswitch and preheating control unit using the following procedure.
Test the thermostat using the following procedure.
Check for signs of aging or damage.
Use new gaskets.
Check for cracks or distortion.
Check for cracks or leaks.
Check for elongation, aging or wear.

Inspection
1.

Water pump
Check rotation of the impeller and shaft.
m

If they do not rotate freely or are abnormally noisy, renew the water
pump assembly.

Fig. 305

30-87

Method of intervention
2.

Standard thermostat.
DANGER
Contact with the water in the radiator can cause severe
burns.
Hang the thermostat in a pan of water as shown in the figure. The thermostat must be below the surface of the water and it must not touch the sides
of the pan. Heat the water uniformly in the pan and read the temperature at
which the thermostat valve starts opening and the temperature at which the
valve lift (distance) is 8 mm (0.3 in).

Table 77

Fig. 306

Temperature at which valve starts 85 1.5 C (180 2.7 F)


opening
Temperature at which the valve lift is 95 C (203 F)
8 mm (0.3 in.)
m

3.

Renew the thermostat if defective.

Thermoswitch (standard).
DANGER
The oil in the pan is hot. Any contact can cause severe
burns.
Hang the thermoswitch in a pan of oil with its temperature sensor below the
surface of oil and measure the resistance while heating the oil as shown
in the figure.

Table 78
Resistance at 120 C (248F)
30 m Ohm
Temperature at which switch is 111 3.5 C (232 6.3 F)
turned ON
m

4.

Fig. 307

If the resistance value is incorrect, renew the thermoswitch.

Preheating control unit (standard).


DANGER
Contact with hot antifreeze can cause severe burns.
Hang the preheating control unit in the pan of antifreeze with its temperature sensing end below the surface of antifreeze and measure the resistance while gradually heating the antifreeze as shown in the figure.

Table 79
Standards

30-88

50 C (122 F): 80 10 W
80 C (176 F): 29.5 2.5 W
120 C (248 F): 10 0.3 W

If the resistance is incorrect, renew the preheating control unit.

Fig. 308

Method of intervention
30.1.40 - Engine air intake pipe
Removal
1.

Disconnect filter clogging sensor (1).

Fig. 309

2.

Remove retaining clamp (2).

Fig. 310

3.

Disconnect the air intake pipe from turbocharger (3).

Fig. 311

4.

Remove intake pipe (4).

Fig. 312

30-89

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.1.41 - Intake and exhaust systems


Disassembly
1.

Removal of the exhaust manifold.


Remove the exhaust manifold from the cylinder head.

Fig. 313

2.

Removal of the air intake manifold.


Remove the air intake manifold from the cylinder head.

Fig. 314

Refitting
1.

Refitting the air intake manifold.


Tighten the screws securing the air intake manifold (1) to the specified
torque.
m

Use a new gasket (2).

Table 80
Tightening torque

1.85 + 0.35 kgf x m


(13.4 2.5 lbf x ft)
[18 3.4 N x m]
Fig. 315

2.

Refitting the exhaust manifold.


Tighten the screws securing exhaust manifold (1) to the specified torque.
m

Use a new gasket (2).

Table 81
Tightening torque

1.85 + 0.35 kgf x m


(13.4 2.5 lbf x ft)
[18 3.4 N x m]
Fig. 316

30-90

Method of intervention
30.1.42 - Inspection of the air intake and exhaust system
Inspection

Fig. 317 - Schematic drawing


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Air breather pipe (for recirculation of blowby gases).


Air (from air cleaner).
Air intake manifold.
Blowby gases
To exhaust silencer.
Exhaust manifold.

Inspection

30-91

Method of intervention

Fig. 318 - Inspection points


1.
2.

Use a new gasket.


Make sure there are no cracks.

Inspection procedure
1.

Using a straight edge and a feeler gauge, check the flange faces of the
manifold for warpage and compare with the values given in the table below.

Table 82
Item

Warpage of manifold
m

Standards

0.15 mm (0.0059 in)

If warpage exceeds the limit, recondition or renew the manifold.

Fig. 319

30-92

Method of intervention
30.2 - C0 - Engine accessories

30.2.1 - Engine cooling system radiator


Removal
1.

Open radiator cap (1) to allow the coolant to flow and then open drain valve
(2).

Fig. 320

2.

Remove the clamp securing coolant recovery hose (3).

Fig. 321

3.

Remove the four upper screws and two lateral screws (4) and remove RH
fan guard (5).

Fig. 322

4.

Remove the three retaining screws (6) and remove LH fan guard (7).

Fig. 323

30-93

Method of intervention
5.

Remove the three retaining screws (8) of the top hose shroud.

Fig. 324

6.

Loosen clamp (9) to disconnect top hose (10).

Fig. 325

7.

Remove screw (11) securing the radiator to the engine mounting.

Fig. 326

8.

Remove the six hex socket screws (12) securing the fan cowling.

Fig. 327

30-94

Method of intervention
9.

Remove the two lower radiator retaining screws (13) on either side.
m

Recover the silent blocks for subsequent refitting.

Fig. 328

10.

Tilt the radiator forwards and loosen clamp (14) to disconnect the bottom
hose.

Fig. 329

11.

Tilt the radiator forwards and loosen clamp (15) to disconnect the water
drain hose.

Fig. 330

12.

Remove radiator (16).

Fig. 331

30-95

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m On refitting, make sure that the silent blocks are installed in the correct positions.
m

Fill the engine cooling system.

Engine coolant: max 5 litres (1.3 US gall.).

Start the engine and run for a few minutes to allow the coolant to circulate; check the system for leaks.

30.2.2 - Expansion tank


Removal
1.

Remove the two screws (1) securing the expansion tank to the hood support bracket.

Fig. 332

2.

Remove RH fixing screw (2) and clamp (3).

Fig. 333

3.

Remove expansion tank (4).

Fig. 334

Refitting
1.

30-96

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Method of intervention
30.2.3 - Fan
Removal
1.

Remove the three fixing screws (1).

Fig. 335

2.

Remove the centre nut (2) of the fan by turning it clockwise (LH thread),
while holding the back of the fan against rotation.
m

Use a pneumatic hammer nut runner.

Apply pressure in brief spurts to avoid damaging the nut.

Fig. 336

3.

Remove fan (3).

Fig. 337

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Centre nut: Loctite 510.

30-97

Method of intervention
30.2.4 - Air cleaner assembly
Removal
1.

Loosen retaining clamp (1).

Fig. 338

2.

Remove upper collar (2).

Fig. 339

3.

Remove air cleaner assembly (3).

Fig. 340

30-98

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.5 - Fuel filter


Disassembly
1.

Normally, the fuel filter is not to be disassembled. It is recommended that


only the element is removed for cleaning or renewal.
When installing the valve lever after washing, coat the lever O-ring with
silicone oil and the washer with grease.
1 - Nut
2 - Bowl
3 - O-ring
4 - Element
5 - Lever plate
6 - Washer
7 - Valve lever
8 - O-ring
9 - Seal
10 - Valve seat
11 - Filter head
A - Do not remove
B - Coat with silicone oil
C - Coat with grease
D - Wash in diesel fuel every 100 hours of service
Replace every 500 hours of service
E - Check for water and sediment.

Fig. 341

30.2.6 - Fuel tank - Fuel tank float switch


Fuel tank float switch
Removal
1.

To remove the fuel tank float switch it is not necessary to carry out
all the removal operations described above.
Remove the upper retaining screws of shroud (1) and the retaining screw
of upper panel (2), and unscrew fuel tank filler cap (3).
m

Fig. 342

2.

Remove the upper panel by moving shroud (4).

Fig. 343

30-99

Method of intervention
3.

Disconnect float switch wiring connector (5).

Fig. 344

4.

Remove the float switch and recover O-ring (6).

Fig. 345

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Fuel tank
Removal
1.

Remove steering wheel adjuster knob (7).


m

Recover the copper pellet.

Fig. 346

2.

Remove upper panel (4) and fuel tank filler cap (3), if the fuel tank float
switch has not already been removed.

Fig. 347

30-100

Method of intervention
3.

Remove relay (8) and preheating control unit (9) from the fuel tank.

Fig. 348

4.

Loosen clip (10) and remove preheating control unit wiring (11).

Fig. 349

5.

Disconnect direction indicator relay (12).

Fig. 350

6.

Remove retaining screws (14) and remove side panel (13) on either side.

Fig. 351

30-101

Method of intervention
7.

Remove the lateral fuel tank retaining screws (15) on both sides.

Fig. 352

8.

Disconnect fuel recovery pipe (16).

Fig. 353

9.

Remove the three screws (18) and remove upper heat shield (17).

Fig. 354

10.

Raise fuel tank (19).


m

Note the position of the pipe connecting the main fuel tank to auxiliary tank (20).

Fig. 355

30-102

Method of intervention
11.

Remove the main fuel tank.


m

Take care not to lose the spacers and the damper located on the two
guides (21) of the fuel tank subframe.

Fig. 356

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.7 - Auxiliary fuel tank


Removal
1.
2.

First drain the main fuel tank and then the auxiliary tank.
m Do not remove the drain plug of the auxiliary tank without having first removed the drain plug of the main tank.
Remove cover (1) of the A/C valve.

Fig. 357

3.

Disconnect fuel gauge wiring connector (2).

Fig. 358

4.

Remove the auxiliary electrical connector support bracket (3) from the tank.

Fig. 359

30-103

Method of intervention
5.

Remove connection pipe (4) to the main fuel tank.

Fig. 360

6.

Loosen clamp (5) and disconnect fuel pickup pipe (6).

Fig. 361

7.

Remove the auxiliary fuel tank.

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.8 - Engine stop keyswitch

Information, specifications and inspection


General information
1.

Turning the starter switch to ON position activates the glow plugs to heat
the engine and causes the glow plug indicator to come on.

Table 83
Heating time

6.2 0.7 seconds

1 - Fuel lift pump.


2 - Switch.
3 - Glow plug timer.
4 - Fuse.
5 - Glow plug indicator light.
6 - Glowplug relay.
7 - Glow plugs.
8 - Ammeter.
9 - Battery switch.
10 - Starter motor
11 - Battery.
Fig. 362

30-104

Method of intervention
Glow plug timer specifications
1.

The following table contains the standard technical data for the glow plug timer.

Table 84
Model

QGS

Type
Voltage rating
Operating voltage range
Operating temperature range
Storage temperature range
Glow plug activation time

Quick heating
12 Vdc
7 to 15 V
from -30 C to +70 C (from -22 F to +158 F)
from -40 C to +80 C (from -40 F to +176 F)
6.2 0.7 seconds

Glow plug relay specifications


1.

The following table contains the standard technical data for the glow plug
relay.

Table 85
Model

Voltage rating
Continuous rating
Coil resistance
Inductance
Operating temperature range

G71SP

12 Vdc
1 minute
13 Ohm
24 mH (at 1 kHz)
from -40 C to +100 C (From -40 F
to +212 F)

Fig. 363

Glow plug inspection


1.

Test for continuity between the terminal and body as shown in the figure.

Table 86
Item

Resistor

Standard

0.55 Ohm

Fig. 364

30-105

Method of intervention
30.2.9 - Exhaust pipe - tractor with cab
Removal
1.

Disconnect the exhaust pipe from silencer (1).

Fig. 365

2.

Remove hex socket screw (2).

Fig. 366

3.

Remove exhaust pipe (3).

Fig. 367

30-106

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.10 - Engine stop keyswitch

Information, installation and inspection


General information
1.

This system consisting of a switch, a control timer and a solenoid, permits


the operator to shut off the engine by turning the starter switch key to OFF
position. Another function of this system is to shut off the engine automatically when the oil pressure is too low, or when coolant temperature is too
high.
A - Control timer.
B - Solenoid.
C - Oil pressure switch.

Fig. 368

Standard wire colour code


1.

Engine stop keyswitch wiring diagram.

Table 87
No

Wire colour

1
2
3

Dark blue
Dark blue
Red

Green

Red/white

7
8

Yellow
Black

Connected to:

Solenoid
Solenoid
Battery (starter switch B
terminal)
Starter switch ON terminal
Starter (starter switch
and starter)
Oil pressure switch
Earth

Fig. 369

30-107

Method of intervention
Refitting the engine stop solenoid
1.

Remove the control rod cover. Apply thread sealant (Three Bond 1212) to
the threads of the engine stop solenoid.
Apply sealant to the entire length of thread to be screwed into the
governor housing.
Temporarily install the engine stop solenoid and the relative nut in the governor housing; then move the injection pump control rack to the injection
shutoff position
Insert the engine stop solenoid in the governor housing while pushing the
plunger towards the control rack to bring the shaft in contact with the control
rod. At this point, clearance C should be 0 mm. (the plunger will be rotated
as a result of the engine stop solenoid being screwed in).
Back off the engine stop solenoid by 30 - 45 (the clearance between the
control rack and plunger will be 0.15 to 0.20 mm (0.6059 to 0.0079 in.), then
tighten the nut to the specified torque. Start the engine and make sure the
engine stops when the plunger reaches the end of its stroke.
1 - Tightening torque: 4.5 0.5 kgf x m(32.5 3.6 lbf x ft) [44 N x m].
2 - Threads to be coated with thread sealant.
3 - Shaft.
4 - Plunger.
5 - From 0.15 mm to 0.20 mm (from 0.0059 to 0.0079 in).
m

2.

Fig. 370

Do not allow thread sealant to contact (A) and do not allow cleaning
solvent to enter the solenoid through aperture (B).

Install the rubber cap in position with the arrow pointing upwards (with the
side with the water drain hole down) as shown in the figure.
Do not allow cleaning solvent to come into contact with any part of
the solenoid.
1 - Rubber cap.
2 - Water drain hole.
m

Fig. 371

30-108

Method of intervention
Inspection after installation.
1.

Start the engine and make sure the engine stops when the starter switch key is turned to OFF position. Start the engine and
make sure the engine stops when the oil pressure switch terminal is shorted to the switch body.

30.2.11 - Alternator

Inspection, precautions and checks


1.

Inspection before removal.


The correct diagnosis of the charging system requires a careful inspection
with the alternator on the engine to determine whether or not it is necessary
to remove the alternator from the engine for further inspection.
The following chart, in which two troubles are listed with four possible
causes of each, will help locate the cause of the trouble.

Table 88
Excessive charge from alternator

Lack of charge from alternator

2.

Voltage regulator setting too high


Ground return circuit defective
Incorrect wiring
Series resistor or winding opencircuit
Alternator drivebelt slack
Voltage regulator setting too low
Low charge from alternator
Brushes worn

Fig. 372

Precautions for removal.


The following is a list of basic precautions that should always be observed
when removing components:
2.1. When installing the battery, make sure the negative ( ) terminal is
earthed.
2.2. Do not use a meghom-meter (a high-voltage, low current insulation
tester).
2.3. Disconnect the battery leads before charging the battery.
2.4. Do not attempt to disconnect the lead from the B terminal of the
alternator when the engine is running.
2.5. Battery voltage is being applied to the B terminal of the alternator.
Do not earth it.
2.6. Do not short or earth the L terminal of the alternator with an integral
regulator.
2.7. Do not use a steam cleaner to clean the alternator.

Fig. 373

30-109

Method of intervention
3.

Checking the voltage setting.


Connect the alternator to a 12 volt battery with an ammeter, a voltmeter and
a switch, as shown in the figure.
The voltmeter reading should be zero (0) when the starter switch is in OFF
position, and below the battery voltage level when the switch is in the ON
position. In this condition the engine does not start.
With one ammeter lead short-circuited, start the engine.
Check the voltmeter reading when the ammeter reading is below five amperes and the engine is running at 1800 rpm or 2500 rpm with no electrical
loads. The voltage setting varies with alternator temperature. Generally, the
higher the alternator temperature, the lower the voltage setting.

Table 89
Item

Voltage setting (at 20C [68F])

4.

Fig. 374

Standard

14.7 V 0.3 V

1 - Ammeter.
2 - Switch.
3 - Voltmeter.
4 - Battery (12 volts).
Testing output characteristics.
Disconnect the earth lead from the negative terminal of the battery. Connect one ammeter lead to the B terminal of the alternator and the other lead
to the positive terminal of the battery. Connect one voltmeter lead to the
B terminal and the other lead to earth; then connect the earth (negative)
lead of the battery. Start the engine and switch on all the electrical loads.
Increase the engine revs and measure the maximum output current at the
specified alternator speed, when the voltmeter reading is 13.5 volts.

Table 90
Item

Model

Output character- A7T0207


istics (at normal
temperature)
1 - Ammeter.
2 - Battery charging warning light.
3 - Switch.
4 - Battery.

30-110

Standards

Voltage / current Speed


at terminals
13.5 V / 33 A
2500 rpm maximum
13.5 V / 47 A
5000 rpm. maximum

Fig. 375

Method of intervention
Disassembly
1.

Disconnect the battery leads, disconnect the lead from terminal B of the
alternator, then disconnect the wiring connector from the alternator.
Loosen the mounting screws, move the alternator towards the engine and
remove the drivebelt.
Remove the alternator.

Fig. 376

Refitting
1.

Locate the alternator. Fit the adjustment screw to hold the alternator in
position.
Locate the drivebelt on the pulley. Move the alternator away from the engine to tension the drivebelt.
Tighten the screws.

Fig. 377

2.

Fit the adjuster screw to hold the alternator in position.

Table 91
Deflection under applied force of from 10 mm to 12 mm (from 0.4 in
less then 10 kgf (22 lbf) [98 N]
to 0.5 in)
A - Apply a force of 10 kgf (22 1bf) [98 N] midway between the crankshaft
pulley and the alternator pulley.
B - Adjustment screw.
Fig. 378

30-111

Method of intervention
30.2.12 - Alternator
Disassembly

Fig. 379 - Disassembly sequence


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Screw.
Pulley.
Rotor.
Rear bearing.
Bearing retainer plate.
Front bearing.
Front bracket.
Stator core.
Brush older.
Rectifier.
Rear bracket.

Disassembly procedure
1.

Separation of the stator core from the front bracket.


Prise the stator core off the front bracket with a screwdriver, as shown in
the figure.
m

Be careful not to insert the screwdriver too deep, to avoid damaging


the stator core.

Fig. 380

30-112

Method of intervention
2.

Removal of the pulley.


Hold the rotor assembly in a vice by using thick cloth as padding, as shown
in the figure. Remove the nut securing the pulley, and remove the pulley
and spacer. Remove the rotor assembly from the centre support bracket.

Fig. 381

3.

Removal of the stator core and rectifier.


Unsolder the leads from the rectifier and remove the stator core.
Unsolder the leads as quickly as possible to avoid damaging the
diodes in the rectifier.
Remove the screws that hold the rectifier in position and remove the rectifier.
1- Unsolder.
2 - Rectifier.
m

Fig. 382

Inspection

Fig. 383 - Inspection points


1.
2.
3.
4.

Check for cracks or other defects.


Test for open or short circuit using the procedure below.
Check for cracks or other defects.
Check for signs of wear.

30-113

Method of intervention
Inspection procedure
1.

Diodes.
Test the resistance between the diode and heat sink. Using an ohmmeter,
first touch the diode with the positive (+) probe, then with the negative ( )
probe. If the resistance is infinite in both cases, the diode circuit is open. If
it is nearly zero in both cases, the diode is shorted. Repeat this test on all
the remaining diodes.
m

If any of the diodes are open or shorted, renew the rectifier.

Fig. 384

2.

Field coil.
Test for continuity between the slip rings as shown in the figure.
m

No continuity shows there is an open circuit in the field coil. Renew


the field coil.

Fig. 385

3.

Test for electrical continuity between the slip ring and shaft (or core), as
shown in the figure.
m

The absence of continuity indicates there is a earthed circuit in the


field coil. Renew the field coil.

Fig. 386

4.

Stator core.
Test for continuity between the leads, as shown in the figure.
m

The absence of continuity indicates there is an open circuit in the


stator core. Renew the stator core.

Fig. 387

30-114

Method of intervention
5.

Test for continuity between each wire and the stator core, as shown in the
figure.
m

The absence of continuity indicates there is a earthed circuit in the


stator core. Renew the stator core.

Fig. 388

6.

Brushes.
Renew the brushes if they are worn down to or beyond the wear limit.
A - Wear limit.

Fig. 389

7.

To remove the brushes from the brush holder for replacement, unsolder the
wires from the brushes, then remove the brushes and springs.
1 - Unsolder.
2 - Brush holder.

Fig. 390

8.

Fit the new brushes in the brush holder and solder the wires to the brushes.

Fig. 391

30-115

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, reverse the disassembly steps and use the following procedure:
the rear bearing has a groove for slip ring. Install the slip ring in this groove,
making sure the tab locates the deepest part of the groove.
to install a new rear bearing, position it with the grooved side facing the slip
rings of the rotor;
before installing the bearing in the rear bracket, heat the bracket;
before installing the rotor in the rear bracket, insert a bent wire tool into the
hole in the rear bracket to lift the brushes clear of the slip rings. Remove the
tool after the rotor has been installed in position.
1 - Bent wire tool.
2 - Brushes.
3 - Rear bracket.

Fig. 392

30.2.13 - Starter motor


Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Drain the gearbox oil.


Disconnect starter motor lead (1).

Fig. 393

3.

Remove nut (2) securing the cover of the electromagnet.

Fig. 394

30-116

Method of intervention
4.

Withdraw starter control contact (3).

Fig. 395

5.

Disconnect second power lead (4).


See para. 30.7.2 - Transmission oil filte... - page 30-244

Fig. 396

6.

Remove the two starter motor retaining screws (5).

Fig. 397

7.

Remove starter motor (6).

Fig. 398

30-117

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.14 - Starter motor


Disassembly
1.

Checks prior to removal


Clearance between pinion and armature (pinion clearance). Connect the
starter motor to a 12 volt battery as shown in the figure to cause the pinion
to shift into cranking position and remain there.
Due to the amount of current being passed through the solenoid
series winding, this test must be performed within 10 seconds.
Push the pinion manually toward the end of the commutator to measure its
free movement (pinion clearance) The pinion clearance must be within the
range of 0.5 to 2.0 mm (0.020 to 0.079 in).
m

If the clearance is out of this range, adjust by adding or removing


of the the electromagnetic sensors. Adding contacts will reduce the
clearance.
1 - Pinion.
2 - Battery (12 volts).
3 - Starter motor.
m

2.

Fig. 399

No-load characteristics.
Connect the starter motor to a 12 volt battery, as shown in the figure. Close
the switch to shift the pinion into cranking position, and run the starter at
a speed higher than that specified. If the current draw and/or operating
speed is out of the normal range, disassemble the starter for inspection
and repairs.
1- Switch.
2 - Ammeter.
3 - Starter motor.
4- Speedometer.
5 - Battery (12 volts).

3.

Fig. 400

For this test, use wires of the largest permitted size. Tighten the terminals securely.

The starter motor has a reduction gear Do not confuse gear noise with abnormal noise.

When measuring the starter motor speed at the end face of the pinion, be ready for sudden movement of the pinion.

Table 92
Item

Model
Nominal output, V - kW
No-load characteristics

30-118

Standard

Voltage at the terminals, V


Current draw, A
Speed (rpm)

M2T56272
12 - 2.0
11
130 maximum
3850 minimum

M2T50381
12 - 1.6
11.5
100 maximum
3000 minimum

Method of intervention
4.

Solenoid
Disconnect the wiring connector from the M terminal of the solenoid. Connect the solenoid to a 12 volt battery with a switch, as shown in the figure,
to test the pull-in coil. Close the switch to see if the pinion shifts.
m

If the pinion fails to shift, the solenoid is faulty.

Due to the amount of current being passed through the solenoid


series winding, this test must be performed within 10 seconds.
1 - Battery (12 volt).
2 - Connector disconnected.
m

Fig. 401

5.

Connect the solenoid to a 12 volt battery with a switch, as shown in the


figure, to test the hold-in coil. Close the switch and pull the pinion away
from the commutator end by hand. Release the pinion to see if it remains
stationary.
m

If the pinion returns, the solenoid is faulty.

Due to the amount of current being passed through the solenoid


series winding, this test must be performed within 10 seconds.
1 - Battery (12 volt).
2 - Connector disconnected.
m

Fig. 402

6.

Connect the solenoid to a 12 volt battery with a switch, as shown in the


figure, to test the pinion return. Close the switch and pull the pinion away
from the commutator end by hand. Release the pinion to see if it returns
immediately when released.
m

If the pinion fails to return, the solenoid is faulty.

Due to the amount of current being passed through the solenoid


series winding, this test must be performed within 10 seconds.
1 - Battery (12 volt).
2 - Connector disconnected.
m

Fig. 403

7.

Removal.
Disconnect the battery leads. Disconnect the negative ( ) lead first. Disconnect lead (1) from the starter motor. Loosen the two retaining screws (2)
and remove the starter motor (3).

Fig. 404

30-119

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.2.15 - Disassembly of the starter motor


Disassembly

Fig. 405 - Disassembly sequence


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Pinion assembly.
Field magnet
Support bracket.
Brush gear.
Yoke.
Armature.
Bearing.
Ball.
Seal.
Gear.
Lever assembly.
Gasket kit.
Gear carrier shaft.
Internal gear.
Overrunning clutch.
Front support bracket.
l

The pinion must be removed prior to removing or renewing bracket (16), gears (10) and the overrunning clutch (15).

Disassembly procedure
1.

Pinion.
It is possible to remove the pinion when in the forward position as a result of excitation of the field magnet. Disconnect the
connector of the M terminal and create a circuit that connects the starter motor and the battery as illustrated in the figure. Close
the switches S1 and S2 so that the pinion is moved forward and rotates. Then open switch S2. The pinion will stop rotating but
will remain in the forward position. Apply a tubular tool to the pinion stop and tap it gently with a mallet to remove the pinion.
m If, when tapped, the pinion returns to its back position before the stop is detached, repeat the operation from the beginning.

30-120

Method of intervention
2.

Ball.
The ball at the end of the armature serves as a thrust bearing. When the
armature is removed, the ball may remain attached to the end with grease.
m

Take care not to lose the ball.

Fig. 406

Test
Armature
1.

Coil shortcircuit test.


Position the armature on a shortcircuit tester (growler). Hold an iron bar
parallel to the armature and slowly turn the latter by hand.
m

If the iron bar vibrates or is attracted towards the armature, this


means the armature coil is short circuiting and must be renewed.

Fig. 407

2.

Coil earth test.


Test for continuity between the commutator and the shaft (or core).
m

If there is continuity, this means that the coil is connected to earth


and the armature must be renewed.

Fig. 408

3.

Commutator test.
Measure the commutator run-out using a dial gauge.

Table 93
Commutator run-out
m

Limit

0.1 mm (0.004 in)

If the run-out exceeds the indicated tolerance limit, lightly skim the
commutator on a lathe so that the outside diameter is within the
specifications.

Fig. 409

If the surface of the commutator is rough or has steps worn into it,
smooth using fine grade glasspaper (# 300 500).

30-121

Method of intervention
4.

Measure the outside diameter of the commutator.

Table 94
Normal value

Commutator outside di- 32.0 mm (1.26 in)


ameter
m

Limit

31.4 mm (1.24 in)

If the diameter is not within the prescribed tolerance limits, renew


the armature.
Fig. 410

5.

Measure the depth of the slots between the commutator segments.

Table 95
Commutator run-out
m

Limit

0.1 mm (0.004 in)

If the depth is less that the specified tolerance limit, recut the slots to
depth of 0.4 0.6 mm. (0.016-0.024 inches).

Fig. 411

Field coil
1.

Field coil interruption test.


Test for continuity between the terminal conductor and each of the brushes.
m

If there is no continuity, this means the field coil circuit is interrupted.


In this case the yoke must be renewed.

Fig. 412

2.

Coil earth test.


Test for continuity between the yoke and each of the brushes. If there is
continuity, this means the coil is connected to earth and must be checked
to see if the insulation is defective.
m

Renew the yoke assembly if it cannot be repaired.

Fig. 413

30-122

Method of intervention
Brushes and brush gear
1.

Brushes worn.
Measure the length of the brushes. If the length is below the specified tolerance limit, renew the brush.

Table 96
Brush length
m

2.

Normal value

18 mm (0.71 in)

Limit

11 mm (0.43 in)

If the brush is worn unevenly or has rough contact face, repair using
fine grade glasspaper (#300-500).

Fig. 414

Brush spring force.


Whenever a new brush is fitted, it is necessary to test the force of the
spring. Pull the spring brush with a strain gauge and read the load value at
the point where the spring becomes detached from the brush.

Table 97
Brush spring force

3.

Normal value

Limit

26.7 N 36.1 N (60 14.7 N (3.3 lbf)


lbf8.3 lbf)

Renew the spring if the force is less than the specified limit.

Fig. 415

Brush gear insulation test.


Test for continuity between the brush holder (+) and the brushholder mounting plate ().
m

If there is continuity, renew the brush holder gear.

Fig. 416

30-123

Method of intervention
Overrunning clutch
1.

Check that the pinion shaft runs smoothly when turned clockwise (normal
direction of rotation) and that it locks up when turned anticlockwise.
m

If the pinion shaft does not function correctly, renew the overrunning
clutch.

Fig. 417

Gear carrier shaft end float


1.

It is not necessary to adjust the end float of the gear carrier shaft.

Armature end float


1.

It is not necessary to adjust the end float of the armature.

Assembly

Fig. 418 - Assembly sequence


l

16 > 12 > 13 > 14 > 15 > 1 > 10 > 11 > 9 > 8 > 5 > 6 > 7 > 4 > 3 > 2

Post-assembly tests and checks


1.

After assembling the starter motor, carry out the following tests and checks.

30-124

Method of intervention
Checking and adjustment of the pinion clearance
1.

Connect the starter motor to the battery as shown in the figure. The pinion
will move outwards and rotate slowly. Then remove the connector of terminal M to stop the starter motor.

Fig. 419

2.

Push the pinion shaft gently towards the armature and measure the axial
movement, which corresponds to the pinion clearance.
If the pinion clearance is not within the prescribed tolerance limits of 0.52.0 mm (0.02 0.08 in.), adjust by increasing or decreasing the number of
gaskets on the field magnet (adding gaskets reduces the pinion clearance).
It may be necessary to renew the lever in order to obtain the correct pinion
clearance.

Table 98
Limit

Pinion clearance
m

0.5 mm - 2.0 mm (0.02 in - 0.08 in)

Fig. 420

Do not excite the field magnet for more than 10 seconds to avoid
overheating.

No-load test
1.

When the pinion clearance has been correctly adjusted, connect an ammeter and a voltmeter between the starter motor and the battery as shown
in the figure, then check the no-load characteristics of the starter motor.

Table 99
Voltage

No-load charac- 11 V
teristics
m

Current

Speed (min -1)

130 A maximum 3600 minimum

Use the thickest possible cables. Tighten all the terminals securely.

1. Ammeter.
2. Switch.
3. Starter motor.
4. Voltmeter.
5. Battery.

Fig. 421

30-125

Method of intervention
Field magnet
1.

Carry out the following continuity tests. If the field magnet fails any of these
tests, it should be renewed.
Check for interruptions in the coil circuit. There should be continuity between terminals S and M and between terminal S and earth (casing).
Check for poor contacts. There should be not be continuity between terminals B and M.

Fig. 422

30-126

Method of intervention
30.3 - D0 - Transmission
30.3.1 - Clutch plate
Removal
1.

Insert a suitable dowel (1) in the centre hole of the clutch assembly, then
attach the clutch assembly to a hoist (2).

Fig. 423

2.

Remove the six screws (3).


m

Loosen the six screws (3) gradually in stages a criss-cross sequence.

Fig. 424

3.

Remove complete clutch assembly (4).

Fig. 425

4.

Remove clutch plate (5)

Fig. 426

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-127

Method of intervention
30.3.2 - Checking clutch plate wear
1.

Check that the thickness of clutch plate (1) is within the prescribed tolerance limits and there is no sign of burning.
Clutch plate thickness:
- standard measurement: 10 0.3 mm
- limit measurement: 7.5 mm

Fig. 427

30.3.3 - Clutch release bearing


Removal
1.

Detach the two springs (2) from the clutch housing (1).

Fig. 428

2.

Remove screws (3) securing the clutch release forks, then remove the
clutch release bearing assembly (4).

Fig. 429

3.

Using a suitable drift, separate main clutch release bearing (5) from sleeve
(6).

Fig. 430

30-128

Method of intervention
4.

Using a suitable drift, remove ring (7) from bearing (8) and bearing (8) from
sleeve (9).

Fig. 431

5.

Remove the two thrust pins (10) from each of the two release forks.
m

Check that the pins are not excessively worn or deformed and renew them if necessary.

Fig. 432

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


Grease the sleeve support.
Fit release bearing assembly (4) and locate fork pins (10) in their respective
housings on the sleeves.
Push sleeves (6) and (9) as far as they will go towards the transmission,
then, using a suitable installation tool, fit release bearing (8).
m

Grease sleeves (6) and (9).


Fig. 433

30.3.4 - Clutch release forks


Removal
1.

Remove cotter pin (1) from the external tie-rod of the release fork control
lever.

Fig. 434

30-129

Method of intervention
2.

Withdraw pin (2) and relative fork (3).


m

Note which way round fork (3) is installed.

Fig. 435

3.

Remove lock pin (4) securing the tie-rod of the main clutch release fork.

Fig. 436

4.

Withdraw pin (5) and relative fork (6).


m

Note which way round fork (6) is installed.

Fig. 437

5.

Looking at the clutch housing from the front end, main clutch release fork
(6) is the smaller of the two forks and is located to the rear of PTO clutch
release fork (3).

Fig. 438

30-130

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.3.5 - Clutch housing


Removal
1.

Remove sound-absorbing panels (1).

Fig. 439

2.

Remove the brake tie-rod cotter pins (2) on both sides.

Fig. 440

3.

Remove the four screws (3) and remove footplate support brackets (4).

Fig. 441

4.

Disconnect rear wiring harness (5).

Fig. 442

30-131

Method of intervention
5.

Disconnect oil supply pipe (6) to the rear lift.

Fig. 443

6.

Remove retaining screw (7), cotter pin (8) and remove gearshift linkage (9).
m

Mark the relative positions of gear lever (10) and the gearshift linkage.

Recover the bush.

Fig. 444

7.

Remove the two screws (11) and remove the support complete with shuttle
lever (12).

Fig. 445

8.

Remove cotter pin (13) and remove shuttle tie-rod (14).

Fig. 446

30-132

Method of intervention
9.

Remove the two cotter pins (15) and PTO tie-rod (16).

Fig. 447

10.

Remove the two screws (17) and remove main gear lever (18).

Fig. 448

11.

Remove the two cotter pins (19) and remove gearshift tie-rod (20).

Fig. 449

12.

Unscrew fork retaining screw (21) but leave the fork in position.

Fig. 450

30-133

Method of intervention
13.

Disconnect the PTO/gearbox lubrication pipe (22).

Fig. 451

14.

Attach clutch housing (23) to a hoist.

Fig. 452

15.

Remove the four screws (24) and lift the clutch housing clear so as to withdraw the fork.

Fig. 453

16.

Remove clutch housing (25).

Fig. 454

30-134

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


To avoid damaging the rod oil seals, remove support (26) but remember to
refit it before installing the fork.
Remember to install fork (27) before definitively joining the two transmission casings.

Fig. 455

30.3.6 - Disassembly of the gearbox input shaft

Fig. 456 - Input shaft

Disassembly
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the negative () terminal of the battery.

2.

Remove circlip (1) and spacer (2).

Fig. 457

30-135

Method of intervention
3.

Remove forward driving gear (3), then remove circlip (4).

Fig. 458

4.

Remove synchronizer (5).

Fig. 459

5.

Remove circlip (6) and remove reverse driving gear (7).

Fig. 460

6.

Only if necessary:
Remove inner race (8) of roller cage (9), the remove circlip (10) and remove
roller cage (9).

Fig. 461

30-136

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.

30.3.7 - Disassembly of the main shaft

Fig. 462 - Main shaft

Disassembly
1.

Remove circlip (1) and, using a suitable puller, remove bearing (2).

Fig. 463

Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.

30-137

Method of intervention
30.3.8 - Disassembly of the secondary shaft

Fig. 464 - Secondary shaft

Disassembly
1.

Remove spacer (1).

Fig. 465

2.

Remove 1st speed driven gear (2), then remove driver ring (3) from gear
(2).

Fig. 466

30-138

Method of intervention
3.

Remove needle roller bearing (4) and remove circlip (5).

Fig. 467

4.

Remove synchronizer (6) and friction ring (7).

Fig. 468

5.

Remove circlip (8) and 2nd speed driven gear (9).

Fig. 469

6.

Remove thrust plate (10) and remove circlip (11).


m

Note which way round thrust plate (10) is installed.

Fig. 470

7.

Remove the thrust plate (12) and the 3rd speed driven gear (13).
m

Note which way round the thrust plate (12) is installed.

Fig. 471

30-139

Method of intervention
8.

Remove circlip (14) and remove synchronizer (15) complete with driver ring
(16).

Fig. 472

9.

Remove driver ring (17) and remove circlip (18).

Fig. 473

10.

Remove 4th speed driven gear (19) and remove circlip (20).

Fig. 474

11.

Remove spacer (21); then remove roller cage (22).

Fig. 475

12.

Position output shaft (23) under a press and remove bearing (24).

Fig. 476

30-140

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.

30.3.9 - Gearbox and shuttle assembly - complete unit


Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the negative () terminal of the battery.

2.

Separate the clutch housing from the transmission and remove union (1).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 477

3.

Remove the two screws (2) and remove bracket (3), then remove pivot pin
(4) and rotate 4WD control lever (5).

Fig. 478

4.

Remove screws (6), attach the gearbox/shuttle (7) assembly to a hoist and
remove it.

Fig. 479

5.

Remove the two seals (8) of the range gear selector rod and the PTO
speed selector rod.
m

Remove all traces of paint from the selector rods to prevent damage
to the seals during reassembly.

Fig. 480

30-141

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.
Carry out the following procedures:
Procedure 3
l

Apply a continuous bead of sealant to the contact surfaces of the transmission casing and the gearbox/shuttle assembly.
Surfaces: Loctite 510

Fig. 481

Procedure 3
l
l

Install the gearbox/shuttle assembly and secure it with screws (6).


If the clutch housing is not to be installed immediately, fit the spacers A
on the clutch housing studs and secure them in position with nuts to ensure
perfect adhesion between the mating surfaces.

Fig. 482

Procedure 4
l

Using the installation tool T3, fit previously removed seals (8).

Fig. 483

30.3.10 - Gearbox and shuttle assembly - complete unit


Disassembly
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the negative () terminal of the battery.

2.

Remove plug (1), spring (2) and ball (3).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 484

30-142

Method of intervention
3.

Remove screws (4) and plate (5), then remove pin (6), springs (7) and balls
(8).

Fig. 485

4.

Remove cover (9).

Fig. 486

5.

Drill cover (10) and remove it using a slide hammer puller.


m

Clean all traces of old sealant from the cover seating.

Renew the cover on reassembly.

Fig. 487

6.

Remove circlips (11) and (12) securing the main shaft and secondary shaft.

Fig. 488

7.

Remove oil seal (13) and remove circlip (14).

Fig. 489

30-143

Method of intervention
8.

Remove circlip (15) and spacer (16).

Fig. 490

9.

Using a copper bar and a soft-faced mallet, simultaneously drive out the
input, primary and secondary shafts, tapping each in turn alternately.

Fig. 491

10.

Remove the three circlips (17) and withdraw bearings (18).

Fig. 492

11.

Remove the five oil seals (19).

Fig. 493

30-144

Method of intervention
Assembly
To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.
Carry out the following procedures:
Procedure 3
l
l

Apply a bead of sealant to the transmission casing.


Transmission casing: Loctite 510

Fig. 494

Procedure 4
l
l
l

Apply a bead of sealant to the seating of cover (10).


Cover: Loctite 601
Locate the cover and secure in position by tapping it in the centre.

Fig. 495

Procedure 8
l

Insert all the shafts and forks simultaneously and, using a soft-faced mallet,
tap each shaft in succession to gradually drive them up against the bearings in the gearbox casing.

Fig. 496

Procedure 8
l

l
l
l

Adjust the position of the gear selector forks so that they positioned centrally relative to the synchronizer ring and secure them by tightening nuts (20).
Nuts: Loctite 270
Nuts: 90 to 105 Nm (66 to 77lb.ft.)
Fit the nuts so that the flat sides face the forks.

Fig. 497

30-145

Method of intervention
Procedure 10
l

Take care that the friction ring (21) of the 1st speed synchronizer does not
move out of position.
Do not install the oil seals at this stage.

Fig. 498

30.3.11 - Range gearbox and differential assembly - complete unit

Fig. 499 - Range gearbox and differential assembly

30-146

Method of intervention
Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) and remove washer (2).

Fig. 500

2.

Move circlip (3) towards the rear of the transmission and drive shaft (4)
towards the front using a copper punch.

Fig. 501

3.

Remove bearing (5) and remove shaft (4) complete with gear (6), circlip (3)
and bearing (7).
m

Note which way round gear (6) is installed.

Fig. 502

4.

Slide bearing (7) off shaft (4).

Fig. 503

30-147

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.
l
l

Apply Loctite to screw (1).


Screw: Loctite 242

30.3.12 - Gearbox input shaft - oil seal renewal


Removal
1.

Remove the three retaining screws (1).

Fig. 504

2.

Remove bearing holder sleeve (2).

Fig. 505

3.

Remove circlip (3) securing the gearbox input shaft bearing.

Fig. 506

4.

Withdraw shaft (4) from the rear end of the gearbox.

Fig. 507

30-148

Method of intervention
5.

Remove oil seal (5).


m

The oil seal must always be renewed using installer (6) whenever it
is removed.

Fig. 508

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.3.13 - Bevel gear pair

Fig. 509 - Bevel gear pair

30-149

Method of intervention
Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) and remove spring (2) and ball (3).

Fig. 510

2.

Remove nuts (4), remove fork (5) and rod (6).

Fig. 511

3.

Remove bearing (8) on the opposite side to crown wheel (9) from differential housing (7). Then remove screws (10) and remove crown wheel (9)
complete with bearing (11).

Fig. 512

4.

Remove the outer races of bearings (8) and (11) from differential supports
(12) and (13), while leaving in position the relative shims (14) and (15).

Fig. 513

5.

Using a C spanner and a soft metal bar inserted between the driven gear
and the transmission casing, fully loosen nut (16).
m

Renew nut (16) on reassembly.

Fig. 514

30-150

Method of intervention
6.

Remove circlip (17).

Fig. 515

7.

Move 4WD driving gear (18) towards the front of the transmission and remove key (19); then remove pinion (20).

Fig. 516

8.

Remove the outer race of pinion bearing (21) and spacers (22) from the
transmission casing.
m

Recover the spacers.

Fig. 517

9.

Using a press, remove the remaining components of bearing (21) from pinion (20).

Fig. 518

30-151

Method of intervention
Preparation for refitting
1.

Mount new crown wheel (9) on differential housing (7) and secure it with
screws (10).
m

Screws: 75 4 Nm (55 3 lb ft)

Fig. 519

2.

Using a suitable drift, install the inner races of bearings (8) and (11).

Fig. 520

3.

Remove shims to the value of 0.2 mm from each of the two shim packs (14)
and (15) of differential supports (12) and (13) and refit them in their respective supports along with the outer races of bearings (11) and (8).
m

If it is not possible to identify the shim packs of the two sides, form
two shim packs: one 1.3 mm thick for the crown wheel side and the
other 1.8 mm thick for the opposite side.

Fig. 521

Refitting
1.

Before refitting, see the various bevel gear pair adjustment procedures:
See para. 30.3.20 - Adjustment of the beve... - page 30-162

Fig. 522

30-152

Method of intervention
2.

Insert ball (3), spring (2) and tighten screw (1).


m

Renew the copper washers.

Fig. 523

3.

Adjust the position of fork (5) so that the selector gear is positioned centrally relative to the corresponding gear when the selector rod is in the L
range position. Tighten nuts (4) to secure in position.
m
m

Nuts: 50 to 105 Nm (37 77.4 lb ft)


Nuts: Loctite 270

Fig. 524

30.3.14 - Disassembly of 4WD output shaft and groundspeed PTO


Disassembly
1.

When removing the differential, mark the crown wheel side support
to avoid confusion on reassembly.
m If the bevel gear pair is to be renewed, do not remove the shims from
the differential support.
Remove oil seal (1) and remove circlip (2).
m

Renew oil seal (1) on reassembly.

Fig. 525

2.

Using a soft metal bar as a punch, drive out shaft (3) complete with the
bearing and remove sleeve (4) from the transmission casing; then remove
bearing (5) from shaft (3).

Fig. 526

30-153

Method of intervention
3.

Remove circlip (6) and remove 4WD driven gear (8) and spacer (7).

Fig. 527

4.

Remove circlip (9) and move shaft (10) towards the rear of the transmission
casing. Remove circlip (11) and withdraw the complete shaft assembly (10)
towards the front of the transmission.

Fig. 528

5.

Remove circlip (12) and gear (13), then remove bearing (14).

Fig. 529

6.

Remove bearing (15).

Fig. 530

30-154

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m
m

Lubricate the lips of oil seal (2).


Oil seal: transmission oil.

Fig. 531

30.3.15 - Creeper - synchronizer renewal


Removal
1.

Remove creeper gear (1).

Fig. 532

2.

Remove front part of synchronizer (2).

Fig. 533

3.

Remove circlip (3) securing the synchronizer.

Fig. 534

30-155

Method of intervention
4.

Remove set screw (4), then remove the selector fork-synchronizer assembly (5) and bronze crown (6).

Fig. 535

5.

Remove cover (7 ) and remove the spring and ball (8) from the relative gear
selector rod.

Fig. 536

6.

Remove creeper interlock plunger (9) after removing the relative plug.

Fig. 537

7.

Remove circlip (10) securing the synchronizer gear.

Fig. 538

30-156

Method of intervention
8.

Loosen the nut and locknut of selector fork (11), so that the fork may be
shifted forwards to allow removal of the synchronizer gear.

Fig. 539

9.

Renew synchronizer (12).

Fig. 540

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m During reassembly, take care to install the selector fork the right way round, positioning it centrally relative to the synchronizer ring.
m

Nut and locknut: Loctite 243 threadlocker.

30.3.16 - PTO output shaft.


Removal
1.

Remove cover (1) and remove circlip (2).

Fig. 541

2.

Using a suitable drift, drive out shaft (3).

Fig. 542

30-157

Method of intervention
3.

Remove roller cage (4).

Fig. 543

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.3.17 - Disassembly of the PTO output shaft.


Disassembly
1.

Remove circlip (2) from shaft (1) and remove bearing (3).

Fig. 544

Assembly
To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order. Carry out the following procedures:

30.3.18 - Removal of the PTO output shaft


Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) and remove spring (2) and ball (3).

Fig. 545

2.

Remove nuts (4) and remove fork (5).

Fig. 546

30-158

Method of intervention
3.

Remove oil seal (6) and remove circlip (7).

Fig. 547

4.

Move circlip (8) towards the front of the transmission. Using a suitable tool,
partially withdraw PTO shaft (9).

Fig. 548

5.

Finally remove circlip (8) and remove PTO shaft (9).


m

In some cases bearing (10) may remain on shaft (9). Remove it using gear (11).
Recover shims (12), spacer (13) and gear (14).

Fig. 549

6.

Remove bearing (15) from PTO shaft (9).

Fig. 550

30-159

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m

If PTO shaft (9), bearings (10) and (15) or transmission casing (16)
are to be renewed, form a shim pack to be installed between PTO
shaft (9) and the front bearing (10) to obtain play of 0.05 to 0.15 mm.

Fig. 551

2.

Adjust the position of the PTO speed selector fork so that, when selector
rod (17) is in the 1000 rpm position, selector gear (11) is positioned centrally relative to the gear (18).
m
m
m
m

Tighten nuts (4) to secure in position.


Nuts: Loctite 270
Nuts: 90 to 105 Nm (6677 lb.ft.)
Fit the nuts so that the flat sides face the forks.

Fig. 552

30.3.19 - Parking brake


Removal
1.

To disconnect the parking brake cable, remove cotter pin (1) and loosen the
clamp securing gaiter (2) to remove the outer cable.

Fig. 553

30-160

Method of intervention
2.

Release the inner parking brake cable from clip (3).

Fig. 554

3.

Remove the four retaining screws (6) and remove parking brake lever (7).

Fig. 555

4.

Withdraw cotter pin (8).

Fig. 556

5.

Remove the pin securing the cable to lever (9) and relative circlip (10).

Fig. 557

30-161

Method of intervention
6.

Disconnect the parking brake cable from lever (11).

Fig. 558

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m After connecting the control cable, check that the parking brake lever has three notches of free play.

30.3.20 - Adjustment of the bevel gear pair


Adjustment of the differential preload
1.

Install differential assembly (1) and supports (2) and (3).

Fig. 559

2.

Position a dial gauge with magnetic stand A on the differential support (2)
of the crown wheel side and set it to zero on the head of the differential,
while using a lever to force the differential towards the opposite side to the
crown wheel.

Fig. 560

3.

Force the differential towards the crown wheel side and measure the end
float. Add 0.1 mm to the measured end float to determine the thickness of
the shims to be installed under the bearing (4) on the opposite side to the
crown wheel.
m

Repeat the measurement procedure a number of times.

Fig. 561

30-162

Method of intervention
4.

Remove flange (3) on the opposite to the crown wheel and install a shim
pack (5) of the thickness calculated in the previous step. Refit differential
support (3) to the transmission casing.

Fig. 562

5.

Wind a cord around the 122 mm section of the differential housing and,
using a spring dynamometer T5 (code 5.9030.529.0), measure the rolling
resistance torque of differential (1) to check the correct preloading of the
differential bearings.
m

Force required to maintain steady rotation: 2.5 to 4.0 kg

Fig. 563

Adjustment of the pinion position


1.

Remove differential supports (2) and (3) and differential (1).


m

Take care not to confuse the right and left differential supports.

Fig. 564

2.

Install pinion (6) complete with the bearing in the transmission casing and
drive it into its seating.
Make a note of the value E stamped on a tooth of pinion (6) (in this
example + 0.3 mm).
Temporarily fit 4WD gear (7) and nut (8).
m

Tighten the nut to eliminate bearing play.

Fig. 565

3.

Install differential (1) complete with supports (2) and (3), and then fix the
supports.
m

While tightening the screws, check that there is clearance between


the differential and pinion (6). If the differential is tight up against the
pinion, adjust the two shim packs by reducing the shim thickness on
the crown wheel side and increasing the thickness on the opposite
side.

Fig. 566

30-163

Method of intervention
4.

5.

Use a feeler gauge to measure the distance D between the end face of
pinion (20) and the 122 mm section of the differential housing (in this
example 2.95 mm).
Calculate the value R by adding value E stamped on the tooth of pinion
(20) to the theoretical value of 2.00 mm.
If E is positive, as in the example shown in figure, add it to the theoretical
value of 2.00 mm.
R = 2.00 + E
i.e.
R = 2.00 + 0.30 = 2.30
If E is negative, subtract it from the theoretical value of 2.00 mm.
R = 2.00 - E
i.e
R = 2.00 - 0.30 = 1.70
If the measured value D differs from the calculated value R, calculate the
difference between D and R.
The resulting value S is the shim thickness to be installed under the bearing of pinion (6).
Formula: S = D - R
which in our example gives: S = 2.95 2.30 = 0.65 mm

Fig. 567

Remove differential (1) and pinion (6) complete with the bearing. Fit the
calculated shim pack S (10) on bearing (9) and install in the transmission
casing.
m

Fit 4WD driving gear (7), nut (8) and the driven range gear (11) on
pinion shaft (6).

Fig. 568

6.

Secure bearing (9) in position with circlip (12) selected from the available
sizes.
Select the circlip by applying the following formula:
Circlip thickness = A
Fixed dimension = R
Shim thickness = S
A=RS
which in our example gives: A = 3.50 0.65 = 2.85 mm
A 2.80 mm thick circlip is therefore required.
Fig. 569

7.

Insert key (13) and, using wrench T6 (code 5.9030.964.0), tighten nut (8).
m
m

Nut: 14020 Nm (10314.7 lb.ft.)


Nut: Loctite 270

Fig. 570

30-164

Method of intervention
8.

Stake nut (8) at three points.

Fig. 571

Adjustment of the pinion and crown wheel


1.

Install complete differential assembly (1) and supports (12) and (13). Fix
supports (12) and (13) by tightening screws (24).
m

While tightening the screws, rotate the pinion in both directions and
lightly tap the differential housing to help seat the bearings.

Fig. 572

2.

Position a dial gauge B on a magnetic stand with the contact point perpendicular to the side of a tooth on the external diameter of the crown
wheel. Preload the gauge by approx. 3 mm and measure the backlash Z
between the pinion and crown wheel by turning crown wheel (15) in both
directions.
m
m

Normal backlash: 0.10 to 0.15 mm


Take four measurements 90 apart and calculate the average.

Fig. 573

3.

If the backlash Z is less than 0.10 mm, transfer shims from pack S1
(crown wheel side) to pack S2 (opposite side to the crown wheel). If the
backlash Z is greater than 0.15 mm, transfer shims from shim pack S1
(crown wheel side) to shim pack S2 (opposite side to crown wheel).
The sum total thickness of shim packs S1 and S2 should not be
altered from the value determined by testing the rolling resistance
of the differential.
Recheck backlash Z and, if necessary, continue to adjust the shims until
the backlash is within the specified tolerance limits.
m

Fig. 574

4.

Finally tighten down screws (14) securing differential supports (2) and (3).
m Screws: 211 Nm (15.50.7 lb.ft.)
m Screws: Loctite 242

30-165

Method of intervention
30.4 - E0 - Rear axle

30.4.1 - Left-hand rear axle


Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-) and apply the parking brake.

2.

Loosen clamps (1) and disconnect sleeve (2) from one of the pipes (3).

Fig. 575

3.

Remove nuts (4) and disconnect plate (5) from the transmission.
Move the stand (A) positioned under the rear axle under the bar (B).

Fig. 576

4.

Remove the platform.


Remove the four screws (6) and remove platform support (7) and rear
safety roll-bar.

Fig. 577

5.

Remove the two screws (8), nut (9) and remove oil suction pipe (10).
m

Recover gasket (11).

Fig. 578

30-166

Method of intervention
6.

Remove all the nuts (12), remove bracket (13) and spring (14), then remove
parking brake cable retaining plate (15).

Fig. 579

7.

Attach rear axle (16) to a hoist and take up the slack in the lifting slings/
ropes, then remove axle assembly (16).

Fig. 580

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.
l

Adjust the brake pedals and the parking brake lever.

Carry out the following procedures:


Procedures 6-7
l

Mating faces: Loctite 510

Fig. 581

Procedure 6
l

Screws and nuts: 40.5 to 44.8 Nm (30 33 lb.ft.)

Procedure 5
l
l

Bleed the air from the braking system.


Fill the transmission with the required quantity of oil

30-167

Method of intervention
30.4.2 - Disassembly of LH/RH rear axle

Fig. 582 - Rear axle

Disassembly
1.

Relieve the staking and remove the ringnut (1) using the special wrench T4
(code 5.9030.601.0).
m

Renew the nut on reassembly.

Fig. 583

2.

Using a puller, remove hub (2).

Fig. 584

30-168

Method of intervention
3.

Remove bearing (3) and ring (4) complete with oil seal (5).

Fig. 585

4.

Remove oil seal (5) from ring (4).


m
m

Renew oil seal (5) on reassembly.


Note which way round oil seal (5) is installed.

Fig. 586

5.

Withdraw gear (7) from axle housing (6).

Fig. 587

6.

Remove circlip (8) and remove bearing (9).

Fig. 588

7.

Remove circlip (10) and withdraw complete shaft (11).


m

To withdraw the shaft, pull it towards you while tapping it with a softfaced mallet.

Fig. 589

30-169

Method of intervention
8.

Remove circlip (12) and withdraw bearing (13).

Fig. 590

9.

Remove circlip (14), spacer (15) and remove bearing (16).

Fig. 591

Assembly
1.

Using a press, install bearing (16) on shaft (11), then fit spacer (15) and
secure with circlip (14).

Fig. 592

2.

Install bearing (3) in axle housing (6) then fit oil seal (5) to ring (4).
m

Take care to install the oil seal the right way round.

Fig. 593

3.

Position complete ring assembly (4) in the axle housing and, using a suitable tool, drive it into its seating.
m
m
m
m

Fill the grooves in ring (4) with sealant.


Ring grooves: Silastic
Lubricate the lips of the oil seal.
Oil seal: Oil

Fig. 594

30-170

Method of intervention
4.

Fit shaft (11) in axle housing(6) and secure it in position with circlip (10).

Fig. 595

5.

Install bearing (9) and secure it in position with circlip (8).

Fig. 596

6.

Install gear (7) in axle housing (6).

Fig. 597

7.

Position axle housing (6) under a press and install hub (2), driving it up
against bearing (9).
m

To facilitate installation, place spacers A to a thickness of 20 mm


between the surface of the press and gear (7) to prevent hub (6)
getting stuck in the gear.

Fig. 598

8.

Using a suitable drift, install bearing (13) and secure in position with circlip
(12).

Fig. 599

30-171

Method of intervention
9.

Tighten nut (1).


m
m

Nut: 340-420 Nm (250.5309.5 lb.ft.)


To facilitate tightening of the nut, insert a spring pin in the teeth of
gear (7) and rotate the input shaft until it locks up.
Remove the spring pin.

Fig. 600

10.

Stake nut (1) in correspondence with the slot in hub (2).

Fig. 601

30.4.3 - Rear differential

30-172

Method of intervention

Fig. 602 - Rear differential

Removal
1.

Remove the rear axles and braking devices, and remove the lift assembly.
Remove screws (1) and remove LH differential support (2).
m

Do not use automatic screwdrivers as this could damage the hex


heads of the screws.

Support the differential during removal of the support.

Fig. 603

30-173

Method of intervention
2.

Remove differential lock engagement sleeve (3) and shoe (4).

Fig. 604

3.

Remove screws (5) and remove RH differential support (6).


m

Do not use automatic screwdrivers as this could damage the hex


heads of the screws.

Support the differential during removal of the support.

Mark the RH support to avoid confusion on reassembly.

Fig. 605

4.

Remove differential assembly (7).

Fig. 606

30-174

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Screws: 21 1 Nm (15.5 0.7 lb ft)
m

Screws: Loctite 242

Screws: 21 1 Nm (15.5 0.7 lb ft)

Screws: Loctite 242

30.4.4 - Disassembly of the rear differential


Disassembly
1.

Remove screws (1) and remove differential crown wheel (2).

Fig. 607

2.

Remove thrust washer (3) and side gear (4).

Fig. 608

3.

Withdraw spring pin (5).

Fig. 609

4.

Withdraw the pin (6), planet pinions (7), thrust washers (8) and the second
side gear (9) with its thrust washer (10).

Fig. 610

30-175

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m

Screws: 75 4 Nm (55 3 lb ft)

Thrust washers: transmission oil

Fig. 611

2.

Insert the spring pin (5) so that the end lies approx. 1 mm below
the the face of the differential housing to which the crown wheel is
mounted.

Thrust washers: transmission oil

Fig. 612

30.4.5 - Rear axle brake discs


Removal
1.

Remove friction disc (1).

Fig. 613

2.

Remove plain steel disc (2) and friction disc (3).


m

Note which way round plain steel disc (2) is installed.

Fig. 614

30-176

Method of intervention
3.

Loosen off fully brake operating tie-rod (4) and remove nut (5) and spring
(6).

Fig. 615

4.

Remove braking device (7) and the last friction disc (8).

Fig. 616

Only if necessary
1.

Remove boot (9) and replace it with a new one.

Fig. 617

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Adjust travel of brake pedals.

30-177

Method of intervention
30.5 - F0 - Front axle
30.5.1 - Front support
Removal
1.

Disconnect the pipes to the front hydraulic service couplers (1).

Fig. 618

2.

Disconnect differential lock pipe (2) and the two power steering pipes (3).

Fig. 619

3.

Position a stand under gearbox (4).

Fig. 620

4.

Remove radiator bracket screws (5) on both sides.

Fig. 621

30-178

Method of intervention
5.

Disconnect the lower connection pipe of front lift control valve (6).

Fig. 622

6.

Remove the two metal straps (7) and move the pipe to one side.

Fig. 623

7.

Remove metal strap (8) on the RH side.

Fig. 624

8.

Disconnect oil supply pipe (9) from the holding valve and oil return pipe (10)
from the PTO clutch.

Fig. 625

30-179

Method of intervention
9.

Disconnect front PTO lubrication pipe (11) on the LH side.

Fig. 626

10.

Remove on the RH side the two screws and the two nuts (12) connecting
the front engine support.

Fig. 627

11.

Remove on the RH side the three screws and two nuts (13) connecting the
front engine support.

Fig. 628

12.

On the RH side, disconnect PTO wiring harnesses (14).

Fig. 629

30-180

Method of intervention
13.

Remove PTO solenoids (15).


m

Recover the three O-rings.

Fig. 630

14.

Fit two eyebolts to radiator bracket (16).

Fig. 631

15.

Attach the front support to an overhead crane and remove front support
complete with axle (17).
m

Proceed with caution to avoid damaging the PTO solenoid valve.

Fig. 632

30-181

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Take care to connect the PTO engagement connector to the first solenoid and the PTO brake connector to the second
solenoid.

30.5.2 - Front axle - complete assembly


Removal
1.

DANGER
Apply the parking brake and remove the key from the starter switch.

2.

Remove the two screws (1) securing the clamps, remove the five screws
(2) and remove the 4WD shaft shield (3).

Fig. 633

3.

Disconnect steering pipes (4).


m

Plug the pipes to prevent the ingress of dirt.

Fig. 634

4.

Disconnect front differential lock control pipe (5).


m

Plug the pipe to prevent the ingress of dirt.

Fig. 635

5.

Unseat circlip (6) and withdraw pin (7).

Fig. 636

30-182

Method of intervention
6.

Move sleeve (9) towards pinion (8) in order to release 4WD shaft (10).
Repeat the above procedure for the front sleeve.
m

Take care not to get sleeve (9) stuck on the pinion teeth (8).

Fig. 637

7.

Remove screws (11) and remove 4WD shaft (10) complete with centre support (12).

Fig. 638

8.

Raise the front end of the tractor and position a stand A under the sump,
then remove the front wheels (13).

Fig. 639

9.

Position a jack under the front axle; remove nuts (14) and washers (15) and
remove axle (16).

Fig. 640

30-183

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Fill the front axle with oil of the specified type and quantity.
m

Front axle: max. 4.8 (1.3 US.gall.)

Start the engine and repeatedly turn the steering to full lock in both directions to expel any air from the steering circuit.

Grease the front axle supports.

Supports: Grease

Nuts: 112 5.6 Nm (82.5 4.1 lb.ft.)

30.5.3 - Steering cylinders

Fig. 641 - Removal points

Removal
1.

Remove the left and right plugs (1) and plug (2) and drain off all the oil.
m

Front axle oil: max. 4.8 l (1.3 US.gall.)

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 642

30-184

Method of intervention
2.

Remove split pin (3) and loosen nut (4).


m

Fit new split pins on reassembly.

Fig. 643

3.

Using a soft mallet and nut (4) as a driving tool, disconnect pin (5) from
steering knuckle housing (6), then remove nut (4) and remove pin (5) from
the steering knuckle housing.
m

Repeat the above operations to remove the pin on the opposite side.

Fig. 644

4.

Remove the two unions (7).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 645

5.

Using a hot air blower, heat one side of the piston to approx. 65 C and
removing steering arm (8).

Fig. 646

6.

On both sides remove the two screws (9), remove end fitting (10), then
withdraw piston (11) complete with end fitting (12).

Fig. 647

30-185

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Take care to position ring (A) and ring (B) as shown in the figure.

Nut (4): 25 Nm (18.4 lb ft)

Steering arms (8): 131 - 145 Nm (96.5 - 107 lb ft).

Steering arms (8): Loctite 242.

Fig. 648

30.5.4 - Steering cylinders disassembly

Fig. 649 - Disassembly points

Disassembly
1.

Grip the piston in a vice (with soft-faced jaws) and, using a hot air gun, heat
the end to approx. 65C and remove steering arm (1).

Fig. 650

30-186

Method of intervention
2.

Remove spacers (3), the shims (4) and the steering cylinder (5) from axle
housing (2).

Fig. 651

3.

Remove O-ring (6), seal (7) and dust seal (8) from the end caps (9).
m

Check the condition of O-ring (6) and renew it if necessary.

Note which way round seal (7) is installed.

Renew seal (7) and dust seal (8) on reassembly.

Fig. 652

4.

Remove seal (11) and guide ring (12) from piston (10).

Fig. 653

30-187

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


Wide version.
On both ends of the steering cylinder, install piston (10), spacer (3) and end
cap (9) and tighten screws (13).
m

Note which way round seal (7) is installed.

Renew seal (7) and dust seal (8) on reassembly.

Surfaces (S): Silastic.


Fig. 654

2.

Narrow version.
On both ends of the steering cylinder, install piston (10), spacer (3) and end
cap (9) and tighten screws (13).
m

Note which way round seal (7) is installed.

Renew seal (7) and dust seal (8) on reassembly.

Surfaces (S): Silastic.

Fig. 655

30.5.5 - Steering knuckle housing and axle shaft


Removal
1.

Raise the front of the tractor and position a stand (A) under the sump.

Fig. 656

2.

Position a jack under the front axle and remove nuts (1) and the two washers (2); apply a lever between front support (3) and front and rear axle supports (4) and remove the complete axle.

Fig. 657

30-188

Method of intervention
3.

Remove axle shafts (5).

Fig. 658

4.

Remove screw (6) and unions (7) and remove steering control pipes (8).

Fig. 659

5.

Remove rear axle support (9) and spacer (10), then remove union (11) and
differential lock pipe (12).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 660

6.

Remove screws (13) and remove the complete differential assembly (14).
m

Check the condition of the O-ring (15). Renew it if distorted or damaged.

Fig. 661

30-189

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.5.6 - Disassembly of the bevel gear pair

Fig. 662 - Bevel gear pair

Disassembly
1.

Remove screws (1) and remove the complete differential assembly (2).
m

Check the condition of O-ring (3). Renew it if distorted or damaged.

Fig. 663

30-190

Method of intervention
2.

Detach spring (4) from fork (5) and remove sleeve (6) and shoes (7).

Fig. 664

3.

Drive out spring pin (8) and remove, in order: washer (9), pin (10), complete
with washer (11), spring (12), fork (13) and spacer (14).
m

Note which way round spring (12) is installed.

Fig. 665

4.

Force out the differential lock piston (15) using a low pressure compressed
air jet.
m

Carefully check the condition of O-ring (16); renew it distorted or


damaged.

Fig. 666

5.

Remove circlip (17) on the crown wheel side and recover shims (18).
m

Make a note of the total thickness of shim pack (18).

Fig. 667

6.

Remove circlip (19) from the opposite side to the crown wheel and recover
shims (20).
m

Make a note of the total thickness of shim pack (20).

Fig. 668

30-191

Method of intervention
7.

Withdraw bearings (21) and (22) and remove the complete differential assembly (23).

Fig. 669

8.

Remove screws (24) and remove crown wheel (25).

Fig. 670

9.

Remove the sun gear (28) and thrust washer (27) from differential housing
(26).

Fig. 671

10.

Drive out spring pin (29) sufficiently to release pin (30) and withdraw pin
(30); then withdraw planet pinions (31) and relative washers (32).

Fig. 672

11.

Remove side gear (33) and thrust washer (34) from differential housing
(26).

Fig. 673

30-192

Method of intervention
12.

Using wrench (T), remove nut (35).


Renew the nut on reassembly.
Remove spacer (36).
m

Recover O-ring (37).

Fig. 674

13.

Remove oil seal (38) and withdraw pinion (39).


m

Renew the oil seal on reassembly.

Fig. 675

14.

Remove the inner race of bearing (41) from differential support (40) and
withdraw the inner race of the bearing (42) from pinion shaft (39).

Fig. 676

15.

Withdraw the outer races of bearings (41) and (42) from the differential
support (40).
m

Recover shims (43) installed under the outer race of bearing (42).

Fig. 677

30-193

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

Install bearing (42) without shims (43) in differential support (40), and use a
depth gauge (A) to measure dimension X.
m

To facilitate the measurement, use a pin (B) or a calibrated plate.

Fig. 678

2.

Calculate the distance D of the axis of rotation of the differential from the
face of bearing (42) using the following formula:
D = X + B radius of crown wheel bearing (R)
Example:
- dimension X = 128.9 mm
- pin diameter B = 8.00
- radius of crown wheel bearing = 40.0 mm
D = 128.9 + 8.00 40.0 = 76.9 mm
Fig. 679

3.

4.

Note the dimension E stamped on the tooth tip. Remove outer race of
bearing (42) and differential support bearings (21) and (22); form a shim
pack S using the following formula:
S = D theoretical value E
where:
S =shim pack thickness
D = distance calculated in point 2.
theoretical value = 76.00
E = value stamped on tooth
Example 1 (positive E value): D = 76.90 mm E = 0.30 mm theoretical
value = 76.00 S = 76.90 76.00 0.30 = 0.60 mm Example 2 (negative E
value): D = 76.90 mm E = 0.30 mm theoretical value = 76.00 S = 76.90
76.00 + 0.30 = 1.20 mm

Fig. 680

Install in differential support (40) shim pack (43), the outer race of bearing
(42) and the outer race of bearing (41).

Fig. 681

30-194

Method of intervention
5.

Insert pinion (39) complete with the inner races of bearing (42) and bearing
(41).

Fig. 682

6.

Fit O-ring (37) and spacer (36).

Fig. 683

7.

Using tool (T), screw in nut (35) to seat the bearings, then back off by about
1/4 turn.
Nut: Loctite 270
While tightening the nut, rotate pinion (39) in both directions and tap it lightly to help seat the bearings.
m

Tighten nut (35) gradually until all pinion end float is eliminated, but
without preloading the bearings.
Fig. 684

8.

Position thrust washer (34) and the side gear (33) in differential housing
(26).
m

Washer: transmission oil

Fig. 685

9.

Position planet pinions (31) with their thrust washers (32).


Thrust washers: transmission oil
Insert pin (30) and secure it in position with spring pin (29).
m

Insert the spring pin so that the end lies approx. 0.5 mm below the
face of the differential housing to which the crown wheel is mounted.

Fig. 686

30-195

Method of intervention
10.

Locate side gear (28) and its thrust washer (27).


Washer: transmission oil
Fit crown wheel (25) and tighten screws (24).
m

Fig. 687

11.

Position the complete differential assembly (23) in support (40) and fit bearing (22) on the opposite side to the crown wheel.

Fig. 688

12.

Form shim pack (20) on the opposite side to the crown wheel by adding 0.2
mm to the thickness measured during disassembly.
Example:
measured thickness = 1.5 mm
new shim pack = 1.7 mm
Fit new shim pack (20) and secure with circlip (19).

Fig. 689

13.

Fit crown wheel side bearing (21) in its seat in the differential housing.
m

Check that both bearings are fully seated in the differential housing.

Fig. 690

14.

Position a dial gauge F on a magnetic stand as shown with the contact


point perpendicular to the outer side of a tooth on the crown wheel. Preload
the gauge by approx. 2 mm and measure the backlash Z between the
pinion and crown wheel by turning differential (23) back and forth in both
directions.
m

m
m

Check that bearing (22) on the opposite side to the crown wheel is
seated against the circlip.
Normal backlash Z: 0.14 to 0.19 mm
Take four measurements 90 apart and calculate the average.
Fig. 691

30-196

Method of intervention
15.

Temporarily fit circlip (17) and, with a feeler gauge, measure the clearance
between circlip (17) and bearing (21) to determine the thickness of the shim
pack (18) to be installed under the circlip on the crown wheel side.
Shim pack (18) should be thick enough to eliminate the end float of
differential (23).
Fit shim pack (18) and secure it with circlip (17).
m

Fig. 692

16.

Insert differential lock piston (25) in differential support (40).


m

O-ring: transmission oil

Fig. 693

17.

Install the following components in the differential support in the order given: spacer (14), fork (13), spring (12), pin (10), washer (9) and secure with
spring pin (8).
m

Take care to install spring (12) the right way round.

Fig. 694

18.

Insert shoes (7) in fork (13) and insert the end of spring (12) in hole (A),
then fit sleeve (6).

Fig. 695

19.

Using a suitable tool, fit oil seal (38) on differential support (40) and install
O-ring (3).
m

O-ring: grease

Fig. 696

30-197

Method of intervention
30.5.7 - Propeller shaft - Front axle drive shaft
Removal
1.

Remove the two front screws (1) and central screw (2) securing the cover.

Fig. 697

2.

Remove the two rear screws (3) and remove cover (4).

Fig. 698

3.

Unseat circlip (5) and drive out spring pin (6) from the front and rear ends
of the shaft.

Fig. 699

4.

Move the sleeve towards pinion (7) and remove front axle drive shaft (8).
m

Take care not to get the sleeve stuck on the pinion teeth.

Fig. 700

30-198

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.5.8 - Planetary reduction gear


Removal
1.

Remove the front wheels, remove left and right plugs (1) and (2) and drain
off all the oil.
m

Front axle: max. 4.8 l (1.3 gall).

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 701

2.

Remove split pin (3) and loosen nut (4).


m

Fit new split pins on reassembly.

Fig. 702

3.

Using a soft faced mallet and nut (4) as a drift, detach pin (5) from steering
knuckle housing (6); remove nut (4) and remove pin (5) from the steering
knuckle housing. Remove screws (7) and finally remove complete planetary reduction gear assembly (8).

Fig. 703

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


Fill the front axle with oil of the specified type and quantity.
m Front axle: max. 4.8 l (1.3 gall).
m

Nut (4): 25 Nm (18.4 lb ft).

30-199

Method of intervention
30.5.9 - Disassembly of the planetary reduction gear

Fig. 704 - Disassembly points

Disassembly
1.

Remove screws (1) and remove the complete flange assembly.

Fig. 705

2.

Check the condition of O-ring (2) and renew it if necessary.

Fig. 706

30-200

Method of intervention
3.

Remove bearing (3) and remove crown wheel (4).

Fig. 707

4.

Remove ring halves (5) and remove flange (6).

Fig. 708

5.

Remove circlip (7) and withdraw bearing (8).

Fig. 709

6.

Remove oil seal (9).


m

Note which way round the oil seal is installed.

Fig. 710

7.

Remove cover (10), remove circlip (11) and spacer (12).

Fig. 711

30-201

Method of intervention
8.

Remove from stub axle housing (13) bearing (14) complete with gear (15)
and shaft (16); remove circlip (17).
m

Mark gear (15) to avoid confusion on reassembly.

Fig. 712

9.

Using a soft metal punch and a mallet, separate steering joint support (18)
from stub axle housing (13).

Fig. 713

10.

Using a soft metal punch and a mallet, drive bearing (19) from stub axle
housing (13).

Fig. 714

11.

Using a lever, prise out oil seal (20) then remove spacer (21) and bearing
(22).

Fig. 715

12.

Remove O-ring (23) from steering joint support (18).


m

Check the condition of the O-ring and renew it if distorted or damaged.

Fig. 716

30-202

Method of intervention
13.

Remove from steering joint support (18) bearings (24) and (25) complete
with gears (26) and (27).

Fig. 717

14.

Separate bearings (14), (24) and (25) from the respective gears (15), (26)
and (27) , then recover spacers (28) from gear (27).

Fig. 718

Assembly
1.

Fit gear (27) without shims (28) on bearing (25) and fit gears (15) and (26)
on the corresponding bearings (14) and (24).

Fig. 719

2.

Fit complete gear assembly (26) and carefully drive it into its seating in
steering joint support (18); then fit gear (27) previously assembled without
the shims and seat it against gear (26).

Fig. 720

3.

Using a depth gauge (A), measure distance (B) between the face of steering joint support (18) and the outer race of bearing (25). Calculate the thickness of the spacers S to be inserted by applying the following formula: S
= B 0.3 mm.

Fig. 721

30-203

Method of intervention
4.

Form shim pack (28) with thickness equal to calculated value S 0.04
mm; then install shim pack (28) under gear (27).

Fig. 722

5.

Install bearing (22) and spacer (21) in stub axle housing (13).

Fig. 723

6.

Using service tool T8, install oil seal (20) in stub axle housing (13).
m

Before installing the oil seal, carefully clean and degrease the seat
of the seal in the stub axle housing and on the steering joint support.

Do not lubricate the oil seal seat.

Fig. 724

7.

After carrying out the above steps, reassemble following the disassembly
procedure in reverse order.

30-204

Lubricate O-ring seal (2).

O-ring: grease.

Moisten surfaces S of the steering joint support with ethyl alcohol


to facilitate installation of the oil seal.

Lubricate O-ring (23).

O-ring: grease.

Fig. 725

Method of intervention
30.6 - G0 - Bodywork - Cab - Platform
30.6.1 - Cab
Removal
1.

Remove accelerator pedal (1).

Fig. 726

2.

Remove the knob of 4WD lever (2).

Fig. 727

3.

Remove the knob of creeper gear lever (3).

Fig. 728

4.

Remove the two screws (4) securing the floor mat moulding.

Fig. 729

30-205

Method of intervention
5.

Remove floor mat (5).

Fig. 730

6.

Remove A/C valve assembly cover (6) secure with two screws on the LH
side.

Fig. 731

7.

Remove the four screws (7) and remove oil filter bracket (8).

Fig. 732

8.

Loosen clamp (9) and remove cab heating water pipe (10).

Fig. 733

30-206

Method of intervention
9.

Disconnect A/C pipe (11) on LH side.

Fig. 734

10.

Disconnect starter motor lead (12).

Fig. 735

11.

Disconnect the two wiring connectors (13) on the LH side and remove cab
wiring fuses (14).

Fig. 736

12.

Disconnect the parking brake cable by removing the cotter pin, pin (15) and
loosening the clamp securing gaiter (16) to release the outer cable.

Fig. 737

30-207

Method of intervention
13.

Release the parking brake cable from metal strap (17).

Fig. 738

14.

Disconnect the two wiring harnesses (18) for the rear lights.
m

Do not remove the connector for the rear trailer lights from the bracket.

Fig. 739

15.

Disconnect the two tie-rods of rear remote valves (19).

Fig. 740

16.

Disconnect the two lift control tie-rods (20).

Fig. 741

30-208

Method of intervention
17.

Remove lower cover (21) secured with two screws and side panels (22)
secured with four screws.

Fig. 742

18.

Remove on both sides the four screws (23) securing the inside of the cab
to the footplate.

Fig. 743

19.

Disconnect earth lead (24) under the cab.

Fig. 744

20.

On both sides remove the two screws (25) to release the cab from the metal
guards.

Fig. 745

30-209

Method of intervention
21.

Remove the two rear silent blocks (26).

Fig. 746

22.

Disconnect the pipe from the A/C valve (27) on the RH side.

Fig. 747

23.

Remove the three retaining screws and remove A/C pipe cover (28).

Fig. 748

24.

Loosen clamp (29) and disconnect heater pipe (30).

Fig. 749

30-210

Method of intervention
25.

Sling the top of the cab to a hoist and raise it about by 10 cm.

Fig. 750

26.

On the LH side disconnect parking brake warning light connector (31) and
on the RH side disconnect front PTO pushbutton wiring connector (32).

Fig. 751

27.

Raise the cab slowly and carefully remove it from the tractor.
m

Help separate the lower part of the cab from the tractor with little
jolts.

Fig. 752

30-211

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.2 - Hood and side panels


Front hood and side panels
Removal
1.

Open the hood.

Fig. 753

2.

Disconnect air cleaner clogging sensor (1).

Fig. 754

3.

Disconnect LH and RH side light connectors (2) and (3).

Fig. 755

4.

Disconnect the three-wire connector of LF front worklight (4) and the fourwire connector of RH front worklight and horn (5).

Fig. 756

30-212

Method of intervention
5.

Remove gas spring (6).


DANGER
Support the hood by hand during this operation to prevent it
from falling when the gas spring is removed.

Fig. 757

6.

Remove the two screws and washers (7) on the RH and LH sides to release
the hood.

Fig. 758

7.

Slide the hood forwards to remove it from the tractor.

Fig. 759

30-213

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Engine hood support bracket


Removal
1.

Remove the two upper front screws (8).

Fig. 760

2.

Remove the four centre screws (9).

Fig. 761

3.

Remove the two upper screws (10).

Fig. 762

4.

Remove the two front screws (11).

Fig. 763

30-214

Method of intervention
5.

Remove bracket (12).

Fig. 764

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


Refit the two centre screws by positioning in the correct sequence: screw
(9), washer (13), asbestos washer (14), washer (13), bracket (12), asbestos washer (14).

Fig. 765

2.

Refit the two front screws by positioning in the correct sequence: screw
(11), washer (13), asbestos washer (14), washer (13), bracket (12), washer
(13), asbestos washer (14).

Fig. 766

Lower hood
Removal
1.
2.
3.

Remove the battery.


T.H36.21.L0.01.00.00.01
Remove the two side screws (15) on both sides.

Fig. 767

30-215

Method of intervention
4.

Remove lower hood (16).

Fig. 768

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.3 - Cab access steps


Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) located at the front of the steps.

Fig. 769

2.

Remove nut (2).


m

Recover the nut, washers, stud, pipe and other components.

Fig. 770

3.

Remove the two hex socket screws (3) located on the underside of the
steps.
DANGER
Support the auxiliary fuel tank to prevent it from falling.

Fig. 771

4.

Remove the steps assembly, leaving the auxiliary fuel tank attached to the tractor.

30-216

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.4 - Adjustable front fenders


Removal
1.

Remove the two retaining screws (1) with their washers.

Fig. 772

2.

Remove fenders (2).

Fig. 773

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.5 - Cab door lock - tie-rod


Removal
1.

Undo the two retaining screws and remove cover (1).

Fig. 774

30-217

Method of intervention
2.

Remove the two screws, disconnect the internal tie-rod (2) and remove
door lock (3).

Fig. 775

3.

Remove one screw, disconnect tie-rod (4) and remove the manual door
opening control (5).

Fig. 776

4.

Remove tie-rod (6).

Fig. 777

5.

Remove two screws (7) and nut (8).

Fig. 778

30-218

Method of intervention
6.

Remove the external lock complete with handle (9).

Fig. 779

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.6 - Instrument panel


Removal
1.

Withdraw the instrument panel from its shroud by pushing in side clip (1).

Fig. 780

2.

Disconnect the five instrument wiring connectors (2).

Fig. 781

3.

Remove instrument panel (3).

Fig. 782

30-219

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.7 - Left-hand rear cab pillar - screenwash reservoir


Removal
1.

Unscrew cap (1).

Fig. 783

2.

Remove pillar trim knob (2).

Fig. 784

3.

Disconnect front and rear wiring connectors (3) and front and rear water
pipes (4).

Fig. 785

4.

Remove pillar trim - screenwash reservoir (5).

Fig. 786

30-220

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.8 - Right-hand console


Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) and remove knob (2) of the rear PTO control lever.
m

Remove inner part (3) by rotating counterclockwise.

Fig. 787

2.

Remove screw (4) and remove gear lever (5).

Fig. 788

3.

Remove the two screws (6) and remove RH side panel (7).

Fig. 789

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-221

Method of intervention
30.6.9 - Left-hand console
Removal
1.

Remove screw (1) and remove knob (2) of the rear PTO control lever.
m

Remove inner part (3) by rotating counterclockwise.

Fig. 790

2.

Remove screw (4) and remove shuttle control lever (5).

Fig. 791

3.

Remove the two screws (6) and remove LH side panel (7).

Fig. 792

30-222

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.10 - Instrument panel


Removal
1.

Remove the six screws (1) and move the dashboard towards the rear.

Fig. 793

2.

Unscrew lock nut (2).

Fig. 794

3.

Withdraw metal outer sleeve (3) from the support slot.

Fig. 795

4.

Unseat metal cable (4).

Fig. 796

30-223

Method of intervention
5.

Disconnect wiring connector (5) and remove dashboard (6).

Fig. 797

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.11 - Centre console


Removal
1.

Remove PTO control knob (1).

Fig. 798

2.

Remove the four screws (2) and then remove centre console (3).

Fig. 799

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-224

Method of intervention
30.6.12 - RH rear cab pillar trim
Removal
1.

Remove retaining knob (1) of the cab pillar trim.

Fig. 800

2.

Remove pillar trim (2).

Fig. 801

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.13 - A/C system air intake filters


Removal
1.

Undo the two knobs (1) and remove filter cover (2).

Fig. 802

30-225

Method of intervention
2.

Remove filter (3).

Fig. 803

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.14 - Cab roof


Removal
1.

Discharge the refrigerant from the A/C system.


Disconnect pipe (1) from the condenser.

Fig. 804

2.

Unscrew the two retaining screws and remove pipe cover (2).

Fig. 805

3.

Remove the two retaining screws for each and remove covers (3) on both
sides.

Fig. 806

30-226

Method of intervention
4.

Remove the six screws and remove upper panel (4).

Fig. 807

5.

Remove the six retaining screws and remove cab roof lining (5) from rear
of cab.

Fig. 808

6.

Remove the three retaining screws and remove fuse assembly support (6).

Fig. 809

7.

Disconnect rear wiper wiring connector (7).

Fig. 810

30-227

Method of intervention
8.

Remove coolant pipes (8) on both sides.

Fig. 811

9.

Remove evaporator condensate drain pipes (9) on both sides.

Fig. 812

10.

Remove expansion valve pipe (10).

Fig. 813

11.

Disconnect windscreen wiper wiring connector (11).

Fig. 814

30-228

Method of intervention
12.

Disconnect the three earth leads (12).

Fig. 815

13.

Remove the four roof retaining screws (13) located in the four corners of
the cab roof.

Fig. 816

14.

Remove the cab roof (14).

Fig. 817

30-229

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.15 - Seat
Removal
1.

Remove the four fixing screws (1).

Fig. 818

2.

Remove seat (2).

Fig. 819

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-230

Method of intervention
30.6.16 - Air conditioning system - Standard roof version

Fig. 820 - Operating diagram


KEY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Compressor with electromagnetic clutch


Condenser
Receiver-drier
3-level pressure switch for compressor clutch engagement/disengagement and condenser cooling fans control.
Expansion valve
Evaporator
Evaporator electronic minimum temperature sensor
Cab air blowers
Air cowling
Condenser cooling fan.
l
l
l

To: low pressure gas


B: high pressure gas
C: high pressure liquid

TECHNICAL DATA
30-231

Method of intervention
l

Minimum safety pressure: 2.45 bar Maximum safety pressure: 28 bars


Refrigerant type: R134a
Refrigerant quantity: 1100 g
Total quantity of moisture-free oil added at 1st charging: 200 g
Oil type: SUN-OIL COMPANY SP20

Operation
The compressor (1) is driven from the crankshaft via a drivebelt and pulley with an electromagnetic clutch (1a), which is controlled by
a switch on the control panel. The system is protected by a safety pressure switch, which performs the following functions:
l

Inhibits engagement of the electromagnetic clutch (1a) when the system pressure falls below 2.45 bar as a result of incomplete charging or refrigerant leakage.
Disengages the clutch (1a) and thereby stops the compressor when the pressure exceeds the permitted maximum of 28 bar
(406 psi) (generally as a result of overheating).

A further contact controls the operation of fan (10) of condenser (2) in order to maintain normal operating pressure within the range
of 11 to 15 bar. The refrigerant (in vapour form) is drawn in by the compressor where it is compressed. This compression causes the
temperature of the vapour to rise; the refrigerant flows to the condenser (2) where its heat is radiated to the air flow generated by
the cooling fans (10). The refrigerant vapour is thus cooled to the point where it condenses to high-pressure liquid. On leaving the
condenser, the liquefied refrigerant flows to the receiver-drier (3) which performs three functions: to filter out any impurities, absorb
any moisture in the circuit, and finally, act as a storage reservoir. The liquid refrigerant is then transferred to the evaporator (6) through
the expansion valve (5), which meters the flow of refrigerant into the evaporator to ensure optimum evaporation. In the evaporator,
the refrigerant expands to the critical evaporation point with an ambient temperature of around -- 8C (17.6F). The temperature of
the air flow over the evaporator (6) generated by the fans (8) is significantly higher than -- 8C (17.6F), and therefore it gives up its
heat to the refrigerant, causing it to boil and evaporate. On leaving evaporator (6), the refrigerant returns to compressor (1) to repeat
the cycle. The removal of heat from the ambient air flowing over the evaporator causes the moisture in the air to condense, and the
air is thus dehumidified; the moisture condenses on the fins of the evaporator, where, if it is not maintained at temperature above 0C
(32F), it will freeze and impair the efficiency of the evaporator. The task of maintaining the evaporator at a temperature above 0C
(32F) (and within the optimum temperature for efficient heat exchange), is performed by an electronic temperature sensor (7); this
sensor disengages the clutch (1a) of the compressor (1) when the temperature falls to the lower limit and engages the clutch (1a)
when the evaporator temperature reaches the upper limit. The condensate that forms on the evaporator fins (6) contains dust, pollen
and other airborne particulates; continuous condensation thus has the effect of purifying the air, and the droplets of condensate are
conveyed out of the vehicle via two ducts. A fixed quantity of moisture-free oil is added to the circuit in order to lubricate all the mechanical components of the system; a certain percentage of this oil continuously circulates in the form of an oil mist, thereby lubricating
the compressor (pistons and bearings) and the expansion valve.

Discharging, flushing and recharging


1.

DANGER
Before discharging, flushing and recharging the air conditioning system, check the system for leaks using a
leak detector.

2.

In order to carry out the system servicing operations you will require a dedicated A/C servicing station capable of performing
the following tasks:
m Aspiration of the refrigerant fluid.
m Creation of a high vacuum to purge the system of contaminants.
m Filtration of the recovered refrigerant.
m Separation of the antifreeze and lubricating oil from the liquid refrigerant and determination of its quantity by weight.
m Recharging system with the exactly the same amounts of refrigerant and oil as those recovered.
m Measuring the system high side pressure and low side pressure.

Discharging the system


1.

DANGER
Remove the key from the starter switch.

2.
3.

Connect the service machine to high pressure service valve (1) and follow the specific instructions for the service machine to
discharge the system.
Disconnect the system component to be renewed or overhauled immediately after the service machine stops; plug the open
ends of the system pipes as quickly as possible.

30-232

Method of intervention
Flushing and recharging the system
1.

Before each recharging, the system must be purged of all air, moisture and contaminants (oxides, deposits). This entails
creating a high vacuum within the system to evaporate any moisture present. The vapour, when extracted, draws with it any
contaminants present in the system.
m For the flushing and recharging operations, the service station must be connected to the high (1) and low (2) pressure
service valves.
DANGER
Maximum vacuum must be maintained for at least 10 minutes.

2.

After flushing, the moisture-free oil recovered during the discharging operation must be returned into the system, followed by
the refrigerant.
m Quantity of refrigerant (R134a): 1100 g Oil quantity: the quantity recovered.
DANGER
If the system must be discharged and flushed in order to renew a system component, the quantity of oil in the
replaced component must be measured and the same amount of new oil must added as that recovered with
the refrigerant.
DANGER
For details of the oil and refrigerant recharging procedure, refer to the instructions supplied with the service
machine.

30.6.17 - Air conditioning compressor


Removal
1.

Discharge the refrigerant from the A/C system.


Remove the three retaining screws (1) and remove belt guard (2).

Fig. 821

2.

Undo locknut (3) and loosen the tensioner so as to remove the drivebelt.

Fig. 822

30-233

Method of intervention
3.

Disconnect compressor wiring connector (4).

Fig. 823

4.

Remove the screw from clamp (5) securing the front and rear pipes.

Fig. 824

5.

Remove the two retaining screws in order to remove front pipe (6) and
remove the retaining screw to remove rear pipe (7).

Fig. 825

6.

Remove the two upper screws (8) and the two lower screws (9), moving the
compressor away from the support bracket.

Fig. 826

30-234

Method of intervention
7.

Remove compressor (10).

Fig. 827

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.18 - Condenser
Removal
1.

Discharge the refrigerant from the A/C system.


Disconnect the condenser from pipes (1).

Fig. 828

2.

Remove the two LH and RH screws (2).

Fig. 829

3.

Remove condenser (3).

Fig. 830

30-235

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.19 - Receiver-dryer
Removal
1.

Disconnect the two pressure switch wiring connectors (1).

Fig. 831

2.

Disconnect pipe (2) connected to the expansion valve.

Fig. 832

3.

Remove filter bracket (3).

Fig. 833

4.

Disconnect pipe (4) connected to the condenser.

Fig. 834

30-236

Method of intervention
5.

Remove filter (5).

Fig. 835

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.20 - Evaporator assembly


Removal
1.

Disconnect the two evaporator wiring connectors (1).

Fig. 836

2.

Remove the two expansion valve pipes (2).

Fig. 837

3.

Remove on both sides screws (3) securing the evaporator assembly.

Fig. 838

30-237

Method of intervention
4.

Remove yellow relay (4) from its seat.

Fig. 839

5.

Remove complete evaporator assembly (5).

Fig. 840

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.21 - Air conditioner fan


Removal
1.

Remove the six screws (1) and remove the guard.

Fig. 841

2.

Disconnect fan wiring connector (2) and remove relative bracket (3).

Fig. 842

30-238

Method of intervention
3.

Remove the four retaining screws and remove fan assembly (4).

Fig. 843

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.22 - Bistable pressure switch for compressor clutch engagement/disengagement


Removal
1.

It is not necessary to drain the system as it is equipped with a specific check valve (1).

Fig. 844

2.

Disconnect the two pressure switch wiring connectors (2).

Fig. 845

3.

Remove pressure switch (3).

Fig. 846

30-239

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.6.23 - Steering wheel


Removal
1.

Remove cover (1).

Fig. 847

2.

Unscrew centre nut (2).

Fig. 848

3.

Remove steering wheel (3).

Fig. 849

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-240

Method of intervention
30.6.24 - Adjustment of the lift control valve levers
Position control lever
Adjustment
1.

Move position control lever (1) to MAX position (2).

Fig. 850

2.

Loosen nut (3).

Fig. 851

3.

Adjust end fitting (4) to bring screw (5) into contact with stop (6), then tighten nut (3).

Fig. 852

30-241

Method of intervention
Draft control lever
Adjustment
1.

Move position control lever (1) to CONTR position (7).

Fig. 853

2.

Loosen nut (8) and adjust end fitting (9).

Fig. 854

3.

Move draft control lever (10) to position 4 (11).

Fig. 855

4.

Once the lift has been raised, tighten nut (8).

Fig. 856

Balance check
1.

With position control lever (1) in the CONTR position (7) and draft control lever (10) in position 4 (11), check that the linkage
is raised when the test implement is pulled upwards and is lowered when the test implement is pulled downwards.
m Test implement: 200 kg counterweight.

30-242

Method of intervention
30.6.25 - Remote valve control levers
Removal
1.

Remove control lever pin (1).

Fig. 857

2.

Disconnect the two tie-rods (2) of the rear remote valve control linkage.

Fig. 858

3.

Remove control levers (3).

Fig. 859

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-243

Method of intervention
30.7 - H0 - Hydraulic system

30.7.1 - Pump for hydraulic lift and auxiliary services and power steering system
Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Drain the oil from the circuit.


Disconnect the two oil supply pipes (1).

Fig. 860

3.

Remove the two screws (2) the remove the pumps assembly (3).

Fig. 861

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Renew gasket (4) after every removal.

Fig. 862

30-244

Method of intervention
30.7.2 - Transmission oil filter assembly
Removal
1.

Loosen the two hose clamps (1) and collect the transmission oil.

Fig. 863

2.

Remove the two screws (2) securing the oil filter.

Fig. 864

3.

Disconnect the wiring connector (3) of the filter clogging sensor.

Fig. 865

4.

Remove oil filter (4) together with suction pipe.

Fig. 866

30-245

Method of intervention
Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.
l

After refitting the filter, fill the transmission with 30 litres of oil.

30.7.3 - Power steering valve - Complete assembly


Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the negative battery lead () and apply the parking brake.

2.

Remove the two screws (1), remove cover (2) and disconnect the two
steering control pipes (3).
m

Plug the pipes to prevent the ingress of contaminants.

Fig. 867

3.

Disconnect supply pipe (4) to the power steering valve and fully loosen nut
(5) but do not remove it.

Fig. 868

4.

Remove screw (6) to release pipe (7) from the controls support and disconnect return pipe (8).

Fig. 869

5.

Undo the two unions (9).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 870

30-246

Method of intervention
6.

Remove the four screws (10), remove steering tube (11) and remove the
power steering valve (12).

Fig. 871

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m After refitting all the components, start the engine and bleed the air from the steering circuit.

30-247

Method of intervention
30.7.4 - Power steering disassembly
26

27

24

28

15

18

13

25
25b
25a
29

19

21

20

22
16

17a

12

17b
10

17

23a
23b
5a

8
7

23

23a

6
11
9
2
5

4
2
3

Fig. 872 - Power steering

30-248

Method of intervention
Disassembly
1.

Unscrew and remove screws (1) and (3) and washers (2) securing cover (4)
(6 screws plus one special screw).

1 2

F0009470

Fig. 873

2.

Remove cover (4) by sliding it off sideways.

F0009480

Fig. 874

3.

Lift rotary spool unit (5) complete with O-rings (6) and spacer (7).

F0009490

Fig. 875

4.

Remove drive shaft (8).


8

F0009500

Fig. 876

5.

Remove distributor plate (9).


9

F0009510

Fig. 877

30-249

Method of intervention
6.

Remove relief valve stop bush (10).


10

F0009520

Fig. 878

7.

Remove O-ring (11).

11

F0009530

Fig. 879

8.

Remove ball (12) of the check valve and pins (13) and balls (15) of the
suction valves.
15

13

12

F0009541

Fig. 880

9.

Checking through the central hole of the spool, position spool-bush assembly cross pin (16) horizontally. Push assembly (17) and the bearing
assembly out of power steering housing (18).
17

18
F0009550

Fig. 881

10.

Remove outer ring (19), inner ring (20) and roller bearing (21) from the
spool; remove also ring (22).
m

It may occur that inner ring (20) (thin) remains in the steering valve
housing; ensure that it is actually removed.

20

22

19

21
F0009560

Fig. 882

30-250

Method of intervention
11.

Remove cross pin (16), bush (17b) and spool (17a).


m

Use special cover screw (3).


17b

16

17a

F0009570

Fig. 883

12.

Slowly withdraw spool (17a) from bush (17b).


17b
17a

F0009580

Fig. 884

13.

Press neutral position springs (23) and remove them from spool (17a).
23

17a

F0009590

Fig. 885

14.

Remove dust seal (24) and composite seal (25) (O-ring + seal).
25

24

F0129940

Fig. 886

15.

Remove plug (26) and its seal.

26
F0129930

Fig. 887

30-251

Method of intervention
16.

Remove pressure relief adjuster screw (27).

27
F0129950

Fig. 888

17.

Turn over the steering valve housing and remove spring (28) and relief
valve (29).
IMPORTANT

29

The seat of the relief valve is a force fit in the housing and
cannot be removed.

28

F0009681

Fig. 889

Installation
1.

IMPORTANT
Prior to reassembly, lubricate all components with gearbox
oil.
Insert the two flat washers (23a) in the seat and centre them relative to
the diameter of spool (17a). Insert the four curved washers (23b) in pairs
between the two flat washers (23a) and push them fully home.

23b

23b

23a

23a

17a

F0009690

Fig. 890

2.

Align spring assembly (23).

23

F0009700

Fig. 891

3.

Insert spool (17a) in bush (17b).


IMPORTANT
Check that the position between the bush and the spool is
as described in stage 1.

17b
17a

F0009580

Fig. 891

30-252

Method of intervention
4.

Simultaneously push springs (23) and spool (17a) until the springs are
seated in the slots in bush (17b).

23

17a
17b
F0009710

Fig. 892

5.

Align springs (23) and make sure they are positioned centrally in relation to
the diameter of bush (17b).

23

17b
F0009720

Fig. 893

6.

Install ring (22) on its seat on bush (17b).


IMPORTANT
Ring (22) must be free to rotate without interfering with
springs (23).

22

17b
F0009730

Fig. 894

7.

Insert cross pin (16).

16
F0009740

Fig. 895

8.

Install the thrust bearing components in the order indicated in point 9.

20

22

21

F0009751

Fig. 896

30-253

Method of intervention
9.

Thrust bearing assembly.


m

17a - Spool
17b - Bush
21- Needle roller bearing
20 - Inner ring
22 - Outer ring

20
21
22
17

DANGER
The outer ring must be installed with chamfer X facing the
shoulder of the spool.
10.

17

Fig. 897

Position steering valve housing (18) so the hole is horizontal. Insert into the
bush/spool assembly bore the guide of special tool T9 (P/N. 5.9030.480.0).

Fig. 898

11.

Lubricate oil seal (25a) and O-ring (25b) and fit them on the push rod of tool
T9 (P/N. 5.9030.480.0).

Fig. 899

12.

Fit tool T9 (P/N. 5.9030.480.0). and insert it in the guide previously inserted
in the steering valve bore.

Fig. 899

13.

Push seal (25) into its seat in steering valve housing (18) while rotating it
to ease it into position.

18
F0009790

Fig. 900

30-254

Method of intervention
14.

Withdraw tool T9 (P/N 5.9030.480.0). from valve housing (18) and removal
also the guide, leaving the tool push rod in the housing.

Fig. 901

15.

Insert bush/spool assembly (17) in steering valve bore (18). Rotate the
valve slightly while inserting it to ease it into position.

17

IMPORTANT
Keep the cross pin horizontal while inserting the assembly.

18

F0009810

Fig. 902

16.

Push in assembly (17) until fully seated so that it forces out the tool push
rod left in the housing in step 14.

18

17
F0009820

Fig. 903

17.

Rotate steering valve housing (18) until the centre hole is vertical. Insert
ball (12) of the relief valve in the hole indicated by the arrow.

12

18

F0009830

Fig. 904

18.

Screw valve retaining bush (10) into the bore of the relief valve.
IMPORTANT

10

The top of the retaining bush should be set below the face of
steering valve housing (18).
18

F0009521

Fig. 905

30-255

Method of intervention
19.

Insert the two balls (15) in the holes indicated by the arrows.

15
F0010310

Fig. 906

20.

Insert elements (13) in the same holes.


13

F0009841

Fig. 907

21.

Lubricate O-ring (11) and fit it in its seat.


m

11

O-ring: Gearbox oil

F0009850

Fig. 908

22.

Locate distributor plate (9) so that its holes are aligned with the holes in
steering valve housing (18).

18
F0009860

Fig. 909

23.

Insert drive shaft (8) in the hole so that it engages the cross pin; check
that the engagement with the cross pin is parallel to the steering column
mounting face.

F0009870

Fig. 910

30-256

Method of intervention
24.

Position the drive shaft so that it is vertical and hold it in this position using
a suitable tool.

F0009880

Fig. 911

25.

Lubricate the two O-rings (6) and fit them in the two grooves in rotary spool
unit (5). Fit rotary spool unit (5) to drive shaft (8).
m

O-rings: Gearbox oil

8
5

F0009890

Fig. 912

26.

DANGER
Install rotor (5a) on drive shaft (8) so that the valley between
two lobes is aligned with the groove in the end of the drive
shaft. Then turn outer ring (5b) to align the fixing holes.

5a
F0009900

Fig. 913

27.

Install spacer (7).


7

5
F0009910

Fig. 914

28.

Fit cover (4).


4

F0009920

Fig. 915

30-257

Method of intervention
29.

Insert special screw (3) complete with washer (2) in the hole indicated in
the photo.
3

F0009930

Fig. 916

30.

Insert the six screws (1) complete with washers (2). Tighten screws (1) and
(3) in a crosswise sequence to a torque of 306 Nm (22.14.4 lb.ft.).

1 2

F0009471

Fig. 917

31.

Fit valve (29).

29

F0129960

Fig. 918

32.

Fit spring (28).

28

F0129970

Fig. 919

33.

Fit pressure adjustment screw (27).

27
F0129950

Fig. 919

30-258

Method of intervention
34.

Fit plug (26) complete with seal.


m

Plug: 5010 Nm (36.87.4 lb.ft.)

26
F0129930

Fig. 919

35.

Locate dust seal (24) in steering valve housing (18).

24

18

F0009970

Fig. 920

36.

Install dust seal (24) in the steering valve housing using a suitable drift and
a soft faced mallet.

F0009980

Fig. 921

37.

Close off the oil ports with plastic plugs to prevent impurities getting in.
IMPORTANT
Fit the plugs by hand pressure alone; do not hammer.

F0009990

Fig. 922

38.

On completion of the assembly operation, test the operating pressure of the relief valve and calibrate as necessary.

30-259

Method of intervention
30.7.5 - Pressure relief valve - lift control valve
Removal
1.

Unscrew plug (1).

Fig. 923

2.

Withdraw spring (2), gasket and washer (3).

Fig. 924

3.

Withdraw pressure relief valve (4) and spool (5).

Fig. 925

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Renew the gasket on reassembly

Fig. 926

30-260

Method of intervention
Calibration
1.

Interpose one or more shims (6) between the spring and the plug to increase the spring preload and thereby return the operating pressure in the
circuit to 30 bar.

Fig. 927

30.7.6 - Lift locking shut-off valve


Removal
1.

Disconnect the three pipes (1).

Fig. 928

2.

Remove valve (2).

Fig. 929

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Renew copper gasket (3) on reassembly.

Fig. 930

30-261

Method of intervention
30.7.7 - Remote control valve
Removal
1.

Undo the two unions (1) and remove pipe (2).


m

Renew the washers on reassembly

Fig. 931

2.

Remove the four screws (3) and remove remote control valve assembly (4).
m

Check the condition of the O-rings and renew them if necessary.

Fig. 932

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Holes for remote control valve retaining screws: Loctite 510.

O-rings: apply grease to hold them in position.

Fig. 933

30.7.8 - Remote control valve


Disassembly
1.

Remove the two plugs (1).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly

Fig. 934

30-262

Method of intervention
2.

Remove screws (2) and remove plate (3).

Fig. 935

3.

Remove the spool of control valve n 1 (4) and the spool of control valve
n 2 (5).

Fig. 936

4.

Remove plug (6) and remove the spring and ball (7).

Fig. 937

5.

Remove screw (8) and disassemble the spool return device.

Fig. 938

6.

Remove screw (9) then remove disc (10), spring (11) and disc (12).

Fig. 939

30-263

Method of intervention
Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.

30.7.9 - Control rods


Disassembly
1.

Remove nut (1), washer (2) and remove lever (3).

Fig. 940

2.

Remove the two Woodruff keys (4), then remove Woodruff key (5), ring (6)
and O-ring (7).

Fig. 941

3.

Withdraw the two rods (8) and (9) then remove O-ring (10).

Fig. 942

Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m Grease the rods and the O-rings.

30-264

Method of intervention
30.7.10 - Double/single acting conversion valve
Removal
1.

Remove complete valve (1).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 943

2.

Remove ball (2) using a magnet and remove spring (3).

Fig. 944

3.

Remove circlip (4) and separate nut (5) from pin (1).

Fig. 945

4.

Remove O-ring (6).


m

Renew O-ring (6) on reassembly.

Fig. 946

30-265

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

Fig. 947

30-266

Method of intervention
30.8 - L0 - Electrical system
30.8.1 - Battery
Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Remove the four screws (1) securing battery holder (2).

Fig. 948

3.

Remove battery holder (2).

Fig. 949

4.

Detach fan control unit (3) an move it out of the way of the battery.

Fig. 950

5.

Remove positive terminal cover (4) and loosen clamp screw (5) securing
positive lead (6).

Fig. 951

30-267

Method of intervention
6.

Remove battery (7) raising the front and withdrawing it a forward direction.

Fig. 952

Refitting
Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.2 - Fuse and relay assembly


Removal
1.

Remove on both sides the retaining screws (two per cover) and side covers (1).

Fig. 953

2.

Remove the six retaining screws and remove upper panel (2).

Fig. 954

3.

Remove the six retaining screws and remove cab roof lining (3) from the
rear of the cab.

Fig. 955

30-268

Method of intervention
4.

Remove the three screws and remove fuse unit support (4).

Fig. 956

5.

Remove the two screws (5) and remove relay support bracket (6).

Fig. 957

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.3 - Electrostatic unit


Removal
1.

Remove viscostatic unit (1).

Fig. 958

2.

Remove the three retaining screws (2).

Fig. 959

30-269

Method of intervention
3.

Disconnect wiring connector (3).

Fig. 960

4.

Remove electrostatic unit (4).

Fig. 961

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.4 - Parking brake switch


Removal
1.

Remove the two retaining screws (1) and remove parking brake cover (2).

Fig. 962

2.

Remove the two retaining screws (3).

Fig. 963

30-270

Method of intervention
3.

Disconnect wiring connector (4).

Fig. 964

4.

Remove switch (5).

Fig. 965

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.5 - Adjustment of the parking brake switch


Adjustment
1.

The height of the microswitch can be adjusted by way of the lateral slots (1).

Fig. 966

30-271

Method of intervention
30.8.6 - Brake lights switches
Removal
1.

Remove the two screws securing the switch (1).

Fig. 967

2.

Disconnect wiring connector (2).

Fig. 968

3.

Remove switch (3).

Fig. 969

30-272

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.7 - Adjustment of the brake light switches


Adjustment
1.

The height of the switches can be adjusted by way of slots (1).


Position the switch so that it is activated when the brake is operated (2).

Fig. 970

30.8.8 - Steering column switch


Removal
1.

Remove the four screws (1) securing the steering column switch support.

Fig. 971

2.

Remove steering column switch unit (2).

Fig. 972

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.8.9 - Control buttons - RH console

30-273

Method of intervention
Removal
1.

Remove the two rear lift control knobs (1) and the two remote valve control
knobs (2).

Fig. 973

2.

Remove the three retaining screws (3) under the RH fender.

Fig. 974

3.

Remove the two internal screws (4) securing the console.

Fig. 975

4.

Move the console aside and disconnect front PTO wiring connector (5).

Fig. 976

30-274

Method of intervention
5.

Remove console (6).

Fig. 977

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-275

Method of intervention
30.9 - M0 - Front PTO

30.9.1 - Pump - clutch assembly - brake


Removal
1.

Remove the eight fixing screws (1) of the upper cover of the front PTO.

Fig. 978

2.

Remove cover (2).


m

Check the condition of the gasket (3) inside the cover.

Fig. 979

3.

Loosen the plug on the underside of the sump (4) to allow the oil to drain
out of the PTO.

Fig. 980

4.

Remove side plug (5).


m

Recover the washer and seal (6).

Fig. 981

30-276

Method of intervention
5.

Remove oil filter (7).

Fig. 982

6.

Remove the three retaining screws (8) of the front bearing cover.

Fig. 983

7.

Remove cover (9).


m

Recover the O-ring.

Fig. 984

8.

Remove the three retaining screws (10) of the oil pump.

Fig. 985

30-277

Method of intervention
9.

Remove flange (11) connecting the shaft to the crankshaft pulley.

Fig. 986

10.

Remove shaft (12) from the front end.

Fig. 987

11.

Remove the second PTO drive shaft (13) from the front end .

Fig. 988

12.

Remove the clutch-brake and oil transfer pump assembly (14).


m

Recover bearing (15).

Fig. 989

30-278

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.9.2 - PTO output shaft


Removal
1.

Remove set screw (1) securing the front PTO input shaft.

Fig. 990

2.

Remove the three retaining screws (2) of the PTO input shaft flange.

Fig. 991

3.

Remove the two hydraulic hose clamps (3).

Fig. 992

4.

Remove the two lower screws (4) and four front screws (5) of the front lift
support.

Fig. 993

30-279

Method of intervention
5.

Remove front lift support (6).

Fig. 994

6.

Remove PTO oil sump (7).

Fig. 995

7.

Remove oil seal (8).


m

To remove the oil seal, make a hole in it and use a slide hammer
puller.

Fig. 996

8.

Remove circlip (9).

Fig. 997

30-280

Method of intervention
9.

Remove PTO output shaft (10) with gear (11) and bearing (12).

Fig. 998

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.9.3 - Solenoid valve


Removal
1.

Disconnect the solenoid valve from wiring (1).

Fig. 999

2.

Remove solenoid retaining nut (2).


m

Make a note of the correct installation sequence of the solenoids


and the four O-rings.

Fig. 1000

3.

Remove nut (3).

Fig. 1001

30-281

Method of intervention
4.

Withdraw solenoid valve (4).


m

Check the condition of the mesh filter (5) on the solenoid valve.

Fig. 1002

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-282

Method of intervention
30.10 - N0 - Front lift

30.10.1 - Front lift - version with front PTO Removal


1.

Remove the two cotter pins (1) and the two relative pivot pins (2).

Fig. 1003

2.

Remove the two front lift arms (3).

Fig. 1004

3.

Remove the two hydraulic service couplers (4) with their copper washers
and circlips (5).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1005

4.

Disconnect cylinder supply pipe (6).


m

Renew the copper washer on reassembly.

Fig. 1006

30-283

Method of intervention
5.

Remove on both sides the two screws (7) securing the front lift assembly on
the underside of the support.

Fig. 1007

6.

Remove the four screws (8) securing the front part of the front lift assembly.

Fig. 1008

7.

Remove front lift assembly (9).

Fig. 1009

30-284

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30.10.2 - Cylinder
Removal
1.

Remove split pin (1).

Fig. 1010

2.

Remove cylinder retaining pin (2).

Fig. 1011

3.

Remove circlip (3).

Fig. 1012

4.

Remove pin (4) and cylinder (5).

Fig. 1013

30-285

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-286

Method of intervention
30.11 - R0 - Rear lift

30.11.1 - Rear lift - complete assembly


Removal
1.

Disconnect front lift supply pipes (1).

Fig. 1014

2.

Disconnect the four pipes (2) of the rear hydraulic service couplers.

Fig. 1015

3.

Remove the two pipe retaining brackets (3).

Fig. 1016

4.

Remove the two centre screws (4) and remove service coupler support
frame (5).

Fig. 1017

30-287

Method of intervention
5.

Remove screw (6) securing the holding valve to the lift cover.

Fig. 1018

6.

Remove the two locking pins (7) and two pivot pins (8) from the link arms.

Fig. 1019

7.

Remove the nine screws (9) securing the lift assembly to the transmission.

Fig. 1020

8.

Remove complete lift assembly (10).

Fig. 1021

30-288

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Fixing screws (9): 40 2 Nm.

30.11.2 - Rear lift - complete assembly


Lift cylinders
Removal
1.

Undo the two unions (1) and remove pipe (2).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1022

2.

Turn the lift assembly over, remove the three screws (3) and loosen screw
(4).

Fig. 1023

3.

Turn the lift assembly over again, remove the screw (4) previously left in
place and remove cylinder assembly (5).

Fig. 1024

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Cylinder fixing holes: Loctite 510.

Fig. 1025

30-289

Method of intervention
Lift cylinders
Disassembly
1.

Remove lift safety valve (6).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1026

2.

Using a bar made of soft material, withdraw piston (7) from cylinder (5).

Fig. 1027

3.

Remove seal (8) from piston (7).


m

Note which way round seal (8) is installed.

Fig. 1028

Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m

Check that seal (8) is the right way round.

Seal and cylinder: transmission oil.

Fig. 1029

30-290

Method of intervention
Lift arms
Removal
1.

Detach springs (9) from levers (10).

Fig. 1030

2.

Remove cotter pin (11) and remove pivot pin (12).


m

Always renew the cotter pin on reassembly.

Fig. 1031

3.

On both sides, remove circlip (13), remove lift arm (14) and then remove
thrust washer (15).

Fig. 1032

4.

Loosen nut (16) and remove set screw (17).


m

Note the position of cam (18).

Fig. 1033

5.

Loosen nut (19) and remove set screw (20).

Fig. 1034

30-291

Method of intervention
6.

Withdraw shaft (21) towards the side opposite controls (22).


m

Renew the oil seal on the opposite side to the controls on reassembly.

Note which way round the oil seal is installed.

Note that the widest part of plate (23) faces upwards.

Fig. 1035

7.

Remove oil seal (24) from the controls side.


m

Note which way round the oil seal is installed.

Fig. 1036

8.

Check that bushes (25) are not worn out-of-round and renew them if necessary.

Fig. 1037

30-292

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.
2.
3.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Check that all components are installed the right way round.
Screw in fully and then, while holding it in position, secure with the nut.
m Grub screw: Loctite 242
Screw fully into its seating on the shaft and then unscrew it by half a turn. Hold in position and secure with the nut.
m Grub screw: Loctite 242
m

Grease the shaft, the bushes and the oil seal.

Bush
Renewal
1.

Position the lift cover under a press and, using a suitable tool, remove bush
(26).

Fig. 1038

2.

Fit the new bush (26) in the lift cover, taking care to align it with the hole

Fig. 1039

3.

Fit the bush with the split rotated 45 relative to the rear of the lift cover

Fig. 1040

30-293

Method of intervention
30.11.3 - Adjustment of the rear lift
Internal adjustment
Safety stop
1.

Move cylinder (1) to bring lever (2) up to stop (3).

Fig. 1041

2.

Adjust screw (4) to obtain a clearance of 2 0.5 mm (5).

Fig. 1042

3.

Tighten nut (6).


m

Screw (A): Loctite 242.

Fig. 1043

30-294

Method of intervention
External adjustment
Maximum lift height
1.

Move position control lever (7) to MAX position (8).

Fig. 1044

2.

Move draft control lever (9) to position 12 (10).

Fig. 1045

3.

Move RH lever (11) to bring the notch on the lever into alignment (12) with
the notch on the hub of the casing (13).

Fig. 1046

4.

Adjust screw (14) to bring it up against stop (15) then tighten nut (16).

Fig. 1047

30-295

Method of intervention
Adjustment of the sensor tie-rod
Adjustment
1.

Install the various components of the sensor tie-rod as shown in the figure.

Fig. 1048

2.

Adjust the length (17) to 92.4 0.2 mm.

Fig. 1049

30.11.4 - Lift cylinders


Removal
1.

Undo the two unions (1) and remove pipe (2).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1050

2.

Turn the lift assembly over, remove the three screws (3) and loosen screw
(4).

Fig. 1051

30-296

Method of intervention
3.

Turn the lift assembly over again, remove the screw (4) previously left in
place and remove cylinder assembly (5).

Fig. 1052

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

Cylinder fixing holes: Loctite 510.

Fig. 1053

30.11.5 - Lift cylinders


Disassembly
1.

Remove lift safety valve (1).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1054

2.

Using a bar made of soft material, drive piston (3) out from cylinder (2).

Fig. 1055

30-297

Method of intervention
3.

Remove seal (4) from piston (3).


m

Note which way round seal (4) is installed.

Fig. 1056

Assembly
1.

To assemble, follow the disassembly steps in reverse order.


m

Check that seal (4) is installed the right way round.

Seal and cylinder: transmission oil.

Fig. 1057

30.11.6 - Renewal of the rear lift bush


Renewal
1.

Position the lift cover under a press and, using a suitable tool, remove bush
(1).

Fig. 1058

2.

Install new bush (1) making sure that it is inserted flush with the bore in the
lift cover.

Fig. 1059

30-298

Method of intervention
3.

Fit the bush with the split rotated 45 relative to the rear (A) of the lift cover.

Fig. 1060

30.11.7 - Lift arms


Removal
1.

Detach springs (1) from levers (2).

Fig. 1061

2.

Remove cotter pin (3) and remove pivot pin (4).


m

Always renew the cotter pin on reassembly.

Fig. 1062

3.

On both sides, remove circlip (5), remove lift arm (6) and then remove
thrust washer (7).

Fig. 1063

30-299

Method of intervention
4.

Loosen nut (8) and remove set screw (9).


m

Note the position of cam (10).

Fig. 1064

5.

Loosen nut (11) and remove set screw (12).

Fig. 1065

6.

Withdraw shaft (13) towards the side opposite controls (14).


m

Renew the oil seal on the opposite side to the controls on reassembly.

Note which way round the oil seal is installed.

Note that the widest part of plate (15) faces upwards.

Fig. 1066

7.

Remove oil seal (16) from the controls side.


m

Note which way round the oil seal is installed.

Fig. 1067

8.

Check that the bushes (17) are not worn out-of-round and renew them if
necessary.

Fig. 1068

30-300

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.
2.
3.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Check that all components are installed the right way round.
Screw in fully and then, while holding it in position, secure with the nut.
m Grub screw: Loctite 242
Screw fully into its seating on the shaft and then unscrew it by half a turn. Hold in position and secure with the nut.
m Grub screw: Loctite 242
m

Grease the shaft, the bushes and the oil seal.

30.11.8 - Hydraulic lift control valve


Removal
1.

DANGER
Disconnect the lead from the battery negative terminal (-).

2.

Undo the two unions (1) and remove pipe (2).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1069

3.

Undo the two unions (3) and remove pipe (4).

Fig. 1070

4.

Detach springs (5) from levers (6).

Fig. 1071

30-301

Method of intervention
5.

Remove cotter pin (7) and remove pivot pin (8).


m

Renew the cotter pin on reassembly.

Fig. 1072

6.

Remove screws (9) and remove control valve (10).

Fig. 1073

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m

For control valve fixing screw holes: Use Loctite 510.

Hydraulic travel limit control lever: Check adjustment.

Fig. 1074

30.11.9 - Disassembly of the lift control valve


Disassembly
1.

Remove the two screws (1) and remove the complete bracket (2).

Fig. 1075

30-302

Method of intervention
2.

Remove screw (3) and separate control valve bodies (4) and (5).

Fig. 1076

3.

Remove spring (6) and spacer (7) from valve body (4).

Fig. 1077

4.

Remove circlip (8), washer (9) and spring (10).


m

Gradually relieve the load exerted by spring (10).

Fig. 1078

5.

Withdraw valve (11).

Fig. 1079

6.

Remove plug (12) and remove valve (13), pin (14) and spring (15).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1080

30-303

Method of intervention
7.

Withdraw piston (16) from the valve body (4).

Fig. 1081

8.

Remove the four O-rings (17) from valve body (4).

Fig. 1082

9.

Withdraw spool (18) from valve body (5) and remove piston (19) and spring
(20).

Fig. 1083

10.

Remove plug (21) and withdraw spring (22), spacer (23) and valve (24).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1084

11.

Remove spring (25) and rod (26).

Fig. 1085

30-304

Method of intervention
12.

Remove plug (27) and remove spring (28) and valve (29).
m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1086

13.

Remove valve (30).


m

Renew the copper washers on reassembly.

Fig. 1087

Assembly
1.
2.

Assemble by reversing the disassembly sequence.


Check that valve (13) is installed the right way round.
Check that valve (13) slides freely in its seat.

Fig. 1088

3.

Check that piston (16) is installed the right way round.

Fig. 1089

30-305

Method of intervention
4.

Check that spool (18) slides freely without sticking.


Check that piston (19) slides freely in its seat.

Fig. 1090

5.

Check that valve (24) slides freely.


Make sure that the assembly sequence is correct.

Fig. 1091

6.

Check that rod (26) is installed the right way round.

Fig. 1092

7.

While holding ball (A) in valve (29) tight up against rod (26), that the standout of rod (26) relative to the face of valve body (5) is within the prescribed
tolerance limits: 15.8 0.05 mm (B).

Fig. 1093

30-306

Method of intervention
30.11.10 - Three-point linkage with mechanical adjustment
Removal
1.

Remove the two screws (1) and remove rear PTO output shaft shield (2).

Fig. 1094

2.

Remove the two pins (3) and towing hitch support pins (4).

Fig. 1095

3.

Remove rear towing hitch (5).

Fig. 1096

4.

Remove the six screws (6) and remove the two brackets (7) for lateral adjustment of the towing hitch.

Fig. 1097

30-307

Method of intervention
Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-308

Method of intervention
30.12 - S0 - Wheels
30.12.1 - Front wheels
Removal
1.

DANGER
Remove the key from the starter switch and apply the parking brake.

2.

Raise the tractor and position two stands A under the front axle.
Remove all the screws (1) except one, which should be left in position for
safety.
Remove the wheel. Repeat the above operations for the other wheel.

Fig. 1098

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Wheel screws: 169 Nm (124.5 lb.ft.)

30.12.2 - Rear wheels


Removal
1.

Place a jack (A) under the rear gearbox casing.


Position jack (A) close to the wheel to be removed.
Raise the tractor sufficiently to eliminate the flexure of the tyre wall.
Remove all the screws (1) and nuts (2), then remove the wheel.
m

Fig. 1099

2.

Position a stand B under the rear axle housing and lower the jack until the
axle housing is resting on the stand.
Check that the stand is in exactly the correct position and then remove the
trolley jack.
Repeat the above operations to remove the other wheel.

Fig. 1100

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.


m Nuts: 169 Nm (124.5 lb.ft.)
m

Screws: 169 Nm (124.5 lb.ft.)

30-309

Method of intervention
30.13 - V0 - Ballast - towing hitches
30.13.1 - Support and towing hitch
Removal
1.

Remove the two locking pins (1).

Fig. 1101

2.

Remove the two pins (2).

Fig. 1102

3.

Removing towing hitch support and guard (3).

Fig. 1103

Refitting
1.

Refitting is the reverse of removal.

30-310

40 - Wiring diagrams

40-1

Wiring diagrams
40.1 - Introduction

40.1.1 - Structure of the unit

For easier consultation, this unit has been divided into the following chapters:
l

introduction
m Contains a brief description of the terminology used, the procedures to follow for troubleshooting and repairs, and the
instruments required for troubleshooting.
Indices
m Contains the indices arranged by connector name, by component code and by component description.
Components
m Contains the layouts of the connectors used in the electrical system, descriptions of the components installed on the
tractor,the technical data necessary for functional testing and the pinouts of the electronic control units.
Systems
m Contains the electrical diagrams of the tractors systems.
Wiring looms
m Contains the layouts, the wiring diagrams and the positioning of connectors on the tractor.

How to consult the unit

Fig. 1104

How to consult the table


The quickest way to determine the cause of a malfunction of a component (e.g. the starter motor) is to check all the components in
the system in which the component is incorporated. In this example, the problem is a malfunction of the starter motor, which fails to
start the engine.
l

40-2

Find the starter motor in heading Index by part description and identify the system in which the component is incorporated.
The system is indicated in the System column and in this case is 2 (figure A).

Wiring diagrams
l

l
l

Consult heading Starting (figure B), where all system components are shown in the electrical diagram; these components
are accompanied by numbers that correspond to the key on the same page.
Check all the components in the system, starting for example with switch 1.
In heading Index by part description (figure A) find the item Start switch and check in the column Technical Descrn to see
if there is a technical description of the component (in this case it appears at no. 42 in the heading component technical data)
(figure C). Take note also of the name of the connector to which the component is connected (in this case X4).

Only if the position of the component is not known


Only if the position of the component is not known:
l

l
l

In heading Connector index (figure D) find the name of the connector to which the component is connected (in this case
X4) and note down the wiring loom in which it is incorporated (in this case 0.012.5957.4) and the type of connector (in this
case 19).
Find the wiring loom in chapter Plans, wiring diagrams, connector positions using the index at the beginning of the chapter.
Find the name of the connector in the photos attached to the electrical diagrams and establish its position on the tractor using
the drawing (figure E)
Using the data contained in the paragraph Component technical data (figure C) in position no. 42, check the operation of
the switch.
DANGER
In the electrical diagrams (figure F) are indicated the names of the connectors and the descriptions that are used in
all the tables of chapter 2.
DANGER
If the pinout of the connector is not known, look in paragraph Connector layouts (figure G) for the number found in
the column Type of paragraph Connector index.

introduction
This section of the workshop manual is intended as a practical guide to troubleshooting the tractors electrical and electronic systems.
The following pages provide the technician with all the necessary information regarding the tractors systems and components. Due
to the possible time difference between the introduction of technical modifications (in line with our policy of continuous product improvement) and the corresponding amendment of our printed documentation, we are obliged to state that the data contained in this
document are subject to modification and as such are not binding.
Definition of components and symbols
To prevent any misunderstanding or ambiguity, listed below are definitions for some of the key terms used in this unit.

Table 100
TERM

Connector
Transmission oil
Main clutch
Accelerator pedal
Pressure switch
Thermostat
Lights switch
HML control

DESCRIPTION

Element used to connect two components (e.g. wiring-switch, wiring-wiring)


Electrical component that converts the temperature of a medium (air, water, oil, etc.) into a voltage
or resistance
Electrical component that converts the pressure of a medium (air, water, etc.) into a voltage or
resistance
Electrical component that converts the angular or linear position of an object into a voltage
Switch that changes state (opens or closes a contact) according to the operating pressure in the
circuit in which it is installed
Switch that changes state (opens or closes a contact) according to the temperature of the medium
in which it is immersed.
Mechanical component that opens or closes one or more electrical contacts.
Valve operated by applying electrical current to a coil (or solenoid)

Chapter Components shows the wiring diagrams for certain switches and buttons. The following symbols are used for ease of
interpretation:

Table 101
SYMBOL

DESCRIPTION

Contact between pins CLOSED (stable switch position)

40-3

Wiring diagrams
SYMBOL

DESCRIPTION

Contact between pins CLOSED (unstable switch position)


Indicator LED

Indicator lamp

Diode

General rules
The inspection, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair operations are essential to ensure that the tractor continues to operate
correctly over time and to prevent malfunctions and breakdowns. The scope of this paragraph is to describe repair procedures and
to help improve the quality of repairs.
Modification of the tractors electrical/electronic circuits
The manufacturer prohibits any modification or alteration of the electrical wiring for the connection of any non-approved electrical
applicances or components. In particular, if it is discovered that the electrical system or a component has been modified without authorisation, the Manufacturer will accept no liability for any damage to the vehicle and the vehicle warranty will be invalidated.
Main wiring faults
Bad contact between connectors
l

The main causes of poor contact between connectors are incorrect insertion of the male into the female connector, deformation of one or both connectiors, and corrosion or oxidisation of the pin contact surfaces.

Defective pin soldering or crimping


l

The pins of the male and female connectors make good contact in the crimped or soldered area, but the wires are subjected
to excessive tension, leading to breakage of the insulation or the wire itself and a poor connection.

Disconnecting wiring
l

If components are disconnected by pulling on the wires, or if components are removed with the wires still connected, or if the
wiring is subject to a heavy impact this could damage the connections at the pins, breaking strands of wire.

Penetration of water inside connectors


l

The connectors are designed to prevent penetration of liquids (water, oil etc.); however, it is possible that when the tractor is
cleaned using high-pressure water or steam, water could penetrate or condense in the connectors.
As the connectors
are designed to prevent liquid penetration, any water that does get in will not be able to drain out, and thus may cause shortcircuits across the pins. For this reason it is good practice to dry the connectors with a low pressure jet of compressed air after
washing the tractor.

Oil or dirt on connectors


l

If the connectors or pin contact surfaces show signs of oil or grease contamination, this will prevent the passage of current
(oil and grease are electrical insulators) creating a poor contact. Clean the connectors thoroughly using a dry cloth or a low
pressure jet of compressed air and use specific products (deoxidising sprays, etc.) to degrease the contacts.
Important
Take care not to bend the pins when cleaning them. Use dry oil-free compressed air.

Removal, refitting and drying of connectors and wiring


When disconnecting wiring, pull on the connectors rather than on the wires themselves. For connectors that are held in position
with screws or levers, fully loosen the screws, then pull on the connector. For connectors that are clipped together, fully depress the
40-4

Wiring diagrams
clip then pull the connector apart. After disconnecting connectors, seal them in waterproof material to prevent contamination of the
contacts with dirt or moisture.
Connecting the connectors. Check the condition of the connectors:
l
l
l
l
l

Make sure the pin contact surfaces are free of water, dirt or oil.
Check that the connectors are not deformed and that the pins are not corroded or oxidised.
Check that the connector casings are not damaged or split.
If a connector is contaminated with oil or grease, or if moisture has penetrated the casing, clean it thoroughly.
If a connector is damaged, deformed or broken, replace it with a new one.

When connecting connectors, make sure they are properly aligned before applying force. For connectors with clips, insert the two
halves until they clip together.
Cleaning and drying wiring
l

l
l

When wiring is dirty or contaminated with oil or grease, clean it with a dry cloth, or, if necessary, with water or steam. If the
wiring must be cleaned with water, avoid directing the water or steam jet on the connectors; if water penetrates the connector,
clean it thoroughly.
Check that the connector is not short circuited due to the presence of water by testing for continuity across the pins.
After checking that the connector is good condition, degrease the contacts using a deoxidising product.

Renewal of damaged electrical components.


l
l

When replacing electrical components (fuses, relays, etc.), use only original parts supplied by the manufacturer.
When replacing fuses, check that the new fuse conforms to DIN 72581 or ISO 8820 standards and in particular:
m fuse F1 (100A) DIN 72581/2
m bayonet fuse (F2, F3, etc.) DIN 72581/3C
m fuse F51 (100A) and F52 (200A) ISO 8820.
The fitting of replacement fuses that do not comply with these standards will invalidate the warranty with immediate effect and
release the manufacturer from any liability.
When replacing relays, make sure that the new relay conforms to the standards marked on the original relay.

Diagnostic instruments
For the correct diagnosis of any faults in the tractors electrical system, the following instruments are required:
l

Digital multimeter with the following minimum characteristics:


m AC VOLT 0-600
m DC VOLT 0-600
m OHM 0-32M
m AC AMP 0-10
m DC AMP 0-10
All Round Tester or computer with PCTESTER software installed

Wire colour codes


Table 102

COLOUR CODES

A
B
C
G
H
L
M
N
R
S
V
Z

Light blue
White
Orange
Yellow
Grey
Dark blue
Brown
black
Red
Pink
green
Purple

40-5

Wiring diagrams
40.1.2 - Wiring and components index
List of wiring harnesses
Table 103

Description

Code

Wiring diagram

Aereo cab
Front
Front with cab
Cab power supply
Compressor wiring
Remote valve wiring
Solenoid valve wiring
Rear lights wiring
Flashing light wiring
Cab earth wiring
Radio wiring
Central wiring
Front lights
Rear

0.014.7593.4
0.012.6951.4
0.015.0032.4
0.014.7594.4
0.014.7601.4
0.012.6955.4
0.014.1482.4
0.014.7602.4
0.014.7597.4
0.015.0031.4
0.014.7600.4
0.012.6949.4
.014.7599.4
0.013.1452.4/10

40-89
40-57
40-66
40-92
40-65
40-86
40-80
40-86
40-100
40-96
40-104
40-71
40-62
40-82

Connector positions

40-90
40-58
40-68
40-93
40-65
40-81
40-87
40-101
40-96
40-104
40-74
40-63
40-84

Index by part description


Table 104

Component description

Check panel

Component code

LH light

2.8339.230.0
2.8339.230.40
2.8519.035.4
0.013.3337.3
0.013.9053.2
2.8039.293.0
2.8039.293.0
2.8039.294.0

Front lights

2.8039.230.0

Worklights d. 80
Rear lights

2.8039.001.0
2.8059.230.0 (LH)

Sol. valve control unit


Steering column switch
Ex rotating beacon wire
RH light

2.8059.240.0 (RH)
Receiver-dryer

0.008.9604.0

Flasher
Bosch emergency pushbutton
PTO switch
Windscreen wiper timer relay
Windscreen wiper
Rear wiper
Air conditioning fan

0.009.6758.4/10
2.7659.110.0
2.7659.262.0
2.8639.008.0
2.9019.200.0
2.9019.190.0
0.010.0618.4

Connector

A18
A20
U1
A25
N1
P2
P3
P5
P6
Z5
Z8
G14
S2
S3
S4
S6
S7
S8
M3
M4
A26
A7
V4
G9
G19
L4
M5

System

40-71
40-71
40-80
40-71
40-100
40-62
40-62
40-62
40-62
40-66
40-66
40-89
40-86
40-86
40-86
40-86
40-86
40-86
40-94
40-94
40-71
40-71
40-61
40-89
40-89
40-98
40-94

40.1.3 - Introduction

For easier consultation, this unit has been divided into the following chapters:
l

40-6

Introduction
m Contains a brief description of the terminology used, the procedures to follow for troubleshooting and repairs, and the
instruments required for fault diagnosis.
Components list
m Contains the components of the electrical systems, organised by type.
m Indicates the system code, the component code and description, the technical data required for functional testing and
a description of the pin-outs of the ECUs.

Wiring diagrams
l

Systems
m Contains the wiring diagrams of the tractors systems.
Wiring harnesses
m Contains the layouts, the wiring diagrams and the positions of connectors on the tractor.

Introduction
This section of the workshop manual is intended as a practical guide to fault diagnosis of the tractors electrical and electronic
systems. The following pages provide the technician with all the necessary information regarding the tractors systems and components. Due to the possible time difference between the introduction of technical modifications (in line with our policy of continuous
product improvement) and the corresponding amendment of our printed documentation, the data contained in this document are
subject to modification and as such are not binding.
Definition of components and symbols
To prevent any misunderstanding or ambiguity, definitions for some of the key terms used in this unit are listed below.

Table 105
TERM

DESCRIPTION

Connector
Temperature sensor

Element used to connect two components (e.g. wiring-switch, wiring-wiring)


Electrical component that converts the temperature of a medium (air, water, oil, etc.) into a voltage
or resistance
Electrical component that converts the pressure of a medium (air, water, etc.) into a voltage or
resistance
Electrical component that converts an angular or linear position into a voltage
Switch that changes state (opens or closes a contact) according to the operating pressure in the
circuit in which it is installed
Switch that changes state (opens or closes a contact) according to the temperature of the medium
(air, water, etc.) in which it is immersed.
Mechanical component that opens or closes one or more electrical contacts.
Valve operated by applying electrical current to a coil (or solenoid)

Pressure sensor
Position sensor
Pressure switch
Thermostat
Switch
Solenoid valve

Chapter Components shows the wiring diagrams for certain switches and buttons. The following symbols are used for ease of
interpretation:
Contact between pins CLOSED (stable switch position)
Contact between pins CLOSED (unstable switch position)
Indicator LED

Indicator light

Diode

General rules
The inspection, maintenance, fault diagnosis and repair operations are essential to ensure that the tractor continues to operate correctly over time and to prevent malfunctions and breakdowns. This paragraph describes repair procedures and aims to help improve
the quality of repairs.
Modification of the tractors electrical/electronic circuits
The manufacturer prohibits any modification or alteration of the electrical wiring for the connection of any non-approved electrical
appliances or components. In particular, if the electrical system or a component is altered without the Manufacturers authorisation,
the Manufacturer will accept no liability for any damage to the vehicle and the vehicle warranty will be invalidated.

40-7

Wiring diagrams
Main wiring faults
Bad contact between connectors
l

The main causes of poor contact between connectors are incorrect insertion of the male into the female connector, deformation of one or both connectors, and corrosion or oxidisation of the pin contact surfaces.

Defective pin soldering or crimping


l

The pins of the male and female connectors make good contact in the crimped or soldered area, but the wires are subjected
to excessive strain, leading to breakage of the insulation and a poor connection or breakage of the wire.

Disconnecting wiring
l

If connectors are disconnected by pulling on the cables, or if components are removed with the wires still connected, or if the
wiring is subject to impact by a heavy object this could damage the soldering or crimping of wires on the pins and some wires
may break.

Penetration of water inside connectors


l

The connectors are designed to prevent penetration of liquids (water, oil etc.); however, when cleaning the tractor with pressure washers or steam washers water could penetrate or condense in the connectors. As the connectors are designed to
prevent liquid penetration, any water that does get in will be unable to drain out, and thus may cause short circuits across the
pins. It is therefore good practice to dry the connectors with a low pressure jet of compressed air after washing the tractor.

Oil or dirt on connectors


l

If the connectors or pin contact surfaces show signs of oil or grease contamination, this will prevent the passage of current
(oil and grease are electrical insulators) creating a poor contact. Clean the connectors thoroughly using a dry cloth or a low
pressure jet of compressed air and use specific products (deoxidising sprays, etc.) to degrease the contacts.
Important
Take care not to bend the pins when cleaning them. Use dry oil-free compressed air.

Removal, refitting and drying of connectors and wiring


When disconnecting wiring, pull on the connectors rather than on the wires themselves. For connectors that are held in position with
screws or levers, fully loosen the screws, then pull on the connector. For connectors that are clipped together, fully depress the clip
then pull the connector apart. After disconnecting connectors, apply water proof covers to prevent contamination of the contacts with
dirt or moisture.
Connecting the connectors. Check the condition of the connectors:
l
l
l
l
l

Make sure the pin contact surfaces are free of water, dirt or oil.
Check that the connectors are not deformed and that the pins are not corroded or oxidised.
Check that the connector casings are not damaged or split.
If a connector is contaminated with oil or grease, or if moisture has penetrated the casing, clean it thoroughly.
If a connector is damaged, deformed or broken, replace it with a new one.

When connecting connectors, make sure they are properly aligned before applying force. For connectors with clips, insert the two
halves until they clip together.
Cleaning and drying wiring
l

l
l

When wiring is dirty or contaminated with oil or grease, clean it with a dry cloth, or, if necessary, with water or steam. If the
wiring must be cleaned with water, avoid directing the water or steam jet on the connectors; if water penetrates the connector,
clean it thoroughly.
Check that the connector is not short circuited due to the presence of water by testing for continuity across the pins.
After checking that the connector is good condition, degrease the contacts using a deoxidising product.

Renewal of damaged electrical components.


l
l

40-8

When replacing electrical components (fuses, relays, etc.), use only original parts supplied by the manufacturer.
When replacing fuses, check that the new fuse conforms to DIN 72581 or ISO 8820 standards, and in particular:
m fuse F1 (100A) DIN 72581/2
m bayonet fuse (F2, F3, etc.) DIN 72581/3C
m fuse F51 (100A) and F52 (200A) ISO 8820.

Wiring diagrams
l

The fitting of replacement fuses that do not comply with these standards will invalidate the warranty with immediate effect and
release the manufacturer from all liability.
When replacing relays, make sure that the new relay conforms to the standards marked on the original relay.

Diagnostic instruments
For the correct diagnosis of any faults in the tractors electrical system, the following instruments are required:
l

l
l

Digital multimeter with the following minimum characteristics:


m AC VOLT 0-600
m DC VOLT 0-600
m OHM 0-32M
m AC AMP 0-10
m DC AMP 0-10
All Round Tester or computer with PCTESTER software installed
SDF Analyzer

Wire colour codes


Table 106

COLOUR CODES

A
B
S
G
H
L
M
N
R
S
V
Z

Light blue
White
Orange
Yellow
Grey
Blue
Brown
Black
Red
Pink
Green
Purple

40.1.4 - Basic electronics for mechanics (1/2)


What is electronics?

The name of this branch of electrical science is derived from the word ELECTRON, the name given to a small electrically charged
particle.
The movement of electrons produces electrical current, which we know more about for its effects - heat, light, magnetism, electrolysis, etc. - than for its actual nature.
While electrical engineering is concerned with these external effects of electrical current, electronics deals with way materials react
to the gain or loss of electrons.
Electrons in fact move from (-) to (+), but according to a convention that was established before the emergence of modern atomic
theory, electric current flows in the opposite direction from (+) to (-).
Using electronics it is possible to program complex logical processes, which could not be achieved in other ways.
The various applications of electronics on our tractors can be divided into two groups:
l

Invisible electronics, which operate without requiring any intervention of the driver, (voltage regulation, rectification of the current produced by the alternator, timing, etc.);
Visible electronics, ranging from the visible and audible information to made available to the driver via the vehicles instruments and signalling systems, to the control systems that serve to optimise work processes (Performance Monitor, SBA
System, I-Monitor, etc.).

Logical development of the electronics


As mentioned previously, electronics is generally viewed as a branch of electrical science, even though in certain aspects they are
quite independent.
Whereas electrical engineering generally deals with large amounts of current, electronics is more concerned with very low levels of
current.
Electronic applications are based on the movement of electrons and thus exploit the different degrees to which different materials
conduct electrical current:
40-9

Wiring diagrams
l
l
l

Conductors,
Insulators,
Semiconductors

We therefore need to know what happens electrically inside the material.


All matter is composed of tiny particles called atoms.
The atom can be likened to a planetary system which has at its core a nucleus, comprised of protons and neutrons, around which
rotate the electrons in different orbits, or shells.

Fig. 1105

Under certain conditions, electrons can move from one atom to another.
If the number of electrons in an atom is the same as the number of protons, the atom is neutral (it has no charge).
If the number of electrons exceeds the number of protons, the atom is negatively charged, while if it loses electrons it will become
positively charged.

Atomic structure of matter


The atom is the smallest particle of a simple element that can combine with other
atoms to form molecules.

Fig. 1106

40-10

Wiring diagrams
The composition of the nucleus and the number of electrons present in an atom
determine which element it belongs to.

Fig. 1107

The structure of an atom can be compared to that of the solar system:


1.
2.

Electron (Planet)
Nucleus (Sun)

Fig. 1108

Electrical charges of the same sign (1) repel each other while charges of opposite
signs (2) attract.

Fig. 1109

40.1.5 - Basic electronics for mechanics (2/2)


Conductors, Insulators and Semiconductors

The behaviour exhibited by different materials in response to electricity derives from their atomic structure:
1.
2.
3.

In conductors (generally metals), electrons are able to move freely from one atom to another;
In insulators (generally metalloids) electron movement is restricted to varying degrees, depending on the type of material.
Their atoms are not able to acquire electrons.
Semiconductors (germanium, silicon, selenium, etc.), are materials which in their pure state may act as insulators, but with
the addition of precisely calibrated amounts certain impurities, they can become conductors. Their electrical properties thus
lie somewhere in the range between insulators and conductors. If these materials in their pure state are subjected to a technical process known as doping (the addition of impurities with a certain number of atoms with free electrical charges), they
become positively or negatively charged, depending on the specific process.

Electrical voltage
We have talked about external causes that can provoke the movement of electrons in atoms.
One of these external causes is voltage or potential difference, which exerts a force on electrical charges, causing them to start
moving.
This force is known as electromotive force; the force supplied by electrical sources (battery, dynamo, alternator).

40-11

Wiring diagrams
The concept of voltage or potential difference is illustrated by the example shown
here.
l

The levels in A and B are equal if the valve is open.

Fig. 1110

The concept of voltage or potential difference is illustrated by the example shown


here.
l

For water to flow from A to B, there must a difference in level h when the
valve closed.
The difference between the height of water in A and that in B creates a difference in pressure.

Fig. 1111

When the valve is opened, water flows from A to B until the point where the two
pressures are equalised.
The same happens with electrical current:
l

to obtain current flow, there has to be potential difference at one of the


conductor (caused by the presence of electrical charge).

Fig. 1112

Resistance
The water model can also be used to explain the concept of electrical resistance. If water encounters obstacles when flowing through
a pipe the the flow rate will slow or the direction of flow will change .
The same applies to electrical current; obstacles of an electrical nature reduce the flow of electrons. Every material offers some degree resistance to the flow of electrons; the level of this resistance will depend on its atomic structure and its dimensions. Obstacles
in a water course will slow down or change the direction of the water flow.
Electrical resistance can be compared to a restriction in the conductor or scaling
on the inside of a water pipe.

Fig. 1113

40-12

Wiring diagrams
The electrical resistance of a material can be defined as the opposition it presents to the flow of electrons and varies according to the
nature of the material and its dimensions.

Electrical continuity
Staying with the water analogy, lets examine how to obtain a continuous flow of water in a circuit. 424For the flow to be continuous,
the water must be returned to basin 1.
In this hydraulic circuit, the function of the pump (2) is to return the water to basin
or tank (1).

Fig. 1114

Similarly, for current to flow continuously in an electrical circuit, the electrons must return from the positively charged terminal to the
negatively charged terminal, in order to maintain a potential difference between the two terminals. This is the job of the electrical
power source.

Electrical power supply


An electrical power source can be defined as a system capable of separating and initiating the motion of a number of electrons.
A battery, for example, has two metal terminals, one positive and one negative.
Inside the battery, a chemical process causes free electrons to flow to the negative terminal to create a negative charge and a corresponding positive charge to build at the positive terminal.
This process will continue inside the battery until the actions which caused it are balanced by the forces of attraction between the
electrons and the positive charges.
If the electrons could flow to the positive terminal, the initial neutral status could be restored, but as there is internal connection between the two terminals, this can only be achieved if there is an external connection between B and A.
We can therefore state that a difference in potential, or voltage, has been created between the two terminals A and B.
If we now connect an external load between B and A, the electrons concentrated at terminal A (+) will starting moving towards terminal
B, thereby pushing along the free electrons present in the connecting conductor.
An electrical current is thus created, (which by convention is deemed as flowing from A to B), and this current will continue to flow as
long as there remains a difference in potential between the two terminals.
Schematic representation of a electrical power source
A = Positive terminal
B = Negative terminal
G = Generator

Fig. 1115

40-13

Wiring diagrams
Electromotive force (e.m.f.)
Taking a simple electrical circuit , lets see what happens to the voltage at the terminals of the power source when the circuit is closed
(in this example, the power source is a battery, but the same result would be obtained with a different source of power, such as an
alternator).
Simple circuit with switch I open: no current flow.
The same situation occurs if we replace the battery with an alternator in rotation.
A voltage (e.g. 12V) is present at the terminals of the power source, which can be
measured with a voltmeter. This no-load voltage is known as the electromotive
force.
R = resistance of a load.

Fig. 1116

Simple circuit with switch I closed. The battery powers the resistance R. A voltage drop occurs between the terminals of the power source, caused by the circulation of current in the source itself, which has its own internal resistance.
Vd = r A
r = internal resistance of the power source in series with the other elements of the
circuit
A = current flowing through the circuit

Fig. 1117

The following relationship is therefore true for every power source:


Available voltage = Electromotive force - Internal resistance x Current
V=E-(rI)

Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC)


Electrical current can be either direct or variable: with direct current, the electrons always flow only one direction; with variable current, the direction and intensity of electron flow varies over time in accordance with the laws of trigonometry.
If this change in direction is regular over time, the current is described as alternating. Alternating current changes cyclically from
positive values to zero and from zero to negative values and so on.
On a tractor, the battery supplies direct current voltage, and therefore direct current flows through the connected circuits.
The alternator produces alternating current, which, as we shall see, must be converted into direct current by a bridge rectifier before
it can be used.
The graph below illustrates the behaviour of a sinusoidal alternating current. The voltage increases from zero volts up to the maximum positive value and then decreases to zero volts . The polarity is then inverted and the the voltage rises to the maximum negative
value before returning once again to zero. This complete sequence is referred to as one cycle.
If a cycle is performed once every second, then the frequency of the alternating current is said to be 1 Hertz. In domestic electrical
supplies, the frequency of the supply is 50 Hz.
Frequency is thus the number of complete cycles performed in one second.
A period is defined as the time required for an alternating sine wave to complete one cycle, i.e. from zero to a positive peak to zero
to a negative peak and back to zero.
This time period is expressed in seconds and is denoted by the letter T.

40-14

Wiring diagrams
The alternating current wave form illustrated in the graph is called sinusoidal.
T = 1 period
A = Amplitude
B = Positive voltage
C = Negative voltage

Fig. 1118

The number of cycles per second is the FREQUENCY and is expressed in Hertz and denoted with the letter f.
f=1T
T=1f
An AC current with a frequency of 50 Hertz therefore has a period of 1 50 = 0.02 seconds.

Electrical values: Current and Voltage


CURRENT Symbol A
Value: Amount of electrical charge that passes through a conductor in a given unit of time.
Units: amperes.
Instrument: ammeter.
Connection to circuit: In series.
Basic electrical circuit incorporating a voltmeter and an ammeter.
Resistance is present in the conductors (R), in the loads (Ri1) and in the power
source (Ri2).
The inclusion of an ammeter (unlike a voltmeter) requires a modification to the
circuit, in that the circuit must be opened at some point by cutting a conductor and
the instrument must be then connected between the open ends of the conductor.

Fig. 1119

The inclusion of an ammeter (unlike a voltmeter) requires a modification to the


circuit, in that the circuit must be opened at some point by cutting a conductor and
the instrument must be then connected between the open ends of the conductor.

Fig. 1120

VOLTAGE Symbol V
Voltage: Difference in potential; (emf); force that causes electrons to flow
Units: Volts
Measuring instrument: Voltmeter.
Connection to circuit: in parallel.

40-15

Wiring diagrams
Resistance
In an electrical circuit, voltage and current are both dependent on RESISTANCE, i.e. the opposition to the flow of electrons in a
material.
We have already mentioned how the motion of electrons occurs as a result of forces produced by the collision of these minute particles.
This phenomenon generates heat and is this reason why materials heat up when current passes through them.
The greater the current (the greater the number of electrons in motion) the more heat is produced.
As the temperature increases, the movement of the electrons also increases, and the electrons find it more difficult to move under
the influence of the voltage.
In some materials, this resistance is minimal; these materials are good conductors of current (conductors: copper, aluminium, silver,
etc.). In others, the resistance is so high that it is difficult for electrons to move (insulators: mica, porcelain, glass, paper, etc.)
In addition to the nature of the material, resistance is also affected by its dimensions:
l
l

LENGTH: the greater the length of the conductor the greater the number of collisions between atoms and free electrons.
CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA; the greater the cross-sectional area, the greater the number of free electrons. Resistance is
inversely proportional to cross-sectional area.
TEMPERATURE, the motion of atoms and consequently the probability of collision with free atoms increases proportionally
with the temperature, thus increasing also the resistance.

The electrical circuits on the tractor are generally comprised of wire conductors with a cross-sectional area that is negligible in comparison with their length.

Fig. 1121 - Load connection cables


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Single colour.
Spiral striping with max. pitch 50 mm
Horizontal striping.
With narrow-spaced coloured rings.
With wide spaced rings.
With rings in groups of 2 of same or different colours, depending on use.
With coloured rings in groups of 3

RESISTANCE Symbol R ( Omega )


Resistance: Opposition to the flow of electrons.
Units: Ohm (Omega ).
Measuring instrument: Ohmmeter (tester), or voltmeter and ammeter when in presence of voltage.

40-16

Wiring diagrams
The resistance of different materials - Resistivity
It has been determined experimentally that the resistance of a wire conductor is given by:
R = p ( l S ) = ohms
in which:
p = (Greek letter pronounced rho) is a proportional coefficient that varies according to the nature of the material and is known as
resistivity or specific resistance.
l = length, expressed in metres
S = sectional area, expressed in mm
This formula can also be written:
p=(RS)l
so we can state that the unit of measurement of resistivity (p) represents a resistance of 1 ohm of a conductor of the material in question, with a length 1 metre, and sectional area of 1 mm, at a temperature of 0C.
While for conductors resistivity is measured in ohms per mm/m, for insulators it is almost always expressed in mega ohms/mm,
which is the resistance in millions of ohms of a cube with a side length of 1 m.
Variation of resistance with temperature (temperature coefficient)
For most metals, resistivity increases with the temperature (positive temperature coefficient); this is why when talking about resistivity
there must always be a reference to temperature.
There are exceptions to this rule, such as, for example, chromium and carbon, in which resistivity decreases with the temperature
(negative temperature coefficient) and some alloys in which resistivity does not vary, which have temperature coefficient of 0.
This increase or decrease in the resistance per degree of temperature and per ohm of resistance is termed the temperature coefficient , and is denoted with the Greek letter a (alpha).
If the initial resistance is R0, at a temperature t0 (ambient temperature), and the temperature difference is t = t1 - t0, the variation in
resistance will be:
Rta
and the final resistance is:
Rt = R0 + R0 t a
Rt = R0 (1 + a t0)
This formula is of great practical importance as it allows us to calculate the final temperature of a coil or resistor using the resistance
variation method.
The temperature coefficient is used (positive or negative) to characterise thermistors (PTC = Positive Temperature Coefficient and
NTC = Negative Temperature Coefficient)

The interdependence of electrical values


In an electrical circuit, the relationship between current, voltage and resistance is given by the formula:
V=IxR
Volts = ohms x amps
If any of these values is unknown, it can be calculated, providing the other two values are known, simply by applying one of the
following formulae:
R=VI
I=VR
V=IxR

Power
The power developed or dissipated is given by the formula:
Power = Voltage x Current
Watt (W) = Volts x Amps
In mechanical engineering, power is still commonly expressed in terms of horsepower: hp
The relationship between horsepower and Watts is given in the following equation:
1 hp = 736 W = 0.736 kW
1 kW = 1.36 hp
40-17

Wiring diagrams
Dissipated power, in electrical terms, is power transformed into heat and is given by:
Power = Voltage x Current = Resistance x Current x Current
given that:
W=VI
V=RI
then:
W = R I I = R I

Multiples and submultiples of electrical values


Table 107

Multiples and submultiples of units of measurement


Prefix
Name
Symbol

megakilohectodecadecicentimillimicronanopico-

M
k
h
da
D
S
M

N
P

Multiply by

Divide by

1,000,000
1000
100
10
-

10
100
1.000
1,000,000
1,000,000,000
1,000,000,000,000

40.1.6 - Electrical and electronic components (1/2)


Electrical and electronic components

Electronic components are used in circuits to modulate (vary, modify), control and regulate electrical values or to protect other devices.
In particular, electronic semiconductor components exploit the various reactions of electrons to heat, magnetism, and light in order
to generate small electrical signals. These electrical signals, when suitably modified, can be used by signalling devices or to control
other components.
Components can be classified on the basis of the functions they perform; components used to control or amplify power signals are
deemed ACTIVE; components which neither control nor amplify power are deemed PASSIVE.

Resistors*
Components of various design comprised of a conductor with a known resistivity that when included in a circuit causes a voltage
drop.
They are therefore used to change voltage and current; they come in different shapes and sizes, depending on their type, ohmic
resistance value, tolerance and heat dispersion characteristics.

Table 108
TYPES OF RESISTORS

FIXED

VARIABLE

wirewound
film
-

wirewound
film
Linear or non-linear variation

THERMALLY SENSITIVE RE- LIGHT


SISTORS
TORS
Thermistors:
LDR
NTC
PTC
-

SENSITIVE

RESIS-

All resistors are defined by their dimensions and characteristics: ohmic value, and maximum operating temperature.
* N.B. To avoid confusion, in this manual the term RESISTANCE is used for the value expressed in ohms which represents the opposition to the flow of electrical current.
The term RESISTOR is used for the component used to introduce resistance into an electrical circuit.
Resistors are of two types: fixed or variable.
(the term resistance is also often used for the component).

40-18

Wiring diagrams
Fixed resistors
How to determine the ohmic value of a resistor
In wirewound resistors, the value is printed with decimal point (or comma) and the
omega symbol.
If the value of the resistor is 10.5 ohms, the marking will be: 10.5 ohms
sometimes the letter R is used in place of the decimal separator (point or comma):
10 R5
On resistors with values measured in thousand of ohms, the printed value will
include the letter k, which stands for thousand (1000): 10.5 kohms (10,500 ohms)

Fig. 1122

Potentiometers (Variable resistors)


This a resistor with a sliding contact that varies the resistance as it is moved along
the resistor.
The symbols used in schematics for a variable resistor or potentiometer are shown
in the figure on the right:

Fig. 1123

Use of a variable resistor as a voltage divider


Divides the voltage into two or three parts in a specific ratio.
V1 = Applied voltage,
P = Potentiometer,
U = Load,
V2 = Required voltage (obtained by moving the sliding contact) < V1

Fig. 1124

Use of a variable resistor as an electrical resistance of absolute value


All the current flows through the sliding contact.
This means that the sliding contact must be held securely in place, otherwise the
voltage V2 will change.

Fig. 1125

40-19

Wiring diagrams
Preventing arcing between the resistor and sliding contact.
The figure shows a way to prevent the arcing between the resistor and the sliding
contact that may occur in the case of poor contact.
This connection allows some of the current to flow through the full length of the
resistor. The voltage drop between the sliding contact and the resistor is less than
V1, thus reducing the possibility of arcing.
The resistor of the rheostat can be sized so that the resistance can be varied in
both a linear and a non-linear way.

Fig. 1126

Voltage divider
Voltage dividers with fixed resistors or potentiometers are used whenever circuits require electrical power below the standard voltages available on the tractor (12 Volts with engine off and 14.5 Volts with engine running).
Voltage dividers are found in the voltage regulator of the alternator and in the electronic control units.
Thermistors (Thermally Sensitive Resistors)
These are semiconductor resistors in which the resistance decreases as the temperature rises, ranging from just a few ohms at 0 C
to tens of thousands of ohms at 100 C; they are used to detect changes in temperature.
They may be either self-heating, if the heat is produced by the current flowing through them, or externally heated, if sensitive to the
temperature of the environment or the component on which they are mounted.
There are two types: PTC (Positive Temperature Coefficient) and NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient)
With PTC thermistors, resistance increases with the temperature, while with the NTC type, resistance decreases as the temperature
rises.
NTC types are available with resistance values ranging from just a few ohms to several hundred kohms.
Operating characteristics of NTC thermistors

Fig. 1127

Operating characteristics of PTC thermistors


Note the linearity of the variation.

Fig. 1128

Thermistors are used in cab heating and climate control systems.

40-20

Wiring diagrams
Capacitor
This component consists of a pair of conductors, generally in the form of flat plates, separated by an insulator (dielectric). Its function
to store electrical charge from a power supply.
This charge can then be given as and when required.
Symbol

Fig. 1129

Capacitor in a circuit with a generator.

Fig. 1130

The amount of electrical charge that a capacitor can store is referred to as its capacitance (C), and is measured in farads (F). In
practice, however, the farad is too large for general use so the following units are used instead:
mF = millifarad = 1/1,000 F
F = microfarad = 1/1,000,000 F
nF = nanofarad = 1/1,000,000,000 F
On closing the switch, the electrons start moving but their flow is impeded by the dielectric. Electrons will therefore accumulate in the
plate connected to the negative terminal (-) of the generator, causing negative charge to build up. In the meantime the positive plate
loses electrons, thereby becoming positively charged. A potential difference is thus created across the plates of the capacitor, and
this increases until it equals the potential difference of the generator.
The capacitance of the capacitor is therefore proportional to the applied voltage and to the surface area of the plates and is inversely
proportional to the distance d between the plates. It also depends on the type of dielectric used.
The process described above is known as charging the capacitor, and is complete when the capacitor is fully charged. If a resistor
or a load of another type is connected to the capacitor, the latter discharges as electrons flow in opposite direction and the potential
difference between the plates decreases to zero.

Diodes
A diode can be defined simply as a junction between two semiconductors, one made of P-type material and the other made of N-type
material.

40-21

Wiring diagrams
A diode is a junction between two semiconductors, one made of P type material
and the other made of N type material.

Fig. 1131

The contact between the two semiconductors in different situations of electrical charge forms a barrier to electrical current flow at
the junction.
This barrier prevents the current from flowing through the diode.

Fig. 1132

Rectification, isolation, (switch), discharge and protection.

Fig. 1133

The diode symbol and the designations of its terminals.

Fig. 1134

The situation at the junction between the two semiconductors changes when a voltage is applied across the anode and cathode; the
diode is polarised, as shown in the figure.
When a voltage is applied to the diode, it polarises in the two ways indicated.

40-22

Wiring diagrams
(A) = Direct polarisation (forward biasing)
( - ) = Cathode
( + ) = Anode

Fig. 1135

(B) = Reverse polarisation (reverse biasing)


( - ) = Cathode
( + ) = Anode

Fig. 1136

With forward biasing (positive connected to the anode and negative to the cathode) the resistance to current flow is significantly
reduced and the diode allows current to flow, providing that the applied voltage exceeds the threshold value, i.e. the voltage required
to initiate the process by which the barrier is reduced.
If the polarity of the diode is reversed, there is no electron flow except for the very weak current that crosses the junction. If the reverse voltage applied to the diode exceeds a certain value (thousand of Volts) the reverse current flowing through the diode will increase
rapidly to the point where the junction is damaged.
The function of the diode is therefore to allow current flow in one direction only, from the anode (+) to the cathode ( - ).
It this way it acts as an electrical one-way valve.
Forward biased diode allows current flow.
The lamp illuminates,

Fig. 1137

40-23

Wiring diagrams
Reverse biased diode blocks current flow.
The lamp does not illuminate.

Fig. 1138

The main function of the diode is to act as an electrical one-way valve.

Fig. 1139

Zener diode
We have already mentioned how diodes do not tolerate reverse voltage, as when this reaches a certain level, the reverse current flow
will increase significantly to the point where the diode itself is damaged.
The Zener diode is specifically designed to allow a certain amount of reverse current flow without damage to the junction.
It is also possible to make this reverse current flow occurs at a certain reverse voltage, known as zener voltage.
A zener diode can therefore be defined as semiconductor with a special PN junction with controlled reverse bias properties.
If forward biased, the Zener diode behaves just like a normal diode, while if reverse biased, it prevents current flow until the voltage
reaches the critical level, which is defined as the Zener point.
At this point the current increases rapidly.

40-24

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1140

The behaviour of the Zener diode can thus be compared to that of a pressure relief valve in a hydraulic circuit.
a) current and water flow
b) no current or water flow,
c) the water flows when it overcomes the opposing force of the valve spring. Likewise, the current flows when the voltage reaches
the zener point.

LED (light emitting diode)


A LED is a special diode with two terminals; it allows current flow in one direction only and emits light when low-voltage current passes through it.
The polarity of the terminals is very important, and the cathode is marked to facilitate identification.
The light emitted is monochromatic; the colours red, yellow, green and orange are available.
Operating characteristics of a LED and its symbol.

Fig. 1141

40-25

Wiring diagrams
LED
1.
2.
3.
4.

Light beam emitted


Diode
Transparent plastic cap
PIN terminals

Fig. 1142

LEDs are often used for signal lamps as their power consumption is very low, they require only low levels of reverse current and they
are impact resistant.
A typical application is as an indicator lamp, which, unlike a conventional bulb, can be flashed on and off repeatedly without failing.
They are also used to display segmented symbols and alphanumeric digits.

40.1.7 - Electrical and electronic components (2/2)


Transistors

A transistor is semiconductor which has three junctions.


It can be distinguished from a diode by its three leads, whereas a diode only has two.

Fig. 1143 - Schematic diagram and symbol of the transistor.


As you can see from the schematic, there two possible configurations: PNP (with a N semiconductor in the centre) or NPN (with a P
semiconductor in the centre). The central part is known as the base.
The lateral parts are doped with impurities and are termed the collector and the emitter. On the symbol, note that the emitter is
marked with an arrow, which indicates the direction of current flow between the base and the emitter.
Inside the transistor, there are two opposing barriers to current flow: if voltage is applied at one end of the semiconductor (E-C), one if
the barriers is eliminated while the other is strengthened and consequently no current flows; the same result is obtained if the polarity
of the applied voltage is reversed.

40-26

Wiring diagrams
When voltage is applied across terminals (E) and (C), no current flows through
the transistor.

Fig. 1144

If a weak voltage is applied simultaneously to the base terminal, the transistor becomes a conductor and current flows between the
emitter and collector.
When voltage is also applied to the base terminal, the transistor allows current
flow.

Fig. 1145

When the voltage applied to the base terminal is modified, the current flow between the emitter and collector will also vary proportionally. From this behaviour are derived the two main characteristics of the transistor:
1.

Current does not flow through the transistor if the circuit between the emitter and collector is interrupted, i.e. no voltage applied.
The current flowing through the transistor is directly proportional to current that flows through the emitter-base circuit, within
the operating limits of the transistor. This means that the base current (the current that flows between the emitter and base) is
proportional to the collector current (the current flow between the emitter and the collector) and therefore the latter increases.

2.

Given these two characteristics, a transistor can function as a switch (by removing the voltage at the base) or as an amplifier.
With a transistor, a weak current flowing from the emitter E to the base B (PNP transistor) or from the base to the emitter (NPN
transistor), can be used to control a strong current flow from the emitter to the collector (PNP) or from the collector to emitter (NPN).
This is the most useful characteristic of the transistor, which can be summarised in the equation:
a = ( Ic ) ( Ib )
This parameter, however, varies according to the collector current and voltage, as well as the temperature of the transistor.
The difference between NPN-type and PNP-type transistors lies solely in the direction of the current flow. The operating limits of
transistors are:
l
l

the maximum collector current,


maximum voltage from collector to emitter.

40-27

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1146 - Operation schematic


Schematic showing operation of a PNP transistor and an NPN transistor when voltage is applied at the base.
The current Ic can flow from E to C only if it flows from E to B (1) or from B to E (2). Ic is amplified relative to Ib.

Fig. 1147

Typical connection of a transistor. The resistor R limits the current and protects the transistor.

40-28

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1148

Typical connection of a transistor. The resistor R limits the current and protects the transistor.

Fig. 1149

The transistor as a current amplifier

Use of a transistor as a switch or relay


Thanks to their amplifying properties, transistors can be used in place of relays (electromagnetic switches) as they can perform the
same function, but with the advantage that they use static components rather than moving parts.
The figure shows two electrical circuits, one controlled by a relay and the other by a transistor.
In the relay circuit, when the switch is closed in the relay control circuit, the contacts close the main circuit (drawn with the thick black
line); i.e. a relatively small current (0.2 A) can be used to control a much larger working current (8A).
The transistor circuit works in exactly the same way. When the switch in the control circuit is closed, the current flows from the positive
pole of the battery through the emitter; the base terminal of the transistor is polarised and the transistor allows current flow (EC) thus
allowing current to flow in the main circuit.

40-29

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1150

Circuit diagrams show use of an electromagnetic relay (B) and use of a transistor as a relay (A). U = Load in main circuit.

40-30

Wiring diagrams
40.2 - Components
40.2.1 - Components
This chapter contains:
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Components table: technical and functional description of the components


Pinouts of the electronic control units

Component technical data


Table 109

Description

Bosch emergency pushbutton


Check panel

Code

Steering column switch


Flasher
Windscreen wiper timer relay

2.7659.110.0
2.8339.230.0
2.8339.230.4
0.013.3337.3
0.009.6758.4/10
2.8639.008.0

Worklights d.80

2.8039.001.0

Windscreen wiper

2.9019.200.0

Characteristics

Connector

A7
A18
A20
A25
A26
G9

Fig. 1151

Fig. 1152

G14

G19

Fig. 1153

40-31

Wiring diagrams
Description

Code

Characteristics

Receiver-dryer

0.008.9604.0

Air conditioning fan


Ex rotating beacon wire

0.010.0618.4
0.013.9053.2

RH light

2.8039.293.0
2.8039.293.0
2.8039.294.0
2.8039.294.0
2.8059.230.0
(LH)

2.8059.240.0
(RH)

Rear wiper

LH light
Rear lights
Rear lights

40-32

2.9019.200.0

Connector

L4

Fig. 1154

Fig. 1155

M3
M4
M5
N1

P2
P3
P5
P6
S2
S3
S4
S6
S7
S8

Wiring diagrams
Description

Code

PTO switch

2.7659.262.0

Front lights

2.8039.230.0

Fan control unit

2.8519.035.4

Characteristics

Connector

U1

Fig. 1156

Fig. 1157

V4

Z5
Z8

PINOUTS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF THE ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNITS


Fan control unit (CODE 0.014.1482.4) - U1

Table 110
PIN

VOLTS

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

+12V
-

SYMBOL

GND
-

Positive (+12V)
N.C.
Triangle warning light
N.C.
N.C.
N.C.
N.C.
N.C.
N.C.
Earth
Sensor on/off
Temperature sensor
N.C.
N.C.
Fan control
N.C.
N.C.

Instrument panel (CODE 2.8339.230.0/70) - Connector A18

Table 111
PIN

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

VOLTS

SYMBOL

B
L1A
L2A
L2A
L3A
L4A
L5A
L6A

DESCRIPTION

External buzzer output


Air cleaner warning light (red)
Glowplugs warning light (amber)
Glowplugs indicator light (amber)
Battery charging warning light (red)
Convert. oil filter warning light (red)
Engine oil pressure warning light (red)
PTO engaged warning light (amber)
40-33

Wiring diagrams
PIN

9
10
11
12

VOLTS

+12V

SYMBOL

L7A
L8A
L9A
+

DESCRIPTION

Handbrake on warning light (red)


Conv. oil pressure warning light (red)
Alarm warning light (red)
Positive (+12V)

Instrument panel (CODE 2.8339.230.0/70) - A19

Table 112
PIN

1
2
3
4
5
6

VOLTS

+12V
-

SYMBOL

+
S
+L
GND

DESCRIPTION

Positive (+12V)
N.C.
N.C.
ILC instrument signal
Lighting (+lights)
Earth

Instrument panel (CODE 2.8339.230.0/70) - A20

Table 113
PIN

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

VOLTS

+12V

SYMBOL

GND
L1B
L2B
L3B
L4B
L5B
L6B
L7B
L8B
L9B
L1B
+

DESCRIPTION

Earth
Differential lock indicator light (amber)
Front wheel drive engaged (yellow)
Low fuel warning light (yellow)
Trailer brakes alarm warning light (red)
Direction indicators warning light (green)
Trailer direction indicators warning light (green)
Sidelights warning light (green)
Full beam headlights warning light (blue)
PTO clutch indicator light (red)
N.C.
Positive (+12V)

Instrument panel (CODE 2.8339.230.0/70) - A21

Table 114
PIN

1
2
3
4
5

VOLTS

+12V
-

SYMBOL

GND
+L
S2
+12
+24

DESCRIPTION

Earth
Lighting (+lights)
TA instrument signal
Positive (+12V)
N.C.

Instrument panel (CODE 28993.230.0/70) - A22

Table 115
PIN

1
2
3
4
5
6

40-34

VOLTS

+12V

SYMBOL

GND
+L
5
+

DESCRIPTION

Earth
Lighting (+lights)
Temperature gauge signal
N.C,
N.C.
Positive (+12V)

Wiring diagrams
40.3 - Systems

40.3.1 - Earthing points


Radar earthing points

Fig. 1158 - Radar earthing points

Connector positions
Table 116

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A28

A34

GND6

Fig. 1159

Fig. 1160

40-35

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

U8

G13

J1

L5

C2

Fig. 1161

Fig. 1163

Fig. 1165

Fig. 1167

40-36

Fig. 1162

H3

Fig. 1164

J2

Fig. 1166

Wiring diagrams
40.3.2 - Starting

Fig. 1168 - Starting


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A1 External 12 volt outlet socket


A3 LH headlight
A4 Maxi fuses
A5 Starter switch
A6 Differential switch
A8 Fusebox
A9 Clutch enable switch
A10 PTO enable
A11 Clutch
A13 Brakes
A14 LH headlight
A17 Preheating relay control unit
A18 Instrument panel
A19 Coolant temperature gauge
A20 Instrument panel
A21 Rev counter
A22 Fuel gauge
A23 Fuel level float switch
A24 Pre-heating relay
A26 Flasher
A27 Engine stop control unit
A28 Earth
A29 Engine STOP
A30 RH headlight
A31 To front wiring
40-37

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1168 - Starting


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A32 Glowplugs
A33 Front PTO
A34 Earth
A39 Starter motor
A40 Starter motor
V1 To central wiring
Z9 To central wiring
Z10 Engine stop solenoid
Z11 Engine stop solenoid

Wiring and connectors list


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40-38

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.014.2645.4 - PTO wiring
m See para. 40.4.3 - Front PTO wiring - 0.0... - page 40-61
m See para. 40.4.4 - Positions of front PTO... - page 40-61
0.015.0032.4 - Front wiring with cab / 0.012.6951.4 - Front wiring
m See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66
m See para. 40.4.10 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-68
m See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57
m See para. 40.4.2 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-58

Wiring diagrams
40.3.3 - Control unit - Fan

Fig. 1169

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U1 Control unit
U2 Fan
U3 Indicator light
U4 Temperature
U5 Temp
U6 Female connector terminal
U7 Male connector terminal
U8 Earth
Z13 Fuel lift pump
Z15 Engine coolant temperature sensor for warning light

Wiring and connectors list


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0.014.1482.4 - Fan wiring


m See para. 40.4.13 - Solenoid valve wiring ... - page 40-80
m See para. 40.4.14 - Positions of solenoid ... - page 40-81
0.015.0032.4 - Front wiring with cab / 0.012.6951.4 - Front wiring
m See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66
m See para. 40.4.10 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-68
m See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57
m See para. 40.4.2 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-58

40-39

Wiring diagrams
40.3.4 - Steering column lights switch

Fig. 1170 - Steering column lights switch


Key
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40-40

A1 External 12 volt outlet socket


A2 Cab power supply
A3 LH headlight
A4 Maxi fuses
A6 Differential switch
A7 Emergency switch
A8 Fusebox
A13 Brakes
A14 LH headlight
A15 To front wiring
A16 To front wiring
A17 Preheating relay control unit
A18 Instrument panel
A19 Coolant temperature gauge
A20 Instrument panel
A21 Rev counter

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1170 - Steering column lights switch


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A22 Fuel gauge


A24 Pre-heating relay
A25 Steering column switch unit
A26 Flasher
A30 RH headlight
A31 To front wiring
A34 Earth
A36 To rear wiring
C1 To central wiring
C5 RH rear light
C6 Trailer socket
C7 LH rear socket
C9 Worklight
L2 To front worklight
P1 To front wiring
P4 To front wiring
S1 To rear wiring
S2 To LH rear light
S3 To LH rear light
40-41

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1170 - Steering column lights switch


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Z13 Fuel lift pump


S4 To LH rear light
S5 To rear wiring
S6 To RH rear light
S7 To RH rear light
S8 To RH rear light
Z1 To central wiring
Z2 To central wiring
Z4 Air cleaner clogging sensor
Z5 RH headlight
Z6 Horn
Z7 Horn
Z8 LH front light
Z9 To central wiring

Wiring and connectors list


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40-42

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74

Wiring diagrams
l

0.013.1452.4/10 - Rear wiring


m See para. 40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.14... - page 40-82
m See para. 40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiri... - page 40-84
0.014.7596.4 - Worklights, number plate, flashing light wiring
m See para. 40.4.28 - Worklights-number plat... - page 40-98
m See para. 40.4.29 - Positions of worklight... - page 40-99
0.014.7599.4 - Front lights wiring
m See para. 40.4.5 - Front lights wiring - ... - page 40-62
m See para. 40.4.6 - Positions of front lig... - page 40-63
0.014.7602.4 - Rear lights wiring
m See para. 40.4.18 - Rear lights wiring - 0... - page 40-86
m See para. 40.4.19 - Positions of rear ligh... - page 40-87
0.015.0032.4 - Front wiring with cab / 0.012.6951.4 - Front wiring
m See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66
m See para. 40.4.10 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-68
m See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57
m See para. 40.4.2 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-58

40.3.5 - Instrument panel

Fig. 1171 - Instrument panel


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A2 Cab power supply


A6 Differential switch
A8 Fusebox
A10 PTO enable
40-43

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1171 - Instrument panel


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40-44

A11 Clutch
A15 To front wiring
A18 Instrument panel
A19 Coolant temperature gauge
A20 Instrument panel
A21 Rev counter
A22 Fuel gauge
A23 Fuel level float switch
A24 Pre-heating relay
A26 Flasher
A31 To front wiring
A34 Earth
A36 To rear wiring
A37 Alternator
A38 Alternator
A41 Oil filter
Z2 To central wiring
Z3 Air cleaner clogging sensor
Z4 Air cleaner clogging sensor
Z9 To central wiring
Z12 Engine oil pressure switch
Z13 Fuel lift pump
Z14 Coolant temperature sensor
Z15 Engine coolant temperature sensor for warning light

Wiring diagrams
Wiring and connectors list
l

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.015.0032.4 - Front wiring with cab / 0.012.6951.4 - Front wiring
m See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66
m See para. 40.4.10 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-68
m See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57
m See para. 40.4.2 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-58

40.3.6 - Cab

Fig. 1172 - Cab


Key
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A2 Cab power supply


G10 Power supply
G11 Power supply
G14 To worklights wiring
G15 To radio/interior light wiring
G16 To A/C wiring
H1 To compressor
H2 To central wiring
H5 To cab wiring
H6 To relay
L1 To aereo cab wiring
L2 To front worklights
40-45

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1172 - Cab


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40-46

L3 To front worklights
L4 To rear wiper
L5 Earth
L6 To front worklights
L7 To front worklights
L8 To rotating beacon
L9 To LH rear worklight
L10 To number plate light
L11 To number plate light
L12 To RH rear worklight
M1 Relay
M2 Aereo-cab system
M3 To receiver-drier
M4 To receiver-drier
M5 To fan
N1 Worklight connection
Q1 Provision for radio
Q2 Provision for radio
Q3 Interior roof light
Q4 RH loudspeaker
Q5 LH loudspeaker
Q6 To aereo-cab wiring
X1 Fan speed selector switch
X2 Fan speed resistor
X3 Electric fan

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1172 - Cab


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X4 Power supply block


X5 Block for air conditioning variant
X6 Antifrost thermostat
X7 Air conditioning relay
Y1 Compressor
Y2 Power supply fuse
Y3 Earth
Y4 Air conditioning pressure switch

Wiring and connectors list


l

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.014.7593.4 -Aereo-cab wiring
m See para. 40.4.20 - Aereo cab wiring - 0.0... - page 40-89
m See para. 40.4.21 - Positions of aereo-cab... - page 40-90
0.014.7594.4 - Cab power supply wiring
m See para. 40.4.22 - Cab power supply - 0.0... - page 40-92
m See para. 40.4.23 - Positions of cab power... - page 40-93
0.014.7595.4 - Worklights, number plate, flashing light wiring
m See para. 40.4.28 - Worklights-number plat... - page 40-98
m See para. 40.4.29 - Positions of worklight... - page 40-99

40-47

Wiring diagrams
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0.014.7596.4 - Air conditioning system wiring


m See para. 40.4.24 - Air conditioning syste... - page 40-94
m See para. 40.4.25 - Position of air condit... - page 40-94
0.014.7597.4 - Flashing light wiring
m See para. 40.4.30 - Flashing light wiring ... - page 40-100
m See para. 40.4.31 - Positions of flashing ... - page 40-101
0.014.7600.4 - Radio wiring
m See para. 40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7... - page 40-104
m See para. 40.4.35 - Positions of radio-lou... - page 40-104

40.3.7 - Aereo cab

Fig. 1173 - Aereo cab


Key
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40-48

G1 Clock
G2 Rear wiper switch
G3 Rear worklights switch
G4 Windscreen wiper switch
G5 Screenwash pump
G6 Front lights switch
G7 Flashing light switch
G8 Relay

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1173 - Aereo cab


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G9 Timer
G10 Power
G11 Power
G12 To door switch
G13 Earth
G14 To worklights wiring
G15 To radio/interior light wiring
G16 To A/C wiring
G17 To Borletti heater - air conditioning unit
G18 To Borletti heater - air conditioning unit
G19 To windscreen wiper
G20 Fusebox
H5 To aereo-cab wiring
H6 To relay
L1 To aereo-cab wiring
M2 Aereo-cab system
O2 To aereo-cab wiring
Q6 To aereo-cab wiring

40-49

Wiring diagrams
Wiring and connectors list
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40-50

0.014.7593.4 -Aereo-cab wiring


m See para. 40.4.20 - Aereo cab wiring - 0.0... - page 40-89
m See para. 40.4.21 - Positions of aereo-cab... - page 40-90
0.014.7594.4 - Cab power supply wiring
m See para. 40.4.22 - Cab power supply - 0.0... - page 40-92
m See para. 40.4.23 - Positions of cab power... - page 40-93
0.014.7595.4 - Worklights, number plate, flashing light wiring
m See para. 40.4.28 - Worklights-number plat... - page 40-98
m See para. 40.4.29 - Positions of worklight... - page 40-99
0.014.7596.4 - Air conditioning system wiring
m See para. 40.4.24 - Air conditioning syste... - page 40-94
m See para. 40.4.25 - Position of air condit... - page 40-94
0.014.7598.4 - Windscreen wiper wiring
m See para. 40.4.32 - Windscreen wipers - 0.... - page 40-102
m See para. 40.4.33 - Positions of windscree... - page 40-102
0.014.7600.4 - Radio wiring
m See para. 40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7... - page 40-104
See para. 40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7... - page 40-104

Wiring diagrams
40.3.8 - PTO

Fig. 1174 - PTO


Key
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A9 Clutch enable switch


A10 PTO enable
A11 Clutch
A18 Instrument panel
A20 Instrument panel
A33 Front PTO
A34 Earth
40-51

Wiring diagrams
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A36 To rear wiring


A40 Starter motor
C1 To central wiring
C2 Earth
C11 PTO speed indicator light switch switch
C12 PTO speed indicator light switch switch
D1 To central wiring
D2 To PTO wiring
D3 Flow control switch
D4 To platform wiring
V1 To central wiring
V2 PTO brake
V3 PTO
V4 PTO switch

Wiring and connectors list


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40-52

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.013.1452.4/10 - Rear wiring
m See para. 40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.14... - page 40-82
m See para. 40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiri... - page 40-84
0.012.6955.4 - Remote valve wiring
m See para. 40.4.17 - Remote valve wiring - ... - page 40-86
0.014.2645.4 - Front PTO wiring
m See para. 40.4.3 - Front PTO wiring - 0.0... - page 40-61
m See para. 40.4.4 - Positions of front PTO... - page 40-61

Wiring diagrams
40.3.9 - Front axle differential lock

Fig. 1175 - Front axle differential lock


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A1 External 12 volt outlet socket


A3 LH headlight
A6 Differential switch
A8 Fusebox
A10 PTO enable
A11 Clutch
A13 Brakes
A14 LH headlight
A15 To front wiring
A17 Preheating relay control unit
A18 Instrument panel
A19 Coolant temperature gauge
A20 Instrument panel
A21 Rev counter
A22 Fuel gauge
A23 Fuel level float switch
A24 Pre-heating relay
A26 Flasher
A28 Earth
A29 Engine STOP
A30 RH headlight
A31 To front wiring
A33 Front PTO
40-53

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1175 - Front axle differential lock


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A34 Earth
A36 To rear wiring
C1 To central wiring
C2 Earth
C3 4WD engagement light switch
C10 Diff. lock engagement control solenoid
Z9 To central wiring
Z10 Engine stop solenoid

Wiring and connectors list


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40-54

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.013.1452.4/10 - Rear wiring
m See para. 40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.14... - page 40-82
m See para. 40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiri... - page 40-84
0.015.0032.4 - Front wiring with cab / 0.012.6951.4 - Front wiring
m See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66
m See para. 40.4.10 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-68
m See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57
m See para. 40.4.2 - Positions of front wir... - page 40-58

Wiring diagrams
40.3.10 - Brakes

Fig. 1176 - Brakes


Key
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A18 Instrument panel


A36 To rear wiring
C1 To central wiring
C2 Earth
C4 Handbrake switch
C5 RH rear light
C7 LH rear socket
40-55

Wiring diagrams
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S1 To rear wiring
S2 To LH rear lights
S5 To rear wiring
S6 To RH rear lights

Wiring and connectors list


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40-56

0.012.6949.4 - Central wiring


m See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71
m See para. 40.4.12 - Positions of central w... - page 40-74
0.013.1452.4/10 - Rear wiring
m See para. 40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.14... - page 40-82
m See para. 40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiri... - page 40-84
0.014.7602.4 - Rear lights wiring
m See para. 40.4.18 - Rear lights wiring - 0... - page 40-86
m See para. 40.4.19 - Positions of rear ligh... - page 40-87

Wiring diagrams
40.4 - Wiring harnesses
40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses

Fig. 1177 - Front wiring (1/2)


Connectors list
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B1 - To central wiring
B2 - To central wiring
B3 - Air cleaner clogging sensor
B4 - Air cleaner clogging sensor
B5 - RH front light
B6 - Horn
B7 - Horn
B8 - LH front light
B9 - To central wiring
B10 - Engine stop solenoid
B11 - Engine stop solenoid
B12 - Engine oil pressure switch
B13 - Fuel lift pump
B14 - Coolant temperature sensor
B15 - Coolant temperature sensor for warning light
B16 - Earth
B17 - Battery negative
B18 - Battery positive
B19 - Heatshrink sheath
B20 - Earth

40-57

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1178 - Front wiring (2/2)

40.4.2 - Positions of front wiring connectors


View of wiring

Fig. 1179 - Positions of front wiring connectors (1/2)

40-58

Wiring diagrams
View of wiring

Fig. 1180 - Positions of front wiring connectors (2/2)


0.012.6951.4
l

See para. 40.4.1 - Wiring harnesses - page 40-57

Connector positions
Table 117

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z1
40-40
Z2
40-40
40-43

Z3
40-43
Z4
40-40
40-43

Fig. 1181

Fig. 1182

40-59

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z5
40-40

Z8
40-40

Z10
40-52
40-37
Z11
40-37

Z13
40-39
40-40
40-43

Z6
40-40
Z7
40-40

Fig. 1183

Fig. 1185

Fig. 1187

Fig. 1189

40-60

Z9
40-37
40-40
40-52
40-43

Z12
40-43

Z14
40-43

Fig. 1184

Fig. 1186

Fig. 1188

Fig. 1190

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z15
40-39
40-43

Fig. 1191

40.4.3 - Front PTO wiring - 0.014.2645.4

Fig. 1192 - Front PTO wiring


Connectors list
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V1 - To central wiring
V2 - PTO brake
V3 - PTO
V4 - PTO switch

40.4.4 - Positions of front PTO wiring connectors.


0.014.2645.4
l

See para. 40.4.3 - Front PTO wiring - 0.0... - page 40-61

40-61

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 118

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

V1
40-43
40-50

V4
40-50

V2
40-50
V3
40-50

Fig. 1193

Fig. 1195

40-62

Fig. 1194

Wiring diagrams
40.4.5 - Front lights wiring - 0.014.7599.4

Fig. 1196 - Front lights wiring


Connectors list
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P1 - To front wiring
P2 - To RH front lights
P3 - To RH front lights
P4 - To front wiring
P5 - To LH front lights
P6 - To LH front lights

40-63

Wiring diagrams
40.4.6 - Positions of front light wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1197 - Positions of front light wiring connectors


0.014.7599.4
l

See para. 40.4.5 - Front lights wiring - ... - page 40-62

Connector positions
Table 119

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

P1
40-40
P2
P3

P4
40-40
P5
P6

Fig. 1198

40-64

Fig. 1199

Wiring diagrams
40.4.7 - Compressor wiring - 0.014.7601.4

Fig. 1200 - Compressor wiring


Connectors list
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R1 - Connector
R2 - Connector

40.4.8 - Positions of compressor wiring connectors


View of wiring

Fig. 1201 - Positions of compressor wiring connectors


0.014.7601.4
l

See para. 40.4.7 - Compressor wiring - 0.... - page 40-65

40-65

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 120

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

R1

R2

Fig. 1202

40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab

Fig. 1204 - Front wiring with cab (1/2)


Connectors list
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40-66

Z1 - To central wiring
Z2 - To central wiring
Z3 - Air cleaner clogging sensor
Z4 - RH front light
Z5 - Horn
Z6 - LH headlight
Z7 - To central wiring

Fig. 1203

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1204 - Front wiring with cab (1/2)


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Z8 - Engine stop solenoid


Z9 - Engine oil pressure switch
Z10 - Fuel lift pump
Z11 - Coolant temperature sensor
Z12 - Coolant temperature sensor for warning light
Z13 - Earth
Z14 - Battery negative
Z15 - Battery positive
Z16 - Heatshrink sleeve
Z17 - Earth

40-67

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1205 - Front wiring with cab (2/2)

40.4.10 - Positions of front wiring connectors with cab


View of wiring

Fig. 1206 - Positions of front wiring connectors with cab (1/2)

40-68

Wiring diagrams
View of wiring

Fig. 1207 - Positions of front wiring connectors with cab (2/2)


0.015.0032.4
l

See para. 40.4.9 - Front wiring with cab - page 40-66

Connector positions
Table 121

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z1
40-40
Z2
40-40
40-43

Z3
40-43
Z4
40-40
40-43

Fig. 1208

Fig. 1209

40-69

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z5
40-40

Z8
40-40

Z10
40-52
40-37
Z11
40-37

Z13
40-39
40-40
40-43

Z6
40-40
Z7
40-40

Fig. 1210

Fig. 1212

Fig. 1214

Fig. 1216

40-70

Z9
40-37
40-40
40-52
40-43

Z12
40-43

Z14
40-43

Fig. 1211

Fig. 1213

Fig. 1215

Fig. 1217

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Z15
40-39
40-43

Fig. 1218

40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012.6949.4

Fig. 1219 - Central wiring (1/2)


Connectors list
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A1 - 12 volt external outlet socket


A2 - Cab power supply
A3 - LH light
A4 - Maxi fuses
A5 - Starter switch
A6 - Differential switch
A7 - Emergency switch
A8 - Fusebox
40-71

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1219 - Central wiring (1/2)


l
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40-72

A9 - Clutch enable switch


A10 - Clutch enable switch
A11 - Clutch
A12 - Relay
A13 - Brakes
A14 - LH light
A15 - To front wiring
A16 - To front wiring
A17 - Preheating relay control unit
A18 - Instrument panel
A19 - Coolant temperature gauge
A20 - Instrument panel
A21 - Rev counter
A22 - Fuel gauge
A23 - Fuel level float switch
A24 - Preheating relay
A25 - Steering column switch
A26 - Flasher
A27 - Engine Stop control unit
A28 - Earth
A29 - Engine Stop
A30 - RH light
A31 - To front wiring
A32 - Glowplugs
A33 - Front PTO
A34 - Earth
A35 - Joint connector
A36 - To rear wiring
A37 - Alternator

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1219 - Central wiring (1/2)


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A38 - Alternator
A39 - Starter motor
A40 - Starter motor
A41- Oil filter

40-73

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1220 - Central wiring (2/2)

40-74

Wiring diagrams
40.4.12 - Positions of central wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1221 - Positions of central wiring connectors


0.012.6949.4
l

See para. 40.4.11 - Central wiring - 0.012... - page 40-71

40-75

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 122

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A1
40-37
40-52
40-40

A4
40-37
40-40

A6
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-52

A3
40-37
40-52
40-40

Fig. 1222

Fig. 1224

Fig. 1226

40-76

A5
40-40

A7
40-40

Fig. 1223

Fig. 1225

Fig. 1227

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A10
40-52
40-50
40-37
40-43

A12

A14
40-37
40-40
40-52
A15
40-52
40-40
40-43
A16
40-40

A11
40-50
40-52
40-43
40-43

Fig. 1228

Fig. 1230

Fig. 1232

A13
40-37
40-52
40-40

A17
40-37
40-40
40-52

Fig. 1229

Fig. 1231

Fig. 1233

40-77

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

A18
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-50
40-52
40-55
A19
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-52
40-50
40-55
A20
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-50
40-52
A21
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-52
A22
A24
40-37
40-37
40-43
40-52

A26
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-52

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A23
40-37
40-43
40-52

Fig. 1234

A25
40-40

Fig. 1236

Fig. 1238

40-78

Fig. 1235

A27
40-37
A28
40-37
40-52
A29
40-52
40-37

Fig. 1237

Fig. 1239

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A30
40-37
40-40
40-52

A32
40-37

A34
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-50
40-52

A36
40-40
40-43
40-50
40-52
40-55

A31
40-37
40-40
40-43
40-52

Fig. 1240

Fig. 1242

Fig. 1244

Fig. 1246

A33
40-50
40-37
40-52

A35

A37
40-43
A38
40-43

Fig. 1241

Fig. 1243

Fig. 1245

Fig. 1247

40-79

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

A39
40-37
A40
40-37
40-50

A41
40-43

Fig. 1248

40.4.13 - Solenoid valve wiring - 0.014.1482.4

Fig. 1250 - Solenoid valve wiring


Connectors list
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40-80

U1 - Control unit
U2 - Fan
U3 - Indicator light
U4 - Temperature
U5 - Temp
U6 - Female connector terminal
U7 - Male connector terminal
U8 - Earth

Fig. 1249

Wiring diagrams
40.4.14 - Positions of solenoid valve wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1251 - Positions of solenoid valve wiring connectors


0.014.1482.4
l

See para. 40.4.13 - Solenoid valve wiring ... - page 40-80

Connector positions
Table 123

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

U1
40-39

U2
40-39
U3
40-39

Fig. 1252

Fig. 1253

40-81

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

U4
40-39

U5
40-39

Fig. 1254

U6
40-39
U7
40-39

Fig. 1256

40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.1452.4/10

Fig. 1258 - Rear wiring


Connectors list
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40-82

C1 - To central wiring
C2 - Earth

U8
40-39

Fig. 1255

Fig. 1257

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1258 - Rear wiring


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C3 - 4WD engagement light switch


C4 - Handbrake switch
C5 - RH rear light
C6 - Trailer socket
C7 - LH rear socket
C8 - Number plate light
C9 - Worklight
C10 - Diff. lock engagement control solenoid
C11 - PTO speed indicator light switch
C12 - PTO speed indicator light switch

Fig. 1259

40-83

Wiring diagrams
40.4.16 - Positions of rear wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1260 - Positions of rear wiring connectors


0.013.1452.4/10
l

See para. 40.4.15 - Rear wiring - 0.013.14... - page 40-82

Connector positions
Table 124

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

C1
40-40
40-50
40-52
40-55

C2
40-50
40-52
40-55

Fig. 1261

40-84

Fig. 1262

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

C3
40-52

C4
40-55

Fig. 1264

C5
40-40
40-55
C7
40-40
40-55
C8
C9
40-40

C10
40-52

Fig. 1263

Fig. 1265

Fig. 1267

C6
40-40

C11
40-50
C12
40-50

Fig. 1266

Fig. 1267

40-85

Wiring diagrams
40.4.17 - Remote valve wiring - 0.012.6955.4

Fig. 1268 - Remote valve wiring


Connectors list
l
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D1 - To central wiring
D2 - PTO wiring
D3 - Flow control switch
D4 - To platform wiring

40.4.18 - Rear lights wiring - 0.014.7602.4

Fig. 1269 - Rear lights wiring


Connectors list
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40-86

To rear wiring
To LH worklights
To LH worklights
To LH worklights
To rear wiring
To RH worklights
To RH worklights
To RH worklights

Wiring diagrams
40.4.19 - Positions of rear light wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1270 - Positions of rear light wiring connectors (LH side)

40-87

Wiring diagrams
View of wiring

Fig. 1271 - Position of rear light wiring (RH side)


0.014.7602.4
l

See para. 40.4.19 - Positions of rear ligh... - page 40-87

Connector positions
Table 125

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

S1
40-40
40-55
S2
40-40
40-55
S3
40-40
S4
40-40

S5
40-40
40-55
S6
40-40
40-55
S7
40-40
S8
40-40

Fig. 1272

40-88

Fig. 1273

Wiring diagrams
40.4.20 - Aereo cab wiring - 0.014.7593.4

Fig. 1274 - Aereo cab wiring (1/2)


Connectors list
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G1 - Clock
G2 - Rear wiper switch
G3 - Rear worklights switch
G4 - Windscreen wiper switch
G5 - Screenwash pump
G6 - Front lights switch
G7 - Flashing light switch
G8 - Relay
G9 - Timer
G10 - Power supply
G11 - Power supply
G12 - To door switch
G13 - Earth
G14 - To worklights wiring
G15 - To radio/interior light wiring
G16 - To A/C wiring
G17 - To Borletti heater - air conditioning unit
G18 - To Borletti heater - air conditioning unit
G19 - To windscreen wiper
G20 - Fusebox

40-89

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1275 - Aereo cab wiring (2/2)

40-90

Wiring diagrams
40.4.21 - Positions of aereo-cab wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1276 - Positions of aereo-cab wiring connectors


0.014.7593.4
l

See para. 40.4.20 - Aereo cab wiring - 0.0... - page 40-89

Connector positions
Table 126

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

G1
40-48
G2
40-48

G3
40-48
G4
40-48
G5
40-48
G6
40-48
G7
40-48
G13
40-48
G19
40-48
Fig. 1277

Fig. 1278

40-91

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

G14
40-45
40-48
G15
40-45
40-48

Fig. 1279

40.4.22 - Cab power supply - 0.014.7594.4

Fig. 1281 - Cab power supply


Connectors list
l
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40-92

H1 - To compressor
H2 - To central wiring
H3 - Earth
H4 - Fuses (20 A - 40 A)
H5 - To cab wiring
H6 - To relay

G8
40-48
G9
40-48
G10
40-48
40-45
G11
40-48
40-45
G12
40-48
G13
40-48
G16
40-45
40-48
G17
40-48
G18
40-48

Fig. 1280

Wiring diagrams
40.4.23 - Positions of cab power supply wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1282 - Positions of cab power supply wiring connectors


0.014.7594.4
l

See para. 40.4.22 - Cab power supply - 0.0... - page 40-92

Connector positions
Table 127

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

H1
40-45
H2
40-45
H4

H3

Fig. 1283

Fig. 1284

40-93

Wiring diagrams
40.4.24 - Air conditioning system - 0.014.7596.4

Fig. 1285 - Air conditioning


Connectors list
l
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40-94

M1 - Relay
M2 - Aereo cab system
M3 - To receiver-drier
M4 - To receiver-drier
M5 - To fan

Wiring diagrams
40.4.25 - Position of air conditioner wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1286 - Position of air conditioner wiring connectors


0.014.7596.4
l

See para. 40.4.24 - Air conditioning syste... - page 40-94

Connector positions
Table 128

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

M1
40-45

M2
40-45
40-48

Fig. 1287

Fig. 1288

40-95

Wiring diagrams
Connec- Connector positions
tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

M3
40-48
M4
40-45

M5
40-45

Fig. 1289

40.4.26 - Cab earth wiring - 0.015.0031.4

Fig. 1291 - Cab earth wiring


Connectors list
l
l

40-96

J1 - Earth 1
J2 - Earth 2

Fig. 1290

Wiring diagrams
40.4.27 - Positions of cab earth wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1292 - Positions of cab earth wiring connectors


0.015.0031.4
l

See para. 40.4.26 - Cab earth wiring - 0.0... - page 40-96

Connector positions
Table 129

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

J1

J2

Fig. 1293

Fig. 1294

40-97

Wiring diagrams
40.4.28 - Worklights-number plate light- flashing light - 0.014.7595.4

Fig. 1295 - Worklights-number plate light- flashing light (1/2)


Connectors list
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40-98

L1 - To aereo cab wiring


L2 - To front worklights
L3 - To front worklights
L4 - To rear wiper
L5 - Earth
L6 - To screenwash pumps
L7 - To screenwash pumps
L8 - To rotating beacon
L9 - TO LH rear worklight
L10 - To number plate light
L11 - To number plate light
L12 - To RH rear worklight

Wiring diagrams

Fig. 1296 - Worklights-number plate light- flashing light (2/2)

40.4.29 - Positions of worklight, number plate and flashing light wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1297 - Positions of worklight, number plate and flashing light wiring connectors
0.014.7595.4
l

See para. 40.4.28 - Worklights-number plat... - page 40-98

40-99

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 130

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

L1
40-45
40-48

L4
40-45

L8
40-45
L9
40-45
L10

L2
40-40
40-45
T3
40-45

Fig. 1298

Fig. 1300

Fig. 1302

40-100

L6
40-45
L7
40-45

L11
L12

Fig. 1299

Fig. 1301

Fig. 1303

Wiring diagrams
40.4.30 - Flashing light wiring - 0.014.7591.4

Fig. 1304 - Flashing light wiring


Connectors list
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N1 - Connessione faro lavoro fanalino


N2 - Rotating beacon connection
N3 - Rotating beacon connection

40.4.31 - Positions of flashing light wiring connectors


View of wiring

Fig. 1305 - Positions of flashing light wiring connectors


0.014.7597.4
l

See para. 40.4.30 - Flashing light wiring ... - page 40-100

40-101

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 131

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

N1
40-45
N2
N3

Fig. 1306

40.4.32 - Windscreen wipers - 0.014.7598.4

Fig. 1307 - Windscreen wipers


Connectors list
l
l

O1 - To windscreen wipers
O2 - To aereo wiring

40-102

Wiring diagrams
40.4.33 - Positions of windscreen wiper wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1308 - Positions of windscreen wiper wiring connectors


0.014.7598.4
l

See para. 40.4.32 - Windscreen wipers - 0.... - page 40-102

Connector positions
Table 132

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

O1

O2
40-48

Fig. 1309

Fig. 1310

40-103

Wiring diagrams
40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7600.4

Fig. 1311 - Radio wiring


Connectors list
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l
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Q1 - Provision for radio


Q2 - Provision for radio
Q3 - Interior roof light
Q4 - LH loudspeaker
Q5 - LH loudspeaker
Q6 - To aereo wiring

40-104

Wiring diagrams
40.4.35 - Positions of radio-loudspeaker wiring connectors
View of wiring

Fig. 1312 - Positions of radio-loudspeaker wiring connectors


0.14.7600.4
l

See para. 40.4.34 - Radio wiring - 0.014.7... - page 40-104

40-105

Wiring diagrams
Connector positions
Table 133

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Connec- Connector positions


tor/System

Q1
40-45
Q2
40-45

Q6
40-45
40-48

Q3
40-45

Fig. 1313

Fig. 1315

40-106

Q5

Fig. 1314

INDEX

A
A/C fan - compressor drivebelt
A/C system air intake filters
Adjustable front fenders
Adjustment of the bevel gear pair
Adjustment of the brake light switches
Adjustment of the lift control valve levers
Adjustment of the parking brake switch
Adjustment of the rear lift
Aereo cab
Aereo cab wiring - 0.014.7593.4
Air cleaner assembly
Air conditioner fan
Air conditioning compressor
Air conditioning system - 0.014.7596.4
Air conditioning system - Standard roof version
Alternator
Auxiliary fuel tank

30-29
30-225
30-217
30-162
30-273
30-240
30-271
30-293
40-48
40-89
30-97
30-238
30-233
40-94
30-230
30-109, 30-111
30-103

B
B0 - Engine
Baruffaldi electromagnetic clutch
Basic electronics for mechanics (1/2)
Basic electronics for mechanics (2/2)
Battery
Bevel gear pair
Bistable pressure switch for compressor clutch engagement/disengagement
Brake lights switches
Brakes
Brakes and rear axle assembly

30-2
20-2
40-9
40-11
30-267
30-149
30-239
30-271
40-55
10-13

C
C0 - Engine accessories
Cab
Cab access steps
Cab door lock - tie-rod
Cab earth wiring - 0.015.0031.4
Cab power supply - 0.014.7594.4
Cab roof
Central wiring - 0.012.6949.4
Centre console
Checking clutch plate wear
Clutch housing
Clutch plate
Clutch release bearing
Clutch release forks
Components
Compression test
Compressor wiring - 0.014.7601.4
Condenser
Control buttons - RH console
Control rods
Control unit - Fan
Conversion factors
Cooling system
Crankshaft pulley
Creeper - synchronizer renewal
Cylinder
Cylinder head and valve train components

30-93
30-205, 40-45
30-216
30-217
40-96
40-92
30-226
40-71
30-224
30-128
30-131
30-127
30-128
30-129
40-31, 40-31
30-11
40-65
30-235
30-273
30-264
40-39
0-10
30-85
30-31
30-155
30-285
30-55

D
D0 - Transmission
Diagnostic tool screens
Differential lock control assembly

30-127
20-2
10-17

INDEX
Disassembly of 4WD output shaft and groundspeed PTO
Disassembly of LH/RH rear axle
Disassembly of the bevel gear pair
Disassembly of the gearbox input shaft
Disassembly of the lift control valve
Disassembly of the main shaft
Disassembly of the planetary reduction gear
Disassembly of the PTO output shaft.
Disassembly of the rear differential
Disassembly of the secondary shaft
Disassembly of the starter motor
Double/single acting conversion valve

30-153
30-167
30-190
30-135
30-302
30-137
30-199
30-158
30-175
30-137
30-120
30-264

E
E0 - Rear axle
Earthing points
Electrical and electronic components (1/2)
Electrical and electronic components (2/2)
Electrostatic unit
Engine
Engine - Separation from the transmission
Engine air intake pipe

30-166
40-35
40-18
40-26
30-269
30-10
30-3
30-89

e
engine block, crankshaft, pistons and sump

30-13

E
Engine cooling system radiator
Engine stop keyswitch
Evaporator assembly
Exhaust pipe - tractor with cab
Expansion tank

30-93
30-104, 30-107
30-237
30-105
30-96

F
F0 - Front axle
Fan
Fan - alternator drivebelt
Flashing light wiring - 0.014.7591.4
Flywheel bearing
Front axle
Front axle - complete assembly
Front axle differential lock
Front lift - version with front PTO Front lights wiring - 0.014.7599.4
Front PTO wiring - 0.014.2645.4
Front support
Front wheels
Front wiring with cab
Fuel filter
Fuel injection nozzle
Fuel System
Fuel tank - Fuel tank float switch
Fuse and relay assembly

30-178
30-97
30-26
40-100
30-33
10-14, 10-14
30-182
40-52
30-283
40-62
40-61
30-178
30-309
40-66
30-99
30-79
30-66
30-99
30-268

G
G0 - Bodywork - Cab - Platform
Gear pump
Gearbox and shuttle assembly - complete unit
Gearbox input shaft - oil seal renewal
General safety rules
Governor
II

30-205
10-17
30-141, 30-142
30-148
0-2
30-82

INDEX

H
H0 - Hydraulic system
Hood and side panels
Hydraulic lift control valve
Hydraulic system

30-244
30-212
30-301
10-17

I
Injection pump
Inspection and adjustment of the fuel system
Inspection of the air intake and exhaust system
Inspection of the camshaft
Inspection of the connecting rods
Inspection of the cooling system
Inspection of the crankshaft
Inspection of the cylinder head
Inspection of the engine monobloc
Inspection of the flywheel and ring gear
Inspection of the fuel injection pump camshaft
Inspection of the fuel lift pump
Inspection of the idler gear
Inspection of the lubrication system
Inspection of the pistons, piston rings and gudgeon pins
Inspection of the rocker arms and rocker shaft
Inspection of the valve pushrods
Inspection of the valve springs
Inspection of the valves, valve guides and valve seats
Instrument panel
Intake and exhaust systems
Introduction

30-71
30-69
30-91
30-48, 30-49
30-47
30-87
30-23
30-62
30-23
30-44
30-78, 30-79
30-70
30-50
30-65
30-44
30-55
30-62
30-62
30-50
30-219, 30-223, 40-43
30-90
0-2, 40-2, 40-6

L
L0 - Electrical system
Left-hand console
Left-hand rear axle
Left-hand rear cab pillar - screenwash reservoir
Lift arms
Lift cylinders
Lift locking shut-off valve
Lifting instructions
Lubrication System

30-267
30-221
30-166
30-220
30-299
30-296, 30-297
30-261
0-4
30-63

M
M0 - Front PTO
Maintenance of the injector nozzles

30-276
30-82

N
N0 - Front lift

30-283

O
Operator seated sensor ECU (p/n 2.8519.106.0)

20-8

P
Parking brake
Parking brake switch

30-160
30-270

III

INDEX
Planetary reduction gear
Position of air conditioner wiring connectors
Positions of aereo-cab wiring connectors
Positions of cab earth wiring connectors
Positions of cab power supply wiring connectors
Positions of central wiring connectors
Positions of compressor wiring connectors
Positions of flashing light wiring connectors
Positions of front light wiring connectors
Positions of front PTO wiring connectors.
Positions of front wiring connectors
Positions of front wiring connectors with cab
Positions of radio-loudspeaker wiring connectors
Positions of rear light wiring connectors
Positions of rear wiring connectors
Positions of solenoid valve wiring connectors
Positions of windscreen wiper wiring connectors
Positions of worklight, number plate and flashing light wiring connectors
Power steering disassembly
Power steering valve
Power steering valve - Complete assembly
PREPARATION FOR DISASSEMBLY
Pressure relief valve - lift control valve
Propeller shaft - Front axle drive shaft
PTO
PTO output shaft
PTO output shaft.
Pump - clutch assembly - brake
Pump for hydraulic lift and auxiliary services and power steering system

30-199
40-94
40-90
40-96
40-93
40-74
40-65
40-101
40-63
40-61
40-58
40-68
40-104
40-87
40-84
40-81
40-102
40-99
30-247
10-22
30-246
30-2
30-260
30-198
40-50
30-279
30-157
30-276
30-244

R
R0 - Rear lift
Radio wiring - 0.014.7600.4
Range gearbox and differential assembly - complete unit
Rear axle
Rear axle brake discs
Rear differential
Rear lift - complete assembly
Rear lights wiring - 0.014.7602.4
Rear PTO and Mid PTO
Rear wheels
Rear wiring - 0.013.1452.4/10
Receiver-dryer
Remote control valve
Remote valve control levers
Remote valve wiring - 0.012.6955.4
Removal of the PTO output shaft
Renewal of the jets
Renewal of the rear lift bush
RH rear cab pillar trim
Right-hand console

30-287
40-104
30-146
10-13
30-176
30-172
30-287, 30-289
40-86
10-8
30-309
40-82
30-236
10-22, 30-262, 30-262
30-243
40-86
30-158
30-62
30-298
30-224
30-221

S
S0 - Wheels
Safety notes
Safety precautions for removal and refitting operations
Seat
Solenoid valve
Solenoid valve wiring - 0.014.1482.4
Starter motor
Starting
Steering circuit
Steering column lights switch
Steering column switch
Steering cylinders
Steering cylinders disassembly
Steering knuckle housing and axle shaft
Steering wheel
Structure of the unit
Support and towing hitch
Systems
IV

30-309
0-2
0-3
30-230
30-281
40-80
30-116, 30-118
40-37
10-20
40-40
30-273
30-184
30-186
30-188
30-240
40-2
30-310
40-35

INDEX

T
Threadlockers, adhesives, sealants and lubricants
Three-point linkage with mechanical adjustment
Tightening torques
Timing gears and flywheel
Transmission
Transmission oil filter assembly

0-8
30-307
0-5
30-33
10-2, 10-2
30-244

V
V0 - Ballast - towing hitches
Valve clearances

30-310
30-53

W
Windscreen wipers - 0.014.7598.4
Wiring and components index
Wiring harnesses
Worklights-number plate light- flashing light - 0.014.7595.4

40-102
40-6
40-57, 40-57
40-98

MODIFICATIONS SINCE LAST VERSION


Operator seated sensor ECU (p/n 2.8519.106.0)

VI

20-8

*307.W.0430.en.6.02*
04/2015
SAME DEUTZ-FAHR ITALIA S.p.A.
Viale F. Cassani, 15 - 24047 Treviglio (BG) Italy
T + 39.0363.4211 F + 39.0363.421638
www.samedeutz-fahr.com

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www.deutz-fahr.com

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