Addiction Treatment Does Not Work Addiction treatment does not work.

Although this statement is not as incendiary as it was 20 years ago when alcohol and drug treatment were the 2 fastest growing segments of the medical industry, it still raises eyebrows for those holding onto the 12 step paradigm still used in 90% of all treatment centers nationwide. Regardless of this, the statement holds true. A report by Linda C. Sobell, PhD, John A Cunningham, PhD, and Mark B. Sobell, PhD called Recovery from Alcohol Problems With and Without Treatment: Prevalence in Two Population Surveys also confirms the previous statement. This is a published report presented in the American Journal of Public Health, July 1996, Vol. 86, No. 7. This report demonstrates that more alcoholics recover without treatment than do those who receive treatment, at a rate of more than 3:1. To say that “Treatment Doesn’t Work” according to this study, and many others would grossly understating he impact of treatment. On any given day there are 700,000 people in the United States receiving treatment. One in 5 men and 1 in 10 women who visit their primary care providers meet the criteria for at-risk drinking, problem drinking, or alcohol dependence (Manwell et al. 1998). In the year 2000, the census bureau released a population overview that estimated there were 134,979,000 men in the United States. Using the Manwell et al study that would mean there are 26,995,800 men who show signs of alcohol abuse and 14,108,000 women who also show signs of alcohol abuse, giving a combined total of 41,103,800 million residents of the United States who can be classified as alcoholics. This is 6.7% of the population. Using the report by Linda C. Sobell, PhD, John A Cunningham, PhD, and Mark B. Sobell, PhD called Recovery from Alcohol Problems with and without Treatment: Prevalence in Two Population Surveys, with the above numbers, if everyone who was diagnosed with alcohol dependence sought treatment, 27,128,508 would not get sober in treatment. If everyone who was diagnosed with alcohol dependence sought help in AA, after five years, 41,001,041 will have failed in AA. In short, the treatment system has failed. With all this said, there are alternatives. The St. Jude’s Retreat House in NY state has been providing nontreatment based solutions known as the Jude Thaddeus Program®, a six week social/educational model for the past twenty years with resounding success. The St. Judes Retreat House was first established by Baldwin Research, an independent alcohol and drug research center founded in the early 90’s in Upstate NY. For more information you can contact St. Judes Retreats at 1-888-424-2626.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful