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FALCON 900
PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
VOLUME 1
OPERATIONAL INFORMATION
SECOND EDITION
FlightSafety International, Inc.
Marine Air Terminal, LaGuardia Airport
Flushing, New York 11371-1061
(800) 877-5343
www.FlightSafety.com

Courses for the Falcon 900 and other Falcon aircraft are taught at
the following FlightSafety learning centers:
FlightSafety International
Teterboro Learning Center
Teterboro International Airport
100 Moonachie Avenue
Moonachie, New Jersey 07074
Phone: (201) 528-0100
Toll-Free: (800) 827-8058
Fax: (201) 528-0101
FlightSafety International
Paris Learning Center
BP 25, Zone dAviation dAffaires
1300 Avenue de lEurope, Aeroport du Bourget
93352 Le Bourget, CEDEX
FRANCE
Phone: +33 (1) 49-92-1919
Fax: +33 (1) 49-92-1892

Copyright 2007 by FlightSafety International, Inc.


All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.

INSERT LATEST REVISED PAGES, DESTROY SUPERSEDED PAGES


LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Dates of issue for original and changed pages are:
Second Edition .......0 ..............June 2007

NOTE
For printing purposes, revision numbers in footers occur at the bottom of every page that has changed in any way (grammatical or typographical revisions, reflow of pages, and other changes that do not
necessarily affect the meaning of the manual).
THIS PUBLICATION CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING:
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NOTICE
The material contained in this training manual is based on information
obtained from the aircraft manufacturers Pilot Manuals and Maintenance
Manuals. It is to be used for familiarization and training purposes only.
At the time of printing it contained then-current information. In the event
of conflict between data provided herein and that in publications issued
by the manufacturer or the FAA, that of the manufacturer or the FAA shall
take precedence.
We at FlightSafety want you to have the best training possible. We welcome any suggestions you might have for improving this manual or any
other aspect of our training program.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CONTENTS
EXPANDED CHECKLIST
Normal Procedures
Abnormal Procedures
Emergency Procedures
LIMITATIONS
MANEUVERS AND PROCEDURES
WEIGHT AND BALANCE
PERFORMANCE
CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
RECURRENT
System Review
Master Warning System
APPENDIX

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXPANDED CHECKLISTS
CONTENTS
Page
NORMAL PROCEDURES ................................................................ NP-I
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES......................................................... EP-I
ABNORMAL PROCEDURES........................................................... AP-I

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EC-i

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NORMAL PROCEDURES
CONTENTS
Page
BEFORE START (POWER OFF) ..................................................... NP-1
COCKPIT CHECK............................................................................ NP-1
Overhead Panels....................................................................... NP-1
CONSOLE/OVERHEAD PANEL .................................................... NP-5
Left Console............................................................................. NP-5
Pilot Instrument Panel.............................................................. NP-5
Center Instrument Panel........................................................... NP-6
Copilot Instrument Panel ......................................................... NP-7
Right Console........................................................................... NP-8
Pedestal .................................................................................... NP-9
BEFORE START (POWER ON) .................................................... NP-10
After APU Start or Engine 2 Start
or if a Ground Power Unit Is Used ........................................ NP-15
STARTING ENGINES.................................................................... NP-22
Starting Problems................................................................... NP-22
Start........................................................................................ NP-23
BEFORE TAXI ............................................................................... NP-25
TAXI ............................................................................................... NP-29
BEFORE TAKEOFF ....................................................................... NP-33
AFTER TAKEOFF.......................................................................... NP-35
CRUISE ........................................................................................... NP-37
DESCENT ....................................................................................... NP-37
Approach................................................................................ NP-40
Before Landing ...................................................................... NP-41
After Landing......................................................................... NP-42
PARKING........................................................................................ NP-45

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-i

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS .........................................


Operating in Icing Conditions ...............................................
Cold Weather Operation ........................................................
Severe Turbulence Penetration ..............................................
Windshear Situation...............................................................

NP-ii

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-46
NP-46
NP-49
NP-51
NP-51

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
NP-1
NP-2
NP-3

Title
Overhead Switch Panel ..............................................
Warning Panel ............................................................
Buffet Onset Envelope................................................

Page
NP-11
NP-27
NP-50

TABLE
Table
NP-1
NP-2.

Title
Page
Landing Computations .............................................. NP-38
Three Engines Operative ............................................ NP-47

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-iii

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NORMAL PROCEDURES
NOTE
This Normal checklist is designed only for training
purposes. Where checklist procedures differ from
the Airplane Flight Manual, the Airplane Flight
Manual takes preference.

NOTE
Items marked with an asterisk are to be accomplished
on the first flight of the day with the same crew.

BEFORE START (POWER OFF)


1.

*Preflight Checklist................................................................ COMPLETE


The aircraft exterior and interior preflight checks must be completed and
the chocks removed before closing the door and starting the engines.

2.

*Documents and Keys ............................................................ ON BOARD


The aircraft flight, performance, weight and balance, and operating
manuals must be on board before dispatch. The Certificates of Registration
and Airworthiness must also be readily available at all times prior to flight.
Any other documents as required by company policy must be on board at
this time. Any keys and/or security items required for the flight should be
on board as well.

COCKPIT CHECK
1.

Park Brake ..................................................... INTERMEDIATE DETENT

OVERHEAD PANELS
1.

Circuit Breakers....................................................................................... IN
Check that all circuit breakers are in before powering the aircraft. Circuit
breakers are not to be used as switches, so as to preclude premature wear
of these protective devices.

2.

LH AV Master and RH AV Master .............................................. OFF (IN)

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-1

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

3.

FMS Master (LH and RH) ........................................................... OFF (IN)


In order to save battery power when turning on the batteries later on in the
checklist, these master switches should be placed off, ensuring that the
switches are in or flush with the surrounding panel.

4.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


By separating the buses, this allows an individual battery check when
turning on the batteries later in the checklist. Separation of the buses
allows for detection of low battery voltage and proper discharge rates.

5.

APU Generator Switch.......................................................... DEPRESSED


This action satisfies APU start interlock circuitry requirement and excites
and APU generator field circuit.

6.

BAT 1BAT 2 Switches ....................................................................... OFF


This prevents the needless discharge of the batteries while the Power Off
checklist is complete.

7.

GEN 1GEN 2GEN 3 Switches .......................................................... ON


The generator switches must be placed in the on position in order to
provide engine start interlock circuitry.

8.

*IRS1IRS 2IRS 3 Battery Voltages ...................................... CHECKED


These test buttons are depressed individually to test the voltage of the
respective auxiliary batteries on the overhead panel left voltmeter.
Minimum voltage is 24 volts.

9.

*E BAT Battery Voltage ........................................................... CHECKED


This test button is depressed to test the voltage of this optional battery.
Minimum voltage is 24 volts.

10.

APU Master Switch.................................................................. OFF (OUT)


This limits battery discharge when they are placed on later in the checklist.

11.

DC Power Selector ..................................................................... NORMAL


This two-position selector allows selection of an electrical power source
for use in starting the engines. In this case, power would be supplied by
the two aircraft batteries, connected in parallel, when the battery switches
are on and the start is initiated.

NP-2

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

12.

CMPTR 123 Switches .................................................................. AUTO


The engine computers must be in the auto position for proper starting of
the engines. Ensure that the CMPTR lights on the master warning panel
are out when electrical power is applied to the aircraft.

13.

Start Selector Switches (All 3)............................................... GRD START


These three-position switches must be placed in the GROUND START
position in order to provide ignition and part of the proper electrical
interlock for starting the engines.

14.

XTK Switch .............................................................................. NEUTRAL


Ensure that the switch used to connect Group 1 fuel tanks with Group 3
fuel tanks is in the neutral position.

15.

Booster (Pump) Switches (All 3) ......................................................... OFF


This limits battery discharge when they are placed on later in the checklist.

16.

X-BP Rotary Switches (All 3) ..................................................... CLOSED


These three rotary switches are closed to provide a direct tank-to-engine
configuration for starting the engines and takeoff.

17.

XTK 2 Switch (If Installed).............................................................. AUTO


This switch, if installed, is placed to the AUTO position, allowing automatic
operation of the valve between the forward and aft Group 2 fuel tanks.

18.

HP and PRV Bleed Switches (3) ...................................................... AUTO


These switches are placed in the AUTO position to ensure proper
operation of the pneumatic systems for air conditioning, pressurization,
and anti-icing requirements.

19.

APU Bleed-Air Switch......................................................................... OFF


It is required that the APU bleed-air switch be in the OFF position before
APU start. This ensures proper loading of the APU after its start.
Generator load, associated with the charging of the batteries, must be
considered before selecting APU bleed on. It is recommended that a oneminute waiting period be observed before selecting bleed air on after APU
is started and on speed.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-3

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20.

Isolation Valve Knob.......................................................... HORIZONTAL


This switch is in the horizontal (open) position in order that the entire
bleed-air manifold can be supplied by all three engines and the APU.

21.

Crew and Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switches (2) .............. AUTO


Placing these three-position switches to the AUTO position allows a logic
circuit to automatically close the valves when takeoff power is applied,
then open the valves slowly after takeoff.

22.

BAG Switch..................................................................................... NORM


This three-position switch allows normal pressurization and ventilation of
the baggage compartment.

23.

Windshield Switches (3) ...................................................................... OFF


This position ensures that the demand on the batteries is at a minimum
when they are turned on.

24.

Anti-ice Switches (4)............................................................................ OFF


This precludes unwanted anti-ice system operation after APU or engine start.

25.

Pitot Heating Switches (3) ................................................................... OFF


This position ensures minimal battery discharge when they are turned on
and prevents overheating of the pitot static components.

26.

Wiper Switches (2)............................................................................... OFF


This position ensures minimal battery discharge when they are turned on
and prevents wipers from operating on a dry windshield.

27.

Exterior and Interior Lights Switches (7)............................................. OFF


This position ensures minimal battery discharge when they are turned on.

28.

Instrument and Panel Lighting Rheostats (8)........................ FULLY CCW


These switches, four above each pilot, should be rotated fully
counterclockwise to ensure minimal battery discharge when the batteries
are turned on.

NP-4

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CONSOLE/OVERHEAD PANEL
LEFT CONSOLE
1.

Data Loader .............................................................................. OFF (OUT)


The FMS data loader should be turned off until such time as the aircraft is
powered by other than batteries and the data loader is needed for updating
the flight management system.

2.

Oxygen Mask............................................................................ CHECKED


The pilots oxygen mask must be checked as being in place, selected to
100%, and with both the hose and communications cable connected to
the proper positions. Press the test button on the mask to ensure a flow of
oxygen.

3.

IRS 1 (and Optional IRS 3).................................................................. OFF


IRS 1 should be off until the aircraft is powered by other than batteries or
unless the checklist calls for the IRS to be turned on for programming. If
IRS 3 is installed, it also should be off.

4.

Audio Control Panel............................................................................. SET


a. SPK, ST Audio VHF 1 and VHF 2.................................. DEPRESSED
b. Microphone VHF and CPIT ........................................... DEPRESSED
c. All Other Pushbuttons........................................................ RELEASED
d. VORDME Potentiometer ................................................ FULL HIGH
Set the pilots radio jackbox for the proper radio transmitter/receiver and
mask communication positions.

PILOT INSTRUMENT PANEL


1.

Clock ......................................................................................... CHECKED

2.

EFIS Dim Controls (2) ...................................................... FULL BRIGHT


The EFIS dim controls, located in the front of each pilot, should be turned
fully clockwise to the bright position before powering the aircraft. The
brightness of the instruments can be adjusted after the aircraft is powered
by other than batteries and the master avionics, FMS, and switches are
turned on.

3.

Standby Horizon ............................................................................ CAGED

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-5

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CENTER INSTRUMENT PANEL


1.

Radar (2)............................................................................................... OFF


If two radar control panels are installed, the master switches should be
turned off until the checklist calls for the radar to be turned on. This
action will save the batteries and prevent damage to equipment and/or
injury to personnel.

2.

Fuel Shutoff Switches (3)......................................................... GUARDED


These three switches should be in the guarded position to ensure a flow of
fuel to the engines for starting. These switches are to be used only in the
event of an engine fire.

3.

Fire-Extinguisher Switches (5) ..................................... ZERO/SAFETIED


These five switches must be in the zero/safetied position to preclude
inadvertent discharge of the fire bottles.

4.

Normal L/G Control..................................................... DOWN/LATCHED


It is imperative that the normal landing gear handle be in its proper
position to preclude the inadvertent retraction of the landing gear when
power is applied to the aircraft.

5.

Gear Pull Handle..................................................................... PUSHED IN


This ensures normal electrical retraction sequencing of the landing gear
and, when required and operated, allows landing gear extension.

6.

Brake Selector Switch ......................................................... #1/ASKID ON


This action ensures proper positioning of the brake selector valves before
engine start.

7.

ST-BY Pump Switch ............................................................................ OFF


This three-position switch must be placed in the OFF position to prevent a
high draw on the batteries when the batteries are placed on, prior to
starting the APU. This unit can draw 68 to 80 amps, depending on the
hydraulic demand on the pump.

8.

Temperature Controllers (2) Selector and Knob....... AUTO/12 OCLOCK


The temperature controllers can be selected to AUTO and set to the desired
temperature levels unique to individual user needs. Usually, a setting at 10
to 11 oclock on the automatic controller is standard for most users.

NP-6

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9.

Thrust Reverser Switch.......................................... NORMAL/GUARDED


This switch is usually kept in this position to allow normal operations of
the thrust reverser while on the ground. The switch is used for emergency
stowing of the thrust reverser either on the ground or in flight.

COPILOT INSTRUMENT PANEL


1.

Automatic Cabin Pressure Controller................................... PROG OR FL


This three-position switch on the controller panel allows the operation of
the pressurization system based on a predetermined schedule or normal
barometric control.

2.

DN/UP Knob ............................................................................ FULLY DN


The DN position (green index) allows that the cabin will be manually
commanded to an increased pressure condition in the event of electrical
failure of the automatic cabin pressurization controller. This position
commands a cabin altitude rate of descent of approximately 1,000 feet
per minute.

3.

Auto/Manual Selector Switch........................................................... AUTO


This allows for the normal operation of the cabin pressurization controller.

4.

NORM/EMERG Selector Switch.................................................... NORM


The NORM position permits full normal operation of the air-conditioning
and pressurization systems. The EMERG selection is used only for
abnormal and/or emergency checklist procedures.

5.

Dump Switch ................................................................... OFF/GUARDED


This switch is used to dump cabin pressure in the event of flight
emergencies. The normal operation of the pressurization system is
possible only with this switch in the off position.

6.

Clock......................................................................................... CHECKED

7.

ELT Switch................................................................... AUTO/GUARDED


This switch ensures proper operation of the emergency locator.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-7

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8.

GPWS Flaps ORIDE Switch .................................................. GUARDED


This switch, when not guarded and in the override position, disables the
TOO LOW FLAPS warning given by the GPWS system. This warning
usually occurs when on final approach and when the aircraft is not
configured in the SLATS + 40 flaps configuration.

RIGHT CONSOLE
1.

Passenger Oxygen Valve Selector .............................................. NORMAL


Placing the passenger oxygen valve in the normal position will allow
automatic deployment of the passenger oxygen masks should the cabin
altitude exceed 10,000 feet during flight.

2.

Oxygen Pressure................................................................ APPROPRIATE


Minimum oxygen pressure with no passengers on board is 700 psi,
assuming the flight stays under 10,000 feet altitude. This minimum covers
the consumption requirements of each crewmember for two hours. It is
recommended that if passengers are carried, the oxygen system be fully
charged to its capacity. This is especially true if the flight is planned over
oceanic areas or over desolate terrain. The aircraft performance manual can
be used as reference as to the minimum pressure required for execution of a
mission with passengers and is based on the following assumptions:
The flight is being flown either above or below 41,000 feet. If flying
above 41,000 feet, one of the pilots must breathe oxygen.
An emergency descent to 10,000 feet is made with all occupants of the
aircraft breathing oxygen on NORMAL.
Further flight is conducted at 10,000 feet or below with one passenger
using first aid oxygen.

3.

VHF 3 (If Installed) ............................................... NORMAL/GUARDED

4.

Audio Control Panel............................................................................. SET


a. SPK, ST Audio VHF 1 and VHF 2.................................. DEPRESSED
b. Microphone VHF AND CPIT ........................................ DEPRESSED
c. All Other Pushbuttons........................................................ RELEASED
d. VORDME Potentiometer ................................................ FULL HIGH
Set the copilots radio jackbox for the proper radio transmitter/receiver and
mask communication positions.

NP-8

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

5.

Autoload Shed Switch (If Installed) ...................... NORMAL/GUARDED


This switch allows for the resumption of electrical supply to selected A
bus items if a generator disconnects from its bus in flight.

6.

IRS 2 ..................................................................................................... OFF


IRS 2 should be off until the aircraft is powered by other than batteries or
if the checklist calls for IRS programming.

7.

Oxygen Mask............................................................................ CHECKED


The copilots oxygen mask must be checked as being in place, selected
to 100%, and both the hose and communications cable connected to
the proper positions. Press the test button on the mask to ensure a flow
of oxygen.

8.

Cond Lever (If Installed)............................................................ NORMAL


This lever must be placed in the full forward position. This lever isolates
the crew and passenger air-conditioning systems for normal operations.
This lever has been removed on SN 165 and subsequent.

9.

Nose Lever (If Installed) ............................................................ NORMAL


This lever connects the cabin with the nose compartment for ventilation of
the nose cone in flight. On later aircraft (SN 70 and subsequent), the nose
lever has been removed.

PEDESTAL
1.

Power Levers (All 3) .................................................................... CUTOFF


The power levers are placed in the cutoff position in order for the engines
to be started.

2.

Radios (VHF 1) .................................................................................... OFF


VHF 1 may be wired directly to the A2 electrical bus, bypassing the left
avionics master switch, if a VHF 3 is not installed.

3.

Airbrake Handle ................................................................................ ZERO


Ensure the airbrake handle is fully forward in the 0 detent.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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4.

Normal Tailplane Circuit Breaker ............................................ ENGAGED


The mechanical circuit breaker, located aft of the emergency elevator trim
switch, must be in the down position in order to provide electrical power
for operation of the normal elevator trim system.

5.

Flap-Slat Handle............................................................................. CLEAN


Ensure that the flap-slat handle is fully forward in the clean position prior to
starting the engines or applying pressure to either the No. 1 or No. 2 system.

6.

Emergency Slats Switch........................................................... GUARDED


This switch controls the emergency operation of the outboard slats and
should be used only in the event of a main system malfunction. Therefore,
the switch should be kept in the off and guarded position.

7.

MMO Switch (If Installed) ...................................................... GUARDED


This switch, if installed, allows adjustment of the MMO overspeed aural
warning based on aircraft gross weight.

8.

Landing Gear Emergency Extension Handles (3) .................... CHECKED


Check that the nose landing gear emergency extension handle, located on
the left aft side portion of the center pedestal, is fully down and stowed in
the clips provided. The main landing gear extension handles, located in the
floor area to the right and left of the pilot and copilot seats respectively,
must be stowed by pushing down on the handles and covered by their
access doors.

BEFORE START (POWER ON)


NOTE
On aircraft without the electronic transfer valve
XTK2, the overhead panel (Figure NP-1) does not feature the block diagram and XTK2 transfer switch.
1.

Battery Switches (2) .......................................................... ON/CHECKED


a.

BAT 1

BAT 2

Lights ............................................... OUT

In order to start the APU or an engine, these two switches must be on


to provide electrical power. The BAT 1 and BAT 2 lights on the master
warning panel should be extinguished. Minimum battery voltage for
APU start is 23 volts and 22 volts for engine start.

NP-10

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Figure NP-1. Overhead Switch Panel

CAUTION
Check the battery temperatures as follows:

If either battery temperature is above 120F and


the amber WARM light is on, do not attempt a battery start. The APU/engines must be started using
a ground power unit.

If either battery temperature exceeds 120F


during starting, monitor temperature changes for
a few minutes after starting.

If either battery temperature exceeds 140F


during starting, wait until it drops to 120F
before takeoff.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-11

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If either battery temperature reaches 150F or


160F on aircraft SN 132 and subsequent, and the
red HOT BAT lights are on, the battery must be
turned off, monitored while it cools, and replaced
prior to takeoff.

NOTE
On the average, the rate of battery cooling on the
ground is 1F per minute.
2.

Battery Voltages........................................................................ CHECKED


Minimum battery voltage for APU start is 23 volts and 22 volts for main
engine start.

3.

*HRZN Battery Voltage ........................................................... CHECKED


The standby horizon battery voltage test button is located beneath the
left voltmeter on the overhead panel. The reading should be 24
volts minimum.
If the No. 2 emergency battery is installed, its voltage should be checked,
and the reading should be 24 volts as well.

4.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


This rotary switch controls the bus tie relay, which in turn controls the BUS
TIED light on the master warning panel. The switch is placed in the tied
position to tie the left and right main DC buses together for engine start.

5.

Park Brake/No. 2 Park Brake Light .............................. SET/ON STEADY


Pull the parking brake handle to the first detent, hesitate, and then, using
three fingers, release the first detent lock and pull the parking brake
handle to the second detent. This technique is recommended for all
parking brake handle operations to preclude pulling the parking brake
handle through the first detent when emergency stopping is required
during landing or taxi operations. The No. 2 position allows 2,175 psi of
No. 2 hydraulic system pressure to be applied to the brakes for holding
the aircraft in position. The No. 2 position is recommended for use after
the aircraft is brought to a complete stop. The No. 1 position of the
parking brake handle applies 800 psi of the No. 2 hydraulic system
pressure to the brakes and is not recommended for holding the aircraft.
The #2 P BK light should be on and steady. If the light is flashing, there
is less than 1,200 psi remaining in the parking brake accumulator, and is
not sufficient for holding the parking brakes. Until the APU or another
source of electrical power is available to the aircraft, the aircraft should
be chocked until electrical power other than the batteries is available.
When other electrical power is available, use the standby hydraulic pump
to charge the No. 2 hydraulic system, and reset the parking brake handle
to the No. 2 position after the #2 P BK light stops flashing.

NP-12

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

6.

Fire Detection ............................................................................... TESTED


Set the test control switch, located on the master warning panel, to the
FIRE position. All detection and warning systems will be tested
simultaneously and the aural warning will sound. If one of the systems is
malfunctioning, the corresponding light will not come on. During the test,
the test control must be held in the FIRE position until the FIRE BAG
COMP smoke detection light comes on, that may require up to 4 seconds.
Do not silence the aural warning until the FIRE BAG COMP light comes
on. After silencing the aural warning, release the test switch back to the
center. It may take up to a maximum of 10 seconds for the FIRE BAG
COMP light to extinguish.

7.

COND BAT Pushbutton Light (SB 125) .................................. CHECKED


Aircraft with SB 125 will have a toggle switch and circular amber light
normally located on the copilots instrument panel. The valve controlled
by the toggle switch must be closed before takeoff.

8.

Navigation Lights.............................................................. AS REQUIRED


Although not a mandatory requirement, the FAA encourages all pilots to
turn on the aircraft position or navigation lights any time electrical power
is applied to the aircraft.

9.

ENG 2 FAIL and T/O CONFIG Lights


and Wording NO TAKEOFF..................................................... TESTED
Move the No. 2 power lever from the cutoff position, and advance it
toward the takeoff position. The T/O CONFIG and ENG 2 FAIL lights
should illuminate. Move the power lever back to the cutoff position, and
the lights should extinguish.

AAPU Start
1.

Booster 2 .......................................................................................... ST-BY


FUEL 2

Light ............................................................................. OUT

After placing the booster pump switch to ST-BY, observe that the FUEL 2
light on the master warning panel extinguishes.
2.

APU Master........................................................................... DEPRESSED


Depress the APU master pushbutton on the overhead panel, and it should
illuminate green.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-13

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

3.

APU Start Switch (1 Second)................................................ DEPRESSED


Do not hold the APU start pushbutton in for more than 1 second. The
holding coil, if operating properly, should hold the starter engaged
through the start sequence. The starter will stay engaged to 50% N1. The
OIL light should extinguish by 60% N1. The GEN light should extinguish
at 97% N1 + 4 seconds, signifying the generator is on line. If the green
APU master light should start blinking after the start button is pushed,
one of the start interlock circuit requirements may not have been satisfied
or the APU may shut down for activation of a protective circuit.

4.

APU N1-T5 IndicatorsAPU Generator Volts/Amps.............. CHECKED


After the APU is on speed and the generator has gone out, check that the
APU voltage output is 28.5 volts. The amperage draw will normally peg
out at the maximum of 350 amps. If desired, it may be advisable to turn
off one of the batteries to ease the demand on the APU generator until the
charge draw for the battery being charged is less than 75 amps. Then, the
other battery may be turned on for charging. Closely monitor the battery
charging and the APU generator load before proceeding further on the
checklist. The load demand on the APU should be at 300 amps or less
before performing an engine start.

CAUTION
Discontinue start (STOP PUSHBUTTON) if ITT
does not rise within 10 seconds. Wait 5 minutes prior
to attempting a second start.
5.

APU Bleed-Air Switch...................................................... AS REQUIRED


It is recommended that a 1-minute minimum waiting period be observed
before turning on the APU bleed. If possible, wait until both batteries have
charged to less than a 50-amp draw per battery. All these actions help
preserve the life of the APU, which can be placed under some high
demands when powering up for the first flight of the day. The
23-amp-hour batteries can be subjected to some very high loads when first
turned on, if certain equipment items have not been turned off.

6.

COND BAT Switch (SB 125) ........................................... AS REQUIRED


This service bulletin, if installed, provides additional cooling air to the
batteries in the rear compartment from the crew cold air system.

BGround Power Unit Connection


1.

DC Power Selector................................................................ EXT POWER


BAT 1

NP-14

BAT 2

Lights ....................................................... ON

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

A ground power unit providing 28.5 volts DC and 1,200 amps maximum
must be connected at the receptacle, located on the lower right rear portion
of the aircraft. Move the two-position switch from NORMAL to EXT
POWER. The BAT 1 and BAT 2 lights on the master warning panel will
illuminate, as well the BUS TIED light. The No. 1 and No. 2 batteries are
completely isolated from the electrical system, and the left and right main
DC buses are automatically tied together.

AFTER APU START OR ENGINE 2 START


OR IF A GROUND POWER UNIT IS USED
1.

LH AV Master and RH AV Master ........................................................ ON


AV
MASTER Light (LH and RH)....................................................... OUT

2.

FMS Master (LH and RH)..................................................................... ON


FMS
MASTER Lights (LH and RH) ..................................................... OUT
If all four switches are installed, turn them on at this time.

3.

Maintenance Test Panel .................................................... CHECK/RESET


The test panel at the right side panel of the copilot should be opened and
checked for any red indications at one or more of the magnetic indicators of
the panel. Push the reset button at the center of the panel to clear any red
indicators, or address the malfunction if the red indicator cannot be reset.

4.

Voice Recorder ............................................................................. TESTED

5.

IRS (3)/FMS (2) VLF-Omega ........................................... NAV/INITIATE


POS Sensors ............................................................................. CHECKED
Database Validity...................................................................... CHECKED
Initialization of the flight management and long range navigational
systems should take place at this time. Flight plan programming and any
other activity needed to program the navigational units should be
accomplished as well.

6.

Clocks ............................................................................... CHECKED/SET


Clocks should be checked and set as required by company policy. Flight
time should be zeroed in preparation for the next flight.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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7.

Fasten Belt/No Smoking Lights............................................................. ON


These lights should be placed on in preparation for the arrival
of passengers.

8.

Emergency Lights .................................................................. ON/ARMED


If on, turn off the cockpit dome lights, check that the overhead lights have
two bulbs illuminated in each fixture, and check the cabin and exterior
emergency lighting for proper operation. After the check is complete,
move the switch to ARMED.

9.

Exterior/Interior Lights ..................................................... AS REQUIRED


Adjust the cockpit lights as required for a day or night flight. The cabin
window valance, ceiling, and entry lights will not operate unless the
CABINENTRANCEOFF switch, located on the bottom and extreme
right of the overhead panel, is in the CABIN position.

10.

Standby Horizon ...................................................................... UNCAGED


The standby horizon, located on the right top pilots instrument panel,
must be uncaged and adjusted.

11.

Master Warning Panel................................................................... TESTED


Move the warning panel test switch to the left (LIGHTS position). This
illuminates the lights on the warning panel, the hydraulic control and
monitoring panel, the overhead panel, the side panels, reverse thrust and
engine turbine temperature for each ITT indicator, and the FAULT lights
on the fire panel. Check the BRIGHTDIM control while holding the test
switch to the LIGHTS position.

12.

Landing Gear Panel ...................................................................... TESTED


Push the test button on the landing gear panel to test the landing gear panel
lights, the aural GEAR warning, and the flashing light in the gear
handle. The aural warning should be silenced during the test.

13.

Fuel Quantity Indicators ........................................................... CHECKED


If installed, the counters should be zeroed and set. The small knobs at the
bottom of the fuel flow counters on the engine panel should be carefully
pulled out from the instrument, about 1/2 inch, to zero the fuel flow
counters. Pushing in on this knob will allow a digital readout of the actual
fuel flow to the engines. This fuel flow readout will remain in view for
approximately 30 seconds.

NP-16

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14.

Fuel/Gross Weight Counters................................................ ZEROED/SET


If installed, the counters mounted below the landing gear panel should be
zeroed and set.

15.

Takeoff Data/Bugs......................................................... COMPUTED/SET


Takeoff data should be computed using the Airplane Flight Manual. The
analog airspeed indicators, located to the left of the pilot and copilot
EADIs, have four airspeed bugs attached to the bezel. These bugs should
be set on V1, VR = V2, VMFR (V2 + 25 knots), and VFS (1.43 VS). The
indicated airspeed displays, presented on the pilot and copilot EADIs,
should each be set to V2 by adjusting the IAS knob on the two DC-820
display controllers, located on the center pedestal.

16.

Cabin Pressure Controller............................................. PROG OR FL/SET


The automatic pressure controller, located on the bottom right of the
engine instrument panel, is normally selected to the PROG position for
automatic operation of the pressurization system. Barometric setting
should be adjusted to the local altimeter setting. The landing airfield
altitude can be set if the landing airfield elevation is within 1,000 feet of
the takeoff airfield elevation. Otherwise, it is recommended to leave the
departure airfield altitude set until descent is begun from altitude for
landing at the destination airfield, in conjunction with accomplishment of
the Descent checklist. This is especially true when takeoff is made from
high-elevation airports like Denver and the flight is to lower elevations like
New York, or vice versa. In such a situation, the pressurization system is
more compatibly set up in case of an emergency return.
If the FL mode is used, the automatic programming feature is disabled.
The crew must set the flight level to which a clearance to climb is
received, and must continue to do so each time such a climb clearance is
received. When descending, the controller must be switched over to the
landing mode, and the landing elevation must be set for the descent.

17.

ST-BY Pump Light.............................................................................. OUT


Check that the ST-BY PUMP light on the hydraulic panel is out. If the
light is on steady, then the standby pump is connected to the No. 1
hydraulic system by means of the hydraulic selector located in the rear
compartment, near the No. 2 hydraulic reservoir.

CAUTION
Before changing the selector valve to the No. 2
hydraulic system, all hydraulic pressure must be
depleted from both hydraulic systems.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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18.

HYDR Quantity No. 1 and No. 2.............................................. IN GREEN


At zero pressure, with the accumulators empty, the minimum indication on
the gage should be above 3/4. After starting, the volume absorbed by the
accumulators causes the levels to drop slightly. The quantities should read
in the green in either case.

19.

*Stabilizer Trim (Normal and Emergency) .............. CHECKED/SET T.O.


This check starts with the stabilizer trim in the green range (4.5 to 7.5).
The captain trims nose down; upon the captains call to stop, the copilot
trims nose up and releases. After confirming the stabilizer has stopped, the
captain trims nose up and repeats the above check. Activate the emergency
stabilizer trim nose up and nose down, and observe that the stabilizer
moves properly. Reset the trim circuit breaker, and set takeoff trim using
the normal trim system. Split control wheel switches must be checked to
confirm there is no stabilizer movement with only one switch activated in
either direction.

NOTE
Whenever the stabilizer is in motion, an aural clacker
will sound. The STAB TRIM indicator on the upper
right side of the center instrument panel should also
be checked for proper movement.
20.

*ST-BY Pump Switch/HYDR Press No. 2 ....... AUTO/1,500 TO 2,150 PSI


Move the three-position switch to the AUTO position. The standby
hydraulic pump will now cycle between approximately 1,500 to 2,150 psi
on the No. 2 hydraulic system pressure gage. Perform the following
checks with the standby pump on.

21.

*Emergency Aileron Trim ................. CHECKED/LIGHT OUT/SET T.O.


Press the left emergency aileron button until the AIL ZERO light
illuminates. Press the right emergency aileron button until the AIL ZERO
light goes out and then again illuminates. Press the left emergency aileron
button until the AIL ZERO light goes out.

NOTE
If there is hydraulic pressure on the flight control servos, the control wheel should not move during this
check. However, if there is no hydraulic pressure on
the flight control servos, it is normal to observe that
the control wheel will move in the direction opposite
to the emergency aileron trim input.

NP-18

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

22.

Rudder/Aileron Trim ................................................ CHECKED/SET T.O.


Check the operation of the aileron and rudder trim in each direction by
actuating the double switches on the center pedestal. Check trim travel by
observing the trim indicators and movement of the ailerons and rudder in
the direction in which the respective trim switches are moved. After
checking movement, center the trim to zero for each surface. Additionally,
check that the trim does not move when only one of the trim switches for
each surface is actuated.

23.

No. 2 Stall Test Pushbutton................................................... DEPRESSED


Depress the No. 2 stall button on the center pedestal to activate the No. 2
stall warning system. The following actions should be observed:
The aural stall warning sounds and cannot be silenced.
The IGN lights on the overhead panel illuminate.
The outboard slats extend. A red light followed by a green flashing slat
light should be observed on the slat/flap indicating panel.

24.

Standby Pump Switch .......................................................................... OFF


Place the standby hydraulic pump switch to the OFF position. This
terminates the prestart hydraulic checks.

25.

Cabin Pressure Controller .................................................... TESTED/SET


Cabin Aural Warning................................................................ CHECKED
Push the test button located on the bottom of the cabin pressure controller.
The cabin altitude aural warning should be heard and then be silenced.
The red CABIN light should illuminate. The cabin pressure controller
window display should show:
In PROG or LDG mode .............................................................. 18.800
In FL mode ................................................................................. FL 880
QNH display.................................................................................. 88.88

26.

Battery Temperature Indicator...................................................... TESTED


Push the test button at the bottom of the battery temperature gage. Observe
an increase in both needles, the amber light illuminating at 120F and the
red light and HOT BAT annunciator illuminating at 150F (SN prior to
132) or 160F (SN 132 and subsequent).

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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CAUTION
Check battery temperatures:

27.

if either battery temperature is above 120F and


the amber WARM light is on, do not attempt a battery start. The APU/engines must be started using
a ground power unit.

if either battery temperature exceeds 120F during starting, monitor temperature changes for a
few minutes after starting.

if either battery temperature exceeds 140F during starting, wait until it drops to 120F before
takeoff.

if either battery temperature reaches 150F (SN


prior to 132) or 160F (SN 132 and subsequent)
and the red HOT BAT lights are on, the battery
must be turned off, monitored while it cools, and
replaced prior to takeoff.

ADC 1, then ADC 2 Pushbuttons ................................................. TESTED


VMO/MMO Aural Warnings ...................................................... CHECKED
Individually test ADC 1 and ADC 2 by depressing the test buttons on the
center pedestal. These tests allow the various functions of the air data
computers and the VMO/MMO aural warnings to be tested. When pushing
the test buttons, the following should be observed as well:
Predetermined values appear on the indicators associated with the air
data computer:

NP-20

Altitude1,000 feet

VSI5,000 feet per minute, or flag V/S and VS pointer goes out
on A/C equipped with TCAS II COLLINS and two LCD VSI

IAS350 knots, red color on EADI airspeed ribbon

VMO300 knots

Mach0.79

TAT 16C

SAT 45C

TAS466 knots

AUTO SLAT light illuminates on master warning panel


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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

28.

EFIS Annunciators/GPWS ........................................................... TESTED


Push and hold the PUSH TEST button on top of the DH knob, located on
the instrument remote controller, which is located on the aft portion of the
center pedestal. This tests the radio altimeter and EFIS systems. The test
results in display of a height of 100 feet and appearance of the amber
comparators for the first 4 seconds. The comparators will extinguish,
followed by the flashing red illumination of all EFIS warning flags on
both the EADIs and EHSIs. After 10 seconds, the flashing red will turn to
steady red for all warnings, except for CAT II, which remains flashing. An
amber TEST light is displayed on the EADI for the entire duration of the
test. Release the test button to restore normal operation.
If the aircraft is in the air, only the radio altimeter is tested, displaying the
red RA flag on the EADI. The EFIS system test is inhibited in the air. The
RA test is inhibited after glide slope capture.
The GPWS system is tested by pushing the TEST pushbutton, located
on either GPWS annunciator panel, located on the pilots and copilots
instrument panels. Hold the button in for the duration of the test until
the PULL-UP light goes out. The system will test annunciators and
aural warnings.

29.

Altimeters and ASEL ........................................................................... SET


Four altimeters must be set to the local station altimeter setting: both the
pilot and copilot altimeters, the standby altimeter, and the cabin pressure
controller altimeter.
The ASEL box, located in each EADI, is set for departure altitude by
adjusting the ALT SEL knob on the instrument remote controller, located
on the aft portion of the center pedestal. To set 100-foot increments in
altitude, pull up on the knob before turning it to the desired altitude. To set
1,000-foot increments in altitude, push down on the knob before turning it.

NOTE
It is highly recommended that, after setting the altitude in 1,000-foot increments, the knob be pulled up
to the 100-foot increments position. This is done in
case the ALT SEL knob is inadvertently hit or touched
while climbing or descending to selected altitudes.
In this way, the accidental knob altitude changes will
be in 100-foot increments and should be more readily caught during an instrument crosscheck.
30.

Radio Altimeter ......................................................... TEST AND DH SET

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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31.

Radios/E. Bat 2 ...................................................................................... ON


Any radios that have not already been turned on by the avionics master
switches should be turned on at this time.
Some aircraft have an option including an emergency battery No. 2 for
additional electrical power capability in the event of a total loss of
normal electrical power. The switch to turn on this emergency battery is
located on the middle portion of the center pedestal, just behind the
throttle quadrant.

32.
33.

VHF 1 .................................................................................................... ON
CABIN

and REAR DOORS Lights........................................... OUT

The red CABIN and amber REAR DOORS lights, located on the master
warning panel, should be out prior to taxiing the aircraft. If possible, it is
recommended that the doors be closed prior to starting the engines. The
CABIN light is wired to the main cabin door (two microswitches) and, if
installed, the forward lavatory door (one proximity switch).
34.

Seats and Rudder Pedals ........................................ ADJUSTED/LOCKED

STARTING ENGINES
STARTING PROBLEMS
Discontinue a start whenever any one of the following conditions occurs:
The ITT does not rise within 10 seconds after moving the power lever
to idle.
Oil pressure does not rise within 10 seconds after light off.
N 1 remains close to zero when N 2 is 20%.
The ITT rises rapidly and approaches the 952 (5AR) or 978 (5BR)
limit.
N 2 speed is not rising rapidly and smoothly after light off.
1.

Power Lever ................................................................................ CUT OFF


The power lever is placed to cutoff to stop fuel flow to the engine
and ignition.

2.

Start Selector Switch ............................................. MOTOR-START STOP


This drops out the engaged starter.

NP-22

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NOTE
Perform a dry motoring whenever fuel is suspected
to have accumulated in the tailpipe.
1.

Power Lever ................................................................................ CUT OFF


This completes motoring circuit interlock requirements.

2.

Start Selector Switch ............................................. MOTOR-START STOP


This allows engine motoring while the start button is depressed and
prevents starter engagement after releasing the start button.

3.

Start Button....................................... HOLD DEPRESSED 15 SECONDS


The starter remains engaged as long as the start button is pushed to clear
the exhaust pipe of fuel.

If the amber IGN light remains on, although N 2 speed is greater than 50%,
and all idle parameters are within limits:
1.

Start Selector Switch ............................................. MOTOR-START STOP


This allows the operator to manually disengage the start circuit if there is a
failure of the aircrafts automatic dropout circuitry.

If the ignition light goes out:


2.

Start Selector Switch.............................................................. GRD START

If the ignition light remains on:


2.

Associated GEN Switch....................................................................... OFF

3.

Associated Ignitor Circuit Breaker............................................... PULLED

START
Engine 2 Start
1.

Anticollision Lights Switch................................................................. RED


Aside from FAR 91.33 and FAR 91.73 requirements, where anticollision
lights are required for flight, AIM paragraph 246 prescribes an FAA
voluntary safety program. This program, Operation Lights On, is an
enhancement of the see and avoid concept in aviation safety. Pilots are
encouraged to turn on their anticollision lights any time the engine(s) are
running, day or night. However, anticollision lights need not be

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NP-23

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illuminated when the pilot in command determines that, because of


operating conditions, it would be in the interest of safety to turn off the
lights, whether on the ground or in flight.
2.

Booster 2 Switch .............................................................................. ST-BY


Place the No. 2 boost pump switch to the standby position. Check to
ensure that the FUEL 2 light on the master warning panel goes out.

3.

DC Power Selector ............................................................ AS REQUIRED


a. Battery Start or APU Assist Start ......................................... NORMAL
b. GPU Start......................................................................... EXT POWER
If starting the engines with the batteries or with an APU assist, place the
DC power selector switch in the NORMAL position. If starting with a
ground power unit, place the DC power selector switch in the EXT
POWER position.

4.

Start Button............................... DEPRESSED LESS THAN 2 SECONDS


At 12 to 15% N2 and indication of N1 rotation, do not induce fuel
without indication of LP spool (N1) rotation.

5.

Power Lever........................................................................................ IDLE


This introduces fuel flow and ignition.
a.

6.

IGN

2 Light....................................................................... ON

ITT, N1, Fuel Flow, and Oil Pressure.................................................. RISE


When N2 reaches 50%,

IGN

2 Light ................................... OUT

With N2 stabilized:
a.

PUMP 2

Light ....................................................................... OUT

b. Hydraulic Pressure No. 2.............................................. GREEN BAND


c.

OIL 2

Light ....................................................................... OUT

d.

GEN 2

Light:

(1) If Normal Start ...................................................................... OUT


(2) If External Power Start ........................................................... ON

NP-24

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7.

Idle Speed Parameters .............................................................. CHECKED

8.

Power Selector Switch ............................................................... NORMAL


Subsequent engine starts should be made using aircraft electrical power.
Therefore, at this point, the DC power selector should be in the
NORMAL position.

9.

Ground Power Unit (As Applicable) ....................................... REMOVED


GEN 2

Light ............................................................................ OUT

Removing ground power from the ground power receptacle allows


generator connection to the respective main bus(es).

Engine 3 and 1 Start


1.

Booster Switch (3 or 1).......................................................................... ON


FUEL

2.

Light ............................................................................ OUT

GEN 2 Ammeter.............................................................. 300 AMPS MAX


Use same starting procedure as used for engine 2.
Engine Anti-ice ................................................................. AS REQUIRED

BEFORE TAXI
1.

Circuit Breakers........................................................................ CHECKED


After the engines are started and stabilized, check the circuit-breaker
panels to ensure that no circuit breakers have opened during the starting
process. Check the circuit breakers by running your hand across the panels
to feel if any have opened. It is difficult to see an opened circuit breaker,
especially at night.

2.

Bus-Tied Switch ............................................................... FLIGHT NORM


Turn this switch to FLIGHT NORM. Confirm that the BUS TIED light on
the master warning panel is out. This position isolates the left and right
main DC buses and prevents current or voltage variations on one bus from
affecting the other bus. Check the voltmeters and ammeters on one side
with those on the other side to ensure that the buses are not tied.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

3.

Battery Amps/Temperature....................................................... CHECKED


Check the battery amperage and temperatures are normal. The batteries will
probably show a charge since they assisted in the starting of the engines.

4.

Generators Volts/Amps............................................................. CHECKED


Check the bus voltage on each side by observing the two voltmeters and
their output at 28.5 volts. Move each generator ammeter switch to the
respective generator positions to read the amperage draw for each
generator. The amperage should not exceed 95 to 100 amps for each
generator. Normally, the amperage draw for the No. 1 and No. 3
generators is 110 to 125 amps for each generator, while the No. 2
generator provides 125 to 150 amps. After the check, place each ammeter
switch to the BAT 1 and BAT 2 positions.

5.

Booster 2 Switch.............................................................................. NORM


FUEL 2

6.

Light ..........................................................CHECKED/OUT

*Isolation Valve Knob ............................................... ISOLATION/NORM


ISOL

Light ...................................................................... ON/OFF

This rotary switch on the pneumatic section of the overhead panel is


selected to the closed position and the ISOL light illuminates confirming
closure of this valve. This confirms the operation of the valve that
separates the bleed air from the No. 1 and No. 3 engines from the No. 2
engine and APU. This valve is then opened and the ISOL light goes out.
7.

Compass Headings (5).............................................................. CHECKED


Check the headings on the EHSIs, the RMIs, and the standby compass to
be sure they are all the same and that the IRS systems have aligned.

8.

WindshieldPilot and Copilot .................................................. NORMAL

9.

Windshield Side..................................................................................... ON
Move the windshield heat switches on and observe that the standby
compass may move away from the aircraft aligned heading. Only the
normal position should be selected after starting the engines. Temperature
control of windshield heating is maintained between 25 and 32C.

10.

Warning Panel Lights (7 or 8) .................................................. CHECKED


All warning panel lights (Figure NP-2) should be extinguished except for
the following: L. AOA, R. AOA, L. PITOT, R. PITOT, ST BY PITOT, #2
P BK, and MACH TRIM. An eighth light on extra optional equipment
such as the Teledyne AOA heater light may be illuminated.

NP-26

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Figure NP-2. Warning Panel

NOTE
On aircraft without transfer valve XTK2 lights,
the amber lights labeled XTK 2 OPEN and XTK
2 CLOSED are not used.
11.

Hydraulic System 1 and 2 Pressure and Quantity..................... IN GREEN


Check the hydraulic quantities and pressures to ensure that there has been
no loss of hydraulic fluid during activation of these hydraulic systems.

12.

Standby Pump Switch....................................................................... AUTO


Place the standby hydraulic pump switch in the AUTO position. On the
ground, through the left main gear squat switch, the standby hydraulic
pump will automatically operate to supply hydraulic pressure to the No. 2
system should the No. 2 engine-driven hydraulic pump fail.

13.

Antiskid System............................................................................ TESTED


The antiskid system is tested as follows:
a. The brake selector switch should be in #1 ON.
b. Depress and hold the brake pedals until the green L and R brake lights
illuminate.
c. Depress the antiskid test button until the green brake lights extinguish.

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d. Release the antiskid test button, and after approximately 2.5 to 4


seconds, the green L and R brake lights will again illuminate.
e. Release the brakes and the green lights will go out.
14.

*Airbrakes .............................................................................. POSITION 2


The airbrake handle in the trim well on the center pedestal, moved to the
No. 2 position, allows the extension of the center and lateral airbrake
panels. Check the illumination of the AIRBRAKE light on the flap/slat
configuration panel.

15.

*No. 1 Stall System ...................................................................... TESTED


Now that the No. 1 hydraulic system is powered by engine-driven pumps 1
and 3, the No. 1 stall system is tested to ensure that the outboard slats can
be extended by the No. 1 hydraulic system. A flashing green slat extended
light will be seen, the aural stall warning will sound, and the igniter lights
for all three engines will illuminate. The airbrakes will automatically stow
and the AIRBRAKE light will flash.

16.

*Airbrakes................................................................... ZERO/LIGHT OUT


Move the airbrake handle to zero to extinguish the flashing airbrake light
and arm the system for deployment as required. The airbrakes must be
retracted for takeoff.

17.

Flaps/Slats ................................................................. SET FOR TAKEOFF

18.

No. 1 and No. 2 Stall Systems ...................................................... TESTED


After the slats and flaps have extended to the proper setting selected
above, depress the STALL 1 button. The aural stall warning will sound,
the igniter lights will illuminate, and the inboard slats will retract as
indicated by the flashing green slat light. After these indications have been
seen and heard, release the test button, and allow the slats to return to the
steady green indication. Then depress the STALL 2 button and ensure that
the same test results occur. Release the test button and ensure that the slats
return to the steady green indication.

19.

Mach Trim ............................................................................................. ON


Depress the M TRIM button on the flight guidance controller to engage
the Mach trim system. When it is properly engaged, the pointer on the left
or right of the M TRIM button should illuminate. Additionally, the MACH
TRIM light located on the master warning panel should extinguish.

20.

NP-28

Yaw Damper.................................................................................. ON/OFF

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

21.

AP Transfer by (LH FCS and RH FCS


Pushbuttons on ID-802)............................................................ CHECKED

22.

COMM/NAV/Radar/IRS ...................................................................... SET


Before taxiing the aircraft, check that all the communication and
navigation radios are on, the radar is in the standby position, and the IRS
systems are fully aligned with the mode selector switches selected to the
NAV position.

23.

Flight Recorder ......................................................................... CHECKED

24.

EFIS/MFD Displays ............................................................................. SET


Select the desired mode(s) for the EHSI presentations and the
multifunction display. Set the heading and course information, dependent
upon the departure course to be flown.

25.

All Flags............................................................................. OUT OF VIEW

26.

COND BATT Switch (SB 125)...................................... OFF/LIGHT OUT


Operators with this service bulletin must close the valve supplying cold air
to the batteries in the rear compartment before takeoff.

TAXI
NOTE
The taxi check should be accomplished after leaving
the blocks and when clear of congested areas. One
pilot must maintain an outside watch at all times
during taxi operations.
1.

Taxi Light............................................................................................... ON
It is recommended that the taxi light be placed on for all taxi operations,
day or night.

2.

Parking Brake Handle................................................. FULLY FORWARD


Release the parking brake handle and confirm that the #2 P BK light is out.

3.

No. 1 and No. 2 Brakes............................................................. CHECKED


When moving the brake selector switch from one position to another, the
pilots feet should be removed from the brake pedals until after the brake
position is selected and the check is to be made.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Check the No. 1 brakes simultaneously, and gently depress the left and
right brake pedals until the green L and R lights come on. The lights
indicate that a hydraulic pressure of at least 225 psi is being applied to the
brakes. A slight feedback of pressure should also be felt in the brake
pedals. Maximum pressure delivered to the brakes is as follows:
1,595 psi for aircraft SNs 1, 75 and subsequent, and those with AMDBA SB F900-42 incorporated
2,175 psi for aircraft SNs 2 through 74, except for those with
AMD-BA SB F900-42 incorporated
Check the No. 2 brakes individually, and gently depress the L and R brake
pedals until each brake pedal is depressed enough to illuminate the #2 BK
light. Release one brake check before checking the other brake. This light
illuminates when the hydraulic pressure to the No. 2 brakes is at least 225
psi. A slight feedback of pressure should also be felt in the brake pedals.
The maximum pressure delivered to the brakes by the No. 2 hydraulic
system is 1,080 psi.
A general rule to be followed is that whenever a different brake system is
selected, the brakes should be checked to ensure that the system is
working properly.
4.

Brake Selector ..................................................................... #1/ASKID ON


After the foregoing brake checks have been made, select the brakes to the
No. 1 system with the antiskid on.

5.

Thrust Reverser ....................................................... CHECKED/STOWED


With the No. 2 throttle at idle, pull the reverser lever to REVERSE IDLE
and observe that the amber TRANS light illuminates, then goes out when
the green DEPLOYED light illuminates. Place the emergency stow switch
to STOW and observe the following: the green DEPLOYED light goes
out, the red REV UNLOCK light illuminates, and the amber TRANS light
illuminates. When the reverser is fully stowed, all lights should be out.
Return the reverser lever to the stowed position and the emergency stow
switch to the normal guarded position.

6.

Engine Computers ........................................................ CHECKED/AUTO


This check should not be accomplished in congested areas or on slippery
surfaces. It is highly recommended that this check be performed while the
aircraft is stationary, in the event that an engine runaway occurs. The pilot
performing this check should be prepared to shut the engine down should
a runaway occur. With the parking brakes set in the No. 2 detent position,
and while guarding the toe brakes, perform the check on one engine at a
time. Place the engine computer switch to the MAN position. The
respective CMPTR light on the master failure warning panel will

NP-30

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

illuminate, and a fluctuation in the temperature, fuel flow, and rpm gages
may be observed. Slowly advance the throttle forward to approximately
40% N1 to ensure that manual control of the engine is possible. Return the
throttle to idle, return the computer switch to AUTO, and repeat the check
for all engines.
7.

Pilot Window .............................................................. CLOSED/LOCKED


Slide the left direct-vision window forward and then outward to close the
window. While holding the window closed against the frame, move the
locking lever forward and downward to lock the window in position.
Ensure that the green mark on the grooved tip of the locking button
located on the end of the handle is in view.

8.

APU Stop Button ......................................................................... PUSHED


Push the APU STOP button, which simulates an overspeed signal and
commands APU shutdown by closing the fuel solenoid valve.

9.

APU Master (N1 Zero) ............................................................. OFF (OUT)


When the APU low oil pressure light illuminates, the APU master switch
may be turned off by pushing in on the switch. This action ensures shutdown
of the APU by removing electrical power from the control circuits.

10.

APU Bleed ........................................................................................... OFF


The APU bleed switch should be turned off before closing the pilot
window to preclude any adverse pressure bumps due to the high volume of
air supplied by the APU.

11.

Engine Anti-ice/Wing
(or Wing BRK) Anti-ice.................................... CHECKED (5 SECONDS
MAX FOR WING)
Turn on the wing anti-ice switch on for a maximum of 5 seconds and
observe a rise on the ITT instruments for the No. 1 and No. 3 engines. The
amber light located above the switch should illuminate steadily. Turn the
wing switch off, and observe a temperature drop on the two ITT gages
while the amber light flashes momentarily and then goes out.
Turn the engine anti-ice switches on one at a time, and observe a rise on the
ITT instruments for each respective engine. The respective amber lights
located above the switches should illuminate a steady amber. Turn off each
switch, one at a time while observing a drop in the respective ITT gages.
Except for the No. 2 engine, the amber lights immediately extinguish. The
No. 2 engine amber light will flash momentarily and then extinguish.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

12.

Engine Anti-ice ...................................... AS REQUIRED FOR TAKEOFF


If visible moisture is present and the outside air temperature is below
+10C, the engine anti-ice system must be switched on. The wing anti-ice
system must not be used on the ground. Wing anti-ice is not to be used
until after takeoff when the landing gear is retracted. While advancing the
engine power for takeoff, ensure that the green anti-ice lights located
above each engine anti-ice switch have turned green before beginning
takeoff roll.

13.

Flight Controls.......................................................................... CHECKED


Actuate all three primary flight controls over their full range. These
controls should be completely free and automatically return to the neutral
position when released. Normally, the copilot checks the ailerons and
elevator, while the captain checks the rudder.

14.

Takeoff Briefing ..................................................................... COMPLETE


a. Confirm the V-speeds and N1 to be used for takeoff. Check that the
airspeed bugs are properly set.
b. Discuss the departure with respect to turns, initial altitude, and climb
requirements for noise and/or obstacles as published for the airport
being used.
c. The takeoff roll should be aborted if any of the following occur
before V1:

Fire/overheat warning

Engine malfunction

Illumination of the ENG 2 FAIL light

Illumination of any red light on the master failure warning panel

Uncommanded horizontal stabilizer movement

Any other condition prebriefed by the captain as dictated by


company policy or environmental conditions

NOTE
The pilot observing the problem will say Abort. It
is important to note that the immediate use of antiskid braking is the most important part of the stopping procedure. Therefore, the aircraft will be stopped
using the following simultaneous procedure:
1. Antiskid Braking ............................. MAXIMUM
2. Throttles........................................................ IDLE
NP-32

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3. Airbrake ................................................. EXTEND


4. Thrust Reverser ...................... AS NECESSARY
d. The captain starts the throttles forward, and the copilot trims the power
to takeoff N1 while calling Power set.
e. The copilot calls 80 knots. At this call the captain normally moves
his left hand from the nosewheel steering to the yoke. Above 80 knots,
the rudder should be effective for directional control. However, if
runway or wind conditions dictate otherwise, the nosewheel steering
can be safely used up to rotation speed.
f. The copilot calls V1 as the charted speed is attained on the airspeed
indicator. Any malfunction after V 1 will be treated as an inflight
problem, with the proper actions and checklists applied after a safe
altitude is reached. The captains intentions as to the type of emergency
return to be requested, if necessary, should be briefed at this time.
g. The copilot calls Rotate at the charted VR/V2 speed. The captain
will then apply back pressure to the yoke to attain the charted
rotation attitude.

BEFORE TAKEOFF
1.

Radar (2)/Transponder........................................................................... ON
The radar should be tuned and ready, especially if there is questionable
convective weather in the area of the departure airfield. The transponder
must be turned on with the appropriate code set.

2.

Parking Brake Handle ............................................................................. IN


Disengage the parking brake handle by pushing in on the center button
release while moving the handle to the full forward position. Ensure that
the #2 P BK light on the master warning panel is extinguished.

3.

Flaps-Airbrakes-Trims-Speeds (FATS) ............................ CHECKED/SET


Check that each item is in its proper position by physically checking the
control handles, switches, or dials. The respective indicators must be
checked as well to ensure proper indications of the selected positions.

4.

Anticollision Lights ............................................................................. ALL


This selection ensures the white wingtip strobe lights are activated, as well
as the belly and tail red strobe lights.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

5.

Landing Lights....................................................................................... ON
Place the landing lights on or, in the case of some aircraft, in pulse, day or
night conditions dictating.

CAUTION
Do not use the landing lights for more than 15
minutes while on the ground, as damage may result.
A 45-minute ground cooling period must be observed at the end of 15-minute ground operation.
There is no time restriction for use of the landing
lights in flight, as they are individually ventilated by
ram-air scoops.
6.

Start Selector Switches (3) (If Necessary)................................ AIRSTART


Select the AIRSTART position for takeoff if the runway has any amount of
water, snow or slush on it, or if the presence of birds is expected.

NOTE
It is advisable to use ignition for all takeoffs and
landings, as it may provide an immediate relight of
an engine should an inadvertent flameout occur during these critical phases of flight.
7.

Pitot Heat Switches (3) .......................................................................... ON


Just prior to beginning takeoff roll, turn on all three pitot heat switches to
obtain anti-icing of the pitot probes, stall warning vanes, static ports,
Rosemont probe, and, if installed, the Teledyne AOA probe.

CAUTION
Avoid placing these switches to the on position at too
early a time before beginning the takeoff roll.
Overheating of the probes may cause the loss of proper
pitot-static and temperature data provided to the flight
instruments and the ID-802 advisory display.
8.

All Warning Lights.............................................................................. OUT


All warning lights on the master warning panel, hydraulic panel, and fire
warning panel must be out.

9.

NP-34

Heading and Bugs..................................................................... CHECKED

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

AFTER TAKEOFF
1.

Landing Gear.......................................................................................... UP
When a positive rate of climb is indicated on both the altimeter and
vertical speed indicator, and upon the captains command, the copilot
places the landing gear selector up. Confirm the proper retraction of the
landing gear until the gear is up and the door lights are out.
After takeoff from a snow- or slush-covered runway, delay landing gear
retraction 15 seconds, provided that obstacle clearance requirements are
respected in case of an engine failure. If necessary, and at an airspeed
below 190 knots, cycle the gear up and down prior to final retraction.
However, gear cycling does not apply to aircraft equipped with a brake
heating system (SB F900-32).

2.

Wing Anti-ice Switch........................................................ AS REQUIRED


If the total air temperature is below +10C and prior to entering visible
moisture, place the wing anti-ice switch on after the gear has fully retracted.
For aircraft equipped with a brake heating system (SB F900-32), and after
takeoff from a snow- or slush-covered runway, the following procedure
applies. Once the landing gear is retracted, switch on the brake heating
system by selecting the WING-BRK position on the wing anti-ice switch.
Leave the switch in this position for at least 10 minutes. After this time,
depending on atmospheric conditions, the anti-ice switch should be set to
WING or OFF.

3.

Flaps-Slats ....................................... CLEAN/HYDRAULICS CHECKED


Flaps-slats are retracted at V 2 +25 knots, regardless of the takeoff
configuration. Upon the captains command, the copilot retracts the flapsslats incrementally, one notch at a time. Confirm the proper retraction by
referring to the flap-slat gage on the copilots instrument panel. Check that
the hydraulic pressures and quantities are normal at the end of the
retraction cycle.

4.

Start Selector Switches (3) ............................................ GROUND START


Select all three igniter switches to ground start unless conditions require
that the ignition remain on.

5.

Climb Power......................................................................................... SET

6.

Taxi Light ............................................................................................ OUT


The landing lights may be turned off at this time unless company policy
dictates leaving them on until a higher altitude is reached.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

7.

Fasten Belts/No Smoking Switches .................................. AS REQUIRED


These switches may be turned off at any time the flight conditions permit.

8.

Cabin Pressure and Temperature .............................................. CHECKED


Check the cabin rate of climb, cabin altitude, and differential pressure
indicator to confirm a normal pressurization schedule. Confirm there is
airflow through the gaspers. Rotate the temperature control knobs for the
desired temperature in the cabin and in the cockpit. If desired, and if there
is a remote temperature control for the cabin, the remote position may be
selected at this time for passenger convenience.

9.

Entrance Curtain................................................................ AS REQUIRED


It is recommended that the entrance curtain be closed to provide insulation
from the cold and to reduce the noise level at this location.

After 10,000 feet:


1.

Landing Lights ..................................................................................... OFF


The landing lights may be turned off at this time unless company policy
dictates leaving them on until a higher altitude is reached.

After 18,000 feet or transition level:


1.

Altimeters .................................................................................. 29.92/1013


Set the altimeter to QNE to comply with the FARs.

2.

Oxygen .............................................................................. AS REQUIRED


Recheck the oxygen quantity to ensure adequate quantity remains and that
no oxygen has leaked since the Before Start checklist. Passenger oxygen
should be in normal, and each pilot mask should be selected to 100%.

3.

Station Check:
a. Circuit Breakers................................................................... CHECKED
b. Electrical Panel.................................................................... CHECKED
c. Engine Instruments.............................................................. CHECKED
d. Hydraulic Panel .................................................................. CHECKED
e. Fuel Panel and Quantities.................................................... CHECKED
f. Pressurization and Temperatures......................................... CHECKED

NP-36

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CRUISE
1.

Fuel Management.............................................................. AS REQUIRED


Check that all tanks are feeding properly and that a reasonable balance is
maintained. If the takeoff was made with a full load of fuel, and upon
reaching the filed altitude, open the boost pump 1 to 2 and 3 to 2 crossfeed
valves. The No. 2 fuel boost pump must be selected to the normal position
in order that both boost pumps in group 2 tanks operate, to crossfeed fuel
from the group 2 tanks to all three engines. When group 2 fuel tanks have
shown a decrease of approximately 900 pounds of fuel, or when all three
tank groups show the same level, return the 1 to 2 and 3 to 2 crossfeed
valves to the closed position. The No. 2 boost pump should be kept in the
normal position during all phases of flight.

2.

Station Check.................................................................. PERIODICALLY


The station check should be performed at least once each 15 minutes to
ensure that all aircraft systems are operating normally. It is further
recommended that systems readings be kept at least once an hour to track
systems operations, especially fuel consumption.

DESCENT
1.

Cabin Pressure Controls ....................................................................... SET


Set the automatic pressure controller mode selector to PROG. Set the
landing field elevation in the LAND ELV window. Set the QNH, the local
altimeter setting for the field at which the landing will be made, in the
QNH window of the controller.

2.

Fasten Belt ............................................................................................. ON


Set the seat belt sign to go on in the event turbulence is encountered during
the descent.

3.

Anti-ice Systems ............................................................... AS REQUIRED


If icing conditions are expected during the descent (temperature below
+10C and visible moisture), the anti-ice systems for the engines and
wings should be turned on prior to entering the icing conditions. Ensure
that the minimum power settings prescribed for anti-ice operations are
followed, especially when in icing conditions. It may be necessary to use
the airbrakes to maintain speeds and rate of descent when anti-ice systems
are on and higher power settings become necessary.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

4.

Altimeters............................................................. SET/CROSSCHECKED
When passing the transition level in the descent, four altimeters should be
set to the landing airfields QNH; the pilots and copilots barometric
altimeter, the standby altimeter, and the QNH on the cain pressure controller.

5.

Landing Computations/Bugs.......................................... COMPLETE/SET


Determine the landing weight, and compute the requirements for runway
distance/field length, VREF, and go-around for that weight. Set the VREF
on the EADI by rotating the IAS knob on the DC-820 display controller
on the center pedestal. This VREF setting should only be changed for
additives regarding the final approach configuration of the aircraft, that
is, for flap settings less than 40, if the airbrakes are locked in the
extended position or if there is a flight control problem requiring an
airspeed additive (Table NP-1).
When landing with any wind, or especially if gusty wind conditions exist
at the landing airport, add half the steady wind component, plus the full
gust component, not to exceed a 20-knot additive. Do not change the VREF
bug setting to incorporate wind, but carry the wind additive as a target
speed above VREF. One of the analog airspeed indicator bugs may be set
on this target speed for final approach to touchdown. Any other analog
airspeed indicator bugs may be set on VFR and 1.43 VS in the eventuality
of a go-around.
Wind additives are to be carried as an additive all the way to touchdown.
Table NP-1. LANDING COMPUTATIONS

WT/1,000 LB

24

26

28

30

32

34

36

38

40

42

44

VREF

100

104

108

112

115

119

122

126

129

132

135

HOLDING

172

179

187

193

201

207

212

219

223

228

234

VREF Correction for Configuration (New Bug)


Clean Wing

+ 30 KT

Outboard Slats Only

+ 25 KT

Slats Only

+ 20 KT

Outboard Slats + 7 Flaps

+ 20 KT

Slats + 7 Flaps

+15 KT

Outboard Slats + 20 Flaps

+ 10 KT

Slats + 20 Flaps

+ 5 KT

Outboard Slats + 40 Flaps

+ 5 KT

All wind gust + 1/2 Steady Wind (Max. 20 KT)

6.

Approach Briefing .................................................................. COMPLETE


a. Confirm the VREF and landing distance/field length.

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b. Discuss the approach to be used:


(1) Type and runway direction
(2) Approach frequency and identification
(3) Airport elevation
(4) Minimum safe altitude
(5) Any transition altitude
(6) The inbound magnetic course
(7) The final approach fix altitude
(8) All missed-approach information
(9) The final approach speed to be used
(10) The missed approach point, timing, DME, etc.
(11) All added information to clarify the approach
(12) All lighting that is available
(13) All runway information: length, width, displaced threshold,
touchdown runway remaining, etc.
c. The pilot not flying will make calls on final approach in accordance
with the following:
(1) One dot left or rightLocalizer
(2) One dot above or any belowGlide slope
(3) Any altitude deviationAltitude
(4) Any vertical sink over 1,000 fpmSink rate
(5) Any bank over 30Bank
(6) +10/0 knots from target speedAirspeed
(7) 1,000 feet above DH or MDA1,000 above
(8) 500 feet above DH or MDA500 above
(9) 100 feet above DH or MDAApproaching minimums

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

(10) At minimums:

With runway in sightMinimums-land

With no runway in sightMinimums-go around

Below 10,000 feet:


1.

Landing Lights....................................................................................... ON
Turn the landing lights on or to pulse (those so equipped) to assist in being
seen by other aircraft.

APPROACH
1.

Entrance Curtain ............................................................................... OPEN


As soon as practical prior to entering the approach pattern, open the
entrance curtain, as it is an FAA requirement that the main entrance be
clear of obstructions prior to landing.

2.

No Smoking Sign................................................................................... ON
Place the no smoking sign on prior to landing, as it is an FAA requirement
that all smoking materials be extinguished before landing. This is also a
signal to the passengers that landing is imminent.

3.

Altimeters/Radio Altimeters ................................ SET/CROSSCHECKED


Once again, confirm all altimeters are set to the current station setting to
ensure proper altimeter readings at the DA or MDA. Additionally, set the
HAT/HAA on the radio altimeter for the approach to be flown. This RA
setting is for backup information only and not to be used for determining
decision altitude or minimum descent altitude. Its primary use if for
determining the missed approach point for a Category II ILS approach.

4.

Fuel Crossfeeds (3) ...................................................................... CLOSED


The aircraft manufacturer requires that all three fuel crossfeed valves be
closed and that the fuel system be in a tank-to-engine configuration for all
normal operations.

5.

Flaps-Slats .............................................................. +20 FLAPS + SLATS


When the airspeed is below 200 knots, select the flap-slat handle to
7 FLAPS + SLATS. Confirm that the flaps move to the position selected
and that the slats have properly extended by observing that the green slat
light is steady. When the airspeed is below 190 knots, select the flap-slat
handle to 20 FLAPS + SLATS. Confirm that the flaps move to the
position selected.

NP-40

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CAUTION
Whenever moving the flap-slat handle in flight, move
it one increment at a time to ensure the proper movement to the position selected.

BEFORE LANDING
1.

Landing Gear ...................................................... DOWN/THREE GREEN


Select the landing gear handle to the down position. Confirm proper
operation of the landing gear doors and extension of the landing gear. Make
a positive effort to watch the gear until all three are down and locked with
the proper three green arrow light indications. The red gear door lights
should be out as long as the gear was lowered in the normal manner.

2.

Antiskid ........................................................................................ TESTED


The brake selector switch must be in the #1 ASKID ON position. The
landing gear control handle must be in the down position. Depress and
hold the brake pedals. The green L or R brake lights should not illuminate.
While holding the brake pedals depressed, momentarily depress and then
release the antiskid test button. The green L and R brake lights will
illuminate about one second after depressing the test switch and should
then extinguish about one second later. Release the foot pressure on the
brakes after the green lights extinguish. The lights should remain out.

3.

Hydraulics................................................................................. CHECKED
Check that the hydraulic pressure and quantity indications are normal after
final activation of all the hydraulic components on final approach before
landing. This is a final check to ensure that you have hydraulic pressure
available for activation of airbrakes, brakes, and nosewheel steering during
landing roll.

4.

Airbrake Handle.......................................................... ZERO/LIGHT OUT


The airbrakes must not be extended in flight when within 300 feet above
ground level. Physically check that the airbrake handle is in the forward,
or zero, position and that the amber AIR BRAKE light on the landing gear
control panel is out.

5.

Flaps-Slats .............................................................. +40 FLAPS + SLATS


Normal approach conditions are as follows:
During a VFR approach, the flaps may be set to 40 upon turning from
the base leg to final approach.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

During an ILS approach, the flaps may be set to 40 when the


instruments indicate you are one dot below the glide path.
During a nonprecision approach, the flaps may be set to 40 when the
aircraft is visual and in a position to land, usually when breaking out
on final approach or at the visual descent point.
When inside the final approach fix, with the flaps set at 40, establish
an airspeed of VREF + wind correction. The demonstrated maximum
crosswind component on a dry runway is 30 knots.

NOTE
Whether landing in steady or gusty wind conditions,
VREF must be increased by half the steady wind
factor plus the full gust factor, not to exceed a
20-knot additive.
6.

Start Selector Switches (3) ................................................ AS REQUIRED


It is recommended that the igniters be placed to the AIRSTART position if
birds are present on final approach or if the runway is reported to be wet or
covered with snow, slush, or ice.

7.

Autopilot .............................................................................................. OFF


The autopilot must be disconnected before landing the aircraft. The
autopilot may be disconnected by any one of the following means:
Depressing the autopilot disconnect switch at the forward, lower,
outboard position of either pilots control wheel
Depressing the go-around switch at the top outboard position of
either yoke
Depressing the normal elevator trim switches at the top outboard
position of either yoke
Activating the emergency elevator control switch on the center pedestal
Depressing the AP button on the flight guidance controller on the
center pedestal. This is the button used to engage the autopilot as well.

AFTER LANDING
1.

Thrust Reverser ........................................................................... STOWED


TRANSIT

and REV UNLOCK Lights ........................................ OUT

Confirm that the thrust reverser has stowed when the thrust reverser
control lever is placed to the stow position.

NP-42

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

2.

Anti-iceWing (or Wing-BRK).......................................................... OFF


Wing anti-icing must be turned off as soon as possible after landing. If
icing conditions still exist after landing, engine anti-icing may be left on
until parking the aircraft.

CAUTION
If wing anti-icing is inadvertently left on after landing, do not retract the slats until the wing leading edge
has cooled sufficiently.
3.

Pitot Heat Switches (3)......................................................................... OFF


In sequence with the preceding items, it is necessary to turn off all three
pitot heat switches as soon as landing roll is complete to preclude
overheating of the pitot-static components and errors in the air data systems.

4.

Start Selector Switches (3) ................................................................... OFF


IGN

Lights (3)...................................................................... OUT

If the igniters were placed to airstart for the approach and landing, they
should be placed to the ground start position during taxi-in to the ramp.
5.

Anticollision Lights ............................................................................. RED


Move the three-position anticollision light switch to the RED position,
which turns off the white wingtip strobe lights. Only the red lights need be
illuminated until the engines are shut down at the ramp.

6.

Landing Lights ..................................................................................... OFF


If the landing lights are not needed for taxi to the ramp, they should be
turned off to prevent overheating of the housings and the lenses. The
landing lights may be used for 15 minutes on the ground but require a
45-minute cooling period after that 15-minute use. There is no limit to the
in-flight use of landing lights.

7.

Taxi Light............................................................................................... ON
The taxi light should be left on for taxi-in to the ramp, day or night.
During the day, the taxi light provides additional recognition potential for
the aircraft to other taxiing aircraft, as well as for ground vehicles.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-43

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

8.

Radar (2)/Transponder .............................................................. STANDBY


These units are no longer needed for ground operations and should be
turned off before reaching the ramp.

9.

Flap + Slats Handle ........................................................................ CLEAN


Place the flap-slat handle to CLEAN to prevent possible damage to these
surfaces while taxiing near or over obstacles.

10.

Airbrake Handle ................................................................................ ZERO


Select the zero position with the airbrake control handle.

11.

Windshield Heat Switches (3).............................................................. OFF


If not required for further flight, the windshield heat switches may be
turned off.

12.

Trims (3) ................................................................. TAKEOFF POSITION


Set all three control surface trims to the proper position for takeoff. The
aircraft will be in proper trim for an ensuing takeoff.

13.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


If the APU is to be started, this properly arms the electrical interlock
circuit for starting. This action also ensures APU electrical power is
supplied to all the electrical buses when the engines are shut down.

14.

APU ................................................................................... AS REQUIRED


If the APU is needed for ground operations, or for subsequent engine
starting during a short turnaround, start the APU as follows:
a. APU Master ....................................................................... ON/GREEN
b. APU Generator................................................................... ON/GREEN
c. APU Start Switch .............................. DEPRESSED 1 SECOND MAX
d. APU Bleed Switch ....................................................... AS REQUIRED

NOTE
As a minimum, the No. 2 and No. 3 engines should
be kept running until parked at the ramp. The No. 1
engine may be shut down during taxi to the ramp, provided a 2-minute conditioning period at idle power
is accomplished.
NP-44

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

PARKING
1.

Park Brake/No. 2 Brake Light........................................ INTERMEDIATE


DETENT/ON STEADY

2.

Flight Data (Fuel-IRS) ........................................................... RECORDED

3.

AVIONICS/FMS/EFIS Masters ................................................... OFF (IN)


For those aircraft equipped with one, two, or three master switches, turn
them off at this time. It is recommended that the communication and
navigation radios be turned off at their respective control heads as well to
save the LED from early failure when AVIONICS masters are turned on
and off during ground operations.

4.

Engine Anti-ice Switches (3) ............................................................... OFF


Prior to shutting down the engines, the engine anti-ice switches should be
turned off and the engines stabilized.

5.

Taxi Light ............................................................................................. OFF

6.

IRS (2 or 3)........................................................................ AS REQUIRED

7.

Radar (2)/Transponder ......................................................................... OFF

8.

Standby Horizon ............................................................................ CAGED


Pull the knob on the emergency horizon, and rotate it clockwise to cage
the mechanism.

9.

Standby Pump ...................................................................................... OFF


The standby hydraulic pump should be selected off.

10.

VHF/No. 2 Emergency Battery............................................................ OFF

11.

Engines (3) (After 2 minutes at idle speed) ................................ CUT OFF

12.

Booster Pump Switches (3) with APU (2) ........................................... OFF

13.

Anticollision/Navigation Lights........................................................... OFF


These lights may be turned off as long as the engines are not running or if
there is no power being supplied to the aircraft.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-45

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

14.

Fasten Belt/No Smoking/Emergency Lights........................................ OFF


Turn the cabin warning and emergency exit lights off before removing
electrical power from the aircraft. Although this does not affect the cabin
warning lights, it does affect the emergency lights, as they will come on
when power is removed from the main buses.

15.

Interior Lights....................................................................................... OFF


Turn off all extraneous cabin lights to prevent excessive drain on the main
batteries when power is again applied to the aircraft.

16.

APU/No. 2 Booster Pump ......................................................... STOP/OFF


Depress the stop button on the APU to shut it down, and turn off the No. 2
booster pump, as it is no longer needed. Turn the APU master switch off
when the low oil pressure light comes on.

17.

Batteries (2).......................................................................................... OFF


As soon as possible after supplementary electrical power is removed
from the aircraft, turn off both batteries to prevent an excessive drain of
battery power.

18.

Engine Computers (Last Flight)........................................ AS REQUIRED

19.

Generator Switches (Last Flight) ...................................... AS REQUIRED

20.

Aircraft Chocked ................................................................. BRAKES OFF


The park brake should not be left on for extended parking periods. Ensure
proper chocking before release of parking brake.

ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS


OPERATING IN ICING CONDITIONS
NOTE
Icing conditions exist on the ground or for takeoff
when OAT is 10C (50F) or below when operating
on ramps, on taxiways, or runways where surface
snow or slush may be ingested by the engines or
freeze on engines, nacelles, or engine sensor probe.
Icing conditions exist in flight when TAT is 10C
(50F) or below and visible moisture is present in any
form (such as clouds, fog with visibility of one mile
or less, rain, snow, sleet and ice crystals).

NP-46

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

1.

Engine anti-ice systems (ENG ANTI-ICE) should be switched on in


flight or on ground when icing conditions exist or are anticipated, except
during climb and cruise when the temperature is less than 40C SAT or
TAT more than +10C (50F).
However, flying in vicinity or through a cumuliform cloud can result in
rapid variation of SAT with SAT increasing above 40C. In such case,
anticipate icing conditions by selecting the anti-icing system on.
Do not rely on airframe visual cues to turn anti-icing system on. Use the
temperature and visible moisture criteria specified.
Conclusion:
During climb and cruise, the pneumatic anti-ice system shall be turned on:
Below +10C (50F) TAT and above 40C
In visible moisture
If both of these conditions are not met, the anti-ice should be turned off.

2.

Wing anti-ice system (WING ANTI-ICE) should be switched on in flight


prior to entering visible moisture whenever the TAT is +10C or below.

3.

Encounter with icing conditions is evidenced by the formation of ice on


the non anti-iced area around the windshield panes. In night flight
operation, lights switched on by WING (EXTERIOR LIGHTS) switch
illuminate the wing leading edges to allow the detection of ice.

4.

Comply with engine and wing anti-ice system operational limits and with
minimum N1 speed values.

5.

If necessary during the approach , increase the approach speed and extend
the airbrakes to help keep N1 speed to no less than the specified value.

The N 1 speed of the operative engines must not be less than the minimum values as shown in table below.

Three Engines Operative


Table NP-2. THREE ENGINES OPERATIVE
30 to
20C

20 to
10C

10 to
0C

0 to
+10C

Above 20,000 ft

80%

76%

73%

65%

From 20,000 ft to 10,000 ft

76%

73%

65%

58%

Below 10,000 ft

68%

65%

61%

58%

TAT

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-47

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Two Engines Operative


Increase the values shown in Table NP-2:
By 9% if N 1 is equal to or higher than 65%
By 6% if N 1 is lower than 65%

Landing Gear Operation


In icing conditions, the failure of the red landing gear lights to go out when
landing gear retraction is accomplished may be due to ice preventing locking of the main gear in up position.
Maintain indicated airspeed lower than or equal to VLO (190 KIAS)
After take-off from a snow (dry or wet) or slush covered runway,
delay landing gear retraction for 15 seconds, provided that obstacle
clearance requirements are respected in case of one engine failure (with
gear extended, the second segment climb is 1.7% less). If necessary,
and at airspeed below 190 kts, cycle the gear up and down prior to final
retraction (gear cycling does not apply to aircraft equipped with a brake
heating system (SB F900-32).
During approach, if take-off was from a snow (dry or wet) or slush
covered runway, proceed as follow:
Landing gear down and checked
Brake selector #1, anti-skid OFF
Apply maximum brake pressure several times .
Re-active anti-skid system, brake selector #1, anti-skid ON
Perform antiskid test as usual

Slat System Operation


Should the slats fail to fully retract when retraction is initiated in icing conditions (red transit light ON):
1.

Maintain airspeed at VFE (200 KIAS) or below.

2.

Leave wing anti-ice system on and maintain engine power settings at or


above minimum values.

Windshield Anti-Icing
Selection of the WINDSHIELD PILOT and COPILOT switches to the MAX
position should be limited to those icing conditions encountered in flight such
that the ice protection afforded in the NORM position is inadequate

NP-48

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

When the aircraft has been left on the ground for several hours or one night
in ambient temperatures of 5 F ( -15C) or below , cockpit windows incorporating a heating network must be heated as follows :
Place both WINSHIELD PILOT/COPILOT switches in the NORM
position (medium heating )
Also switch on the side window heating switch SIDE.
Keep the heating ON for 15 minutes before leaving the ramp

COLD WEATHER OPERATION


Fuel Selection
Prior to prolonged parking in very low temperature conditions, ensure (by replacement if necessary) that the freezing point of the fuel used is lower than
the anticipated minimum ambient temperature.
In-flight tank fuel temperature must be maintained at least 3C above the freezing point of fuel being used. If necessary, increase mach number or decrease
altitude to raise the total air temperature.
This should be achieved if the total air temperature is not more than 13C (23F)
below the fuel freezing point .
As water may freeze as it settles out of the fuel when the aircraft is parked in
the cold, draining must not be carried out until the aircraft has been parked
on heated areas of the airfield or in a heated hangar.
While moisture in the fuel is not exclusively a cold weather problem, it does
frequently cause trouble during engine starts in below freezing weather.

Water Servicing
On ground when cold temperatures are expected, water has to be drained properly to prevent any water circuit leaks.
Observe the procedure in the Ground Servicing Manuel (DTM 567, Water
Section)

Operational Conciderations
During starting, taxing, after take off and prior to landing on a runway covered with snow or slush:
Activate the airstart engine ignition system
After take off, to get rid of the slush accumulated during taxi and take
off, cycle the gear up and down prior to final retraction.
Before landing, apply maximum brake pressure several times, using
the anti-skid OFF. Reactivate and check the antiskid prior to landing.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NP-49

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Figure NP-3. Buffet Onset Envelope

NP-50

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SEVERE TURBULENCE PENETRATION


Flights in severe turbulence should be avoided whenever conditions permit.
If necessary, reduce the speed to 280 KIAS max or MI 0.76 max, fasten the
seat belts, decrease altitude to increase buffet boundary margin.

NOTE
Autopilot or yaw damper operation is permitted.
With the autopilot disengaged:
Fly attitude
Avoid using the stabilizer trim
Do not chase altitude and speed

WINDSHEAR SITUATION
If windshear is anticipated:
Do not take offWait
Do not landWait or fly to an alternate airport
Pilot reaction time must be very low3 to 5 seconds. If the pilot takes 15 seconds or more to understand the situation, it will be too late.
If a windshear encounter is imminently anticipated, decide to go around:
1.

Go around pushbutton ........................................................... DEPRESSED

2.

Level the wings

3.

Pull up to stall warning onset

4.

Power levers .................................................................. FULL FORWARD

5.

AIRBRAKES handle.............................................................. POSITION 0

6.

Slats-flaps handle .................................... SECOND NOTCH MAXIMUM

At pilots discretion according to aircraft height and vertical speed:


7.

Landing gear........................................................................................... UP

Pilot must be aware that the landing gear must not be raised as long as a positive rate of climb and terrain clearance are not established. The following are
two reasons for this:
In case of contact with the ground, the gear will absorb most of the
impact energy
Although a small performance increase is available after landing gear
retraction, initial performance degradation may occur when landing
gear doors open for retraction.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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ABNORMAL PROCEDURES
CONTENTS
Page
LANDING DISTANCE/LANDING FIELD
LENGTH ADDITIONS .................................................................... AP-1
Emergency Checklist ............................................................... AP-1
Abnormal Checklist ................................................................. AP-1
ENGINES .......................................................................................... AP-3
Engine Failure Before V1 ......................................................... AP-4
Engine Failure After V1 ........................................................... AP-5
Engine Failure in Flight ........................................................... AP-7
One Engine InoperativeApproach and Landing................... AP-9
One Engine InoperativeGo-Around................................... AP-12
Airstart ................................................................................... AP-15
Fuel Control Computer Inoperative ....................................... AP-25
Engine Oil .............................................................................. AP-26
No. 2 Engine Inlet Door Open ............................................... AP-27
Takeoff Configuration............................................................ AP-28
HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS............................................................... AP-29
Loss of No. 1 System............................................................. AP-29
Failure of a No. 1 System Pump ............................................ AP-31
Loss of No. 2 System............................................................. AP-31
Unwanted Operation of Standby Pump ................................. AP-33
FLIGHT CONTROLS..................................................................... AP-34
Landing with Inoperative Stabilizer....................................... AP-34
Landing with Inoperative Elevator......................................... AP-35
Arthur Unit Inoperative.......................................................... AP-36
Flap Asymmetry or Jammed Flaps ........................................ AP-36
Slat Monitoring System ......................................................... AP-38
Slat System Abnormal Operation .......................................... AP-38
Unwanted Outboard Slat Extension....................................... AP-42

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Airbrake(s) Do Not Retract....................................................


Airbrakes Do Not Extend in Flight........................................
LANDING GEAR...........................................................................
Emergency Extension ............................................................
Control Handle Jammed in Down Position ...........................
Abnormal Retraction .............................................................
Emergency Retraction On Ground.........................................
No. 1 Brake System or Antiskid Inoperative .........................
No. 1 and No. 2 Brake Systems Inoperative ..........................
Nosewheel Steering Inoperative ............................................
Nosewheel Shimmy ...............................................................
FUEL SYSTEM ..............................................................................
Low Boost Pump Pressure .....................................................
Fuel Transfer System Malfunction on Aircraft
Equipped with XTK 2 System ...............................................
Tank Level Abnormally Low on A/C
without XTK 2 System ..........................................................
Tank Level Abnormally Low on A/C
with XTK 2 System ...............................................................
Fuel Asymmetry ....................................................................
Fueling Light On In Flight.....................................................
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS..............................................................
One Generator Inoperative.....................................................
Two Generators Inoperative...................................................
Battery Overheat ....................................................................
Battery Failure .......................................................................
PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM ...............................................................
Either Air Data Computer Inoperative...................................
Both Air Data Domputers Inoperative...................................
Jammed or Abnormal Pilot, Copilot, and Possibly
Standby IAS/Mach Indication at High Altitude ....................
Probe Anti-icing Malfunction................................................
ICE PROTECTION SYSTEMS ......................................................

AP-ii

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-43
AP-44
AP-45
AP-45
AP-47
AP-47
AP-48
AP-48
AP-50
AP-50
AP-51
AP-51
AP-51
AP-56
AP-59
AP-59
AP-60
AP-61
AP-62
AP-62
AP-68
AP-76
AP-77
AP-78
AP-78
AP-79
AP-80
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Wing Anti-ice Inoperative Without Brake Heating ............... AP-83


Wing Anti-ice Unwanted Operation
Without Brake Heating .......................................................... AP-86
Wing Anti-ice Inoperative With Brake Heating .................... AP-87
Wing Anti-ice Unwanted Operation With Brake Heating ...... AP-92
Engine Anti-ice Inoperative................................................... AP-93
Engine Anti-ice Overpressure................................................ AP-95
Engine Anti-ice Unwanted Operation.................................... AP-96
Late Activation of Systems .................................................... AP-98
AIR CONDITIONING.................................................................... AP-98
Bleed-Air System Overheat ................................................... AP-98
ECU Overheat...................................................................... AP-100
Cabin Air-Conditioning Unit Overheat (On Aircraft Without
Turbocooling Unit Anti-icing Emergency Control) ............. AP-102
Cabin Air Conditioning Overheat On Aircraft
Equipped With Anti-icing Emergency Control (SB-131) ... AP-103
Battery Conditioning Failure (SB-125) ............................... AP-104
Nose Cone Overheat............................................................ AP-105
PRESSURIZATION...................................................................... AP-105
Improper Cabin Vertical Speed ........................................... AP-105
Too High Cabin Pressure ..................................................... AP-107
Too High Cabin Altitude or Slow Depressurization............ AP-108
Door Unlocked Indication.................................................... AP-111
OxygenNo Automatic Deployment of Masks .................
APU Bleed Light .................................................................
WINDSHIELD..............................................................................
Cracked or Bubbles Forming ...............................................
Heat System Inoperative ......................................................
AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM (AFCS) ..............
AFCS Out-of-Trim Condition..............................................
Mach Trim Inoperative ........................................................
ANGLE-OF-ATTACK STALL PROBE HEATING FAILURE....
Angle-of-Attack ProbeHeat System Inoperative .............

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-113
AP-113
AP-114
AP-114
AP-114
AP-115
AP-115
AP-116
AP-116
AP-116

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FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS..................................................


Failure of Engine Detection System ....................................
Failure of APU Fire Protection System ...............................
EFIS .............................................................................................
Either EADI CRT Failure ....................................................
Either EHSI CRT Failure.....................................................
Simultaneous Failure of EADI and EHSI
CRTs on the Same Side .......................................................
Successive Failure of EADI and EHSI
CRTs on the Same Side .......................................................
Loss of ASCB Control.........................................................
Invalid Attitude and/or Heading Data..................................
IRS Attitude Comparison Annunciation with
or without a Heading Comparison Annunciation ................
IRS Heading Comparison Annunciation without
an Attitude Comparison Annunciation ................................
IAS/Mach Data Invalid........................................................
IAS Disparity Annunciation ................................................
LOC or GS Disparity Annunciation ....................................
Failure of Either FMS..........................................................

AP-iv

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-116
AP-116
AP-117
AP-117
AP-117
AP-118
AP-118
AP-119
AP-119
AP-119
AP-120
AP-120
AP-121
AP-122
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ILLUSTRATION
Figure
AP-1

Title
Page
Inflight Relight Envelope............................................ AP-15

TABLES
Table
AP-1
AP-2
AP-3
AP-4

Title
Landing Data ..............................................................
Pitot-Static SystemEither Air
Data Computer Inoperative ........................................
Pitot-Static SystemBoth Air
Data Computers Inoperative ......................................
Flight In Icing Conditions ..........................................

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Page
AP-14
AP-78
AP-79
AP-85

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ABNORMAL PROCEDURES
NOTE
This abnormal procedures checklist is provided for
training purposes only. Where checklist procedures
differ from the Airplane Flight Manual, the Airplane
Flight Manual takes precedence.

LANDING DISTANCE ADDITIONS


The following are additives to be made to the landing distances computed for
a 40 flaps + slats landing under normal circumstances.

NOTE
LDLanding distance

EMERGENCY CHECKLIST
Loss of Both Hydraulic Systems
Clean configuration, VREF + 30 knots. Twice the normal landing distance.
Landing field length is not addressed.

Approach and LandingTwo Engines Inoperative


If using No. 2 brakes, add 50% to both the LD.
After making the additive for use of No. 2 brakes above and if landing with:
7 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 20 knots; add 800 feet to LD.
20 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 10 knots; add 400 feet to LD.

ABNORMAL CHECKLIST
Approach and LandingOne Engine Inoperative
If using:
7 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 15 knots; add 600 feet to LD.
20 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 5 knots; add 200 feet to LD.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-1

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Loss of No. 1 Hydraulic System


Add 60% to the LD.

Loss of No. 2 Hydraulic System


The following additions must be made to the landing distance (LD) computations.
0 flaps + slats, fly V REF + 20 knots; add 800 feet to LD.
7 flaps + slats, fly V REF + 15 knots; add 600 feet to LD.
20 flaps + slats, fly V REF + 5 knots; add 200 feet to LD.
40 flaps + slats, land at V REF .
After making the additions for flaps and slats add 10% to the LD for no airbrakes.

Inoperative Stabilizer
Use 20 flaps + slats, and fly VREF + 20 knots; add 800 feet to LD.

Inoperative Elevator
Use 40 flaps + slats, and fly VREF + 10 knots; add 1,800 feet to LD.

PITCH FEEL Light On (Arthur Unit


Failed in Heavy Force Position)
Fly VREF + 10 knots; add 800 feet to LD.

Flap Asymmetry
If using:
Up to 7 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 20 knots; add 800 feet to LD.
7 to 20 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 15 knots; add 600 feet to LD.
20 to 40 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 5 knots; add 200 feet to LD.

AP-2

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Landing with Slats or Flaps Malfunctions


If using:
40 flaps + outboard slats only, fly VREF + 5 knots; add 200 feet to
LD.
Flaps/slats clean, fly VREF + 30 knots; add 50% to LD.

Landing with Airbrake Malfunctions


If:
Airbrakes are extended to position 1, fly VREF + 10 knots; add 600 feet
to LD.
Airbrakes are extended to position 2, fly VREF + 15 knots; add 600 feet
to LD.
Airbrakes do not extend, add 10% to the LD.

Landing with Antiskid Inoperative


Use brakes in #2 A/SKID OFF selected; add 50% to the LD.

Landing with Parking Brake Only


Add 50% to the LD.

ENGINES
NOTE
The warning of an engine failure on the ground during takeoff roll is given either by a yawing of the aircraft, if the No. 1 or No. 3 engine fails, or by
illumination of the red ENG 2 FAIL light, if the center engine fails.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ENGINE FAILURE BEFORE V1


Reject the takeoff:
1.

Brakes................................................................. MAXIMUM PRESSURE


Use the brakes to their maximum pressure, depending on length of
runway, during any aborted takeoff. The brakes, in No. 1 position with
antiskid on, are the most important factor in stopping performance. They
should be applied as other actions are taken to decelerate the aircraft.

2.

Power Levers ...................................................................................... IDLE


Immediately upon the abort call, retard the power levers to idle. Do not
bring the power levers to cutoff; otherwise, hydraulic pressure for stopping
the aircraft may be lost.

3.

Airbrake Handle ..................................................................... POSITION 2


Ensure that the airbrake handle is placed to position 2. Extending the
airbrakes decreases lift on the wings and makes braking more effective.
While on the ground, if the failure was the No. 2 engine, the standby
hydraulic pump will automatically operate when the hydraulic pressure in
the No. 2 system drops to approximately 1,500 psi.

4.

Thrust Reverser....................................................................... DEPLOYED


Use the thrust reverser as an added benefit to stopping performance.
Before ordering reverser deployment, ensure that the aircraft is firmly on
the ground on all three gears, the airbrakes are extended, and No. 2 engine
is effectively at idle power. The thrust reverser can be used until normal
taxi speed is achieved without risk of reingestion of gases and compressor
stalls. The thrust reverser is most effective, however, at the higher speeds
during deceleration. It should be used to slow the aircraft to at least a
speed of 89 knots, which is the hydroplaning speed of a Falcon 900.

NOTE
Accelerate-stop performance is based on a 2-second
time delay from initiation of the abort to being in the
stopping configuration described in this procedure.
Thrust reverser is not a performance consideration in
stopping performance of the aircraft. Charted stopping performance is based on the use of antiskid braking and the deployment of airbrakes to position 2.

AP-4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ENGINE FAILURE AFTER V1


Continue the takeoff:
1.

At VR ...................................................................... ROTATE NORMALLY


Rotate the aircraft to the normal pitch attitude calculated from the flight
manual charts, usually a minimum of 13.5 for a 20 flaps + slats takeoff
or 14.5 for 7 flaps + slats takeoff. This will ensure a minimum climbout
gross climb gradient of 2.7% in the second segment of climb.

2.

Airspeed .............................................................................. MAINTAIN V2


If possible, maintain a speed of V2 for climbout to a minimum altitude of
400 feet AGL. If the speed is higher than V2, maintain that speed, and do
not allow the speed to increase further. Do not pull the nose up further to
try to bring the speed back to V2.

3.

Positive Rate of Climb................................................................ GEAR UP


A positive rate of climb is defined as an indication of climb showing on
both the altimeter and the rate-of-climb indicator.

4.

Crew and Passenger Bleed-Air Switches ............................................. OFF


The performance charts for climbout in the second segment are calculated
with these bleed systems turned off.

5.

Wing Anti-ice .................................................................... AS REQUIRED


If anti-icing conditions are present, turn on the wing anti-ice switch after
the landing gear has been retracted. The performance charts do account for
the use of wing anti-icing, if needed.

CAUTION
If the engine failure occurs at a speed above V2, maintain the speed attained.
At no lower than 400 feet AGL and above safety altitude:
6.

Level Flight Acceleration ........................................................... INITIATE


Acceleration to flaps/slats retraction speeds may be accomplished while in
level flight. Do not descend. However, the aircraft must be capable of
climbing in this transition segment with a minimum gross climb gradient
of 1.5%. If the aircraft meets second-segment climb requirements, it will
automatically meet transition and final segment climb requirements.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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7.

STBY Hydraulic Pump Switch (If No. 2 Engine Failed) .................... ON


If the No. 2 engine has failed, there may not be enough windmilling rpm to
operate the engine-driven hydraulic pump. In order to obtain operation of
No. 2 hydraulic system components, position the standby hydraulic pump
switch to ON. In flight, with the standby pump switch in AUTO, the standby
pump will operate only when the airbrakes are selected to position 1 or 2.

8.

At V2 + 25 knotsFLAPSSLATS Handle .................................. CLEAN


When an airspeed of V2 + 25 knots is achieved, regardless of the takeoff
configuration, retract the slats and flaps incrementally to the clean
position. Check that the flap position indicator on the configuration panel
is at 0.

9.

Enroute Climb Speed..................................................................... ATTAIN


Compute the enroute climb speed from the performance charts. This speed
is 1.43 VS in the clean configuration. It is also the best rate-of-climb speed
if on one engine, the maximum lift over drag speed, and the best speed to
use for driftdown if all engines have failed and cannot be restarted.

10.

Failed Engine......................................................................... IDENTIFIED


Analyze all engine indications. Attempt an airstart on the failed engine
unless a greater emergency exists with the engine. Both pilots must make a
positive and confirmed identification of the affected engine before any
further actions are taken. Shut down the inoperative engine (see Engine
Failure In Flight, this chapter).

Five minutes after brake release:


11.

Crew and Passenger Bleed Switches ................................................ AUTO


At this point, it may no longer be necessary to leave these switches off to
meet performance chart requirements. If required, they may be turned
back on as soon as the final climbout segment has begun.

12.

Maximum Continuous Thrust .............................................................. SET


On the two remaining engines, change the thrust from the takeoff thrust
power settings to the charted maximum continuous thrust power settings.

NOTE
It is the captains responsibility to decide whether to
continue the flight or interrupt it as soon as possible
and apply the One Engine Inoperative Approach and
Landing procedure.

AP-6

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NOTE
An attempt airstart may be tried on the failed engine
(see Airstart section, this chapter). If an airstart is
unsuccessful, complete the engine shutdown procedure (see Engine Failure In Flight section in this
chapter).

ENGINE FAILURE IN FLIGHT


The OIL, GEN, and possibly PUMP lights illuminate.
Yawing tendency (failure of No. 1 or No. 3 engine):
Determine which engine has failed. Analyze all engine indications. Attempt
an airstart on the failed engine unless a greater emergency exists with the engine. Both pilots must make a positive and confirmed identification of the affected engine before any further actions are taken.

Engine Shutdown
1.

Power Lever ..........................................RETARDED AND MAINTAINED


ONE MINUTE TO IDLE (IF POSSIBLE)
If the engine is still running, and a precautionary engine shutdown is
necessary, if possible, allow the engine to cool at idle for one minute
before shutdown.

2.

Power Lever.................................................................................. CUTOFF


After positive identification of the proper engine to be shut down, move
the affected engine power lever to cutoff.

3.

Booster Switch ..................................................................................... OFF


Unless needed for fuel balance operations, place the affected booster pump
switch to OFF and check for corresponding fuel light on warning panel.

4.

GEN Switch ......................................................................................... OFF


The generator for the failed engine is no longer useful and should be
turned OFF to preclude electrical anomalies associated with the electrical
system.

5.

Engine Anti-ice Switch ........................................................................ OFF


This closes the anti-icing valves (air intake and No. 2 engine S-duct).

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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6.

Fuel Shutoff Switch (If Engine Cannot Be Restarted)......................... OFF

CAUTION
If the engine cannot be restarted, switch the fuel
shutoff valve off. In icing conditions, operate No. 2
engine anti-icing even with the No. 2 engine shut
down. The isolation valve must be open.
This will allow bleed air from the bleed-air manifold
to anti-ice the S-duct. If the No. 1 or No. 3 engine is
shut down, turn off the engine anti-icing switch, even
when in icing conditions.
If Engine Shutdown procedure was initiated due to engine failure during takeoff (after V1) 5 minutes after brake release and if obstacle clearance permits:
7.

Crew and Passenger Bleed-Air Switches.......................................... AUTO

8.

Maximum Continuous Thrust .............................................................. SET

If required, see One Engine Inoperative Drift Down chart.

NOTE
After an unsuccessful airstart attempt of engine 1 or
3, select bus-tied switch to FLIGHT NORM and
check that the BUS TIED light is out.
If the No. 2 engine is shut down:
8.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Since the No. 2 generator is no longer supplying electrical power to the
right DC electrical buses, tie the buses to save the No. 2 battery from
depletion. Check the volts and amps on the two operating generators and
illumination of the bus-tied light.

9.

ST-BY Hydraulic Pump Switch............................... ON (AS REQUIRED)


If needed to supply hydraulic power to the No. 2 hydraulic system, turn on
the standby hydraulic pump switch. A windmilling engine, dependent
upon its rpm, may not be able to supply enough hydraulic power to
operate No. 2 system components..

CAUTION
Regardless of flight conditions, fuel in the center
group of tanks must not be kept at a higher level than
the side tanks to prevent problems caused by an aft
CG location at the end of the flight.

AP-8

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10.

Booster 2 Switch ........................................................................ NORMAL


This will allow normal booster pump operation and prepare the standby
booster pump for automatic operation once XBP 21 and or 23
crossfeed switches are selected to crossfeed.

11.

XBP 12 and/or 23........................................................................ OPEN


a. XBP light(s) checked...................................................................... ON
If tank 2 level is higher:
b. BOOSTER 1 or 3......................................................... AS REQUIRED
In this case, BOOSTER 2 also supplies the side engine.
If tank 2 level is lower:
c. BOOSTER 2 ................................................................................... OFF
In this case, BOOSTER 1 or 3 also supplies the center engine.

ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVEAPPROACH AND LANDING


1.

Hydraulic Implications ............................................................. CHECKED


Depending on which engine is shut down and which hydraulic system is
affected, the hydraulic implication and special requirements should be
checked, evaluated, and applied before beginning the approach.

2.

Electrical Implications.............................................................. CHECKED


Depending on which engine is shut down and which DC electrical bus is
affected, electrical implications and bus loading should be taken care of
before starting the approach.

3.

Fuel Implications ...................................................................... CHECKED


If necessary, fuel quantities should be equalized to prevent problems that
might be caused by an aft CG location at the end of the flight. After
shutdown of the No. 2 engine, and regardless of the flight conditions, fuel in
the center group of tanks must not be kept at a higher level than in side tanks.

4.

Landing and Climb Requirements............................................ CHECKED


The landing distance and landing field length requirements, as amended
for hydraulic implications, must be calculated for the landing. In the event
of a go-around, the maximum gross weight limit, to meet the 2.4% gross
climb gradient requirement, must be checked.

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5.

EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE Switch .......................................................... ON


The GPWS FLAPS ORIDE switch prevents the TOO LOW FLAPS audio
warning from sounding when a less than 40 flap landing is made.

6.

Crew Briefing ......................................................................... COMPLETE


The crew should be fully briefed on all plans and contingencies for the
approach and landing to be flown. Special consideration must be given to
the special requirements dictated by the emergency or abnormal situation
that caused the engine to be shut down. The crew has to decide the
approach configuration. The approach speed and the LD have to be
adjusted accordingly. With 20 flaps + slats, increase the LD by 200 ft and
VREF + 5 knots. When 7 flaps + slats, increase the LD by 600 ft and VREF
+ 15 knots.

7.

Approach Checklist............................................................ ACCOMPLISH


a.

Passenger Door Curtain........................................................ OPEN

Open the passenger door curtain to permit use of the passenger door as
an emergency exit if necessary, and also ensure that the passengers
have attached their seat belts correctly and that the passenger seats are
in the required position for landing.
b.

No Smoking Sign...................................................................... ON

c.

Altimeters

............................................................................ SET

Set QNH or QFE as instructed by local air traffic control. QFE can
only be selected if the pressure altitude of the destination airfield is
inside the altimeter setting limits.
d.

Radio Altimeter DH

............................................................ SET

Set the decision height according to the local regulations (approach


map, crew qualifications, etc.).
e.

XBP (All 3)

............................................................... CLOSED

The fuel crossfeed valves must be closed for landing.


f.

AP-10

Landing Lights

...................................................................... ON

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If the landing lights incorporate a pulse mode, ensure that the ON


position is selected.
g.

Approach with 20 flaps + slats:


Flap/Slat Handle..................................... 20 FLAPS + SLATS
At the usual point on approach, as would be done on a normal
approach flown with three engines, set the flap/slat handle to 20
flaps + slats incrementally.
Landing Gear Control

............................................... DOWN

At the usual point on approach, as would be done on a normal


approach flown with three engines, place the landing gear down.
Airspeed

.................................................... VREF + 5 KNOTS

Fly the final approach at the normal 40 flaps + slats VREF speed
plus 5 knots. Increase the landing distance by 200 feet. The
standard correction for wind must be applied.
OR
g.

Approach with 7 flaps + slats:


Flap/Slat Handle

................................... 7 FLAPS + SLATS

At the usual point on approach, as would be done on a normal


approach flown with three engines, set the flap/slat handle to 7
flaps + slats.
Landing Gear Control

............................................... DOWN

At the usual point on approach, as would be done on a normal


approach flown with three engines, place the landing gear down.
Airspeed ....................................... VREF + 15 KNOTS
Fly the final approach at the normal 40 flaps + slats VREF speed
plus 15 knots. Increase the landing distance by 600 feet. The
standard correction for wind must be applied.
8.

Landing Checklist .............................................................. ACCOMPLISH


a.

Landing Gear

.............................................. DOWN/CHECKED

Check for proper indication of landing gear extension and door


sequencing.
b.

Hydraulic Pressure

................................................... CHECKED

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Check for normal operating pressure of approximately 3,000 psi. If the


No. 2 engine is inoperative, required hydraulic pressure for the No. 2
hydraulic system operating components can be supplied from the
standby hydraulic pump (1,500 to 2,150 psi).
c.

Anti-Skid

.................................................................. CHECKED

Ensure that the braking selector switch is selected to the #1/ASKID


ON position. Depress the brake pedals and check that the L and R
NORM brake lights remain out. Depress the test pushbutton and check
that the L and R NORM brake lights come on after one second, then go
out one second later and remain out after releasing the brake pedals.
d.

Airbrake Handle

..................................................................... IN

NOTE
Airbrakes may be used during landing approach provided airspeed is at least VREF + 10 knots. Increase
landing distance by 15%.
e.

Start Selector Switches (If Necessary) .................... AIRSTART

Check for appropriate IGN lights on.


f.

CAT 2 Mode Armed

......................................... AS REQUIRED

Depress the CAT 2 pushbutton on the AP control unit and check that
the CAT 2 message appears on the ID 802.
g.

FLAP + SLAT HANDLE

.................................... 40 FLAPS +
SLATS AS REQUIRED

NOTE
If landing with the No. 2 engine inoperative, operation time for flap extension from 7 to 40 degrees
(standby pump in use) will be doubled.
h.

AUTOPILOT

..................................................... DISENGAGED

i.

INDICATED AIRSPEED

................................................... VREF

ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVEGO-AROUND


1.

Engine Thrust (Full Power) .................................................................. SET


Upon the decision to go around, immediately advance the two operating
engine power levers to the computed takeoff N1.

2.

AP-12

Pitch Attitude........................................................................................ SET

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It is imperative that the landing climb attitude be attained to ensure that the
descent is stopped and the climbout is begun. This action is simultaneous
with the advancement of the power levers to takeoff N1.
3.

Airbrake Handle ................................................................................ ZERO


If the airbrakes were extended for some reason during the approach, they
must be retracted as power is applied and the aircraft is rotated to the
landing climb attitude.

After completing the above checklist items, follow Procedure A or B below,


depending on the flap configuration flown on the approach:

Procedure AIf the Approach


was Flown with 20 Flaps + Slats
1.

Flap/Slat Handle ....................................................... 20 FLAPS + SLATS


Ensure that the FLAPSSLATS handle is set to 20 flaps + slats during the
go-around.

2.

Landing Gear Control............................................................................. UP


As soon as a climb is indicated on both the altimeter and the rate-of-climb
indicator, raise the landing gear.

3.

Airspeed to 400 Feet AGL .............................................. VREF + 5 KNOTS


The best climb speed to maintain to a minimum altitude of 400 feet above
ground level is VREF + 5 knots. If a higher speed is achieved during the
rotation, maintain that speed to 400 feet AGL. Do not overrotate the aircraft.

Procedure BIf the Approach


was Flown with 7 Flaps + Slats
1.

Flap/Slat Handle ......................................................... 7 FLAPS + SLATS


Ensure that the FLAPSSLATS handle is set to 7 flaps + slats during the
go-around.

When a positive rate of climb is established:


2.

Landing Gear Control............................................................................. UP


As soon as a climb is indicated on both the altimeter and the rate-of-climb
indicator, raise the landing gear.

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3.

Airspeed to 400 Feet AGL ............................................ VREF + 15 KNOTS


The best climb speed to maintain to a minimum altitude of 400 feet above
ground level is VREF + 15 knots. If a higher speed is achieved during the
rotation, maintain that speed to 400 feet AGL. Do not overrotate the aircraft.

For all go-around configurations, when reaching 400 feet AGL and above safety
altitude:
4.

Level Flight Acceleration ........................................................... INITIATE


At an altitude no lower than 400 feet above ground level, maintain level
flight while accelerating to the slats-flaps retract speed.

5.

At V2 + 25 KnotsFLAPSSLATS .............................................. CLEAN


This is the normal retraction speed for the FLAPSSLATS. You can use
VREF as the base speed, which is a conservative speed. For a given gross
weight of the aircraft, VREF speed is 7 knots higher than the V2 speed for a
20 flaps + slats takeoff. Moreover, for a given gross weight, the VREF speed
is equal to the V2 speed for a 7 flaps + slats takeoff. Remember, there is
only one VREF for the aircraft at a given gross weight. VREF is 1.3 VS in the
normal landing configuration, which is 40 flaps + slats, gear down.

6.

Enroute Climb Speed..................................................................... ATTAIN


Once the slats-flaps are retracted, accelerate to the enroute climb speed of
1.43 VS. Reduce engine thrust to the maximum continuous power setting.
Table AP-1. LANDING DATA
LANDING DATA 40 FLAPS + SLATS
STANDARD TEMPERATURE UNCORRECTED

G. W.
X VREF
1,000

LANDING DISTANCE/LANDING FIELD LENGTH


G. W.
VREF X
SEA
2,000'
4,000'
6,000'
8,000'
10,000'
1,000
LEVEL

24

100

2,150/3,500 2,250/3,750 2,350/3,900 2,450/4,050 2,550/4,250 2,650/4,400

172

24

26

104

2,250/3,750 2,350/3,900 2,450/4,050 2,550/4,250 2,700/4,500 2,800/4,700

179

26

28

108

2,350/3,900 2,450/4,050 2,600/4,300 2,700/4,500 2,850/4,750 2,950/4,900

187

28

30

112

2,500/4,100 2,600/4,300 2,700/4,500 2,850/4,750 2,950/4,900 3,100/5,200

193

30

32

115

2,600/4,300 2,750/4,600 2,850/4,750 3,000/5,000 3,150/5,250 3,300/5,500

201

32

34

119

2,800/4,700 2,900/4,800 3,050/5,100 3,150/5,250 3,300/5,500 3,500/5,850

207

34

36

122

2,950/4,900 3,100/5,200 3,200/5,350 3,350/5,600 3,550/5,950 3,700/6,200

212

36

38

126

3,150/5,250 3,300/5,500 3,400/5,700 3,600/6,000 3,750/6,250 3,950/6,600

219

38

40

129

3,350/5,600 3,500/5,850 3,650/6,100 3,850/6,450 4,000/6,700 5,200/7,000

223

40

42

132

3,550/5,950 3,700/6,200 3,850/6,450 4,000/6,700 4,200/7,000 4,400/7,400

228

42

AP-14

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AIRSTART
General
WARNING
Do not attempt to relight an engine after an engine
fire if the engine integrity is questionable, or if N 1
rotation is not observed (Figure AP-1).

CAUTION
Wait ten seconds between two consecutive airstart attempts. Do not make more than three successive
airstart attempts.

ALTITUDE (X 1,000 FT)


30
M

=0

.80

20
MAXIMUM AIRSTART ALTITUDE IN MANUAL MODE
VMO

10
VMO

0
100

150

200

250

300

350

400

INDICATED AIRSPEED (KT)

Figure AP-1. Inflight Relight Envelope

Engines Flameout and High Speed Airstart


N 2 rpm must be 15% or higher.

NOTE
This immediate airstart procedure may be attempted
at high altitude, even at altitudes above the maximum
start envelope.

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The best technique is to apply this procedure in a


timely fashion, as soon as it has been ascertained that
the engine malfunction that caused the flameout will
not present a danger if an airstart attempt is made. The
power lever must be immediately set to idle and the
airstart ignition selected in order to take advantage of
the high rotational speed of the compressors.
If the relight attempt is unsuccessful, it is necessary
to descend to an altitude which is within the normal
airstart envelope.
1.

Power Lever ..................................................... IMMEDIATELY TO IDLE


The power lever must be immediately retarded to idle to minimize the
input of fuel for an immediate relight, which might result in a hot start.

2.

Start Selector Switch ............................................................... AIR START


As soon as the power lever is retarded to idle, place the start selector
switch to AIR START. The above two actions must be accomplished
before the N2 rpm decays to 15% or less to increase the probability for a
successful start. This provides ignition for engine starting. Check IGN
light on.

3.

ITT Rise within 10 Seconds ..................................................... CHECKED


This is the indication of a successful relight of the engine. Ensure the ITT
rises normally, being careful the temperatures stay within the limitations
envelope. All other engine instruments must be checked as well for their
proper indications.

4.

Power Lever .............................................................................. ADVANCE


If all engine instruments indicate that the engine is operating normally, the
power lever may be advanced, as required, for normal flight.

After a successful relight:


5.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


Place the start selector switch from AIR START to GRD START to shut
off the ignition circuit and check that the IGN light is out.

6.

Engine Instruments ................................................................... CHECKED


Continually monitor the engine instruments for normal operations. Engine
warning lights must be out.

AP-16

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If an airstart is unsuccessful, complete the ENGINE SHUTDOWN


procedure in this manual.

Abnormal Airstart
Abort an airstart whenever any one of the following conditions occurs:
The ITT does not rise within 10 seconds after moving the power levers
to idle.
The oil pressure does not rise within 10 seconds after light-off.
The ITT rises rapidly and approaches the 952C (TFE-731-5AR) or
978C (TFE-731-5BR) limit.
An N 1 remains close to zero when N 2 speed reaches 20%.
N 2 speed is not rising rapidly and smoothly after light-off.
If, during an airstart with the computer in manual mode, the N 1 exceeds 80% with the power lever at idle.
If any of the above are observed during the airstart, shut down the engine as
follows:
1.

Power Lever.................................................................................. CUTOFF


This is done to shut off the fuel at the engine fuel control and stop the start.

2.

Start Selector Switch ............................................ MOTORSTART STOP


This action disengages the starter if it was used to assist in the airstart
attempt.

3.

Complete the Engine Shutdown checklist.

AirstartComputer in Normal (AUTO) Mode


Preparation Phase
1.

Airstart Envelope .............................................................. ESTABLISHED


If an immediate relight was not possible, establish the aircraft within the
airstart envelope as prescribed in Figure AP-1.

2.

Power Lever.................................................................................. CUTOFF


The power lever must be placed in cutoff to prepare the engine for the
airstart. Fuel is shut off at the fuel control.

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3.

Fuel Shutoff Switch.................................................................. GUARDED


If the fuel shutoff switch was placed off at some point during engine
shutdown, place the switch, located on the fire panel, on. This will restore
the fuel supply from the fuel tanks to the engine.

4.

GEN Switch ........................................................................................... ON


Place the generator switch on, to provide a start interlock, if needed for an
assisted airstart. This will also configure the generator to provide
immediate electrical power to the buses when the engine comes on speed.

5.

Engine Computer Switch.................................................................. AUTO


The engine computer switch, unless the computer is inoperative or was the
cause of the engine shutdown in the first place, should be placed in AUTO.
Check for CMPTR light out. If the computer is inoperative, apply the
AirstartAbnormalComputer Off checklist, which follows this
procedure.

6.

Booster Switch....................................................................................... ON
Place the booster pump switch on, checking that the fuel pressure light
goes out, to supply fuel under pressure from the tank to the engine.

7.

Engine and Wing Anti-ice Switches .................................................... OFF


Place the anti-ice switches off to prevent any unwanted tap-off of bleed
air from the engine being started. The unwanted tap-off of bleed air
might impede the start and/or cause an overtemperature on the engine
being started.

8.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


The DC electrical buses must be tied together, especially if a starterassisted airstart is necessary. This, along with other switch requirements,
provides the proper start interlock in case the starter is needed. Confirm
illumination of bus-tied light.

AP-18

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Select either procedure A or B below, based on N 2 rpm speed and N 1 other


than zero.
Abort airstart when anyone of the abnormal conditions occur (see Abnormal
Airstart, this chapter).

Procedure AWindmilling Airstart


(N2 more than 15% and Indication of N1 Rotation)
NOTE
If N 2 speed is greater than 15%, a starter assist may
not be required.
1.

Start Selector Switch ............................................................... AIR START


The start selector switch will provide ignition for relight when placed to
AIR START in flight. Check IGNITION light on.

2.

Power Lever........................................................................................ IDLE


Move the power lever from cutoff to idle. This action allows fuel to be
supplied through the engine fuel control to the injectors of the affected
engine.

3.

ITT Rise within 10 Seconds ..................................................... CHECKED


This is the indication of a successful relight of the engine. Ensure that the
ITT rises normally, being careful the temperature stays within limits. All
other engine instruments must be checked as well for their proper
indications.

4.

Engine Acceleration to Idle........................................................ NORMAL


Monitor all engine instruments as the engine accelerates to idle. Ensure
that all start limitations are observed as in a normal ground start.

Windmilling airstart when N 2 is above 50%:


5.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


Place the START SELECTOR SWITCH from AIR START to GRD
START to shut off the ignition circuit.

6.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


Place the bus-tied switch to FLIGHT NORM to restore the electrical buses
to an isolated operation, the normal in-flight configuration. The BUS
TIED light should go out.

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If the ignition light remains on after the engine is on speed:


7.

Start Selector Switch ............................................ MOTORSTART STOP


This action disengages the starter if it was used to assist in the airstart
attempt. Check that the ignition light on the overhead engine start panel
is out.

8.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


After the airstart attempt has been aborted, move the start selector switch
back to its normal position of GRD START.
OR

If the BUS TIED light stays on after the bus-tied switch is moved to
FLIGHT NORM:
This means the buses are still tied together. Attempt moving the rotary bustied switch in the opposite direction. If the BUS TIED light is still on:
7.

Generators Volts and Amps ...................................................... MONITOR


Closely monitor the buses for proper power supply and loading. The
buses are no longer isolated in case of generator, battery, bus or
component malfunctions.

Procedure BStarter-Assisted AirstartN2 less than 15%


1.

Start Selector Switch ............................................................... AIR START


The start selector switch will provide ignition for relight when placed to
AIR START in flight.

2.

Start Switch.................................. PUSH (TWO SECONDS MAXIMUM)


Push the start button switch for a maximum of two seconds. This engages
the starter to rotate the engine to the normal rpm for starting, as is done in
ground starting of the engine.

At 10% N 2 and indication of N 1 rotation:


3.

Power Lever........................................................................................ IDLE


Move the power lever from cutoff to idle. This action allows fuel to be
supplied through the engine fuel control to the injectors of the affected
engine.

AP-20

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4.

ITT Rise within 10 Seconds ..................................................... CHECKED


This is the indication of a successful relight of the engine. Ensure that the
ITT rises normally, being careful that the temperature stays within limits.

5.

N1, Fuel Flow, and Oil Pressure..................................................... RISING


All other engine instruments must be checked as well for their proper
indications.

When N 2 is above 50%:


6.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


Place the start selector switch from AIRSTART to GRD START to shut off
the ignition circuit.
IGNGENOILPUMP Lights........................................................... OUT
These lights go out when the normal starting sequence is complete.

7.

Engine Instruments ................................................................... CHECKED


Continually monitor the engine instruments for normal operations.

8.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


Place the bus-tied switch to FLIGHT NORMAL to restore the electrical
buses to an isolated operation, the normal inflight configuration. The BUS
TIED light should go out.

If the ignition light remains on after the engine is on speed:


9.

Start Selector Switch ............................................ MOTORSTART STOP


This action disengages the starter if it was used to assist in the airstart
attempt.
Ignition Light....................................................................................... OUT
Check that the ignition light on the overhead engine start panel is out.

10.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


After the airstart attempt has been aborted, move the start selector switch
back to its normal position of GRD START.

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OR
If the BUS TIED light stays on after the bus-tied switch is moved to
FLIGHT NORM:
This means the buses are still tied together. Attempt moving the rotary
bus-tied switch in the opposite direction.
If the BUS TIED light is still on:
9.

Generators Volts and Amps ...................................................... MONITOR


Closely monitor the buses for proper power supply and loading. The buses
are no longer isolated in case of generator, battery, bus or component
malfunctions.

AirstartComputer in MANUAL Mode


Preparation Phase
1.

Airstart Envelope .............................................................. ESTABLISHED


If an immediate relight was not possible, establish the aircraft within the
airstart envelope as prescribed in the chart (see Figure AP-1).

2.

Power Lever.................................................................................. CUTOFF


The throttle must be placed in cutoff to prepare the engine for the airstart.

3.

Fuel Shutoff Switch.................................................................. GUARDED


If the fuel shutoff switch was placed off at some point during engine
shutdown, place the switch, located on the fire panel, on. This will restore
the fuel supply from the fuel tanks to the engine.

4.

Generator Switch ................................................................................... ON


Place the generator switch on, to provide a start interlock, if needed for an
assisted airstart. This will also configure the generator to provide
immediate electrical power to the buses when the engine comes on speed.

5.

Engine Computer Switch ........................................................... MANUAL


The engine computer switch should be placed in MAN for this start
attempt. It is assumed the computer is not operating, thus necessitating the
use of this procedure. Engine instruments must be more closely monitored
than before, as computer control of fuel input and protection of
temperature is lost. Check CMPTR light on.

AP-22

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6.

Booster Switch....................................................................................... ON
Place the booster pump switch on, checking that the fuel pressure light
goes out, to supply fuel under pressure from the tank to the engine.

7.

Engine and Wing Anti-ice Switches .................................................... OFF


Place the anti-ice switches off to prevent any unwanted tap-off of bleed air
from the engine being started. The unwanted tap-off of bleed air might
impede the start and/or cause an overtemperature on the engine being
started.

8.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


The DC electrical buses must be tied together, especially if a starterassisted airstart is necessary. This, along with other switch requirements,
provides the proper start interlock in case the start is needed. Confirm
illumination of bus-tied light.

Abort airstart when any one of the abnormal conditions occur (see Abnormal
Airstart, this chapter).

Windmilling
After preparing the engine for the computer in manual mode, use the windmilling airstart procedure as used for the computer normal mode procedure.
However, the N 2 speed must be greater than 15%, and the N 1 speed must be
greater than 10%.

Start-Assisted AirstartN2 less than 15%


1.

Start Selector Switch ............................................................... AIR START


Move the start selector switch to AIR START to provide engine starting
circuitry. Confirm IGN light is on.

2.

Start Switch.................................. PUSH (TWO SECONDS MAXIMUM)


Push in on the start button switch for a maximum of two seconds. This
engages the starter to rotate the engine to the rpm necessary for starting
with the computer off.

When N 2 speed is 15% and N 1 rotation is observed:


3.

Power Lever........................................................................................ IDLE

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Move the power lever from cutoff to idle. This action allows fuel to be
supplied through the engine fuel control to the injectors of the affected
engine.
4.

ITT Rise within 10 Seconds........................................................... CHECK


This is the indication of a successful relight of the engine. Ensure that the
ITT rises normally, being especially careful the temperature stays within
limits since the computer is in manual mode.

NOTE
If any abnormal situations occur as described in the
beginning of the airstart checklist, or if the N1 exceeds
80% with the power lever at idle, abort the start.
When N 2 is above 50%:
5.

Start Selector Switch (As Required)..................... MOTORSTART STOP


Move the start selector switch to MOTORSTART STOP to disengage the
starter function of the starter-generator, which causes the generator to
come online to power its bus and stops the ignition to the engine.
IGNGENOILPUMP Lights........................................................... OUT
These lights go out when the starting sequence is completed.

6.

Engine Instruments ................................................................... CHECKED


Continually monitor the engine instruments for normal operations and
ensure that the CMPTR light remains on.

7.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


Move the start selector switch to GRD START, the normal inflight
position of the switch.

8.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


Place the bus-tied switch to FLIGHT NORM to restore the electrical buses
to an isolated operation, the normal inflight configuration. The BUS TIED
light should be out.

If the ignition light remains on after the engine is on speed:


9.

AP-24

Start Selector Switch ............................................ MOTORSTART STOP

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This action disengages the starter if it was used to assist in the airstart
attempt.
Ignition Light....................................................................................... OUT
Check that the ignition light on the overhead engine start panel is out.
10.

Start Selector Switch ..................................................... GROUND START


After the airstart attempt has been aborted, move the start selector switch
back to its normal position of GRD START.
OR

If the BUS TIED light stays on after the bus-tied switch is moved to
FLIGHT NORM:
This means the buses are still tied together. Attempt moving the rotary
bus-tied switch in the opposite direction.
If the BUS TIED light is still on:
9.

Generators Volts and Amps ...................................................... MONITOR


Closely monitor the buses for proper power supply and loading. The buses
are no longer isolated in case of generator, battery, bus or component
malfunctions.

FUEL CONTROL COMPUTER INOPERATIVE


CMPTR

NOTE
If the fuel control computer fails, check that the engine is operating within established limits. The computer no longer monitors the operating limits of the
engine; therefore, the crew must closely monitor all
engine instruments and warning lights to ensure
operating limitations are not exceeded.
1.

Power Lever of the Affected Engine .................................................. IDLE


Retarding the power lever will assist in maintaining the engine within
operational limits when attempting to reset the engine computer.

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2.

Engine Computer Switch ......................................................... OFF/AUTO


Cycle the computer switch to MAN, to OFF, and back to AUTO to see if
normal circuitry can be restored. Monitor the engine instruments and
guard the power lever while cycling the computer switch.

If the CMPTR light stays on:


3.

Engine Computer Switch ................................................................... MAN


If the attempt to reset the computer fails, set the computer switch to MAN,
and operate in that position for the remainder of the flight. Computer
control circuits will be lost, except for N1 and N2 overspeed protection,
necessitating close scrutiny of engine instruments and lights.

NOTE
Do not let the ITT indications of the affected engine
exceed the operating ITT of the other engines.
Avoid rapid displacements of the power lever. The
surge bleed valve cannot open completely, and compressor stalls might result.

CAUTION
Maximum thrust may not be attainable.
Idle thrust may be higher than normal. This should
be taken into consideration, when landing, due to
the increase in residual power of the engine.
The fuel flow on the affected engine may be approximately 5% higher when its N 1 speed is matched
to the N 1 speeds of the other engines.
Acceleration time is longer in manual mode.

ENGINE OIL
OIL

NOTE
The OIL light illuminates at 25 psi if there is a loss
of oil pressure. It will also illuminate if metal chips
are detected in the oil system.
1.

AP-26

Oil Pressure Gage .................................................................... CHECKED

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If the indicated oil pressure is greater than 25 psi:


Illumination of the OIL light is caused by the metal chip detector.The
detection of a chip in the oil may indicate engine internal problems. In this
case it would be prudent to reduce thrust on the engine to minimize the
potential of further damage at high operation speeds and temperatures.
Continue to monitor the oil pressure and temperature gages throughout the
flight if the engine is kept running.
2.

Engine Thrust (If Possible)....................................................... REDUCED

If the indicated oil pressure is less than 25 psi


3.

Retard the power lever and shut down the affected engine as soon as
possible.

4.

Complete engine shutdown by check list .


Engine lubrication is no longer available and extensive engine damage
may result.

CAUTION
In icing conditions, operate the No. 2 engine anti-ice
even with the No. 2 engine shut down. The isolation
valve must be open.
If the engine 2 is shut down, the bus B remains supplied by the BAT 2 during
a limited period. The buses A and B have to be tied and the bus tied light checked
illuminated.

NO. 2 ENGINE INLET DOOR OPEN


ENG 2 FAIL

If the ENG 2 FAIL light comes on in flight, it indicates that the inlet, or
S-duct, door in the aft compartment is not properly fastened. Much damage
can be done to the engine if the inlet door should unlock and open. The inlet
door itself, or any loose equipment present in the aft compartment, might be
ingested into the No. 2 engine.
1.

Power Lever........................................................................................ IDLE


Immediately retard the No. 2 engine power lever to idle to minimize
damage to the engine if the door should actually be open.

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If the engine surges or if any abnormal engine instruments indications are


observed:
2.

Complete the engine shutdown by checklist in the Engine Failure In


Flight section in this chapter.

TAKEOFF CONFIGURATION
T/O
CONFIG

+ AURAL WARNING NO TAKEOFF

This is a ground warning and is activated when at least one of the power levers
is advanced above a position of 82 to 84 or greater and one or more of the
following conditions have not been met:
1.

Airbrakes .............................................................................. RETRACTED


The airbrakes must be fully retracted and the airbrake handle must be in
the zero position.

2.

Slats ........................................................................................ EXTENDED


The flap/slat handle must be placed to the desired configuration for takeoff,
and both inboard slats are not deployed to the fully extended position.

3.

Flaps ...................................................................................... 22 OR LESS


The trailing-edge flaps must not be extended beyond 22.

4.

Stabilizer Trim................................................................. GREEN RANGE


The horizontal stabilizer trim must be in the green range or positioned between 4.5 and 7.5 on the trim indicator.

5.

Flap + Slats Handle......................................................... OUT OF CLEAN


The flap/slat handle must be placed in the desired takeoff position. The
aircraft is not certified for a no flap/slat takeoff.

6.

PARK BRAKE Handle ........................................................... RELEASED


On aircraft employing MOD 880, the PARK BRAKE handle must be fully
retracted and the dual braking system must be deactivated.

AP-28

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HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS
LOSS OF NO. 1 SYSTEM
PUMP 1
AND POSSIBLY

PUMP 3

1.

PITCH
FEEL

Hydraulic Pressure and Quantity.............................................. CHECKED


A loss of the No. 1 system may also be indicated by a drop in pressure on
the hydraulic pressure gage. The hydraulic fluid quantity may also read
zero.

2.

Airspeed ..................................................... 260 KNOTS/.76 MACH MAX


This is the maximum speed for flight in the eventuality that all hydraulic
pressure is lost to the flight controls.

3.

New Bug Speed .................................................................................... SET


Set the appropriate bugs to VREF plus additive, flap retracting speed, and
1.43, respectfully.

4.

Flaps + Slats Handle (On Approach).......................... 7 FLAPS + SLATS


Ensure that the flaps + slats handle is selected to 7 flaps + slats on
approach. This action will provide electrical circuit protection, which will
prevent any flap operation until the outboard slats are fully extended, as a
function of the emergency slat switch. Check for illumination of the red
slat light.

5.

Emergency Slats Switch ........................................................................ ON


This selection will provide for outboard slat extension from the No. 2
hydraulic system. Check for extinguishing of the red slat transit light and
illumination of a green flashing slat light. Land with flaps extended to 40
and VREF + 5 knots.

6.

Brake Selector Switch...................................................... #2 A/SKIDOFF


Set the three-position selector switch to #2 A/SKIDOFF to achieve
braking using the brake pedals supplied through the No. 2 hydraulic
system; the anti-skid system is inoperative. Test system operation by
pressing the left and right brake pedals in turn, and check that the #2 P. BK
light comes on. Brake operating efficiency can be visually checked by

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monitoring the deceleration rate on the EADI, optimum deceleration on a


dry runway being between 0.25 g and 0.30 g, increasing with weight.
7.

Landing Gear (At Appropriate Time) ...................................... FREEFALL


Complete the Landing GearEmergency Extension procedure,
following the Airbrakes Do Not Extend In Flight procedure outlined
later in this chapter.

System Status
Operative Systems
Servoactuators barrel 2
Flaps
Airbrakes
Emergency slats (add 5 knots to VREF )
Aileron Arthur Q
No. 2 brakes
Nosewheel steering
Parking brake
Thrust reverser

Inoperative Systems
Servoactuators barrel 1
Pitch Arthur unit
Normal slats (use EMERG SLATS control switch, land with outboard
slats, flaps 40 and V REF + 5 knots)
No. 1 Braking system with antiskid (select No. 2 system)
Landing gearnormal and emergency lowering (use free fall procedure)

NOTE
Increase the landing distance computations by 60%.

AP-30

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FAILURE OF A NO. 1 SYSTEM PUMP


PUMP 1
PUMP 3

This indicates failure of only one of the No. 1 hydraulic system pumps.
1.

Hydraulic Pressure and Quantity ................................................... CHECK


Check both hydraulic system gages to ensure proper quantity and pressure.
The other engine-driven hydraulic pump light should be out, with normal
pressure and quantity indicated.

If the pressure and quantity are normal, expect longer operating times for No.
1 system components.

LOSS OF NO. 2 SYSTEM


PUMP 2

AND POSSIBLY

AIL
FEEL

A loss of the No. 2 system may also be indicated by a drop in pressure on the
hydraulic pressure gage. The hydraulic fluid quantity may also read zero. This
procedure differs from the No. 1 hydraulic system loss in that only one pump
drives the No. 2 system. Illumination of the PUMP 2 light may simply mean
the loss of the No. 2 engine-driven pump. The standby hydraulic pump is available if it was the engine pump that failed, provided hydraulic quantity is normal.
Depending on airspeed, the AIL FEEL light may illuminate.
1.

No. 2 Hydraulic Pressure and Quantity .................................... CHECKED

If the hydraulic quantity is normal and if the standby pump is to be used:


2.

STBY Hydraulic Pump Switch............................................................ ON


The No. 2 hydraulic system pressure gage should cycle between 1,500 and
2,150 psi, indicating that the standby pump is operating. The No. 2
hydraulic system is usable but with an increase in the operating times of
the components.
OR

If the quantity is low or if the standby pump is not used:


2.

Airspeed ..................................................... 260 KNOTS/.76 MACH MAX


This is the maximum speed for flight in the eventuality that all hydraulic
pressure is lost to the flight controls.

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3.

STBY Hydraulic Pump Switch .......................................................... OFF


If the hydraulic quantity is zero, turn off the pump to prevent overheating
and possible damage. If the quantity is normal, use the pump sparingly or
only for those key phases of flight.

4.

New Bug Speed .................................................................................... SET


Set the airspeed bug to reflect the approach being flown without the
benefit of flaps.

5.

EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE Switch .......................................................... ON


This switch prevents the TOO LOW FLAPS audio warning from sounding
if a less than 40 flap landing is made.

System Status
Operative Systems
Servoactuators barrel 1
Normal slats
No. 1 brakes (antiskid)
Landing Gear (normal and emergency control system)
Pitch Arthur unit
Thrust reverser (available if accumulator is charged)
Parking brake (available if accumulator is charged)

Inoperative Systems
Servoactuators barrel 2
Emergency slats (use normal slats control)
No. 2 braking
Aileron Arthur Q (aircraft SN below 165)
Nosewheel steering
Airbrakes (see following note)
Flaps (see following note)

AP-32

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NOTE
If the No. 2 hydraulic system is lost for landing, the
following additives must be made to the landing distance and landing field length computations.

0 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 20 knots; add 800 feet


to LD and 1,335 feet to LFL.

7 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 15 knots; add 600 feet


to LD and 1,000 feet to LFL.

20 flaps + slats, fly VREF + 5 knots; add 200 feet


to LD and 335 feet to LFL.

40 flaps + slats, land at VREF

After making the additive for flaps + slats, add


10% to both the LD and LFL for no airbrakes.

UNWANTED OPERATION OF STANDBY PUMP


ST BY
PUMP

On the ground, the ST BY PUMP light may indicate that the hydraulic selector
in the rear compartment is out of the IN-FLT detent.

CAUTION
Before correcting the situation by moving the handle to the IN-FLT position (No. 2 hydraulic system),
ensure that all hydraulic pressure is removed from
both the No. 1 and No. 2 hydraulic systems. Do not
restore hydraulic pressure to either system until after
the handle has been fully displaced from one position to the other. The handle must be safety-wired to
the IN-FLT position for flight.
On the ground or in flight, illumination of the light may indicate that the standby
hydraulic pump has been running in excess of one minute. In this case:
1.

Standby Hydraulic Pump Switch ......................................................... OFF


Turn off the pump to prevent overheating and possible damage.

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FLIGHT CONTROLS
LANDING WITH INOPERATIVE STABILIZER
This condition is indicated by the inability to trim the horizontal stabilizer
by either the normal or emergency trim system. The horizontal stabilizer will
remain in the last position selected prior to the trim failure. Hold the control
column and then perform the following procedures:
1.

Autopilot ............................................................................ DISENGAGED


If the autopilot is engaged, and if it hasnt already been disconnected due
to the loss of normal trim capability, disengage it from the aircraft controls
by depressing the yaw damper pushbutton on the center pedestal. This
action will disengage the autopilot and yaw damper and cause the AP light
to come on and show a disengagement message on the ID 802.

NOTE
The failure of the horizontal stabilizer causes the elevator Arthur unit to lock in the position it is in at the
time of failure. When the flaps and slats are extended,
the Arthur unit returns to the low-speed position,
which results in a significant, but very gradual, decrease of elevator feel force.
If the stabilizer is jammed in the +2 to 4 range:
2.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 20 FLAPS + SLATS


This is the recommended final flap setting for approach and landing. This
is a normal trim setting for a 20 flaps + slats landing, which provides
sufficient elevator control for the pilot.

3.

Airspeed ........................................................................ VREF + 20 KNOTS


A final approach speed of VREF + 20 knots will ensure sufficient elevator
control.

4.

GPWS FLAPS ORIDE Switch............................................................. ON


The GPWS FLAPS ORIDE switch cancels the TOO LOW FLAPS
audible warning when landing with flaps less than 40.
Increase the landing distance by 800 feet.

CAUTION
Since the flaps will not be extended to 40 for approach
and landing, ensure that all three landing gears are
visually checked to be down and indicating properly
AP-34

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by both pilots before landing. The landing gear warning horn, normally activated by the 40 flap position
circuitry, will not sound if one or more of the landing gears are not fully extended and locked down.
If the stabilizer is jammed in the 4 to 10 range:
5.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


This is the normal range for the elevator trim when making a slats 40 flap
landing. Make a normal approach.

6.

Airspeed .............................................................................................. VREF

LANDING WITH INOPERATIVE ELEVATOR


The elevator portion of the control column will be frozen in position. The pilot
will be unable to control movement about the pitch axis, except by use of the
horizontal stabilizer trim. Fly the approach and landing using the following
procedures:
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


It is recommended that the normal 40 flap configuration be used for
approach and landing. Check proper positioning on the configuration panel.

2.

Airspeed ........................................................................ VREF + 10 KNOTS


The extra speed will improve controllability of the aircraft with a jammed
elevator.

3.

Increase the landing distance by 1,800 feet.

4.

Use very short pitch trim inputs to set the stabilizer trim.
This method of trimming the aircraft is recommended over the use of long
bursts of trim, which may cause the loss of aircraft control. Use several
short bursts of trim to control pitch, making the pitch trim clacker sound
much like several short bursts of a Gatling gun.

5.

Make a shallow final approach.


Make as shallow an approach as possible to minimize trim changes and
landing flare actions during this phase of flight. If possible, hold the
landing flare on final approach, using power and trim and keeping the
airspeed additive and power on until touchdown.

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ARTHUR UNIT INOPERATIVE


AIL
FEEL

OR

PITCH
FEEL

These lights illuminate when either of the Arthur unit monitoring systems detects a failure. Normally, the autopilot can still be used. If the PITCH FEEL
light is on, reduce airspeed down to 260 KIAS or MI 0.76 maximum.
1.

FASTEN BELTS Light Pushbutton ....................................................... ON

CAUTION
The pitch and/or roll control forces may be higher or
lower than normal, depending on whether the Arthur
unit has failed in the high- or low-speed position.
Follow either procedure below, depending on the
control forces experienced.
Light forcesAvoid large displacements and rapid movement of the flight
controls.
High forcesUse normal or emergency trim systems. If the AIL FEEL light
is on, execute an approach at VREF . If the PITCH FEEL light is on, execute
an approach at VREF + 10 knots, and increase the landing distance by 800 feet.

FLAP ASYMMETRY OR JAMMED FLAPS


FLAP
ASYM

This light illuminates when a flap asymmetry is detected by comparison of


the relative position of the outboard portion of the left and right flaps. The
outboard section of the left and right flaps contain potentiometer transmitters that provide flap asymmetry indications. Flap position indication is provided by only the left outboard flap transmitter. The flaps will stop movement
immediately upon detection of an asymmetry, and the flap control circuit
breaker will open.
With flaps extended up to 7:
1.

Approach Speed ............................................................ VREF + 20 KNOTS


This higher approach speed is flown to allow more controllability of the
aircraft with any degree of asymmetry in this range of flaps. Trim the
aircraft as well as possible under the circumstances.

AP-36

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2.

EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE Switch .......................................................... ON


The EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE switch cancels the TOO LOW FLAPS
audible warning when landing with flaps less than 40.
Increase the landing distance by 800 feet.

With the flaps extended between 7 and 20:


1.

Approach Speed ............................................................ VREF + 15 KNOTS


This higher approach speed is flown to allow more controllability of the
aircraft with any degree of asymmetry in this range of flaps. Trim the
aircraft as well as possible under the circumstances.

2.

EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE Switch .......................................................... ON


The EGPWS FLAPS ORIDE switch cancels the TOO LOW FLAPS
audible warning when landing with flaps less than 40.
Increase the landing distance by 600 feet.

With the flaps extended between 20 and 40:


1.

Approach Speed .............................................................. VREF + 5 KNOTS


This higher approach speed is flown to allow more controllability of the
aircraft with any degree of asymmetry in this range of flaps. Trim the
aircraft as well as possible under the circumstances.

2.

Increase the landing distance by 200 feet.

CAUTION
Since the flaps may not be extended to 40 for approach and landing, ensure that three landing gears
are checked to be down and indicating properly by
both pilots before landing. The landing gear warning horn, normally activated by the 40 flap position
circuitry, will not sound if one or more of the landing gears are not fully extended and locked down.

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SLAT MONITORING SYSTEM


AUTO
SLATS

Illumination of this light indicates that information from the slat monitoring
circuits (ground/flight proximity switches, angle of attack, airspeed) are in
disparity.
If the light comes on after takeoff or at a speed lower than 280 knots:
1.

Airspeed Envelope............................. BETWEEN 1.3 VS TO 270 KNOTS


Do not allow the airspeed to go outside of these limits. Avoid stall
situations, as the stall warning system may not operate properly for
indication of a stall and automatic deployment of the slats. Do not
deliberately perform stall tests.

If the light comes on when at an airspeed of 280 knots or greater:


2.

Reduce Airspeed ........................................................ 270 KIAS OR LESS


The airspeed must be limited to less than 270 knots. When flying above
270 knots, the safety systems that lock out the automatic deployment of
the slats are not operational, and unwanted and untimely extension of the
outboard slats could occur, causing damage to the slats and/or adverse
aircraft control.

SLAT SYSTEM ABNORMAL OPERATION


If using the flaps + slats handle on the center pedestal, continuous illumination of the red arrow light on the gear/ flaps + slats indicator panel indicates
that at least one of the four slats is being maneuvered, neither fully extended
nor fully retracted. If using the emergency control or automatic operation, at
least one of the two outboard slats is being maneuvered, neither fully extended
nor fully retracted. The red light will also be illuminated.
Some normal slat system indications to consider:
The green light is on steady when all four slats are extended.
The green light usually flashes when only the outboard slats are
extended and in conformity with the command.
The red light remains illuminated during slat displacement.
During slat extension by normal control, the red light comes on when
the control handle is set to the 7 flaps + slats position. The red light
goes out when all slats are extended, at which time the green light comes
on steady.

AP-38

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During slat retraction, when the FLAPSSLATS handle is set to


CLEAN, the green light flashes during retraction of the inboard slats
and flaps. As soon as the inboard slats and flaps are retracted, the
outboard slats retract, at which time the green flashing light goes out
and the red light comes on. The red light goes out when the slats are
fully retracted.
During automatic or emergency extension of the slats, the red light
comes on until the outboard slats are fully extended, at which time
the red light goes out and the green light flashes. When the slats begin
retracting after auto deployment, the green flashing light goes out, and
the red light comes on until the slats are fully retracted.
During automatic retraction of the inboard slats, when all slats are
deployed and an AOA stall angle of 23 is detected, the green light
goes from a steady state to a flashing state immediately upon receipt
of the retraction signal. This really means that only the outboard slats
are fully extended. When a stall angle below 16.5 is detected, the green
flashing light goes out, and the red light comes on during extension
of the inboard slats. When the inboard slats are fully extended, the red
light goes out, and the green light comes on steadily, indicating that
all four slats are fully extended.
If the Bus A1 failure occurs in the cockpit, the outboard slats can be
extended through the normal slats control handle (via the battery
bus). In this case the green light flashes.
Green and red light can never illuminate simultaneously except during test on the indication panel.

In Cruise
Normally, in the cruise regime of flight, the flaps + slats handle is kept in the
CLEAN position. There should be no movement of the slats or flaps unless
caused by selection of the handle or activation of the automatic stall system.
If one or more of the slats fail to retract after the handle is placed to the CLEAN
position, the red slat transit light will remain on. There may also be a tendency
for the aircraft to roll. If either of these conditions is noted, the following
procedures should be performed:
1.

Airspeed ..................................................................... 200 KIAS OR LESS


It is imperative that this maximum operational speed, with the slats
extended, not be exceeded.

2.

Autopilot ............................................................................ DISENGAGED


Firmly hold the control wheel during disengagement of the autopilot.
Disengage the autopilot by depressing the autopilot disconnect switch on
the aft bottom portion of either control wheel. The AP light will illuminate
and a disengagement message will be presented on the ID-802. These
indications can be cleared by depressing the disconnect button once again.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-39

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

During Approach
Depending on indications, follow the instructions for either case 1 or case 2 below.

Case 1
A flashing green slat light with the red light off indicates that only the
outboard slats are extended. This is the indication that only the outboard slats
are extended. At this time the power used to supply the outboard slats extension
solenoid is from the battery bus.
Proceed as follows:
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


The flaps may be extended to 40 as long as the outboard slats are
extended.

2.

Approach Speed .............................................................. VREF + 5 KNOTS


Due to the loss of the lift normally provided by the inboard slats, 5 knots
must be added to the VREF speed to provide the proper margin from the
stall speed.

3.

Increase the landing distance by 200 feet.

Case 2
Assume that the flaps + slats handle has been placed in the 7 FLAPS +
SLATS position. The green slat light off, the red slat light on, and a possible
tendency for the aircraft to roll due to asymmetry indicate that one or more
of the slats are not fully extended.

CAUTION
Emergency slat actuation is only authorized when a
failure is experienced.
Proceed as follows:
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................ LEAVE IN 7 FLAPS + SLATS


This selected position will provide electrical circuit protection which will
prevent any inboard slats or trailing-edge flap extension until outboard slat
extension is first satisfied.
If outboard slats are visually extended and flaps 7, go directly to section
titled Procedure B.

AP-40

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If outboard slats are visually not extended and flaps not at 7, continue
with the following item 2.
2.

Emergency Slats Switch ........................................................................ ON


The use of this switch will provide outboard slat extension provided from
the No. 2 hydraulic system.

Note the slats indications after placing the switch on, and follow procedure
A, B or C below, depending on the indications you observe.

Procedure A
If the green light comes on steadily, all slats extended.
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle............................................... 40 FLAPS + SLATS


A normal full 40 flap approach and landing may be made without
additive or penalty.

2.

Approach Speed .................................................................................. VREF

Procedure B
If the red light stays on and only the outboard slats are visually checked
extended, it can be assumed safe to use other flap configurations for approach
and landing.
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


The flaps may be extended to 40 as long as the outboard slats are
extended.

2.

Approach Speed .............................................................. VREF + 5 KNOTS


Due to the loss of the lift normally provided by the inboard slats, 5 knots
must be added to the VREF speed to provide the proper margin from the
stall speed.

3.

Increase the landing distance by 200 feet.

Procedure C
If the red light stays on and neither inboard or outboard slats are extended:
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ...................................................................... CLEAN

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If the slats cannot be extended by any or all means, the wing must be clean
of flaps for approach and landing.
2.

EGPWS Flaps O'Ride Switch................................................................ ON

3.

Approach Speed ............................................................ VREF + 30 KNOTS


To compensate for the loss of lift normally provided by the slats and flaps,
the VREF must be increased by 30 knots to ensure a proper margin from
stall during final approach and landing.

4.

Increase the landing distance and the landing field length by 50%.
The increased speed to be maintained on final approach necessitates an
increase in runway requirements to allow for a longer stopping distance.

CAUTION
Do not change the emergency slats switch position.
The landing-gear-not-extended aural warning, normally activated by the 40 flap warning circuitry,
may not sound if the gear is not fully down and the
flaps are not selected to 40.

UNWANTED OUTBOARD SLAT EXTENSION


AUTO
SLATS

AND

IGN

The red slats transit light comes on and then goes out, indicating that the slats
are in transit. The green slat light then comes on flashing, indicating outboard
slats extension. The audio warning for stall warning sounds.
This warning may occur while in cruise at high altitude and while cruising at
normal cruise speed/Mach number. It is usually due to an erroneous sensing
by either the left or right stall warning vane.
1.

RH AUTO SLAT Circuit Breaker (B1 Bus)................................. PULLED


On primary bus B1, pull the RH AUTO SLAT circuit breaker to deactivate
the right-side stall warning system. This should cause the slats to retract,
and all warnings should cease.

AP-42

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If the slats do not retract:


2.

LH AUTO SLAT Circuit Breaker (A1 Bus)................................. PULLED


On primary bus A1, pull the LH AUTO SLAT circuit breaker to deactivate
the left-side stall warning system. This should cause the slats to retract,
and all warnings should cease.

3.

RH AUTO SLAT Circuit Breaker ................................................... RESET


If the warnings were stopped by pulling the left circuit breaker, then restore
the right-side stall warning system to provide proper warning of stall.
Continue the flight at an indicated airspeed of less than 270 knots, with the
circuit breaker of the defective system pulled.

Depending on the final position of the circuit breakers, if the RH AUTO


SLAT circuit breaker remains pulled:
Manual action of the flap/slat handle remains operative
Emergency slats switch is inoperative
If the LH AUTO SLAT circuit breaker remains pulled manual action of the
flap/slat handle:
Causes only extension of outboard slats. Inboard slats remain in
retracted position and the slat green light is flashing.
Has no action on flaps when flap/slat handle is selected to 7 position,
but will operate flaps when selected to 20 and 40 positions. Add 5
knots to VREF and increase landing distance by 200 feet and landing
field length by 333 feet.

AIRBRAKE(S) DO NOT RETRACT


AIR
BRAKE

Illumination of this light means that at least one airbrake panel has not
retracted. If in doubt about the actual position of the airbrakes, consider them
to be extended to position 2.
For approach and landing:
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-43

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NOTE
Keep the flap/slat handle in this position for landing in order to preclude the possibility of airbrake
asymmetry that can be particularly bothersome on
final approach.
With the airbrakes extended to position 1:
2.

Airspeed ........................................................................ VREF + 10 KNOTS


To compensate for the loss in lift due to the airbrake being extended to
position 1, add 10 knots to the normal VREF to maintain the proper margin
from stall.

3.

Increase the landing distance by 600 feet.

With the airbrakes extended to position 2:


4.

Airspeed ........................................................................ VREF + 15 KNOTS


To compensate for the loss in lift due to the airbrake being extended to
position 2, add 15 knots to the normal VREF to maintain the proper margin
from stall.

5.

Increase the landing distance by 600 feet.

NOTE
Airbrakes may be used during landing approach, provided airspeed is at least VREF + 10 knots. Increase
landing distance by 10%.

AIRBRAKES DO NOT EXTEND IN FLIGHT


Airbrakes, as well as antiskid brakes, are considerations in the performance
charts for computing landing distance and landing field length. Since the
airbrakes cannot be extended, a penalty must be applied to these landing
factors. Make the following additives:
Increase the landing distance by 10%.
The normal procedure provides for airbrake extension to position 2 immediately after touchdown.

AP-44

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

LANDING GEAR
ABNORMAL LANDING GEAR EXTENSION
If, after the LANDING GEAR handle has been placed to the DOWN position,
and one or more of the following indications occur, perform an EMERGENCY
LANDING GEAR EXTENSION.
One or more green gear down light is out
The landing gear handle light is flashing
Landing gear not extended GEAR voice warning may sound

NOTE
The Landing Gear Abnormal Extension procedure is
to be applied as soon as one green light is missing.
It gives no alleviation to any red indicator light/green
gear symbol combination as long as one green gear
symbol is off.

CAUTION
The landing gear handle must be maintained down.

Emergency Landing Gear Extension


1.

EMERGENCY GEAR PULL Handle ......................................... PULLED


Unlatch and pull this T-handle, which is located next to the normal gear
handle. Pulling this handle shuts off the electrical sequencing circuit,
exposes the retraction side of the gear and door actuators to return, and
allows No. 1 system hydraulic pressure to be ported directly to the extend
side of the main doors and all three landing gear actuators.
If all three green gear down lights illuminate and the landing gear handle
light (red) is not illuminated, the landing gear is down and locked. Do not
actuate any landing gear controls.
If at least one green gear down light does not illuminate and the landing
gear handle light is flashing, apply the FREE FALL EXTENSION
procedure.

Free Fall Extension


1.

Airspeed ...................................................................... Not Less than KIAS


Before actuating the main gear red unlocking handles, ensure that the
normal gear handle is down and that the emergency hydraulic gear control
handle is pulled. The main gear unlocking handles are located on the floor
on either side of the center pedestal. A pull of about six inches should be
sufficient. The speed shall be maintained between 160 KIAS and VLO.
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CAUTION
Rapidly alternating large rudder applications in combination with large side-slip angles may result in
structural failure at any speed.
2.

LH MAIN MANUAL GEAR RELEASE Handle............................. PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the left while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the left green gear down light is illuminated.
Maintain wing level with appropriate aileron input .

NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down light may take
more than 30 secs with full rudder deflection.
Gently come back to neutral rudder.
3.

RH MAIN MANUAL GEAR RELEASE Handle ............................ PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the right while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the right green gear down light is illuminated .
Maintain wings level with appropriate aileron input.

NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down light may take
more than 30 secs with full rudder deflection.
Gently come back to neutral rudder.
4.

NOSE GEAR MANUAL RELEASE Handle ................................... PULL


The nose gear manual release handle is located on the left aft side of the
center pedestal. Pull the handle upward to unlock the nose gear. A pull of
about 1 to 2 inches should be sufficient.
Accelerate until illumination of the nose green gear down light is achieved
(190 KIAS).

CAUTION
Do not actuate any landing gear control once the
three landing gears are locked down . The landing gear
must be maintained down.

AP-46

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If, after applying all the methods possible to try to extend the landing gear, a
problem with one or more landing gears still exists, plan on landing with the
assumption that at least one landing gear is locked in the up position. Declare
an emergency, and make a shallow approach and as soft a landing as possible.
If the nose gear is the one gear whose extension is in doubt, touch down on
the main wheels as for a normal landing. Hold the nose off the ground for as
long as possible and then bring it gently into contact with the runway while
the elevators remain effective. Do not use the brakes, unless a greater
emergency exists, until after the nose touches the ground. As soon as the nose
touches the ground, begin normal, or differential, braking as necessary to
maintain directional control. Use No. 1 brakes, No. 2 brakes or the parking
brake handle, depending on the availability of hydraulic and/or braking
systems.
If extension of either of the main landing gears is in doubt, touch down on
the side of the runway corresponding to the extended gear. Hold the wings
level for as long as possible. Control direction with the rudder pedals and
nosewheel steering. When the wing touches the ground, brake with the brake
pedals and counteract veering.

CONTROL HANDLE JAMMED IN DOWN POSITION


It is impossible to retract the landing gear.
1.

Airspeed ...................................................... 245 KIAS MAXIMUM (VLE)


Jamming of the landing gear control handle in the down position may be
caused by misalignment of the nosewheels; consequently, do not attempt
to free the control handle by pressing the red ground safety override
pushbutton located above the control handle (or by pulling the control
handle if the modification M1688 is installed). Damage could be incurred
if the gear is retracted in this configuration.
Keep the landing gear extended to the landing.

ABNORMAL RETRACTION
WARNING
At least one red light remains on.
Gear handle light blinking.
1.

Airspeed ................................................ AT OR BELOW 190 KIAS (VLO)


In icing conditions or if takeoff was made through snow or slush on the
runway:

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-47

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

a. If the red landing gear lights fail to go out upon retraction of the
landing gear, ice may be preventing the main landing gear from locking
in the UP position.
2.

Cycle the gear down and up to get rid of the ice.


In nonicing conditions or if takeoff was made without snow or slush on
the runway:
a. Extend and keep the landing gear down.

EMERGENCY RETRACTION ON GROUND


Emergency retraction of the landing gear on the ground must only be considered if it is imperative to stop the aircraft immediately (risk of collision with
another aircraft or a large obstacle) and conventional means are not adequate.
Ground retraction of the landing gear is achieved using the following procedure, with the first two operations being performed simultaneously:
1.

Ground Safety Override


Pushbutton (If Installed) ....................................... PRESS IN AND HOLD
This is a red pushbutton located above the normal landing gear control
handle. On aircraft with modification M1688, this pushbutton is no more
installed. Unlocking of the gear control handle is performed by pulling it.

2.

Landing Gear Control Handle............................................. UP POSITION

3.

Power Levers ................................................................................ CUTOFF


Normal shutdown of engines.

4.

FUEL SHUT OFF switches (all three) ................................... ACTUATED


This closes the three shutoff valves and cuts off the fuel supply.

NO. 1 BRAKE SYSTEM OR ANTISKID INOPERATIVE


WARNING
Results of abnormal anti-skid test before landing.
The following brake system information is provided as a review:
The L and R brake lights illuminate at 232 psi.

AP-48

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

The #2 P BK light illuminates at 232 psi.


Brake pressure for the No. 1 brake system is:
1,595 psi for SNs 1, 75, and subsequent, and those incorporating
Service Bulletin F900-42
2,175 psi for SNs 2 to 74, except for those with Service Bulletin
F900-42

NOTE
Service Bulletin 42 provides a double-braking system, that assures a better brake-holding capability during pretakeoff, full-engine-power runups.
Brake pressure for the No. 2 brake system is 1,080 psi.
The first detent of the parking brake handle provides 800 psi of No.
2 hydraulic system pressure. This detent stops the aircraft gradually
without locking the brakes.
The second detent of the parking brake provides 2,175 psi of No. 2
hydraulic system pressure. This detent will lock the brakes.
This malfunction is indicated by an abnormal antiskid brake test. The
green No. 1 system L and R brake lights do not illuminate when the
brakes are tested in either the #1/ASKID ON or #1/ASKID OFF
positions of the brake selector switch.
1.

Brake Selector Switch....................................................... #2/ASKIDOFF


Set the three-position selector switch to #2/ASKID OFF. Braking is
achieved using the pedals that are supplied through No. 2 hydraulic
system; the antiskid system is inoperative. Test No. 2 hydraulic system
braking by pressing the LH and RH brake pedals in turn, and check that
the #2 P BK light comes on.

2.

Brake progressively.
Braking efficiency can be visually checked by monitoring the deceleration
rate on the EADI optimum deceleration on a dry runway is between 0.25 g
and 0.30 g, increasing with weight.

3.

Increase the landing distance by 50%.

NOTE
For takeoff, operation of the aircraft on an exceptional
basis with antiskid inoperative is described in annex
5 of the Airplane Flight Manual. Operation on this
basis is subject to prior authorization defined in a
Minimum Equipment List (MEL).
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-49

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NO. 1 AND NO. 2 BRAKE SYSTEMS INOPERATIVE


Land on the centerline of the runway, and maintain directional control down
the centerline by use of the rudders.
1.

Runway Requirements ................................................................... CHECK


Carefully calculate the normal runway landing requirements using the
Airplane Flight Manual. Charted stopping performance is based on
antiskid brakes and airbrakes.

2.

Thrust Reverser.......................................................... APPLY MAXIMUM


Use the thrust reverser to its maximum throughout the landing roll. The
thrust reverser is most effective at the first portion of the landing roll, but
should be used all the way to the stop in conjunction with the use of the
parking brake in the intermediate detent.

3.

Parking Brake ................................................ INTERMEDIATE DETENT


Pull the parking brake handle to the first or intermediate detent. Do not
cycle the handle in and out of this detent. Select the first detent, and leave
the handle there. Avoid pulling the handle to the second detent unless a
greater emergency exists and it becomes necessary to lock the wheels. The
parking brake accumulator can allow up to five applications of the parking
brake using the second detent, if necessary.

NOTE
If the #2 P BK light is flashing, indicating a pressure
of 1,200 psi or less in the parking brake accumulator, residual pressure remaining allows for only one
brake application.
4.

Increase the landing distance by 50%.

NOSEWHEEL STEERING INOPERATIVE


If a malfunction occurs with the nosewheel steering system:
1.

Release the steering control wheel to neutral.


If steering the aircraft with the control wheel, release it to remove
electric control and hydraulic actuation of the nosewheel steering
system. The nosewheel is now free to caster in either direction by use of
differential braking.

2.

AP-50

Use differential braking to steer the aircraft.

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NOSEWHEEL SHIMMY
Hold the nosewheel steering control depressed.
This applies hydraulic pressure to the nosewheel steering system to provide
some shimmy dampening.

FUEL SYSTEM
LOW BOOST PUMP PRESSURE
Case 1
FUEL 2

(4.64 psi)
1.

No. 2 Booster Switch ...................................................................... STBY


If the No. 2 booster switch was in the NORM position, move it to the
STBY position to turn on the other boost pump in the group 2 tanks.
Check the FUEL 2 light. If it goes out, continue the flight with use of the
standby boost pump.

If the FUEL 2 light stays on:


2.

Associated Fuel Quantity.......................................................... MONITOR


Carefully observe the No. 2 fuel quantity. Check that the fuel quantity
is dropping normally through normal engine consumption. Follow
either procedure A or B below, depending on whether a fuel leak is or is
not evident.

Procedure A
If a significant fuel loss is evident:
3.

No. 2 Engine Power Lever ........................................................... CUTOFF


Since the area of the fuel leak is unknown, an isolation process is begun by
shutting down the engine. This action shuts off fuel to the engine at the
fuel control.

4.

No. 2 Engine Fuel Shutoff Switch............................................. ACTUATE


Further isolation of the engine and fuel system is accomplished by this
action. Check for illumination and then extinguishing of TRANS light.
Continue to monitor the fuel quantity to see if the leak stops or continues.
In any situation involving a fuel leak, a precautionary landing might be
appropriate.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

5.

GEN Switch ......................................................................................... OFF


The generator for the shutdown engine is no longer useful and should be
turned OFF to preclude electrical anomalies associated with the
electrical system.

6.

Engine Anti-ice Switch ........................................................................ OFF


This closes the anti-icing valves (air intake and ENG 2 S-duct).

CAUTION
In icing conditions, operate the No. 2 engine anti-icing
even with the No. 2 engine shutdown. The isolation
valve must be open to allow air bleed from the bleedair manifold to anti-ice the S-duct.
If the No. 2 engine is shut down:
7.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Since the No. 2 generator is no longer supplying electrical power to the
right DC electrical buses, tie the buses to save the No. 2 battery from
depletion. Check the volts and amps on the two operating generators and
illumination of the bus-tied light.

8.

STBY Hydraulic Pump Switch.................................... ON (As Required)


If needed to supply hydraulic power to the No. 2 hydraulic system, turn on
the standby hydraulic pump switch. A windmilling engine, dependent
upon its rpm, may not be able to supply enough hydraulic power to
operate No. 2 system components.

9.

No. 2 Fuel Tank Fuel................................................................ USE FIRST


Because the group 2 tank fuel is located mainly in the fuselage, it is desirable
to use up the fuel in group 2 tanks first to preclude any center-of-gravity
problems. To use group 2 fuel, follow the next steps to crossfeed the fuel to
all engines.

10.

No. 2 Booster Switch....................................................................... NORM


This turns on the normal pump in the group 2 tanks and arms the standby
pump for operation when one of the X-BP 1-2 or 3-2 valves is open.

11.

X-BP 1-2 and X-BP 3-2 .................................................................... OPEN


Open these two valves, which turns on the standby boost pump and allows
feeding of fuel to all three engines, thereby using the fuel from the group 2
tanks first. Check for illumination of X-BP 1-2 and 2-3 lights.

AP-52

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

To prevent an engine flameout, carefully monitor the fuel quantity gages


during this operation. The goal is not to run out of fuel in the group 2 tanks
before returning the fuel panel to a configuration, whereby all three engines
can be kept running from the fuel supplied by group 1 and 3 tanks. See One
Engine Inoperative Approach and Landing Procedure, this chapter.

Procedure B
If no fuel leak is evident:
The flight may be continued, as required, by feeding fuel to the No. 2 engine,
by gravity, from the group 2 fuel tank only, except for the descent phase
above 31,000 feet that must be performed with X-BP 1-2 and 3-2 open. Check
that X-BP 1-2 and 3-2 lights are illuminated.

Case 2
FUEL 1

1.

OR

FUEL 3

(4.64 PSI)

X-BP 13........................................................................................... OPEN


Rotate the X-BP 1-3 switch to connect group 1 and group 3 tanks-to-supply
both lateral engines. The corresponding X-BP light should illuminate.

2.

Associated Booster Switch................................................................... OFF


Turn off the boost pump switch that corresponds to the illuminated fuel
pressure warning light.

If the fuel pressure light stays on after opening the X-BP valve:
3.

X-BP 13 ..................................................................................... CLOSED


Close the X-BP valve previously opened. The corresponding X-BP light
should go out. There is no crossfeed between engines 1 and 3 fuel feed
system. This may indicate that a fuel leak is present in the respective fuel
feed system.

4.

Associated Fuel Quantity .................................................... MONITORED


Carefully observe the fuel quantity in the fuel tank associated with the
illuminated fuel pressure light. Check that the fuel quantity is dropping
normally through normal engine consumption.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-53

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If a fuel loss is evident:


5.

Associate Engine Power Lever..................................................... CUTOFF


Since the area of the fuel leak is unknown, an isolation process is begun by
shutting down the associated engine. This action shuts off fuel to the
engine at the fuel control.

6.

Associated Fuel Shutoff Switch.............................................. ACTUATED


Further isolation of the engine and fuel system is accomplished by this
action. Continue to monitor the fuel quantity to see if the leak stops or
continues. In any situation involving a fuel leak, a precautionary landing
might be appropriate. Check for TRANS light on, then off indication.

7.

GEN Switch ......................................................................................... OFF


The generator for secured engine is no longer useful and should be turned
off to preclude electrical anomalies associated with the electrical system.

8.

Engine Anti-ice Switch ........................................................................ OFF


This closes the nacelle anti-icing valve.
OR

If the fuel pressure warning light goes out:


The flight may be continued using fuel management procedures commensurate with flight requirements.
3.

XTK Switch Set to Low Level Side .................................. AS REQUIRED


This selection will allow a transfer of fuel from the high-level wing tank to
the low-level tank, as long as one of the later tanks booster pump is
operational. Check illumination of the XTK light.

Case 3Side Engines are Supplied with X-BP 1-3 Open


FUEL 1

1.

AND

FUEL 3

X-BP 1-3 ...................................................................................... CLOSED


Close the X-BP 1-3 valve on the upper portion of the fuel panel to prepare
for the crossfeed of fuel using different fuel plumbing.

AP-54

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

2.

X-BP 1-2 and X-BP 3-2 .................................................................... OPEN


Crossfeed the lateral engines using the two X-BP switches located on the
lower portion of the fuel panel. Check that the FUEL 1 and FUEL 2
lights go out.

If the FUEL 1 and FUEL 3 lights are out:


3.

No. 1 and No. 3 Booster Switches ....................................................... OFF

4.

Fuel Quantity Indicators ...................................................... MONITORED


To consume fuel in side tanks when no leak is suspected:

5.

Flight Altitude .................................................. 31,000 FEET MAXIMUM


Since gravity flow of fuel, assisted by air pressure, is now the only way
fuel can be transferred from the tank groups to the engines, limit the
altitude of the aircraft.

6.

X-BP 13, X-BP 12, and X-BP 32 .......................................... CLOSED


FUEL 1 and FUEL 3 Lights .................................................................. ON

7.

Fuel Quantity Indicators ........................................................... MONITOR


The range of aircraft may be severely affected by flying at the lower
altitude. Continually monitor the fuel gages for determination of range
capability and for any abnormal consumption of fuel.

If the FUEL 1 or FUEL 3 light remains on (and FUEL 2 light may possibly come on):
3.

X-BP 1-2 and X-BP 3-2.................................... CLOSE SUCCESSIVELY

According to result obtained:


4.

X-BP 1-2 or X-BP 3-2 ................................................................. CLOSED

If a significant fuel loss is evident:


5.

Associated Engine Power Lever................................................... CUTOFF

6.

Associated Fuel Shutoff Switch ................................................ ACTUATE


Check TRANS light on, then off.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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7.

GEN Switch ......................................................................................... OFF


The generator for the secured engine is no longer useful and should be
turned off.

8.

Engine Anti-ice Switch ........................................................................ OFF

FUEL TRANSFER SYSTEM MALFUNCTION ON


AIRCRAFT EQUIPPED WITH XTK 2 SYSTEM
Case 1
XTK 2
OPEN

This light indicates that the XTK 2 valve is open when it should be closed.
At times, this situation can be corrected by merely moving the XTK 2 switch
through each of its respective positions, then back to AUTO. If this does not
correct the indication, follow either procedure A or B below:

Procedure A
If group 2 fuel total quantity indicates approximately 4,400 pounds
green range):
1.

No. 2 Rear Tank Quantity......................................................... CHECKED


Depress the button next to the group 2 tank fuel gage and check the fuel
quantity in the rear tank.

If the group 2 rear tank level is 3,300 pounds and steady, indicating that the
rear tank is full:
2.

XTK 2 Switch .............................................................................. CLOSED


By closing the XTK 2 valve, the fuel flow from the front to the rear tank is
stopped.
XTK 2 OPEN Light......................................................... CHECKED/OUT
Normally, the XTK 2 OPEN light should go out after the XTK 2 switch is
moved to the close position. If the XTK 2 OPEN light does not go out and
there is a possibility of reaching the rear CG limit:

AP-56

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3.

Manual XTK Valve ............................................ CLOSED, THEN NORM


This manually positioned valve is located in the rear cabin area of the
aircraft, in the floor on the left aisle, in line with No. 11 and No. 12 cabin
windows. Lift the carpet cutout to gain access to the handle. Raise the flap
of the valve and rotate it to the closed position. After turning the handle,
return the flap to the stowed position. Now check the master failure
warning panel.
XTK 2 OPEN Light......................................................... CHECKED/OUT
The XTK 2 OPEN light should go out after the manually controlled XTK
2 valve has been closed. Fuel management of the fuel from the front to the
rear tank must be carefully followed. It may become necessary to open the
valve once the rear tank level has burned down to a reasonable level.
OR

Procedure B
If group 2 fuel quantity indicates approximately 2,200 pounds
(amber range):
1.

No. 2 Rear Tank Quantity......................................................... CHECKED

If No. 2 rear tank level is above 1,400 pounds:


2.

XTK 2 Switch .............................................................................. CLOSED


This is done to shut off the fuel transfer from the front to the rear tank.
XTK 2 OPEN Light............................................................................. OUT

NOTE
If the XTK 2 OPEN light does not go out and boost
pump 1 or 3 has failed, or if side tank interconnection has been used, the attitude shall be limited to 10
pitch up as long as the light remains illuminated.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Case 2
XTK 2
CLOSED

This light indicates that the XTK 2 valve is closed when it should be open.
At times, this situation can be corrected by merely moving the XTK 2 switch
through each of its respective positions and then back to AUTO. If this does
not correct the indication, proceed as follows:
1.

No. 2 Rear Tank Quantity......................................................... CHECKED


If the rear tank quantity is lower than 1,100 pounds:

2.

XTK 2 Switch ................................................................................... OPEN


Move the XTK 2 switch to the open position to allow a transfer of fuel
from the front fuselage tank to the rear fuselage tank.
XTK 2 CLOSED Light ................................................... CHECKED/OUT
Check to see that the light goes out when the XTK 2 switch is moved to
the open position.

If the XTK 2 CLOSED light remains on:


3.

Manual XTK 2 Valve .............................................. OPEN, THEN NORM


This manually positioned valve is located in the rear cabin area of the
aircraft, in the floor on the left aisle, in line with No. 11 and No. 12 cabin
windows. Lift the carpet cutout to gain access to the handle. Raise the flap
of the valve, and rotate it to the open position. After turning the handle,
return the flap to the stowed position. Now check the master failure
warning panel.
XTK 2 CLOSED Light ................................................... CHECKED/OUT
The XTK 2 CLOSED light should go out after the manual control XTK 2
valve has been opened. Fuel management of the fuel from the front to the
rear tank must be carefully followed.

NOTE
The manually controlled opening of the XTK 2 valve
will cause the XTK 2 OPEN light to come on later
on in the flight. The attitude shall be limited to 10
pitch-up as long as the light remains on.

AP-58

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TANK LEVEL ABNORMALLY LOW


ON A/C WITHOUT XTK 2 SYSTEM
LO
FUEL 1

OR

LO
FUEL 2

OR

LO
FUEL 3

This light indicates that a fuel level below 200 pounds is detected. Equivalent
to a cruise flight time of 15 minutes at an altitude of 2,500 feet.
1.

Associated Fuel Quantity Gage ................................................ CHECKED


Verify the indication given by the warning light by checking the respective
fuel quantity gage. However, the warning light indication may be more
accurate of the actual fuel quantity in the fuel tank.

2.

Associated X-BP ............................................................................... OPEN


In order to supply fuel to the low-side engine, the crossfeed of fuel can be
gained from a fuel tank containing more quantity. The X-BP light for the
respective valve opened should come on.

3.

Booster of Affected Tank ..................................................................... OFF


Turn off the low-side boost pump until it becomes absolutely necessary to
use the fuel from that low tank.

TANK LEVEL ABNORMALLY LOW


ON A/C WITH XTK 2 SYSTEM
LO
FUEL 1

OR

LO
FUEL 2

OR

LO
FUEL 3

This light indicates that a fuel level below 200 pounds is detected. Equivalent
to a cruise flight time of 15 minutes at an altitude of 2,500 feet.
1.

Associated Fuel Quantity Gage ................................................ CHECKED


Verify the indication given by the warning light by checking the respective
fuel quantity gage. However, the warning light indication may be more
accurate of the actual fuel quantity in the fuel tank.

2.

Associated X-BP ............................................................................... OPEN


In order to supply fuel to the low-side engine, the crossfeed of fuel can be
gained from a fuel tank containing more quantity. The X-BP light for the
respective valve opened should come on.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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3.

Booster of Affected Tank ..................................................................... OFF


Turn off the low-side boost pump until it becomes absolutely necessary to
use the fuel from that low tank.

LO
FUEL 2

4.

If the LO FUEL 2 light and the No. 2 total quantity indicator


is higher than the No. 2 rear tank quantity indication, this
indicates a malfunction of front-to-rear tank transfer.

XTK 2 Switch ................................................................................... OPEN


If the rear tank quantity is still decreasing:

5.

If necessary, MANUAL XTK 2 Valve .................... OPEN, THEN NORM


Disregard illumination of the XTK 2 open light.

When the rear tank quantity has increased:


6.

No. 2 Booster Switch....................................................................... NORM

7.

X-BP............................................................................................. CLOSED
Check that the X-BP light is out.

FUEL ASYMMETRY
This condition is indicated by asymmetric fuel indications and/or by an abnormal application of aileron trim to one wing versus the other. Ensure that
the asymmetry is not caused by a fuel leak. Follow either Case 1 or Case 2
below, depending on the type of asymmetry:

Case 1Side Tank Asymmetry


1.

X-BP 1-3............................................................................................. OPEN


Open the crossfeed line between the No. 1 and No. 3 fuel tanks.
X-BP Light......................................................................... CHECKED/ON
This light verifies that the X-BP 1-3 opened.

2.

XTK Switch Set to Low Side............................................ AS REQUIRED


Move the XTK switch from the center position to the low-side tank. This
action, by opening the valve between the wing fuel tanks, will further
assist in the balancing of fuel. The high-side boost pump will move fuel
from the high-side tank to the low-side tank through jet pump action.

AP-60

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XTK Light ......................................................................... CHECKED/ON


If the XTK valve opened, the XTK light should illuminate.
If booster 1 and 3 switches are on:
3.

Booster Switch on Low-Level Side...................................................... OFF

Case 2Tank 2 to Side Tank Asymmetry


1.

X-BP 1-2 or 3-2................................................................................. OPEN


Move either rotary switch to the open position to allow a crossfeed from
the high tank.
X-BP Light......................................................................... CHECKED/ON
When either rotary switch is moved to the open position, the
corresponding light should illuminate.

If group 2 tank fuel level is higher:


2.

Booster No. 1 or No. 3 Switch.................................. AS REQUIRED/OFF


Turn off either or both of these boost pumps to allow the group 2 tank fuel
to be crossfed to the other engine(s). This will help achieve a balance in
the fuel tanks.

If group 2 tank fuel level is lower:


3.

Booster 2 Switch .................................................................................. OFF


This allows the center engine to be fed from either the No. 1 or No. 2 fuel
tank groups, whichever is higher in quantity.

FUELING LIGHT ON IN FLIGHT


FUELING

1.

Airspeed (If Possible) .................................................................. REDUCE


Reduce the speed of the aircraft to preclude structural damage to the
aircraft should one of the fuel doors come open.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Avoid the following:


High noseup or nosedown pitch attitudes
Rapid changes in pitch or roll
2.

Fuel Quantities .......................................................................... MONITOR


Monitor fuel quantity indicators to detect any fuel loss. Consider landing
the aircraft as soon as possible in the event a fuel leakage occurs through
the fuel tank vent system or if structural damage is suspect.

The FUELING light comes on if the following occurs:


One of the two fuel tank vent valves is not closed.
The defueling/refueling valve is not closed.
The refueling connector door is not closed.
The refueling control panel door is not closed.
The gravity-fueling switch is on.
The defueling switch is on.
The vent valve lever is not stowed.
The B2 bus is not powered.
PRESSURE FUELING circuit breaker

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
ONE GENERATOR INOPERATIVE
Illumination of a generator light indicates that the corresponding generator
is disconnected from its main DC bus system. When a generator malfunctions,
the generator switch may or may not trip off. Determine the position of the
generator switch for the inoperative generator, and then proceed following
Case 1, Case 2 or Case 3 below, depending on the position of the respective
generator switch.

AP-62

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Case 1Any Generator Switch is Tripped


SWITCH OFF

1.

GEN 1

OR

GEN 2

OR

GEN 3

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generators Load ................................................. CHECKED


Check the ammeter readings for each battery and generator to ensure bus
and generator loading is within limits. Each operator should keep a
running record of normal bus loading and have a knowledge of the normal
power demands on the electrical system.

3.

Shed the load, as necessary, to limit the load on the respective battery or
operating generator.

CAUTION
Do not attempt to reset a tripped generator switch.
Since the generator switch has tripped, an overvoltage condition will exist if a reset attempt is made.
If the No. 2 generator is inoperative and BATT 2 load is normal:
4.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


This will allow a sharing of the load between the operating generators and
will preclude abnormal demands on the No. 2 battery, as necessary. Check
bus-tied light illumination and normal bus load and voltage.

5.

Bus Load and Voltages ............................................................. CHECKED

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Case 2GEN 1 Switch is Not Tripped


GEN 1

1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generators Load ................................................. CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the generator still connected to the bus. Shed the load, if
necessary, to keep the load on each remaining generator within limits on
the aircraft without the auto-load feature.

If the left main bus voltage is normal:


The absence of an overvoltage condition for bus A is an indication that the
online generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN light.
3.

GEN 1 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


4.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


OR

If the left main bus voltage is above the green range:


The existence of an overvoltage condition not high enough to cause the GEN
switch to trip may prevent the associated generator from coming on line. In
this case, the faulty generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN
light. Switching this generator off should cause the other generator to come
back on line.
3.

GEN 3 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


a. GEN 3 Light ..................................................................................... ON
b. GEN 1 Light................................................................................... OUT

4.

Left Main Bus Voltage within the Green Range....................... CHECKED

5.

Bus Load................................................................................... CHECKED

AP-64

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If voltage and amperage indications are normal, retain this configuration:


OR
If the GEN 1 and GEN 3 lights remain on, representing that a possible normal No. 1 generator did not automatically reconnect to the bus, then:
4.

GEN 1 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


5.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


The generator is no longer useful and should be turned off to preclude any
electrical anomalies.

6.

Left and Right Main Bus Volts/Amps ...................................... CHECKED


Never tie the buses together without previously checking that voltages and
amperage are within limits.
Check the volts and amps on the left main bus carried by the No. 1 battery
for normal valves. Normal voltage and amperage carried by the No. 2
generator should be shown for the right main bus.

7.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Ensure that the left and right main buses are tied by monitoring
equalization on voltmeters and ammeters, and that they are within
prescribed limits. Check for bus-tied light illumination.

8.

Bus Load and Voltage............................................................... CHECKED

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Case 3GEN 3 Switch is Not Tripped


GEN 3

1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generators Load ................................................. CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the generator still connected to the bus. Shed the load, if
necessary, to keep the load on each remaining generator within limits on
the aircraft without the auto-load feature.

If the left main bus voltage is normal:


The absence of an overvoltage condition for bus A is an indication that the
online generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN light.
3.

GEN 3 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


4.

GEN 3 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


OR

If the left main bus voltage is above the green range:


The existence of an overvoltage condition not high enough to cause the GEN
switch to trip may prevent the associated generator from coming on line. In
this case, the faulty generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN
light. Switching this generator off should cause the other generator to come
back on line.
3.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


a. GEN 1 Light ..................................................................................... ON
b. GEN 3 Light................................................................................... OUT

4.

Left Main Bus Voltage within the Green Range....................... CHECKED

5.

Bus Load................................................................................... CHECKED


If voltage and amperage indications are normal, retain this configuration:

AP-66

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OR
If the GEN 1 and GEN 3 lights remain on, representing that a possible normal No. 1 generator did not automatically reconnect to the bus, then:
4.

GEN 3 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


5.

GEN 3 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


The generator is no longer useful and should be turned off to preclude any
electrical anomalies.

6.

Left and Right Main Bus Volts/Amps ...................................... CHECKED


Never tie the buses together without previously checking that voltages and
amperage are within limits.
Check the volts and amps on the left main bus carried by the No. 1 battery
for normal valves. Normal voltage and amperage carried by the No. 2
generator should be shown for the right main bus.

7.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Ensure that the left and right main buses are tied by monitoring
equalization on voltmeters and ammeters, and that they are within
prescribed limits. Check for bus-tied light illumination.

8.

Bus Load and Voltage............................................................... CHECKED

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Case 4GEN 2 Switch is Not Tripped


GEN 2

1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generators Load ................................................. CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the generator still connected to the bus. Shed the load if
necessary to keep the load on each remaining generator within limits on
the aircraft without the auto-load feature.

3.

GEN 2 Switch................................................ TWO RESETS MAXIMUM


Turn the GEN switch off and then on a maximum of two times to see if the
generator will reset. If the generator cannot be reset:

4.

GEN 2 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


Left and Right Main Bus Voltage ............ NOT ABOVE GREEN RANGE

5.

Check the right battery load for normal indications.

6.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED

7.

Limit the load on the operating generator.

TWO GENERATORS INOPERATIVE


Case 1One or No Generator Switch Has Tripped
GEN

AND

GEN

Two generators have been disconnected from the main DC bus system. The
respective generator switches may or may not be tripped. This procedure would
assume a simultaneous tripping of the reverse current relay of the corresponding generator.
1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

AP-68

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2.

Batteries and Generator Load ................................................... CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the generator and/or battery still connected to the left main
bus and normal loading on the right main bus.

CAUTION
Shed the load on the bus, if necessary, to limit the load
on the operating generator and/or battery. Never tie
the buses together without previously checking that
the voltage and amperages on each bus are within the
prescribed limits.

CAUTION
Do not attempt to reset the generator that has the
tripped switch, as an overvoltage condition will exist
when a reset attempt is made.
On the generator for which the switch has not tripped and bus voltage is
within the green range:
3.

GEN Switch(es) ................................................................ OFF, THEN ON


Attempt two resets maximum of the generator(s) concerned by moving the
GEN switch off, and then on, to see if the generator will reset. If the
generator will not reset, and main bus voltages are not above the green
range, then:

4.

Both GEN Switches ............................................................................. OFF


Check to see that amperage indications on both main buses are indicating
normal loading. If the indications are normal:

5.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Once the buses are tied, continually monitor the voltages and amperages
for normal indications,
OR
On the generator(s) for which the switch has not tripped and main bus
voltage is above the green range, comply with the following appropriate
procedures A, B, and C.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Procedure A
The existence of an overvoltage condition not high enough to cause the GEN
switch to trip may prevent the associated generator from coming on line. In
this case, the faulty generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN
light. Switching this generator off should cause the other generator to come
back on line.
1.

GEN 3 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


a. GEN 3 Light ................................................................. CHECKED/ON
b. GEN 1 Light............................................................... CHECKED/OUT

2.

Left Main Bus Voltage within the Green Range....................... CHECKED

3.

Bus Load................................................................................... CHECKED


If GEN 1 and GEN 3 lights remain on, representing that a possible normal
No. 1 generator did not automatically reconnect to the bus, then:

4.

GEN 1 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


5.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


The generator is no longer useful and should be turned off to preclude any
electrical anomalies.
OR

Procedure B
The existence of an overvoltage condition not high enough to cause the GEN
switch to trip may prevent the associated generator from coming on line. In
this case, the faulty generator is the one associated with the extinguished GEN
light. Switching this generator off should cause the other generator to come
back on line.
1.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


a.

GEN 1 Light ......................................................... CHECKED/ON

b.

GEN 3 Light....................................................... CHECKED/OUT

2.

Left Main Bus Voltage within the Green Range....................... CHECKED

3.

Bus Load................................................................................... CHECKED

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If the GEN 1 and GEN 3 lights remain on, representing that a possible
normal No. 3 generator did not automatically reconnect to the bus, then:
4.

GEN 3 Switch........................................... OFF, THEN ON (TWO RESET


ATTEMPTS MAXIMUM)

If resetting cannot be achieved:


5.

GEN 1 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF


The generator is no longer useful and should be turned off to preclude any
electrical anomalies.
OR

Procedure C
If GEN 2 light is on:
1.

GEN 2 Switch ................................................................... OFF, THEN ON


Turn the GEN 2 switch off and then on a maximum of two times to see if
the generator will reset. If the generator cannot be reset:

2.

GEN 2 Switch ...................................................................................... OFF

3.

Left and Right Main Bus Voltage ............ NOT ABOVE GREEN RANGE
Check the right battery load for normal indications.

4.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Ensure the left and right main buses are tied by monitoring equalization on
voltmeters and ammeters and that they are within prescribed limits. Check
for bus-tied light illumination.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Case 2GEN 2 and GEN 1 or GEN 3 Switches Have Tripped


GEN

AND

GEN

Two generators have been disconnected from the main DC bus system.
The respective generator switches have tripped. This procedure would assume a simultaneous tripping of the reverse current relay of the corresponding generators.
1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generator Load ................................................... CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the generator and/or battery still connected to the left main
bus and normal loading on the right main bus.

CAUTION
Shed the load on the bus, if necessary, to limit the load
on the operating generator and/or battery. Never tie
the buses together without previously checking that
the voltage and amperages on each bus are within the
prescribed limits.
3.

Bus-Tied Switch...................................... CHECKED/FLIGHT NORMAL


Ensure the buses are not tied when attempting to reset a generator whose
switch has tripped. The objective is to protect the bus not associated with
the generator being reset.

4.

BAT Switch of Associated Side......................................... CHECKED/ON


The respective battery will not only provide electrical power to the bus,
but will also function as a buffer when attempting to connect the generator.

5.

Power Lever of No. 2 Engine ............................................................. IDLE


This will minimize the effects, should the reset attempt result in an
overvoltage condition. Consequently, the reset attempt should not
be performed during a critical phase of flight when engine thrust may
not be reduced.
Engine Idle Setting ............................................................... STABILIZED

6.

AP-72

GEN 2 Switch ........................................................................................ ON

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Perform only one reset attempt of generator 2. No more than one reset
attempt should be made, for the reason that a failure to reset is an
indication that the fault still exists, and a new attempt could have
detrimental effects.
Carefully observe the voltmeter/ammeter while placing the generator
switch on. Be prepared to immediately return the switch to off should an
overvoltage condition exist. In fact, the overvoltage condition should cause
the switch to trip.
If No. 2 generator cannot be reset:
7.

Left and Right Main Bus Volts/Amps ...................................... CHECKED

If the volts and amps are normal (in the green range):
8.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Check that the bus-tied light is on and monitor to make sure the loads are
kept within limits.

9.

Bus Load and Voltage............................................................... CHECKED

10.

Power Lever of No. 2 Engine after


Generator Reset Attempt ........................................... NORMAL THRUST

Case 3GEN 1 and GEN 3 Switches Have Tripped


GEN

AND

GEN

Two generators have been disconnected from the main DC bus system. The
respective generator switches have tripped. This procedure would assume a
simultaneous tripping of the reverse current relay of the corresponding generator.
1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check that the voltages are within prescribed limits.

2.

Batteries and Generator Load ................................................... CHECKED


Set the ammeter selector to the position corresponding to the generator
concerned. On aircraft fitted with an auto-load system, a reduced load will
be indicated on the No. 1 battery still connected to the left main bus and
normal loading on the right main bus powered from generator 2.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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CAUTION
Shed the load on the bus, if necessary, to limit the load
on the operating generator and/or battery. Never tie
the buses together without previously checking that
the voltage and amperages on each bus are within the
prescribed limits.
3.

Bus-Tied Switch...................................... CHECKED/FLIGHT NORMAL


Ensure the buses are not tied when attempting to reset a generator whose
switch has tripped. The objective is to protect the bus not associated with
the generator being reset.

4.

BAT 1 Switch..................................................................... CHECKED/ON


The battery will not only provide electrical power to the bus, but will also
function as a buffer when attempting to connect the generator.

5.

Power Lever of No. 1 Engine ............................................................. IDLE


This will minimize the effects, should the reset attempt result in an
overvoltage condition. Consequently, the reset attempt should not be
performed during a critical phase of flight when engine thrust may not be
reduced.
Engine Idle Setting ............................................................... STABILIZED

6.GEN 1 Switch .................................................................................................. ON


Perform only one reset attempt of generator 1. No more than one reset
attempt should be made, for the reason that a failure to reset is an
indication that the fault still exists, and a new attempt could have
detrimental effects.
Carefully observe the voltmeter/ammeter while placing the generator
switch on. Be prepared to immediately return the switch to off should an
overvoltage condition exist. In fact, the overvoltage condition should cause
the switch to trip.
If No. 1 . generator cannot be reset:
7.

Power Lever of No. 1 Engine .................................... NORMAL THRUST


Since the reset attempt of the No. 1 generator was unsuccessful, an attempt
to reset the No. 3 generator will be made. This reset attempt will require a
thrust reduction on the No. 3 engine. To preclude two engines at reduced
thrust at the same time, set normal thrust on the No. 1 engine.

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8.

Power Lever of No. 3 Engine ............................................................. IDLE


This will minimize the effects should the reset attempt result in an
overvoltage condition. Consequently, the reset attempt should not be
performed during a critical phase of flight when engine thrust may not be
reduced.
Engine Idle Setting ............................................................... STABILIZED

9.

GEN 3 Switch ........................................................................................ ON


Perform only one reset attempt of generator 3. No more than one reset
attempt should be made, for the reason that a failure to reset is an
indication that the fault still exists, and a new attempt could have
detrimental effects.
Carefully observe the voltmeter/ammeter while placing the generator
switch on. Be prepared to immediately return the switch to off should an
overvoltage condition exist. In fact, the overvoltage condition should cause
the switch to trip.

10.

Power Lever of No. 3 Engine after


Generator Reset Attempt ........................................... NORMAL THRUST

If No. 1 and No. 3 generators cannot be reset:


11.

Right Main Bus Volts/Amps.......................................................CHECKED


Check to see that the voltage and amperage are within limits as this bus
and its associated No. 2 generator will pick up the entire electrical load
when connecting the main buses. If the indications are normal:

12.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Check to make sure the bus-tied light is illuminated and the bus load and
voltage are kept within prescribed limits.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-75

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BATTERY OVERHEAT
HOT
BAT

Additionally, the battery temperature indicator red light is on.


In flight:
Determine which battery is overheating by referring to the battery temperature gage and checking the individual battery temperature needles. After determining which battery is overheating:
1.

Associated BAT Switch........................................................................ OFF


This action disconnects the battery from the electrical system, which
should reduce the load or charging action that may be causing the overheat
condition.

If the battery temperature keeps rising:


2.

Land as soon as possible.

NOTE
If required, the faulty battery may be switched back
on for landing, provided the HOT BAT light has gone
out. Closely monitor the battery temperature indicator.
On the ground:
If the batteries are warm (temperature higher than 120F) and the amber light
is on, a battery start must not be attempted. Use an external power cart for
starting the engines.
If the temperature during engine start exceeds 120F, monitor the temperature for a few minutes after starting to ensure that the temperature does not
rise further and that it starts to cool.
If the temperature during engine start exceeds 140F, wait for it to drop below
120F before taking off.
If the temperature reaches 150F with the red battery gage light and the HOT
BAT light on, the battery must be switched off. Monitor the battery closely
for cooling and have it removed for inspection.

NOTE
The average cooling time of a battery on the ground
is 1F per minute.

AP-76

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BATTERY FAILURE
BAT 1

OR

BAT 2

The associated battery switch is tripped. If grounding upstream of a battery


protection device occurs, or if a battery has an internal fault, the make-and-break
switch trips open under the action of the reverse current, the corresponding BAT
switch flips off, and the corresponding BAT light on the warning panel comes on.
If these indications occur:
1.

Associated Battery Switch........................................................ ON/RESET


No more than two resets of any electrical system malfunction are allowed.
Try to reset the associated battery by moving the battery switch to on. Loss
of one or both batteries in flight will not have a serious effect on the
operation of electrical systems. However, should the three engine
generators fail, the emergency power normally supplied by the batteries
will be lost if the batteries cannot be reset.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-77

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PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM
EITHER AIR DATA COMPUTER INOPERATIVE
Table AP-2. PITOT-STATIC SYSTEMEITHER
AIR DATA COMPUTER INOPERATIVE
FUNCTION
On-side
EFIS

LOSS OF
Airspeed scale

ASEL

INDICATIONS
IAS

flag on EADI

ASEL

flag on EADI

REMARKS
Data from other ADC
recovered using XFR IAS
M
Coupling to remaining
source by x side CPLD

On-side
AP-FD CPLD

Vertical modes

Reversion to basic mode Coupling to remaining


MSG: CPLD DATA
source by x side CPLD
INVALID on ID 802.

On-side
flight instruments

Altimeter
rate-of-climb
indicators

Flags

Use the instrument of


other instrument panel
side

ID 802 CPLD
on-side

SAT-TAT-TAS

Dashes on
corresponding
line

Data recovered using


x side CPLD

Autoslats

Extension
inhibition at
high speed

Possibility

See slat system


malfunctions

Horizontal
stabilizer trim

If ADC 1 has
failed the 4
limitations at
high speed or
the overriding
of the stop at
low speed

Normal trim limited


to 4

On-side
ATC XPDR

Altitude coding

AUTO
SLATS

light

Use the emergency


trim control

Use the x side XPDR

NOTE:
If VMO/MMO warning sounds permanently, pull out inoperative air data computer circuit breaker.

AP-78

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BOTH AIR DATA COMPUTERS INOPERATIVE


Table AP-3. PITOT-STATIC SYSTEMBOTH AIR
DATA COMPUTERS INOPERATIVE
FUNCTION
EFIS Mach

LOSS OF
Airspeed scale

INDICATIONS
IAS

flag on EADI

ASEL

flag on EADI

REMARKS
Use the standby Mach
airspeed indicator

ASEL
Wind on EHSI
AP-M TRIM
YD-FD

Autopilot,
Mach trim, and
yaw damper

flashing on
EADI,
command bars go out
of view.
on warning
AP
panel and
AP

Coupling to remaining
source by x side CPLD

MACH
TRIM

MSG: DADC DATA


INVALID in ID 802
Flight instruments Altimeters,
rate-of-climb
indicators

Flags

Use the standby


instruments

ID 802

SAT-TAT-TAS

Dashes on
corresponding line

Avoid or leave
icing conditions
(see note 1 below)

Autoslats

Extension
inhibition at
high speed

Horizontal
stabilizer trim

4 limitation
at high speed
or stop overriding at
low speed

Aileron Arthur
Q unit

Monitoring

Warnings

VMO/MMO
landing gear
not extended

FMS

VNAV wind
page data
FLT TIME

ATC XPDR

Altitude report

AUTO
SLATS

light

Normal trim limited


to 4

AIL
FEEL

See slat system


malfunctions
Use the emergency
trim control

light
Operative with flaps
40 + slats and gear up

Message in the
SCRATCH PAD

NOTE:
If VMO/MMO warning sounds permanently, pull out inoperative air data computer circuit breaker.
(1)

If icing conditions cannot be avoided, engine N1 speed MUST NOT be less than
the figure corresponding to the coldest temperature of the N1 anti-icing table.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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JAMMED OR ABNORMAL PILOT,


COPILOT, AND POSSIBLY STANDBY
IAS/MACH INDICATION AT HIGH ALTITUDE
This problem may come about as a result of aircraft operations being conducted
in colder than normal altitude temperatures and while flying through ice
crystals, which may block the pitot heads. The problem may disappear if a
descent is made to an altitude where air temperatures will normally increase.
Cross-check normal instruments with standby instruments.
The warning are as follows:
AIL
FEEL

AUTO
SLATS

MACH
TRIM

AP

The VMO /M MO audio warning sounds, the IAS EADI comparator annunciator illuminates, the AP disengagement and/or DADC DATA INVALID message
appears on ID 802, and a disagreement with standby IAS/Mach indications shows.

CAUTION
If it is certain that the VMO /M MO warning is false, do
not modify flying parameters.
If the above indications are experienced:
1.

Autopilot and Yaw Damper ............................................... DISENGAGED


Due to possible spurious information inputs to air data components,
disconnect the autopilot and yaw damper to prevent any unwanted flight
control inputs. Hand-fly the aircraft, and avoid any large displacements
and rapid movements of the flight controls.

If the VMO /M MO warning sounds:


2.

AUDIO WARN A/AUDIO WARN B Circuit Breakers ............... PULLED


On the left and right circuit-breaker panels, pull the circuit breakers as
labeled above to silence the VMO/MMO audio warning.

3.

Use the standby altimeter to stabilize and fly altitude.

4.

Since air data information may be erroneous, use the standby altimeter for
altitude reference.

5.

Engine Thrust Setting.............................. MAXIMUM CRUISE THRUST


Since airspeed/mach indications may be in error, set the power as
indicated to ensure a safe airspeed for the given flight conditions of gross

AP-80

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weight and temperature. Since SAT/TAT indications may also be in error,


use the last known temperature observed, or use ISA for the given altitude.
6.

Aircraft Attitude ........................................................... 0 TO 4 NOSEUP


This would be a normal indicated attitude for cruise flight. It would be
wise for every pilot to learn the normal attitude indications for all regimes
of flight.

After the fault has been identified, follow Procedure A for the climb phase
of flight, Procedure B for the cruise phase of flight, or Procedure C for the
descent phase of flight.

Procedure A
Climb
1.

N1 RPM .......................................................................... CLIMB THRUST


Set maximum climb thrust N1 in accordance with the maximum climb
thrust charts contained in the Airplane Performance Manual.

2.

Aircraft Attitude ........................................................... 4 TO 5 NOSEUP


This would be a normal climb attitude if a climb was necessary while at
high altitudes.

Procedure B
Cruise or Level Flight
Set N 1 rpm according to the setting for Mach 0.75 cruise, taking into account
flight altitude, aircraft weight, and TAT (if known).
Since SAT/TAT indications may also be in error, use the last known temperature observed, or use ISA for the given altitude.
Limit aircraft attitude to less than 4 noseup.

Procedure C
Descent
Follow either checklist below for operations without anti-icing or for operations with engine and wing anti-icing on.

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Without Anti-icing
1.

N1 RPM .............................................................................................. IDLE


Reduce the power levers to idle rpm for the descent. Cross-check
pressurization requirements. If at high altitude, ensure the cabin pressure is
maintained with the power levers at idle.

2.

Vertical Speed........................................................ 2,000 TO 3,000 FPM

3.

Aircraft Attitude .................................................... 0 TO 2 NOSEDOWN


This attitude range should assure a 2,000- to 3,000-fpm descent.

With Engine and Wing Anti-icing On


1.

N1 RPM ........................................ MINIMUM BY ANTI-ICING CHART


Use the three engines operative minimum N1 anti-ice chart found in the
Normal Procedures section of the Airplane Flight Manual, a copy of
which is printed in this manual, or in the abbreviated checklist.

2.

Airbrakes ................................................................................ POSITION 1


Deploy the airbrakes to position 1 to provide drag in the descent, while the
engine power is kept at a higher power setting for anti-icing purposes.

3.

Vertical Speed in the Descent................................ 1,500 TO 2,000 FPM

4.

Aircraft Attitude .................................................... 0 TO 2 NOSEDOWN


This attitude range should assure a 1,500- to 2,000-fpm descent, with
engines at a higher rpm, while the airbrakes are deployed to position 1.

NOTE
1. Check aircraft altitude frequently by referring
to the standby altimeter.
2. If, prior to the problem occurring, flight was
performed at a static temperature lower than the
authorized minimum limit prescribed by the AFM,
descend as soon as possible until air data indications become normal. Minimum temperatures
are as follows:
a. Sea level to 25,000 feet........................ 54C

AP-82

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b. 25,000 to 34,000 feet ................. Linear from


54 to 75C
c. 34,000 to 51,000 feet ........................... 75C
3. Reset AUDIO WARN A and AUDIO WARN B
circuit breakers at frequent intervals to see if the
audio warning has stopped. Leave the circuit
breakers engaged if the warning has stopped.
4. If IAS/Mach indications are unreliable, the indicated static air temperature may also be incorrect.

PROBE ANTI-ICING MALFUNCTION


L. PITOT

OR

R. PITOT

OR

ST BY
PITOT

Compare instrument readings with the readings of the other two systems. Check
bus power and proper switch positioning.

ICE PROTECTION SYSTEMS


WING ANTI-ICE INOPERATIVE
WITHOUT BRAKE HEATING
The following four cases, with procedures, assume that the wing anti-ice
switch was turned on for anti-ice protection and the system malfunctioned.

Case 1

The wing anti-ice switch is on and the wing amber light comes on steady. This
indicates an insufficient supply of bleed air is available for wing anti-icing.
1.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed................................................ INCREASE UNTIL


GREEN LIGHT ILLUMINATES
Increase the thrust on the No. 1 engine to attempt to supply more highpressure bleed air through the HP 1 valve.

If the light turns green:


2.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed............................................................ MAINTAIN

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If the light remains amber:


3.

No. 3 Engine N1 Speed ............................................................ INCREASE


While maintaining a higher rpm on the No. 1 engine, increase the thrust on
the No. 3 engine to attempt to supply more high-pressure bleed air through
the PRV 3 valve.

If the light turns green:


4.

No. 3 Engine N1 Speed............................................................ MAINTAIN


Keep the thrust increased on both No. 1 and No. 3 engines, while in icing
conditions, to keep the wing anti-ice light green and to ensure a sufficient
anti-icing capability.

If the light still remains amber:


Set the N 1 No. 1 and No. 2 engines to the minimum rpm, according to Table
AP-4 for operations in icing conditions.
Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible. Since the wing anti-icing
is no longer provided, structural icing may result.

Case 2

The wing anti-ice switch is on, and the wing amber light is flashing. This
indicates a system malfunction in which there is too much bleed air sensed
in the system.
1.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed................................................................ REDUCE


Reduce the No. 1 engine N1 rpm until the flashing amber light goes out
and the green light illuminates. This action should reduce the highpressure bleed-air supply to the wing surfaces.

If the light does not turn green:


2.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed ..................................................... AS REQUIRED

3.

No. 3 Engine N1 Speed................................................................ REDUCE


While maintaining a required speed on the No. 1 engine, reduce the engine
speed on the No. 3 engine to further reduce the high-pressure bleed-air
supply to the wing surfaces.

AP-84

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NOTE
Do not go below the minimum engine speed
prescribed for flight in icing conditions, corrected for
temperature (Table AP-4).
Table AP-4. FLIGHT IN ICING CONDITIONS
THREE ENGINES OPERATIVEANTI-ICING N1
TAT

30 TO
20C

20 TO
10C

10 TO
0C

0 TO
+10C

>20,000

80%

76%

73%

65%

>20,000
>10,000

76%

73%

65%

58%

<10,000

68%

65%

61%

58%

ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE


Increase the values of the above by the following:
9% if N1 is equal to or higher than 65%
6% if N1 is lower than 65%

ON AIRCRAFT WITH WING-BRAKE HEATING


When the heating system is used:
The minimum required N1 speed with two or all
engines operating must be increased by 1%.

If the light turns green:


Maintain that engine speed on No. 1 and No. 3 engines when flying through
icing conditions.

Case 3

The wing anti-ice switch is on, and both the amber and green anti-ice lights
are on. It would be quite rare for such an indication as this to appear. However,
the aircraft manufacturer feels that this is a coverall procedure in the event
any other indescribable indications might be seen when you turn on the wing
anti-icing switch. This indicates that the wing anti-ice system may be
malfunctioning and you must:
If in icing conditions, not reduce N 1 speed below the specified value and avoid
or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.

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Case 4

The wing anti-ice switch is on, and the wing green light is out. This may indicate
that the green wing anti-icing light is not operative for one reason or another.
The corrective action to determine if it is an indication problem and not an
operational problem is to:
1.

Wing Anti-ice Switch........................................................................... OFF


Turn off the wing anti-ice switch, and observe the off indications by
watching the wing anti-ice lights. Normally, when turning the wing antiice switch off, the amber light will flash a couple of times and then
extinguish. Turn the switch back on.

2.

Wing Anti-ice Switch ............................................................................ ON


If you observe the normal indications of the amber light coming on and
then going out, you can assume that the wing valves have opened and are
being supplied sufficient bleed air for anti-icing purposes.
If you do not observe these proper indications, the wing anti-icing system
must be considered inoperative. You must:

3.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.

WING ANTI-ICE UNWANTED


OPERATION WITHOUT BRAKE HEATING

The wing anti-ice switch is off and the amber wing light is flashing. This may
mean that some bleed air may still be going to the wings or an indication failure,
even though the wing anti-icing switch is off. To try to correct this malfunction by the following procedure:
1.

Wing Anti-ice Switch ............................................................................ ON


If the green wing light does not come on, it means a failure of the
indicating system and there is no anti-ice pressurized air in the wings.
Flight may be continued with:

2.

AP-86

Wing Anti-ice Switch........................................................................... OFF

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OR
If the green light comes on, it means the operation of the wing anti-icing
system is out of sequence. High-pressure bleed air may still be supplied to
the wings even when the wing switch is off. This case is either untimely
operation of the wing anti-ice system or seizing of the wing anti-ice
system electrovalve in the open position. If the TAT is above +10C, the
following procedure must be followed to eliminate, or to limit, the flow of
high-pressure bleed air to the wings.
2.

Wing Anti-ice Switch........................................................................... OFF

The amber light may still be flashing.


3.

Isolation Valve Knob ................................................................... ISOLATE


Move the rotary switch on the overhead panel to the isolate position. The
amber ISOL light should come on. This separates the bleed-air system so
that the No. 1 and No. 3 engines feed one side while the No. 2 engine
feeds the other side of the bleed-air manifold.

4.

HP 1 and PRV 3 Switches .................................................................... OFF


Moving these switches to off should keep any high-pressure airflow, from
the No. 1 and No. 3 engines, from entering the bleed-air manifold. It is this
side of the manifold from which the wing anti-ice system plumbing taps
its air. Therefore, only low-temperature, low-pressure bleed air can be
delivered to this side of the manifold. To minimize any adverse effects this
low-pressure bleed air might have, perform the following:

5.

Reduce No. 1 and No. 3 engines power settings as soon as possible.

WING ANTI-ICE INOPERATIVE WITH BRAKE HEATING


The following three cases, with procedures, assume that the wing anti-ice switch
was turned on to the position indicated for anti-ice protection and the system
malfunctioned.

Case 1

The wing anti-ice switch is on as specified in Procedure A or B below, and


the wing amber light comes on steady. This indicates an insufficient supply
of bleed air is available for wing anti-icing.

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Procedure A
Switch is in the WING position:
1.

No. 1 Engine N1............................................ INCREASE UNTIL GREEN


LIGHT ILLUMINATES
Increase the power on the No. 1 engine to attempt to supply more highpressure bleed air through the HP 1 valve.

If the light turns green:


2.

No. 1 Engine N1....................................................................... MAINTAIN


OR

If the amber light remains on and steady:


2.

No. 3 Engine N1 ....................................................................... INCREASE


While maintaining a higher rpm on the No. 1 engine, increase the power
on the No. 3 engine to attempt to supply more high-pressure bleed air
through the PRV 3 valve.

If the light turns green:


3.

No. 3 Engine N1....................................................................... MAINTAIN


Keep the power increased on both No. 1 and No. 3 engines, while in icing
conditions, to keep the wing anti-ice light green and to ensure a sufficient
anti-icing capability.
OR

If the amber light remains on and steady:


3.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................... WINGBRK


The purpose of this operation is to detect a brake heating valve not closed
malfunction.

If the light turns green:


4.

AP-88

Maintain an N1 rpm not less than 1% above the specified value for flight
in icing conditions (see Table AP-4).

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OR
If the amber light remains on and steady:
4.

WINGBRK Switch ......................................................................... WING


If in icing conditions, do not reduce N1 speed below the specified value
(see Table AP-4).

5.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


Wing anti-icing is no longer available.

Procedure B
Switch is in the WINGBRK position:
1.

WINGBRK Switch ......................................................................... WING


If the green light comes on, it is an indication that the brake heating
system is inoperative.

If the green light stays out:


2.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................... WINGBRK


Increase the N1 speed of the No. 1 engine until the green light comes on. If
the attempt is unsuccessful, repeat similar N1 speed increase on the No. 3
engine. Maintain this N1.

If the light does not turn green and if in icing conditions:


3.

Maintain an N1 rpm not less than 1% above the specified value for flight
in icing conditions (see Table AP-4).

4.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


Consider the brake heating system inoperative as well.

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Case 2

The WINGBRK switch is in the position as indicated in Procedure A or B


below, and the amber light is flashing with the green light out. This indicates
excessive anti-icing to the wings.

NOTE
When reducing N 1 rpm as directed below, do not reduce the N 1 below the minimum speed required for
operations in icing conditions.

Procedure A
Switch in the WING position:
1.

Reduce N1 speed of No. 1 engine until the amber flashing light goes out
and the green light comes on.

If this does not correct the problem:


2.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed ..................................................... AS REQUIRED

3.

Reduce N1 speed of No. 3 engine until the amber flashing light goes out
and the green light comes on.

Procedure B
Switch in the WINGBRK position:
1.

Reduce N1 speed of No. 1 engine until the amber flashing light goes out
and the green light comes on.

If this does not correct the problem:


2.

No. 1 Engine N1 Speed ..................................................... AS REQUIRED

3.

Reduce N1 speed of No. 3 engine until the amber flashing light goes out
and the green light comes on.
Maintain an N1 speed not less than 1% above the specified value for flight
in icing conditions (see Table AP-4).

AP-90

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Case 3

The wing anti-ice switch is on, and both the amber and green anti-ice lights
are on. It would be quite rare for such an indication as this to appear. However,
the aircraft manufacturer feels that this is a coverall procedure in the event
any other indescribable indications might be seen when you turn on the wing
anti-icing switch. This indicates a general total malfunctioning of the system, and you must:
Avoid or leave icing conditions.

Case 4

The WINGBRK switch is in the position as indicated in Position A or B below,


and the amber and green wing anti-ice lights are out.

Procedure A
Switch in the WING position:
1.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................................. OFF


The amber light should flash and then go out. This indicates that the wing
anti-ice valves were open and that they closed normally.

2.

WINGBRK Switch ......................................................................... WING


Carefully watch the indicator lights as the switch is moved to the WING
position. The amber light should come on steady and then go out. This is a
normal indication; however, the green light should come on. If the green
light did not come on, there is a malfunction in the indicating system, and
it can be assumed that the wing anti-ice system is working properly.

If the amber light did not come on steady and then go out:
3.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


If in icing conditions, do not reduce engine rpm below specified values.

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Procedure B
Switch in WING-BRK position:
1.

WINGBRK Switch ......................................................................... WING

If the green light stays out:


2.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................................. OFF


The amber light should flash and then go out. This indicates that the wing
anti-ice valves were open and that they closed normally.

3.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................... WINGBRK


Carefully watch the indicator lights as the switch is moved to the
WINGBRK position. The amber light should come on steady and then go
out. This is a normal indication; however, the green light should come on.
If the green light did not come on, there is a malfunction in the indicating
system, and it can be assumed that the wing anti-ice system is working
properly.

If the amber light did not come on steady and then go out:
4.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


If in icing conditions, do not reduce engine rpm below specified values.

WING ANTI-ICE UNWANTED


OPERATION WITH BRAKE HEATING

The WINGBRK switch is off and the amber wing light is flashing. This
may mean that some bleed air may still be going to the wings, or indication failure, even though the wing anti-icing switch is off. To try to correct
this malfunction:
1.

WINGBRK Switch ......................................................................... WING


If the green wing light does not come on, it means a failure of the
indicating system and there is no anti-ice pressurized air in the wings.
Flight may be continued with:

2.

AP-92

WINGBRK Switch............................................................................. OFF

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OR
If the green light comes on, it means the operation of the wing anti-icing system
is out of sequence. High-pressure bleed air may still be supplied to the wings
even when the wing switch is off. The cause is either untimely operation of the
wing anti-ice system or seizing of the wing anti-ice system electrovalve in the
open position. If the TAT is above +10C, the following procedure must be
followed to eliminate, or to limit, the flow of high-pressure bleed air to the wings.
2.

WINGBRK Switch............................................................................. OFF


The amber light may still be flashing.

3.

Isolation Valve Knob ................................................................... ISOLATE


Move the rotary switch on the overhead panel to the isolate position. The
amber ISOL light should come on. This separates the bleed-air system so
that the No. 1 and No. 3 engines feed one side while the No. 2 engine
feeds the other side of the bleed-air manifold.

4.

HP 1 and PRV 3 Switches .................................................................... OFF


Moving these switches to off should keep any high-pressure airflow, from
the No. 1 and No. 3 engines, from entering the bleed-air manifold. It is this
side of the manifold from which the wing anti-ice system plumbing taps
its air. Therefore, only low-temperature, low-pressure bleed air can be
delivered to this side of the manifold. To minimize any adverse effects this
low-pressure bleed air might have, perform the following:

5.

Reduce No. 1 and No. 3 engines power settings as soon as possible.

ENGINE ANTI-ICE INOPERATIVE


Case 1
ENG 1, ENG 2 or ENG 3 amber light on steady.

The associated engine anti-ice switch is on and the amber anti-ice light is on
steady, indicating that the air intake (nacelle lip) anti-icing air pressure associated with engine 1 and/or engine 3, or that either the S-duct or the air intake (nacelle lip) anti-icing surfaces of engine 2, are not receiving enough air
pressure for anti-icing purposes.
1.

Increase power on the affected engine until the amber light goes out and
the green light comes on.

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If the amber light goes out and the green light illuminates:
2.

Retain this thrust setting while in icing conditions.

If the amber light does not go out:


3.

In icing conditions, do not reduce N1 below the specified value (see


Table AP-4).

4.

Avoid or leave icing conditions.

Case 2
ENG 1, ENG 2 or ENG 3 amber and green lights on.

The engine anti-ice switches are on and both the amber and green anti-ice lights
are on for one or more engines. It is quite rare for such an indication to
appear. However, the aircraft manufacturer feels that this is a coverall procedure
in the eventuality any other indescribable indications might be seen when you
turn on the engine anti-icing switches. This indicates a general total
malfunctioning of the system and you must:
1.

If in icing conditions, do not reduce N1 below the specified value (see


Table AP-4).

2.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


Since this is an unknown condition and impossible to troubleshoot, it is
best to avoid or leave icing conditions.

Case 3

The No. 2 engine anti-ice switch is on, the amber light is out, but the green
light did not come on. This may be a case where the indicating system is
malfunctioning. If you see the amber light come on and then go out, you can
assume that the system is working correctly. The procedure is to cycle the switch
off and then on again to observe the other indications associated with the
operation of No. 2 engine anti-icing.

AP-94

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1.

No. 2 Engine Anti-ice Switch ........................................ CYCLE OFFON


Observe No. 2 Engine Amber Light............................................. ONOFF
As you cycle the switch off, carefully watch the light indications.
Normally, the amber light should flash a couple of times and then
extinguish. If this is observed, turn the anti-ice switch back on. Now you
should observe that the amber light comes on and then goes out. You can
assume the system is operating, but only with a green light indication
malfunction.

If the amber light does not come on and then go out:


2.

In icing conditions, do not reduce N1 below the specified value (see


Table AP-4).

3.

Avoid or leave icing conditions as soon as possible.


The No. 2 engine anti-icing system must be considered inoperative;
therefore, you must leave or avoid icing conditions.

ENGINE ANTI-ICE OVERPRESSURE


ENG 1, ENG 2 or ENG 3 flashing amber light.

The associated engine anti-ice switch is on and the amber anti-ice light flashes
on one or more engines. This indicates that the pressure in the air intake antiice system of the corresponding engines is too high.
1.

Reduce the power on the affected engine until the flashing amber light
goes out and the green light illuminates.
By reducing the power on the affected engine, you reduce the temperature
and pressure of the high-pressure bleed air being supplied the manifold
and, in turn, the engine anti-ice surfaces.

2.

Retain this power setting. Do not go below the minimum N1 engine rpm
prescribed for flight in icing conditions (see Table AP-4).

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ENGINE ANTI-ICE UNWANTED OPERATION


Case 1
ENG 1 or ENG 3 amber light flashing.

The associated engine anti-ice switches are off and an amber light flashes.
This may mean that some bleed air may still be going to an engines anti-ice
surfaces even though the engine anti-ice switch is off.
1.

Associated Engine Anti-ice Switch ....................................................... ON


If the green engine anti-ice light does not come on, it means a failure has
occurred in the indicating system.

Flight may be continued with:


2.

Associated Engine Anti-ice Switch...................................................... OFF

If the green engine light comes on, it means the operation of that engine antiicing system is out of sequence. High-pressure bleed air may still be supplied
to the engine surfaces even when the engine anti-ice switch is off.
If the TAT is above +10C, the following procedure must be followed to eliminate, or to limit, the flow of high-pressure, high-temperature bleed air to the
engine anti-ice surfaces. Make sure the associated anti-ice switch is off and
perform the following:
3.

Associated Engine Power Thrust................................................. REDUCE


Reduce the power on the associated engine to the minimum needed for
operational purposes.

Case 2
ENG 2 amber light flashing.

The No. 2 engine anti-ice switch is off and the amber light flashes. This may
mean that some bleed air may be going to the engines air intake and S-duct
surfaces even though the engine anti-ice switch is off.

AP-96

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1.

No. 2 Engine Anti-ice Switch................................................................ ON


If the green engine anti-ice light does not come on, it means a failure has
occurred in the indicating system.

The flight may be continued with:


2.

No. 2 Engine Anti-ice Switch .............................................................. OFF

If the green No. 2 engine light comes on, it means the operation of that engine
anti-icing system is out of sequence. High-pressure bleed air may still be
supplied to the engine air intake and S-duct surfaces even when the engine
anti-ice switch is off.
If the TAT is above +10C, the following procedure must be followed to
eliminate, or to limit, the flow of high-pressure, high-temperature bleed air
to the No. 2 engine anti-ice surfaces:
3.

No. 2 Engine Anti-ice Switch .............................................................. OFF

The amber light is now on steady.


4.

Isolation Valve Knob .............................................................. ISOLATION


Move the rotary knob on the overhead panel to the isolate position. The
amber ISOL light should come on. This separates the bleed-air system so
that the No. 1 and No. 3 engines feed one side while the No. 2 engine
feeds the other side of the bleed-air manifold.

5.

PRV 2 Switch ....................................................................................... OFF


Moving this switch to off should keep any No. 2 engine high-pressure,
high-temperature airflow from entering the bleed-air manifold. It is this
side of the manifold from which the S-duct anti-ice system plumbing taps
its air. Therefore, only low-temperature, low-pressure bleed air can be
delivered to this side of the manifold.

If the amber flashing light does not go out and the TAT is above +10C:
6.

No. 2 Engine Thrust .................................................................... REDUCE

Reduce the thrust on the No. 2 engine to the minimum needed for operational
purposes, which will reduce this anti-icing air temperature.

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LATE ACTIVATION OF SYSTEMS


CAUTION
Before turning on the anti-ice systems, when it has
been discovered that you are already flying in icing
conditions, caution should be exercised due to the possible damage that could be caused by the engine ingestion of large pieces of ice. The following steps
should be closely followed before anti-ice switches
are turned on.
1.

Start Selector Switches (3) ...................................................... AIR START


This will help preclude the possibility of an engine flameout. It is also
recommended that the rpm for each engine be reduced, one at a time, as
engine anti-ice switches are turned on.

2.

No. 1 and No. 2 Engine Anti-ice Switches............................................ ON

After waiting 30 seconds:


3.

No. 3 Engine Anti-ice Switch................................................................ ON

After waiting 30 seconds:


4.

Wing or WINGBRK Anti-ice Switch .................................................. ON

5.

Start Selector Switches (3) ............................................ GROUND START


(When no longer required.)

AIR CONDITIONING
BLEED-AIR SYSTEM OVERHEAT
Light on steady.
BLEED
OVHT

This light, on the master failure panel, illuminates when one of three temperature probes, located in the bleed-air manifold downstream from each engine, detects an excessive bleed-air temperature.
The following is a step-by-step identification process.
1.

AP-98

PRV 3 Switch ....................................................................................... OFF

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After turning off the PRV 3 switch, carefully observe the BLEED OVHT
light, and note any changes in its actions.
If the BLEED OVHT light starts blinking and then goes out, leave the
PRV 3 switch off and continue the flight in this configuration. This was
the faulty system.
OR
If the BLEED OVHT light starts blinking and keeps blinking in icing
conditions:
2.

Associated Engines Blinking Light.................................................... IDLE


Move the associated power lever to idle to lower the bleed-air temperature
and pressure in the manifold. Set N1 of other engines corresponding to one
engine inoperative conditions (see Table AP-3) to ensure adequate air for
anti-icing.

NOTE
If you are not in icing conditions, and to preclude having to reduce to idle on an engine, an alternate procedure is possible.
1. Turn the isolation valve knob to isolation.
2. Set the passenger air-conditioning valve switch to
off if the overheat is from No. 2 engine bleed air.
3. Set the crew air-conditioning valve switch to off
if the overheat is from the No. 1 or No. 3 engine.
4. Move the COND control lever, located on the
copilots right console, to the tied position.
If the BLEED OVHT light stays on and is steady:
3.

PRV 3 Switch.................................................................................... AUTO


If the light stayed on and steady after turning the PRV 3 switch off, the
PRV 3 system was not the problem.

If PRV 3 was not the problem:


4.

Apply the above procedures with PRV 2 and HP 1, if necessary.

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For the aircraft with AUXITROL EL 124 box (modification M1905 not applied):
After a flight with a BLEED OVHT warning light illuminated in the
cockpit, it is mandatory to check the LEDs in the rear compartment
on EL 124 box before switching off electrical power.
For the aircraft with AUXITROL EL 137 box (modification M1905 applied):
After a flight with a BLEED OVHT warning light illuminated in the
cockpit, it is mandatory to check the LEDs in the rear compartment on
EL 137 box. This information remains available after switching off electrical power, which makes maintenance of the bleed-air system easier.
Modification M1905 is applied in production since aircraft S/N 167 or in retrofit
by changing boxes.

ECU OVERHEAT
ECU
OVHT

1.

This light indicates failure of the cold-air generation system.

Passenger Temperature Controller........ MANUAL/MINIMUM 40% HOT


Move the passenger temperature control toward the hot position, a
minimum of 40% of the dial. This will decrease the amount of hot bleed
air that is directed through the turbocooling unit compressor.

2.

Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switch (If Required) ..................... OFF


If it is necessary to further limit the amount of air demand for cooling by
the turbocooling unit, move the passenger air-conditioning valve switch to
the off position. The air demand will quickly diminish, and the overheat
light should go out.

3.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED


If it was necessary to turn off the passenger air-conditioning system, to
eliminate the ECU OVHT indication, you must connect the crew and
passenger air-conditioning systems.

If the ECU OVHT light stays on, you must perform the following procedures:
4.

Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switch ....................................... AUTO


This allows airflow from the passenger environmental circuit.

AP-100

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5.

Crew Temperature Controller ............... MANUAL/MINIMUM 40% HOT


Move the crew temperature control toward the hot position, a minimum of
40% of the dial. This again will decrease the amount of bleed air that is
directed through the turbocooling unit. Perhaps the crew system was
making a larger demand than the passenger system.

6.

Crew Air-Conditioning Valve Switch (If Required) ............................ OFF


If it is necessary to further limit the amount of air demand for cooling by
the turbocooling unit, move the crew air-conditioning valve switch to the
off position. The air demand will quickly diminish, and the overheat light
should go out.

If the ECU OVHT light is still on:


7.

Airspeed.................................................... LESS THAN 300 KNOTS TAS


Reduce the airspeed of the aircraft to less than 300 knots true airspeed.
This will allow the turbofan to operate and the air intake door on the
bottom aft of the empennage to open to provide more ventilating air
through the heat exchangers.

NOTE
If you are not in icing conditions, the HP 1, PRV 2,
and PRV 3 switches may be turned off.
If the overheat warning persists:
8.

Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switch (If Required) ..................... OFF


If you are unable to control the overheat condition by the time you have
reached this point in the checklist, control of the overheat condition may
not be possible. The air-conditioning system should be isolated from
operation, a descent should be initiated because you will be unable to
pressurize the aircraft, and a landing should be made at the nearest
suitable airport.

9.

Land as soon as possible.

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CABIN AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT OVERHEAT


(ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT TURBOCOOLING
UNIT ANTI-ICING EMERGENCY CONTROL)
High air temperature occurs along with the light.
CONDG
OVHT

This light indicates overheating in one of the passenger or crew air-conditioning


ducts. Check the valve positions on both the passenger and crew temperature
control panels.
1.

Temperature Controllers................................................. MANUAL/COLD


Move the mode selector switch on each panel from AUTO to MANUAL
to turn off the automatic regulation system. Move the manual temperature
control switch to the cold position.

If the light does not go out or if the temperature does not decrease:
2.

Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switch ........................................... OFF


Move the passenger air-conditioning valve switch to the off position to
eliminate some of the excess temperature coming through the airconditioning ducts. However, in order to provide air circulation throughout
the aircraft, you must perform the following procedure:

3.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED


Move the COND control lever to the tied position to connect the two
systems together. This will provide circulation of air from the cockpit airconditioning unit, which will supply the entire interior of the aircraft.

AP-102

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CABIN AIR CONDITIONING OVERHEAT ON AIRCRAFT


EQUIPPED WITH ANTI-ICING EMERGENCY CONTROL
(SB-131)
CONDG
OVHT

High air temperature occurs along with light.

This light indicates overheating in one of the cabin or cockpit air-conditioning


ducts. Check the valve positions on both the passenger and crew temperature
control panels.
1.

Temperature Controllers................................................. MANUAL/COLD


Move the mode selector switch on each panel from AUTO to MANUAL
to turn off the automatic regulation system. Move the manual temperature
control switch to the COLD position.

CAUTION
Since anti-icing on the turbine is no longer ensured,
the amber ECU A/I pushbutton can only be used at
high altitude (above 35,000 feet) where the water
concentration is practically close to zero.
If altitude is below 35,000 feet:
See note below.
If the temperature is NOT decreasing:
2.

ECU A/I Pushbutton ........................................... DEPRESSED (AMBER)


The turbocooling fan is no longer deiced. Check for amber illumination of
the ECU A/I pushbutton.

If the temperature is still not decreasing after ECU A/I operation:


3.

Passenger Switch.................................................................................. OFF


Move the passenger, or cabin, air-conditioning valve switch to the off
position to eliminate some of the excess temperature coming through the
air-conditioning ducts. However, in order to provide air circulation
throughout the aircraft, you must perform the following procedure:

4.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED


Move the COND control lever to the tied position to connect the two
systems together. This will provide circulation of air from the cockpit airconditioning unit, which will supply the entire interior of the aircraft.

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OR
If the temperature is decreasing:
3.

Temperature Controllers ................................................................... AUTO


The temperature decrease confirms the source of overheat was from a
malfunctioning turbofan anti-icing valve, which has now been closed as a
result of the activation of the ECU A/I pushbutton.

At the beginning of descent:


4.

Pressure Norm/Emergency Switch ..................................... EMERGENCY


This will simultaneously close the passenger air-conditioning valve and
drive the crew temperature control valve to full hot. Check for proper
position indication on the control panel.

5.

ECU A/I Pushbutton ............................................................... RELEASED


Check for extinguishing of light.

If temperature is too high and if not previously accomplished:


6.

Crew Switch ......................................................................................... OFF

7.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED

NOTE
For operation below 35,000 feet with the amber
CONDG OVHT light on, complete only the below
listed items:
Passenger Switch.................................................................................. OFF
COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED

BATTERY CONDITIONING FAILURE (SB-125)


COND BATT light
1.

COND BATT Switch ....................................................... OFF/CHECKED


Aircraft with Service Bulletin 125 have a switch that controls a valve that
provides crew cold air to the aircraft battery compartment. Takeoff is
authorized provided the cold air battery conditioning duct is closed. If the
valve will not close, the conditioning duct is blocked. In this case, the
warning light stays on.

AP-104

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NOSE CONE OVERHEAT


NOSE
CONE OVHT

This light indicates that the nose cone temperature is too high.
1.

Nose Control Lever (If Installed) ................................ CHECK/NORMAL


Check that the nose conditioning lever, located on the copilots right
console, is in the normal, or forward, position. This allows cabin air to be
used for inflight ventilation of the electronic components mounted in the
nose cone.

2.

Unnecessary Avionics .......................................................................... OFF


Check maintenance panel MINELCO indicators for indications of faulty
equipment.
EFIS and MFD symbol generators are located in the nose cone and do
require ventilation. However, certain radios, a radar, and navigation units
are also located in this area. This additional electronic equipment varies
from aircraft to aircraft. It is recommended that an inventory of the
components contained in the nose cone be made available on board each
aircraft in the event that an electrical isolation becomes necessary.

PRESSURIZATION
IMPROPER CABIN VERTICAL SPEED
This is an erratic indication on the cabin vertical speed indicator when the
cabin pressure should be maintaining a stable differential pressure. Certain
steps are necessary to ensure that the controls and switches are in their proper
position for flight.
As a review, remember that the automatic controller commands the electropneumatic outflow valve, and the pneumatic outflow valve is slaved to it.
When not in automatic and in manual, the manual pressurization knob controls the pneumatic outflow valve, and the electropneumatic outflow valve is
slaved to it.
1.

Pressurization UPDN Knob.............. ALIGNED WITH GREEN INDEX


Check the manual pressurization knob to be sure it is set in the green index
on the dial. The automatic pressurization system is calibrated to maintain
cabin pressure automatically with the manual pressurization knob in the
green index. Here it commands a closed configuration on the pneumatic
outflow valve. If the knob is not in this position, the system will not operate
properly, as the automatic system will try to compensate for the knob being
out of its proper calibrated position, commanding a change on the
pneumatic outflow valve, thus causing an erratic vertical speed indication.
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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2.

PRV 2 and 3 Switches................................................... CHECKED/AUTO

3.

Bleed-Air Crew and Passenger Switches........................... CHECKED/ON


Ensure that the air-conditioning valve switches are in the auto position, or
if that does not seem to correct the problem, move them to the on position.
This will bypass the automatic opening circuit and allow the valves to go
to full open. Check that the PRV 2 and PRV 3 switches are selected to auto
to ensure a proper air supply to the bleed-air manifold for air-conditioning
and pressurization purposes.

If normal operation is not restored:


4.

Pressurization UPDN Knob.................... 1- TO 2-OCLOCK POSITION


At this point, it is assumed the automatic pressurization system may
be malfunctioning. By moving the manual pressurization knob to the
1- to 2-oclock position, you command a level cabin altitude signal to the
pneumatic outflow valve in preparation for manual pressurization control.
You may notice a slight fluctuation in cabin vertical velocity when
performing this step. This is normal, as the automatic controller tries to
compensate for the manual knob being out of its compensated position.
If you do not move the knob to the 1- or 2-oclock position, a large
pressurization surge may result when selecting manual pressure.

5.

Auto/Manual Pressure Selector Switch.............................................. MAN


Move the two-position switch, located to the right of the manual
pressurization knob, from the AUTO to the MAN position. This cuts out
automatic pressurization control and allows manual control of cabin
pressure through the use of the manual pressurization knob.

6.

Pressurization UPDN Knob ............................ ADJUST AS REQUIRED


Use the manual knob to control cabin pressure. Moving the switch
counterclockwise, from the 1- or 2-oclock position, commands a cabin
down signal to the pneumatic outflow valve. Moving the knob to its full
counterclockwise position closes the pneumatic outflow valve and
commands an approximate 1,500-foot-per-minute rate of descent for the
cabin, thereby increasing pressure differential.
Moving the knob clockwise, from the 1- or 2-oclock position, commands
a cabin up signal to the pneumatic outflow valve. This opens the
pneumatic valve and allows a cabin rate of climb of up to 1,500 feet per
minute when the knob is turned to the UP position on the dial. By moving
the knob past the UP position to the end of the stop, a cabin rate of climb
of 2,500 feet per minute is commanded.

AP-106

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TOO HIGH CABIN PRESSURE


The indication for this situation is seen on the cabin pressure triple indicator for altitude and differential pressure. An abnormally high cabin pressure
can cause pressurization surges if the overpressure valve opens and closes as
it reaches its preset relief values.
1.

Cabin Pressure Controller....................................................................... FL


Move the PROGFLLDG switch on the cabin pressure controller to the
FL position. You can now select a flight level higher than the one you are
flying, which increases cabin altitude and keeps the outflow valves from
riding on the maximum differential limits.

2.

Select a higher flight level.

If the cabin pressure does not decrease, the automatic regulation system may
be inoperative. Take the following steps:
3.

Pressurization UPDN Knob......................................... 1 TO 2 OCLOCK


In the event the cabin pressure problem is connected to the automatic
pressurization system, this step prepares the pressurization system for
manual operation. This position of the knob approximates a level cabin
altitude command on the pneumatic outflow valve.

4.

AUTO/MANUAL Pressure Selector Switch...................................... MAN


This is done to disable the automatic (electropneumatic) system and to
enable manual (pneumatic) control of the pressurization system.

5.

Pressurization UPDN Knob...................................... UP, AS REQUIRED


Moving the knob clockwise, from the 1- or 2-oclock position, commands
a cabin up signal to the pneumatic outflow valve. This opens the
pneumatic valve and allows a cabin rate of climb of up to 1,500 feet per
minute when the knob is turned to the UP position on the dial. By moving
the knob past the UP position to the end of the stop, a cabin rate of climb
of 2,500 feet per minute is commanded.

If cabin pressure keeps increasing:


6.

Crew and Passenger Air-Conditioning Valve Switches ....................... OFF


This closes the electric valves of the cockpit and passenger cabin airconditioning system, shutting off the flow of bleed air into the aircraft.
Without the flow of air, the pressure differential should decrease.

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If flight requirements so dictate maintaining altitude, cycle the crew and passenger switches off to on periodically to maintain a cabin altitude no higher
than 8,000 feet or a cabin differential pressure no greater than approximately
9 psi. Descend, as required.

TOO HIGH CABIN ALTITUDE


OR SLOW DEPRESSURIZATION
CABIN

The aural warning occurs along with the light.


The red CABIN light will illuminate accompanied by the aural cabin warning as heard from the cockpit speaker system. This indicates that the cabin altitude has climbed higher than 10,000 feet. This is a loss of cabin pressure and
should be dealt with in a timely manner. If climbing, the climb should be stopped
until the problem is corrected. A descent may even be in order. If at a high altitude, immediate donning of the oxygen masks is mandatory by all occupants.
1.

Bleed-Air Crew and Passenger Conditioning ........................................ ON

1A. PRV 2 and PVR3 Switches....................................................... CHECKED


Check that the crew and passenger air-conditioning valve switches are on and
that air is coming into the aircraft. PRV 2 and 3 switches must be in auto. If
these actions have not been taken, then air will not be able to enter the aircraft
cabin. It is suggested that the crew and passenger air-conditioning valve
switches be placed to the on position if it is thought that the automatic feature
is not working.
2.

BAG Switch ........................................................................................ ISOL


When placing the baggage switch to ISOL, you shut off the supply of hot
air to the baggage compartment and close the isolation valve between the
main passenger cabin and the baggage compartment. In the event there is a
pressure leak in the baggage compartment area, it will be isolated by this
step, thereby conserving main cabin depressurization. Check to see if the
cabin altitude is still increasing or is too high, and confirm illumination of
the BAG ISOL light on the warning panel and mechanics panel.

3.

Nose Control Lever (If Installed)................................................. CLOSED


On the copilots right console, pull the nose conditioning lever aft to the
closed position. This isolates the nose cone from the main cabin of the
aircraft, and preserves cabin pressurization should a pressure leak exist in
the nose cone area.

AP-108

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4.

Pressurization UPDN Knob......................................... 1 TO 2 OCLOCK


In the event the cabin pressure problem is connected to the automatic
pressurization system, this step prepares the pressurization system for
manual operation. This position of the knob approximates a level cabin
altitude command on the pneumatic outflow valve.

5.

AUTO/MAN Pressure Selector Switch.............................................. MAN


This is done to disable the automatic (electropneumatic) system and to
enable manual (pneumatic) control of the pressurization system.

6.

Pressurization UPDN Knob .............................. DOWN, AS REQUIRED


Use the manual knob to control cabin pressure. Moving the switch
counterclockwise, from the 1- or 2-oclock position, commands a cabin
down signal to the pneumatic outflow valve. Moving the knob to its full
counterclockwise position closes the pneumatic outflow valve and
commands an approximate 1,500-foot-per-minute rate of descent for the
cabin, thereby increasing pressure differential.

If cabin pressure cannot be restored:


7.

Isolation Valve Knob .............................................................. ISOLATION


This action separates the bleed-air manifold. The ISOL light should come
on. This is an attempt to see if there is a bleed-air leak in one side of the
manifold or the other. If there is a leak, it will be isolated to one side, and
bleed air will be available from the other side for air conditioning and
pressurization.

If cabin pressure is restored:


8.

Cycle the crew and passenger air-conditioning valve switches on and off
alternately to determine which is the operating system for maintaining air
conditioning and pressurization.
Leave the operating system switch on, and turn the malfunctioning system
switch off.

9.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED


If it was necessary to turn off one of the air-conditioning systems, you
must tie the crew and passenger air-conditioning systems together in order
to provide complete interior air circulation.

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OR
If cabin pressure is not restored:
8.

NORMEMERG Pressure Selector Switch .................................. EMERG


Moving this switch to EMERG causes the closure of the passenger airconditioning system electric valve and moves the electric valve of the crew
air-conditioning system to the full hot position. This bypasses the total
conditioning system and allows engine bleed air to be directed straight to
the cabin of the aircraft, through the crew air-conditioning system. If the
aircraft stays in this configuration for long, the air inside the cabin will
begin to get warm.
THEN

If cabin pressure is restored:


9.

Continue flight at the highest possible altitude.


In the decision to continue flight or to descend and land at a suitable
airport, take into account the source of the problem. Where the aircraft is
flying, over land or water, should enter into the judgment.

10.

Crew Temperature Controller............................................ AS REQUIRED


As the temperature of the cabin gets warmer, select manual control on the
crew temperature control panel, and move the temperature control toward
cold. However, do not move the temperature control to less than 50% hot,
i.e., less than half way of the dial. To go lower than 50% hot would mean
that you could start losing pressure again as more air is channeled through
the heat exchanger and other temperature-lowering devices.

If the temperature gets too high during the descent:


11.

Crew Air-Conditioning Valve Switch .................................................. OFF


This will close off the flow of hot bleed air to the cabin. However, keep a
vigilance on the pressurization needs of the aircraft relative to the altitude
through which the descent is made.
OR

If cabin pressure cannot be restored:


9.

Crew Oxygen Masks ..................................................DONNED/NORMAL


To prevent oxygen deprivation, immediately put on the oxygen masks and
ensure 100% is selected.

AP-110

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10.

Microphone Selector........................................................................ MASK


Set the audio panels on each side console to MASK and CPIT for hot
mike communications in the cockpit.

11.

No Smoking Sign................................................................................... ON
Smoking and oxygen are not a good mix in an aircraft. A verbal directive
over the loud speaker system might be appropriate as well.

12.

Passenger Oxygen Masks ........................................................... DONNED

13.

If necessary, execute an emergency descent to 14,000 feet or to the


minimum safe altitude, as required.

DOOR UNLOCKED INDICATION


Case 1
CABIN

No aural warning occurs.


The red cabin light illuminates without any aural warning. If the aural warning
were heard, it is another abnormal procedure for too high a cabin altitude.
This indicates that either the cabin access door is not fully closed or the
forward toilet service door (for those aircraft so equipped) is not fully closed
and latched.
If on the ground, proceed as follows:
1.

Cabin Entrance Door............................................ CHECKED VISUALLY


Visually check the position of the index marks on the handle and the two
crankpins in their tracks on the doorframe.

If the door is properly secured:


2.

Exit the aircraft and check that the forward toilet service door is properly
latched closed.

If in flight:
1.

FASTEN BELTS Sign ........................................................................... ON


Turn on the FASTEN BELTS sign and announce over the cabin paging
system that passengers must take their seats.

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2.

Cabin Entrance Door ................................................. VISUALLY CHECK


Visually check the alignment of the index marks on the handle and the
position of the two crankpins in their tracks on the doorframe. The two
microswitches for cabin door warning indication are located in the bottom
of each crankpin track.

If the door is, or seems to be, improperly locked:


3.

Cabin Differential Pressure ................................ REDUCE, IF POSSIBLE


Be cautious in the method of reducing cabin pressure. It is recommended
that the way to reduce cabin differential is to begin a slow descent and let
the normal automatic reduction of pressurization differential take place. A
sudden rash reduction of pressure by dumping might prove detrimental.

4.

Land as soon as possible.

Case 2
REAR
DOORS

This light indicates that either the baggage compartment external door, or the
rear compartment door, is not fully closed and latched.
Access to the baggage compartment is not permitted.

WARNING
If the suspect door is the baggage compartment door,
access to the baggage compartment must be denied
in the event of a sudden decompression.
1.

BAG ACCESS Light ........................................................................... OUT


This light should normally be out. If it is on, ascertain that the baggage
compartment has been evacuated and that the baggage access door is
closed and latched.

AP-112

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Case 3
BAG
ACCESS

This light should normally be out. This light comes on when a person opens
the access door to the baggage compartment. Entry to the baggage compartment is permitted in flight to a maximum flight level of 410.
If the baggage compartment is not in use, visually check for proper closing
of the baggage compartment access door.

Case 4
BAG
ISOL

This light illuminates if the baggage compartment electric isolation valve is


not fully open. The baggage compartment may not be pressurized if the
baggage access door is closed. Check the BAG selector switch on the overhead
bleed-air panel.

OXYGENNO AUTOMATIC DEPLOYMENT OF MASKS


If the oxygen masks do not automatically deploy when cabin altitude reaches
11,500 750 feet:
1.

Oxygen Controller ................................................................... OVERRIDE


This emergency manual setting for the controller should deploy the masks
if the automatic system fails.

2.

Passenger Masks..................................................... DONNED/CHECKED

APU BLEED LIGHT


BLEED
APU

This light illuminates if the APU bleed-air valve is not completely closed
whenever the bleed switch is off or when one of the power levers is moved
beyond 54 of power lever movement and the valve has not automatically closed.
Investigate the cause and correct the problem before takeoff.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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WINDSHIELD
CRACK OR BUBBLES FORM
If a windshield gets fissured or cracked, the flight can be continued without
danger. Pressurization integrity should be maintained.
1.

Limit Airspeed....................................................... 230 KIAS MAXIMUM


By limiting airspeed, the adverse effects of heavy airloads on a cracked
window are lessened.

2.

Cabin Differential Pressure ........................................ 7.5 PSI MAXIMUM


Maintain this pressure differential as a maximum to preclude further
cracking due to a high-pressure differential.

3.

Associated Windshield Heat Switch .......................................... NORMAL

HEAT SYSTEM INOPERATIVE


XFR

This light illuminates when there is an electrical short or a stoppage in the


left or right regulator probe. Heating regulation is automatically transferred
to the operating regulator. System performance should not be affected.
1.

Pilot and Copilot Windshield Heat Switches ................ SAME POSITION

Pilot and copilot windshield heat switches should be selected to the same
position.
If possible, before landing:
2.

AP-114

Windshield Heat Switches (Pilot and Copilot) .................................... OFF

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AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM (AFCS)


AFCS OUT-OF-TRIM CONDITION
Case 1
MISTRIM

A message will also appear on the ID 802: PITCH MISTRIM NOSE or NOSE
DOWN. This indicates that there is a permanent load on the pitch servomotor.
1.

Hold the control wheel firmly.


Before disconnecting the autopilot, grasp and hold the control wheel
firmly to overcome any out-of-trim condition that might exist when the
autopilot is disconnected.

2.

Autopilot ............................................................................ DISENGAGED


Disengage the autopilot by pressing the disengage button located on the
bottom aft portion of the control wheel. The autopilot can also be
disconnected by pressing the go-around button, the elevator trim buttons,
or the emergency elevator trim switch or by pulling the AFCS circuit
breakers. Be ready for any unusual aircraft flight condition as the
disconnect is initiated. The AP light will come on and the ID 802 will
show disengagement. The AP light can be extinguished by pressing the
autopilot disconnect button once again.

3.

Manually trim the aircraft.


In other words, hand fly the aircraft and retrim the surfaces.

4.

Try to reengage the autopilot.

Case 2
MISTRIM

A message will also appear on the ID 802: RETRIM ROLL R WING DOWN
or L WING DOWN. This indicates that there is a permanent load on the roll
servomotor.
1.

Retrim the aircraft without disengaging the autopilot.

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AP-115

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MACH TRIM INOPERATIVE


MACH
TRIM

This indicates a malfunction of the Mach trim device.


Do not exceed .80 Mach unless the autopilot is engaged.

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK STALL
PROBE HEATING FAILURE
L. AOA

OR

R. AOA

Illumination of either light indicates a failure of the anti-icing system of the


corresponding angle-of-attack stall probe.
1.

Avoid icing conditions.

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK PROBE
HEAT SYSTEM INOPERATIVE
AOA PROBE

This indicates failure of the anti-icing system of the angle of-attack


indicator probe.
The angle-of-attack indicator system must not be used in icing conditions.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS


FAILURE OF ENGINE DETECTION SYSTEM
FAULT

Illumination of this light indicates a defect in the fire protection monitoring


circuit of the corresponding engine.
1.

AP-116

Land as soon as possible.

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FAILURE OF APU FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM


FAULT

Illumination of this light indicates a defect in the APU fire protection


monitoring circuit.
1.

APU...................................................................................... SHUT DOWN

EFIS
NOTE
I n t h e e v e n t o f a f a i l u r e o f e i t h e r C RT, t h e
approach will be flown by the pilot who has both
CRTs operational.

NOTE
In the event of the failure of the EHSI CRT, on aircraft so equipped with the multifunction display, the
MFD controller may be selected to the HSI position,
if required.

EITHER EADI CRT FAILURE


The CRT display on the EADI will go blank, or the color will be altered and
difficult to interpret.
On the associated EFIS reversion controller:
1.

EADI ONOFF Dimmer Knob .......................................... OFF/COMPOS


Information that was formerly displayed on the EADI CRT will be
transferred and will appear in a composite form on the EHSI CRT.

If a multifunction display is installed and if desired:


1.

Place the mode selector switch in the EHSI position corresponding to the
inoperative CRT.
The EHSI display will now appear on the MFD. The composite on the
EHSI will disappear, leaving the full EADI display that formerly appeared
on the EADI CRT.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AP-117

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EITHER EHSI CRT FAILURE


The CRT display on the EHSI will go blank or the color will be altered and
difficult to interpret.
On the associated EFIS reversion controller:
1.

EHSI ONOFF Dimmer Knob ............................................OFF/COMPOS


Information that was formerly displayed on the EHSI CRT will be
transferred and will appear in a composite form on the EADI CRT.

If a multifunction display is installed and if desired:


2.

Place the mode selector switch in the EHSI position corresponding to the
inoperative CRT.
The EHSI display will now appear on the MFD. The composite on the
EADI will disappear, leaving the full EADI display.

SIMULTANEOUS FAILURE OF EADI


AND EHSI CRTs ON THE SAME SIDE
Both CRT displays go blank, SG flags appear on the EHSI and EADI or the
color is altered and difficult to interpret. This indicates a malfunction in the
respective symbol generator for that EFIS system.
On the associated EFIS reversion controller:
1.

SG Pushbutton ............................................................................ DEPRESS


This will allow the good EFIS information that is presented on the other
pilots side to be transferred to the side that was experiencing a
malfunction. White XSG annunciators will illuminate on the EADI and
EHSI. One symbol generator supplies all four CRTs. The center CRT
goes blank.

NOTE
The MFD symbol generator may be used in the backup
mode for both the pilot and copilot symbol generators simultaneously. The crossover annunciation is
an amber XSG flag on all four CRTs.

AP-118

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SUCCESSIVE FAILURE OF EADI


AND EHSI CRTs ON THE SAME SIDE
In this situation, one CRT goes blank, soon followed by the other CRT
going blank.
1.

EADI/EHSI ONOFF Dimmer Knobs............................... OFF/COMPOS


Move both knobs to the counterclockwise position.

2.

Place the mode selector switch in the EHSI position corresponding to the
inoperative CRT.

3.

Use the standby horizon.

4.

The pilot whose CRTs are operating flies the aircraft.

LOSS OF ASCB CONTROL


XDATA flag appears on both EADIs.
Items that are lost:
Cross-side data
Glide-slope, localizer, and radio altimeter comparison annunciators.

NOTE
If the aircraft is equipped with a third IRS, IRS 3 may
be used in the backup mode for both IRS 1 and IRS
2 simultaneously. The associated display is an amber
IRS annunciator on all four CRTs.

INVALID ATTITUDE AND/OR HEADING DATA


IRS flag appears on EADI and EHSI, and loss of attitude and heading reference occurs.
On the associated reversion controller:
1.

IRS Pushbutton........................................................................... DEPRESS


Push the IRS button to cross over to the other side IRS. White XIRS flags
will appear on the EADI and EHSI. Attitude data is supplied by the
operational IRS.

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NOTE
If the aircraft is equipped with a third IRS, IRS 3 may
be used in the backup mode for both IRS 1 and IRS
2 simultaneously. The associated display is an amber
IRS annunciator on all four CRTs.

IRS ATTITUDE COMPARISON ANNUNCIATION WITH OR


WITHOUT A HEADING COMPARISON ANNUNCIATION
IRS comparison annunciators appear on both EADIs and a possible IRS data
invalid message appears on the ID 802.
1.

Standby Horizon .............................................................. CROSS-CHECK


Compare the standby attitude indicator with the information displayed on
the EADI.

2.

Faulty IRS ................................................................................. IDENTIFY


Troubleshoot the electronic instrument systems to try to identify the
faulty IRS.

When the faulty IRS is identified, on the EFIS reversion controller panel on
the faulty side:
3.

IRS Pushbutton........................................................................... DEPRESS


To cross over the system, to put the operative side on the bad side, push
the IRS pushbutton, and observe that an XIRS flag appears. Turn off the
bad IRS.

IRS HEADING COMPARISON ANNUNCIATION


WITHOUT AN ATTITUDE COMPARISON ANNUNCIATION
IRS comparison annunciation appears on both EHSIs.
1.

Standby Compass and RMI.............................................. CROSS-CHECK


Compare the readings on the standby compass and RMI against the
readings on each EHSI. From this comparison, the faulty IRS can be
identified.

2.

AP-120

Faulty IRS ................................................................................. IDENTIFY

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Follow either Procedure A or B below:

Procedure A
If the faulty IRS is in the NAV mode and the position indication is correct,
on the reversion controller for the faulty side IRS:
1.

IRS Pushbutton........................................................................... DEPRESS


To cross over the system, to put the operative side on the bad side, push
the IRS pushbutton, and observe that an XIRS flag appears.
OR

Procedure B
If the faulty side IRS is in the NAV mode, but the position indication is
incorrect, on the mode select unit (MSU) of the faulty IRS:
2.

Selector................................................................................................. ATT
Move the MSU knob from NAV to ATT. This eliminates the navigation
computer and allows the IRS to become a basic attitude reference system.

3.

FMS of Faulty Side IRS........................... ENTER CORRECT HEADING


To enter the correct heading for the FMS to track its IRS, you must select
the POS SENSORS page on the FMS. When this page comes into view,
select the status page of the IRS that is in ATT. Enter the heading in the
space provided on this page. The heading may be obtained from the
information provided by the other FMS or from the standby magnetic
compass if straight and level and with the windshield heat off.

IAS/MACH DATA INVALID


IAS flag appears on EADI and loss of IAS and Mach data occurs.
On the associated faulty side reversion controller:
1.

IAS/Mach Pushbutton ................................................................ DEPRESS


This action will allow the crossover of IAS and Mach information from
the good side. The XIAS annunciators in each EADI should illuminate.

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IAS DISPARITY ANNUNCIATION


IAS comparison annunciation appears in each EADI.
It is possible that a DADC DATA INVALID message will appear in the ID 802
as well.
1.

Standby Airspeed Indicator............................................................ CHECK


Cross-check the information given on the standby airspeed indicator with
the information given on each EADI. The EADI having the same, or
nearly the same, information as the standby airspeed indicator can be
considered having the good DADC information.

After the faulty DADC has been identified, on the faulty side reversion
controller:
2.

IAS/Mach Pushbutton ................................................................ DEPRESS


This action will allow the crossover of IAS and Mach information from
the good side. The XIAS annunciators in each EADI should illuminate.

LOC OR GS DISPARITY ANNUNCIATION


LOC or GS comparison annunciation appears in each EADI for any altitude
below 1,200 feet AGL.
1.

Faulty ILS ................................................................................. IDENTIFY


Check each navigation radio for proper identification of the facility, and
try to determine which radio is malfunctioning. Turn the bad navigation
receiver off and:

2.

Proper ILS Radio for Each Side ................................................... SELECT

FAILURE OF EITHER FMS


1.

Cross-Check Position ...............................................EVERY 30 MINUTES


Continually cross-check the position given by one FMS and IRS with the
position given by the other side FMS and IRS.

If one side FMS appears to have failed:


2.

AP-122

Select the FMS of the good side for navigation on its respective EHSI.

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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CONTENTS
Page
GENERAL......................................................................................... EP-1
ENGINE FIRE................................................................................... EP-2
INTERNAL ENGINE FIRE ON THE GROUND............................. EP-4
APU FIRE.......................................................................................... EP-5
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT FIRE................................................ EP-8
MAIN WHEEL WELL OVERHEAT................................................ EP-9
AIR-CONDITIONING SMOKE..................................................... EP-10
ELECTRICAL SMOKE OR FIRE.................................................. EP-15
SMOKE REMOVAL ....................................................................... EP-19
INADVERTENT THRUST REVERSER
DEPLOYMENT IN FLIGHT.......................................................... EP-21
TWO ENGINES INOPERATIVE
APPROACH AND LANDING ....................................................... EP-23
Preparation ............................................................................. EP-23
Approach................................................................................ EP-24
When Committed for Landing ............................................... EP-25
After Touchdown ................................................................... EP-27
TWO ENGINES INOPERATIVEGO-AROUND ....................... EP-27
On the Go-Around ................................................................. EP-27
ALL ENGINES INOPERATIVE .................................................... EP-28
LOSS OF BOTH HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS .................................. EP-31
Landing Preparation............................................................... EP-32
After Touchdown ................................................................... EP-35
LOSS OF ALL THREE GENERATORS........................................ EP-35
Reduced Load on Batteries (SAFT 2376).............................. EP-39
RAPID DEPRESSURIZATION...................................................... EP-40
EMERGENCY DESCENT ............................................................. EP-41
FORCED LANDING ...................................................................... EP-42
Preparation ............................................................................. EP-42

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Approach................................................................................
Just Before Touchdown..........................................................
After the Airplane Has Come to a Stop .................................
DITCHING......................................................................................
Preparation .............................................................................
ApproachParallel to the Major Swell.................................
Just Before Touchdown..........................................................
After Touchdown ...................................................................

EP-ii

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EP-43
EP-44
EP-45
EP-45
EP-45
EP-47
EP-48
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
EP-1
EP-2
EP-3
EP-4
EP-5
EP-6

Title
Page
Fire Panel and Warning Lights ...................................... EP-2
Fire Panel and Warning LightsFIRE APU ................ EP-6
Fire Panel and Warning LightsFIRE BAG COMP .... EP-8
Bleed-Air Panel .......................................................... EP-12
Inflight Airstart Envelope............................................ EP-29
Hydraulic Panel .......................................................... EP-31

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
GENERAL
Where these emergency checklist procedures differ from the Airplane Flight
Manual, the Airplane Flight Manual takes precedence.
Compliance with the order prescribed for application of these procedures
is recommended.
Where more than one phase for a procedure is specified:

Phase 1 specifies immediate action to be accomplished without the


need for reference to the checklist.

Phase 2 items shall be completed only after phase 1 items have been
accomplished by checklist.
Phase 3 items shall be accomplished as soon as time permits.
Aural warnings shall be identified before being silenced. Eliminating these
aural warnings will enable better coordination during accomplishment of the
emergency procedures.
The Airplane Operating Manual prescribes the following procedure if the fire
aural warning sounds without the presence of a FIRE light:
Test the detection system by activating the test switch to FIRE.
If a FIRE light does not come on, the fire corresponds to that light.
If all the FIRE lights come on, the aural warning is a false alarm.
In all cases, carefully observe all other indications and instruments to confirm either a malfunction or a false alarm.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-1

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ENGINE FIRE
FIRE

+ AURAL WARNING

NOTE
The following procedure must be followed, whether
or not the FAULT light is on.

Phase 1
After positively identifying the engine affected and silencing the aural warning:
1.

Power Lever of Engine Concerned............................................... CUTOFF


Moving the power lever cutoff closes the fuel supply to the engine at the
fuel control.

2.

Fuel Shutoff Switch of Engine Concerned ............................. ACTUATED


Raise the guard on the fuel shutoff switch (Figure EP-1) and move the
switch up to electrically close the fuel shutoff valve. The fuel shutoff valve
is located in the crossfeed manifold downstream from the fuel tank system.
Carefully observe that the amber TRANS light, located under the fuel
shutoff switch, comes on and then goes out after the shutoff switch is
actuated. This light will illuminate during the movement of the valve in
order to confirm positioning of the valve with the position of the switch.

Figure EP-1. Fire Panel and Warning Lights

EP-2

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

3.

Airspeed ................................................................... BELOW 250 KNOTS


The airspeed must be reduced to ensure that the fire-extinguishing agent,
when discharged to the engine, stays within the engine cowling and is not
siphoned overboard.

4.

Fire-Extinguisher DISCH Switch.......................................... POSITION 1


Break the safety wire holding the fire-extinguisher switch in position 0.
Without pulling out on the switch, carefully move the switch up to
position 1. This is best done by placing only one finger under the switch
and moving it upward from the bottom.
Selecting position 1 discharges one fire-extinguisher bottle to a lateral
engine or two fire-extinguisher bottles to the center engine.

If the fire warning persists:


5.

Fire-Extinguisher DISCH Switch.......................................... POSITION 2


Position 2 is a lever-locked position, and the switch must now be pulled
out and moved upward to select this position.
Selecting position 2 discharges one alternate fire extinguisher bottle to a
lateral engine and two alternate fire extinguisher bottles to the center engine.

Phase 2
Proceed with phase 2 items after phase 1 items have been verified by
the checklist.

CAUTION
After the fire has been extinguished, do not attempt
to restart the affected engine.

Engine Shutdown
6.

Booster Switch ..................................................................................... OFF


Move the respective engine booster switch to the off position, unless the
pump is needed for fuel management purposes, and check for illumination
of the corresponding fuel light on the warning panel. If the No. 2 engine is
shut down, No. 2 system fuel must be consumed first in order to maintain
a correct center of gravity.

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7.

GEN Switch ......................................................................................... OFF


The generator switch should be placed off to remove the affected generator
from the electrical circuitry.

8.

Engine Anti-ice .................................................................................... OFF

If the No. 2 engine is shut down:


9.

Bus-Tie Switch ................................................................................... TIED


With the No. 2 engine shut down, generator power to the right side
electrical buses is lost. To prevent the No. 2 battery from being depleted,
tie the bus to supply the right-side bus from the No. 1 and No. 3
generators. Check the generator volts and amps to ensure the buses have
been tied. A higher-than-normal bus load may be indicated on the
remaining generators. This higher load may be caused by the No. 2 battery
being charged after tying the buses. Continue to monitor bus loading until
the No. 2 battery is fully charged.

10.

Standby Hydraulic Pump ........................................... ON/AS REQUIRED


Consider moving the standby hydraulic pump switch to ON. The enginedriven hydraulic pump may not have sufficient windmilling rpm for normal
operation of the No. 2 hydraulic system components. In flight, in the AUTO
position, the standby pump cycles only to support airbrake operations.

CAUTION
If in icing conditions, operate the No. 2 engine antiice even with the engine shut down. The S-duct will
continue to be anti-iced through bleed air supplied
from the main manifold by the No. 1 and No. 3 engine.
11.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

INTERNAL ENGINE FIRE ON THE GROUND


The best way to fight an internal engine fire is to rotate the compressor by
means of the starter in order to cool the engine at the location of the fire. The
purpose is to evacuate both excess fuel and any flames present.

EP-4

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If a fire breaks out during a starting attempt, or when shutting down the engine, the engine must be rotated, with the power lever set to cutoff, until the
fire is out.
1.

Power Lever.................................................................................. CUTOFF


Move the power lever to cutoff to shut off the fuel at the fuel control.

2.

Fuel Shutoff Switch ................................................................ ACTUATED


Move the fuel shutoff switch (Figure EP-2) up to shut off fuel at the fuel
manifold for the engine affected.

3.

Start Selector Switch ............................................ MOTORSTART STOP


This arms the start circuit for engine motoring.

4.

Start Button ........................................................................... DEPRESSED


Hold the respective engine start button depressed until the fire goes out.
This rotates the engine without the presence of fuel, an action that should
evacuate any residual fuel, causing the fire to extinguish.

5.

Crew and Passenger Bleed Switches.................................................... OFF


This is done to keep fumes from entering the cabin of the aircraft.

6.

Evacuation...................................................... INITIATED IF REQUIRED


Initiate the evacuation when crew and passengers have been breifed. Fire
brigade is also advised.

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EP-5

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APU FIRE
See Figure EP-2 for location of the FIRE APU and FAULT indicator light.

DISCH
2
1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

DISCH
2
1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

1
0

FAULT
FIRE APU

TRANS
FAULT

FIRE 1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

TRANS
FAULT

DISCH
2
1

TRANS
FAULT

FIRE 2

FIRE 3

1
0
FIRE
BAG COMP

Figure EP-2. Fire Panel and Warning LightsFIRE APU

APU FIRE

+ AURAL WARNING

NOTE
The following procedure must be followed, whether
or not the FAULT light is on.

NOTE
If a fire or an overheat is detected and indicated, the
APU stops automatically through closure of the
fuel shutoff valve and removal of the electrical
power supply.
1.

APU Master Pushbutton Light............................................. SHUT DOWN


This action is taken to ensure power is removed from the APU electrical
control circuitry.

2.

APU Generator Pushbutton Light ........................................................ OFF


This is part of the cleanup procedure to disconnect any possible residual
electrical circuitry.

3.

Bleed-Air APU Switch......................................................................... OFF


This action is necessary to close off any potential air supply to the cabin to
prevent smoke or fumes from entering.

EP-6

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NOTE
Wait for ten seconds to allow the APU to come to a
complete stop before discharging the fire extinguisher. This will ensure that the discharge agent
stays within the APU compartment to increase the effectiveness of the agent.
4.

APU Extinguisher Switch ...................................................... POSITION 1


There is only one position on the APU extinguisher switch that fires one
bottle to the APU compartment. This same bottle is used for protection of
the baggage compartment.

If the fire warning persists:


5.

No. 2 Engine Fuel Shutoff Switch .......................................... ACTUATED


The fuel supply to the APU is provided through the No. 2 engine fuel
system. If the fire persisted, shutdown of the No. 2 engine is required to
further attempt to isolate the cause of the fire. Check for illumination and
then extinguishing of the TRANS light on the fire panel.

6.

No. 2 Engine Power Lever ........................................................... CUTOFF


The No. 2 engine must be shut down as well to permit access to the APU
by firefighting personnel. This is the continuing cleanup procedure to
ensure engine shutdown.

7.

Booster 2 Switch .................................................................................. OFF


As it is no longer needed, the boost pump must be turned off.

8.

No. 2 GEN Switch................................................................................ OFF

9.

No. 2 Engine Anti-ice .......................................................................... OFF


If the anti-ice system was turned on for ground operations, it should be
turned off as part of the cleanup procedure.

CAUTION
Do not attempt to restart the APU after it has been
shut down, due to a fire or an overheat condition.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-7

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT FIRE


FIRE
BAG COMP

+ AURAL WARNING

See Figure EP-3 for location of FIRE BAG COMP light.

Phase 1
BAG Switch....................................................................................... HE
XAT

1.

Move the BAG switch from NORM to the HE


XAT position. This action
shuts off the hot bleed-air supply to the baggage compartment. Because
the isolation valve between the cabin and baggage compartment is still
open, the pressure between the two compartments should remain equal,
allowing the baggage access door to be opened for firefighting purposes.

DISCH
2
1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

DISCH
2
1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

1
0

TRANS
FAULT

FIRE 2

FAULT
FIRE APU

TRANS
FAULT

FIRE 1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

TRANS
FAULT

DISCH
2
1

FIRE 3

1
0
FIRE
BAG COMP

Figure EP-3. Fire Panel and Warning LightsFIRE BAG COMP

NOTE
For aircraft registered in the United States, Australia,
Italy, and the U.K., access to the baggage compartment is not authorized when the aircraft altitude is
above 41,000 feet. Modifications to the following
procedures must be made in order to comply with this
restriction when above 41,000 feet.
2.

EP-8

If access to the baggage compartment is permitted, the copilot dons the


smoke hood and fights the fire with the handheld fire extinguisher.

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CAUTION
The lavatory door must be properly closed prior to
opening the baggage compartment door to prevent
smoke and fumes from entering the passenger cabin.
If access to the baggage compartment is not permitted because the
compartment has depressurized, the aircraft is above 41,000 feet, the
aircraft is in the takeoff or landing phase of flight, or the presence of both
pilots is required in the cockpit.
1. BAG Switch................................................................................... ISOL
This will close the isolation valve between the cabin and baggage
compartment in order to keep fumes from entering the main cabin.
Confirmation of valve closing is obtained by illumination of both the
BAG ISOL light and ISOL light indications on the mechanics panel.
It may serve a secondary purpose by starving the oxygen supply to a
fire existing in the compartment. Your judgment in evaluating this
situation and applying the proper decision-making process is certainly
very important.
2. BAG COMP Extinguisher Switch .................................... POSITION 1
Break the safety wire on the baggage compartment fire-extinguisher
switch and move the switch to position 1. This fires one bottle to the
baggage compartment.

Phase 2
3.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

MAIN WHEEL WELL OVERHEAT


L. WHL
OVHT

AND/OR

R. WHL
OVHT

Lights are on the master failure warning panel.

NOTE
There is no fire-extinguishing system for the wheel
wells. The warning can originate from either wheel
well, usually caused by overheated brake units.
However, if the wheel well heating system has been installed, this system could be the cause of the warning.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-9

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

1.

Airspeed ..................................................................... 190 KIAS OR LESS


This is the maximum airspeed for landing gear operations (VLO). Slow to
this speed before extending the landing gear.

2.

Landing Gear.......................................................................... EXTENDED


Place the normal landing gear selector handle down to extend the gear.
Check for normal indications during the extension of the landing gear.
Keep the landing gear down until the overheat warning light(s) is out, but
not for less than ten minutes. Do not exceed 245 KIAS while the landing
gear are extended.

3.

Brake Heating System (A/C Equipped with this System) ................... OFF
This will close the respective brake heat valves and limit the introduction
of heated air into the wheel well area.

CAUTION
The overheat condition may have caused brake and/or
tire damage. Make a shallow final approach and as
soft a landing as possible.

NOTE
Unless a greater emergency exists, it is advisable to
leave the landing gear extended until landing at the
nearest suitable airport is achieved, especially if tire
or brake damage is suspected.

AIR-CONDITIONING SMOKE
The warning associated with this emergency may be smoke originating from
the air-conditioning outlets and the gaspers.

Phase 1
1.

Crew Oxygen Masks and Smoke Goggles....................... 100%/DONNED


The crew oxygen masks must be put on immediately upon the detection of
smoke. Be careful of eye glasses when putting on the masks to avoid
personal injury or to avoid a poor fit of the mask around the glasses. The
mask must fit tightly around the face to ensure smoke does not penetrate
the mask and enter the breathing passages. Ensure that the
NORMAL100% oxygen selector button on the front of the mask is in the

EP-10

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100% (pure oxygen) position. Remove the smoke goggles from their
storage area and place them over the eyes with a tight fit to ensure proper
vision during the smoke/fire emergency.
2.

Microphone Selector.................................................... MASK AND TEST


For hot mike communications within the cockpit, speakers must be
selected, and the mask and CPIT buttons on the pilot and copilot audio
panels must be pushed on. To communicate to an outside agency, select
the proper radio microphone button on the audio panel, and depress the
MIC button on the top inside of either control wheel.

3.

No Smoking Sign................................................................................... ON

4.

Passenger Oxygen Controller .................................................. OVERRIDE


On the copilots right console, move the selector switch on the passenger
oxygen panel clockwise to OVERRIDE and check that the pneumatic
PASS ON indicator is fully open. This position drops the passenger oxygen
masks from their storage bins at each passenger position and allows a flow
of oxygen when the passenger pulls the mask down and then dons it.

5.

Passenger Masks......................................................................... DONNED


Before takeoff on the first flight of the day, the passengers must be briefed
on the location and proper use of the masks. A crewmember must ensure
that the passengers have properly donned their masks in the event of this
emergency.

Phase 2
1.

Crew Gaspers .................................................................................... OPEN


This action is designed to increase the airflow in the cockpit to expedite
smoke evacuation as the checklist continues.

2.

Isolation Valve Knob (Figure EP-4) ....................................... ISOLATION


On the overhead panel, move the isolation valve knob to a straight up and
down position to isolate the bleed-air manifold into a left and right
configuration. The amber ISOL light located above the knob should be on,
indicating the valve is closed. Once the isolation valve is closed, carefully
watch the cabin and crew air-conditioning outlets to see if there is a
change in the smoke entering the aircraft.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-11

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Figure EP-4. Bleed-Air Panel


I f s m o ke i s n o l o n g e r o b s e r ve d t o b e c o m i n g t h r o u g h t h e c r ew a i rconditioning system, there is no need to set the crew air-conditioning switch
to OFF.
3.

Crew Bleed-Air Switch (If Smoke Persists) ........................................ OFF


If the smoke decreases or disappears after this action, the smoke was
coming from the No. 1 or No. 3 engine. There are two alternatives to
consider. Follow alternative 1 or 2 below:

EP-12

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

4.

COND Control Lever ......................................................................... TIED


On the copilots right console, move the cabin/cockpit interconnection
control lever aft. This interconnects the ducting of the two air-conditioning
systems. Clean conditioned air will now be supplied to the entire airconditioning system by the passenger air-conditioning system using bleed
air from only the No. 2 engine.
OR
Troubleshoot the system to determine which engine, No. 1 or No. 3, was
causing the smoke. The air-conditioning systems can then be switched
back to normal operations, provided the defective engine N1 rpm is kept
3% below that of the other two engines. Sound judgment should dictate
your choice in this emergency. It might be prudent to choose Alternative
1 above.

If smoke persists:
5.

Crew Bleed-Air Switch.......................................................................... ON


The passenger bleed-air system becomes suspect at this point. To keep air
coming into the aircraft before proceeding further with the checklist, move
the crew bleed-air switch to ON.

6.

Passenger Bleed-Air Switch................................................................. OFF


If the smoke decreases or disappears, continue the flight with the
faulty bleed-air switch isolated. The smoke probably emanated from the
No. 2 engine.

If the smoke persists, the cooling unit is suspect. Proceed as follows:


7.

Crew Temperature Controller ................................... MANUAL/40% HOT


Since the crew bleed-air switch is the only bleed on, an attempt to control
the flow of cold air to a minimum will be made. Set the crew temperature
controller to MANUAL, and hold the manual COLDHOT selector to the
HOT position until the indicator needle moves toward the H indication,
about 40% away from the left side of the gage.

If the smoke disappears:


If the smoke decreases or disappears, continue the flight and use the crew temperature controller, as required, to establish the proper cabin temperature. Do
not select a position lower than 40% HOT.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-13

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If the smoke persists:


8.

Crew Bleed-Air Switch ........................................................................ OFF


The only remaining procedure is to turn off the entire bleed-air supply to
the air-conditioning system. The aircraft will now begin to depressurize,
yet may still be filled with smoke.

9.

Descend to 14,000 feet or below or to the minimum safe altitude.

CAUTION
The following procedure must not be applied if flames
are present in the cabin or cockpit.
At or below 14,000 feet:
10.

Pressurization Dump Switch............................................................ DUMP


Lower the guard on the dump switch, and set the switch to the DUMP
position. This action opens the outflow valves and dumps the cabin
pressure at a rapid rate down to the cabin altitude limiter altitude of
14,000 500 feet. Smoke should be evacuated from the cabin during the
dump operation.

At or below and indicated airspeed of 215 knots:


11.

LH Direct-Vision Window ................................................................ OPEN


If required to help eliminate smoke from the cockpit, the pilots directvision window may be opened.

Phase 3
1.

Descend to 10,000 feet or to the minimum safe altitude for the


route flown.
This is the maximum altitude for sustained flight, without oxygen, in an
unpressurized aircraft.

If the smoke continues or if the fire is not visibly verified to be out:


2.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

EP-14

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ELECTRICAL SMOKE OR FIRE


Phase 1
Smoke and Unusual Odors
1.

Crew Oxygen Masks and Smoke Goggles....................... 100%/DONNED


The crew oxygen masks must be put on immediately upon the detection of
smoke. Be careful of eye glasses when putting on the masks to avoid
personal injury and to avoid a poor fit of the mask around the glasses. The
mask must fit tightly around the face to ensure smoke does not penetrate
the mask and enter the breathing passages. Ensure that the
NORMAL100% oxygen selector button on the front of the mask is in the
100% (pure oxygen) position. Remove the smoke goggles from their
storage area, and place them over the eyes with a tight fit to ensure proper
vision during the smoke/fire emergency.

2.

Microphone Selector.................................................... MASK AND TEST


For hot mike communications within the cockpit, speakers must be
selected and the mask and CPIT buttons on the pilot and copilot audio
panels must be pushed on. To communicate to an outside agency, select
the proper radio microphone button on the audio panel, and depress the
MIC button on the top inside of either control wheel.

3.

No Smoking Sign................................................................................... ON

Only if there are no flames in the cabin:


4.

Passenger Oxygen Controller


and Passenger Masks............................................. OVERRIDE/DONNED
On the copilots right console, move the selector switch on the passenger
oxygen panel clockwise to OVERRIDE and check that the pneumatic
PASS ON indicator is fully open. This position drops the passenger
oxygen masks from their storage bins at each passenger position and
allows a flow of oxygen when the passenger pulls the mask down and then
dons it. Before takeoff on the first flight of the day, the passengers must be
briefed on the location and proper use of the masks. A crewmember must
ensure that the passengers have properly donned their masks in the event
of this emergency.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-15

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Phase 2
1.

Crew Air Gaspers.............................................................................. OPEN


This action is designed to increase the airflow in the cockpit to expedite
smoke evacuation as the checklist continues.

If the origin of the fire or smoke is evident:


2.

Suspected Equipment ............................................................... ISOLATED


If equipment has been malfunctioning, or if smoke is observed to be
coming from a specific electrical component, turn off that equipment if it
is the apparent cause of smoke or fire.
OR

If the origin of the fire or smoke is not evident, and if flight conditions
permit a total electrical shutdown:
2.

GEN 1, BAT 1, BAT 2, GEN 2, and GEN 3 Switches ......................... OFF


If inflight situational conditions will permit such an action, turn off all
BAT and GEN switches to shut off all electrical power supplied to the
aircraft. After the fire/smoke has stopped, attempt to find the source of the
fire/smoke by turning on the batteries, one at a time, to see which bus side
causes the fire/smoke to recur. When the origin is known:

3.

BUS TIED Switch....................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


Confirm BUS TIED light out on the master warning panel.

4.

BAT Switch (Affected Side)................................................................. OFF


Turn off the BAT switch for the bus which is causing the fire/smoke.

5.

BAT and GEN Switches (Opposite Side) .............................................. ON


In order to restore electrical power to at least some of the aircraft
components, turn on the battery and generator for the bus not affected by
the fire/smoke. Do not tie buses.
OR

If the origin of the fire or smoke is not evident, and if flight conditions do
not permit a total electrical shutdown:
2.

EP-16

BAT 2 and GEN 2 Switches................................................................. OFF

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Move the BAT 2 and GEN 2 control switches to the OFF position. This
action eliminates the electrical power supply to the right DC electrical
buses. The amber BAT 2 and GEN 2 lights on the master failure warning
panel will illuminate.
3.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL

4.

BUS TIED Light ................................................................................. OUT


Ensure that this normal flight configuration, one which isolates the right
DC bus from the left DC bus, is maintained. This is necessary in order that
the troubleshooting procedure be effective.

5.

Passenger Temperature Controller ................................. MANUAL/COLD


Set the passenger temperature controller to manual. Hold the COLDHOT
switches to the full cold position of the indicators.

If the smoke or fire persists:


6.

AUTOMAN Pressurization Selector Switch.................................... MAN


Since the left DC buses are no longer supplied with electrical power,
which includes control of automatic pressurization, the manual mode must
be selected to control the cabin pressure. Adjust the manual pressurization
control knob, as required, to control the cabin pressure within limits.

7.

BAT 2 and GEN 2 Switches .................................................................. ON


This action is taken to restore electrical power to the right DC electrical
buses, prior to isolating the left DC electrical buses. It is assumed that the
smoke or fire was not caused by a component on the right main bus.

8.

GEN 1, BAT 1, and GEN 3 Switches................................................... OFF


This action removes electrical power from the left DC electrical buses in
order to further troubleshoot the cause of the problem.

9.

Crew Temperature Controller......................................... MANUAL/COLD


Set the crew temperature controller to MANUAL. Hold the COLDHOT
switches to the full COLD position of the indicators.

If fire or smoke is visibly verified removed:


10.

Continue the flight to the nearest suitable airport.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-17

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

If fire or smoke is not visibly verified removed:


10.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

If smoke persists:
11.

Crew Air Gaspers.............................................................................. OPEN


This action is designed to increase the airflow in the cockpit to expedite
smoke evacuation as the checklist continues.

12.

Descend to 14,000 feet or below or to the minimum safe altitude.

CAUTION
The following procedure must not be applied if flames
are present in the cabin or cockpit.
At or below 14,000 feet:
13.

Pressurization Manual UPDN Control ................................................. UP


Positioning of the manual knob control will ensure a decrease in cabin
differential and cabin depressurization.

At or below an indicated airspeed of 215 knots:


14.

LH Direct-Vision Window ................................................................ OPEN


If required to help eliminate smoke from the cockpit, the pilots directvision window may be opened.

Phase 3
1.

Descend to 10,000 feet or to the minimum safe altitude for the


route flown.
This is the maximum altitude for sustained flight, without oxygen, in an
unpressurized aircraft.

If the smoke continues or if the fire is not visibly verified to be out:


2.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

EP-18

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SMOKE REMOVAL
Phase 1
1.

Crew Oxygen Masks and Smoke Goggles....................... 100%/DONNED


The crew oxygen masks must be put on immediately upon the detection
smoke. Be careful of eye glasses when putting on the masks to avoid
personal injury and to avoid a poor fit of the mask around the glasses. The
mask must fit tightly around the face to ensure smoke does not penetrate
the mask and enter the breathing passages. Ensure that the
NORMAL100% oxygen selector button on the front of the mask is in the
100% (pure oxygen) position. Remove the goggles from their storage area,
and place them over the eyes with a tight fit to ensure proper vision during
the smoke/fire emergency.

2.

Microphone Selector.................................................... MASK AND TEST


For hot mike communications within the cockpit, speakers must be
selected, and the mask and CPIT buttons on the pilot and copilot audio
panels must be pushed on. To communicate to an outside agency, select
the proper radio microphone button on the audio panel, and depress the
MIC button on the top inside of either control wheel.

3.

No Smoking Sign................................................................................... ON

If there are no flames in the cabin:


4.

Passenger Oxygen Controller


and Passenger Masks............................................. OVERRIDE/DONNED
On the copilots right console, move the selector switch on the passenger
oxygen panel clockwise to OVERRIDE, and check that the pneumatic
PASS ON indicator is fully open. This position drops the passenger
oxygen masks from their storage bins at each passenger position and
allows a flow of oxygen when the passenger pulls the mask down and then
dons it. Before takeoff on the first flight of the day, the passengers must be
briefed on the location and proper use of the masks. A crewmember must
ensure that the passengers have properly donned their masks in the event
of this emergency.

Phase 2
1.

Crew Air Gaspers.............................................................................. OPEN


This action is designed to increase the airflow in the cockpit to expedite
smoke evacuation as the checklist continues.

2.

Crew and Temperature Controllers ................................ MANUAL/COLD

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-19

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

This action is intended to prevent the recirculation of smoke entrained air


into the cabin and cockpit.
3.

Descend to 14,000 feet or below or to the minimum safe altitude for the
route flown.

CAUTION
The following procedure must not be applied if flames
are present in the cabin or cockpit.
At or below 14,000 feet:
3.

Pressurization Dump Switch............................................ DUMP (A1 BUS


POWER REQUIRED)
Lower the guard on the dump switch, and set the switch to the DUMP
position. This action opens the outflow valves and dumps the cabin
pressure at a rapid rate down to the cabin altitude limiter altitude of
14,000 500 feet. Smoke should be evacuated from the cabin during the
dump operation.

At or below and indicated airspeed of 215 knots:


4.

LH Direct-Vision Window ................................................................ OPEN


If required to help eliminate smoke from the cockpit, the pilots directvision window may be opened.

EP-20

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Phase 3
1.

Descend to 10,000 feet or to the minimum safe altitude for the


route flown.
This is the maximum altitude for sustained flight, without oxygen, in an
unpressurized aircraft.

If the smoke persists or if the fire is not visibly verified to be out:


2.

Land as soon as possible.


The aircraft must be landed at the nearest suitable airport for inspection
and repair.

INADVERTENT THRUST REVERSER


DEPLOYMENT IN FLIGHT
REV
UNLOCK
AND POSSIBLY

TRANSIT

AND/OR

DEPLOYED

The aircraft may experience a pitch-down moment, accompanied by abnormal noise and buffeting.
The REV UNLOCK light means the thrust reverser has deployed when it is
supposed to be fully stowed. The clamshell doors of the thrust reverser may
not be fully stowed and locked.
The TRANSIT light means the clamshell door claws are not locked.
The DEPLOYED light means the synchronizing bellcrank controlling the
clamshell doors has moved to the deployed position.

Phase 1
1.

No. 2 Engine....................................................................................... IDLE


Move the throttle on the No. 2 engine to idle to reduce the engine power
loads on the deployed clamshell doors.

2.

Thrust Reverser NORM/STOW Switch ........................................... STOW


On the center instrument panel, raise the guard on the switch and move the
switch upward to the stow position. This causes retraction of the thrust
reverser by overriding all other thrust reverser electrical circuitry,
regardless of the flight conditions or the position of the thrust reverser
lever or system microswitches.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-21

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

3.

Airspeed.................................................................. 230 KNOTS OR LESS


This will additionally reduce the airloads on the clamshell doors.

Phase 2
If the thrust reverser stows:
1.

Continue the flight with the NORM/STOW switch in the stow position.
Do not actuate the thrust reverser handle. Leave the NORM/STOW switch
in STOW to maintain a constant retraction signal with hydraulic pressure
on the stow side of the actuator.

If the thrust reverser remains deployed:


2.

Thrust Reverser NORM/STOW Switch ........................................... STOW


Keep the thrust reverser NORM/STOW switch in STOW to keep
the emergency stow signal and hydraulic pressure on the retraction side of
the actuator.

3.

Land as soon as possible.


Land at the nearest suitable airport for inspection and repair.

NOTE
The drag associated from an idling No. 2 engine,
with the thrust reverser deployed, adversely affects
the performance characteristics of the aircraft. It is
recommended that the engine be shut down for approach and landing.
Follow the procedure for One Engine InoperativeApproach and Landing
found in the Abnormal Procedures section in this manual.

EP-22

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

TWO-ENGINES INOPERATIVE
APPROACH AND LANDING
PREPARATION
Reduce the aircraft weight as much as practical. If the actual weight of the
aircraft exceeds the maximum limits for landing weight, go-around or landing distance, burn off fuel, if practical.
Determine the weight limitation for enroute climb gradient. This chart is
found in the Flight Manual, Section 5, subsection 60, page 2.
1.

Fuel Supply to Remaining Engine............................................ CHECKED


Check that the booster pumps and booster crossfeed valves are in the
proper configuration to ensure an uninterrupted flow of fuel to the
operating engine. A reasonable wing fuel balance should be maintained if
conditions permit. Group 2 fuel should be used first for proper weightand-balance maintenance of the aircraft center of gravity.

2.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Tie the left and right DC buses together to ensure the one operating
generator supplies the electrical power requirements. The BUS TIED light
should be on.

3.

Limit Generator Load .......................................... 300 AMPS OR BELOW


Generator limitations of 300 amps, 350 amps for one minute, should be
observed. Check the buses for proper load distribution by the operating
generator. Turn off nonessential electrical equipment.

4.

Crew and Passenger Bleed-Air Switches ............................................. OFF


This action eliminates the tap-off of bleed air from the operating engine,
thus producing more power for flight.

If No. 1 and No. 3 engines are inoperative:


5.

Brake Selector Switch....................................................... #2/ASKIDOFF


Move the brake selector switch to #2/ASKIDOFF to supply emergency
braking from the No. 2 hydraulic system. This means no antiskid
braking, and add 50% to the landing distance and 50% to the landing
field length computations.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EP-23

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

6.

STBY Hydraulic Pump Switch............................................................ ON


The standby hydraulic pump is now available to back up the No. 2 enginedriven hydraulic pump, should No. 2 system pressure drop below 1,500 psi.

7.

Avoid icing conditions.


The one remaining engine may not be able to supply sufficient bleed air
for anti-icing purposes without jeopardizing the power reserve required for
flight of the aircraft.

APPROACH
1.

Flaps + Slat Handle..................................................... 7 FLAPS + SLATS


When in the traffic pattern, in preparation for the final approach, extend
the slats and flaps to the first detent, provided aircraft control and power
reserve permit.

2.

Emergency Slats Switch (If Necessary and


Inoperative Engines are No. 1 and No. 3).............................................. ON
The No. 2 hydraulic system is available to provide extension of only the
outboard slats at VFE (200 KIAS).

3.

Make the decision to land or go around at not less than 1,000 feet above
ground level.
The aircraft should be in a position to land at this point. If not, go around.
A go-around is not recommended when below 1,000 feet above ground
level. See the Two Engines Inoperative Go-Around checklist.

EP-24

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

WHEN COMMITTED FOR LANDING


1.

Landing Gear ............................................................................... EXTEND

NOTE
If the No. 1 or No. 3 engine is the operating engine,
the gear may be extended using the normal procedure.
If the No. 2 engine is the operating engine , it is necessary to perform an emergency extension as follows:
2.

Normal Gear Handle.. DOWN

CAUTION
The landing gear handle must be maintained down.
3.

EMERGENCY GEAR PULL Handle .. PULLED

The electrical sequence is bypassed . The No. 1 system residual fluid is routed
straight to the gear uplock boxes and actuators.
If all three green gear down lights illuminate and the landing gear handle
light (red) is not illuminated, the landing gear is down and locked. Do not actuate any landing gear controls.
If at least one green gear light does not illuminate and the landing gear handle light is flashing , apply the FREE FALL EXTENSION procedure .

Free Fall Extension Procedure


4.

Airspeed.............................................................. Not Less Than 160 KIAS

CAUTION
Rapidly alternating large rudder applications in combination with large side-slip angles may result in
structural failure at any speed .
Extend the main gear first, one at a time :
5.

LH Main Manual Gear Release Handle ........................................... PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the left while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the left green gear down light is illuminated. Maintain wings
level with appropriate aileron input.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down light may take
more than 30 seconds with full rudder deflection .
Gently come back to neutral rudder.
6.

RH Main Manual Gear Release Handle ............................................ PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the left while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the left green gear down light is illuminated. Maintain wings
level with appropriate aileron input.

NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down light may take
more than 30 seconds with full rudder deflection.
Gently come back to neutral rudder .
7.

Nose Gear Manual Release Handle................................................... PULL


Accelerate until illumination of the green gear light
KIAS max).

is achieved (190

NOTE
Free fall extension of the three landing gear may
take approximatelytwo minutes to complete.
8.

Flaps/Slats (As Required) ......................................... 20 FLAPS + SLATS


At some altitude below 1,000 feet above ground level, after the landing gear
is down and locked, extend the flaps to 20, if performance will permit.

Airspeed on approach:
9.

7 Flaps + Slats............................................................. VREF + 20 KNOTS


If this is selected as the final flap setting for landing, fly the approach at
this speed, plus the additive for the wind correction. Increase the normal
landing distance by 800 feet and the normal landing field length by
1,335 feet.

10.

20 Flaps + Slats........................................................... VREF + 10 KNOTS


If this is selected as the final flap setting for landing, fly the approach at
this speed, plus the additive for the wind correction. Increase the normal
landing distance by 400 feet and the normal landing field length by
670 feet.

EP-26

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NOTE
With No. 1 and No. 3 engines inoperative, extend the
slats using the emergency system. Extend the gear
manually as described above.

AFTER TOUCHDOWN
1.

Thrust Reverser (If Available)..................................................... APPLIED


The normal deceleration devices, such as airbrakes and antiskid braking,
should be applied, if available. The thrust reverser is most effective at the
higher speeds of the landing rollout.
If the No. 2 brake system must be used, use moderate braking, as antiskid
braking is not available. Use the thrust reverser to slow the aircraft to more
effective braking speeds. This is necessary to prevent skidding of the
wheels and the possibility of tire failure.
If No. 2 braking system is used, increase the landing distance, calculated
above by 50%, due to the lack of antiskid brakes and the use of less than
40 flaps for landing.

TWO ENGINES INOPERATIVEGO-AROUND


CAUTION
The decision to land or go around must be made at
or above 1,000 feet above ground level. The altitude
loss associated with this go-around procedure is approximately 500 feet.

ON THE GO-AROUND
1.

Engine Thrust (Full Power) .................................................................. SET


Set maximum takeoff power on the operating engine as soon as the
decision is made to go around.

2.

Landing Gear (If Down)....................................................... RETRACTED


Place the landing gear selector up as the power is being applied to the
maximum. This is one case when you do not wait for a positive rate climb
before retracting the landing gear.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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CAUTION
The landing gear cannot be retracted if No. 1 and
No. 3 engines are inoperative.
3.

Accelerate the aircraft while in descent on normal slope.

At V REF + 25 knots:
4.

Flaps + Slat Handle ........................................................................ CLEAN


As soon as the airspeed reaches the 40 flap VREF + 25 knots, retract the
slats and flaps incrementally to clean.

5.

Accelerate to and maintain the enroute climb speed, then begin to climb
the aircraft.
As soon as the airspeed of 1.43 velocity of stall in the clean configuration
is achieved, begin to climb the aircraft to a safe altitude. Maintain the
enroute climb speed until the assigned, or a safe, altitude is reached.

CAUTION
The altitude loss associated with this go-around procedure is approximately 500 feet.

ALL ENGINES INOPERATIVE


Phase 1
1.

Communications ................................................................... VHF 1/ATC 1


The VHC 1 and ATC 1 should be used to establish emergency
communications and for identification with ATC. These radios may be
powered through emergency battery packs on some aircraft or by the left
main electrical bus on many aircraft.

2.

Establish the aircraft within the airstart envelope (Figure EP-5).

3.

Reduce the electrical load to the lowest possible.


Reduce the electrical load by turning off nonessential radios and
electrical equipment. Attempts to reduce the load on each battery to less
than 50 amps.

EP-28

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ALTITUDE (X 1,000 FT)


30
M

=0

.80

MAXIMUM COMPUTER-OUT ALTITUDE


20
VMO
START ENVELOPE
10
VMO

0
100

150

200

250

300

350

400

INDICATED AIRSPEED (KT)

Figure EP-5. Inflight Airstart Envelope

NOTE
To load shed the electrical network, switch OFF the
below listed items:
Booster Pumps
Windshield Heat
Pitot
RH Avionics Master
Lavatory/Galley Master
Unnecessary Lights.
4.

Relight the engines using the airstart procedure.


Attempt to airstart all three engines, one at a time, using the Airstart
checklist found in the Abnormal Procedures section in this manual.
Selection as to which engine is to be started first must be based on the
factors that caused the engines to be shut down in the first place; that is,
choose the best engine first.
It is important to note that, if the airspeed is low, a starter assist may be
necessary. This will place a high demand on battery power. Ensure that the
generator switch is on for the engine being started and that the bus-tied
switch is tied. Judicious and expeditious management of resources
available is mandatory.

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Phase 2
If no engine(s) can be started:
1.

Prepare for a forced landing or a ditching.


Refer to the Forced Landing or Ditching checklists found in this section of
the manual.

2.

ST-BY Hydraulic Pump (For


Emergency Flaps + Slats Extension) ..................................................... ON
Remember to use this pump carefully, as its power demands on the
batteries will be great. Turn it on only when you are ready to deploy the
emergency slats and the flaps to the desired configuration. Turn the pump
off after the desired configuration has been achieved.

3.

Extend the flaps/slats at VFE (200 KIAS) using the emergency slat system,
if necessary.

If a forced landing is anticipated:


4.

Extend the landing gear.


At VLO (190 KIAS) if possible, and if necessary, perform a landing gear
emergency (freefall) extension of the landing gear.

CAUTION
The landing gear should not be extended if a ditching is anticipated.

EP-30

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LOSS OF BOTH HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS


PUMP 1

PUMP 2

PUMP 3

AND POSSIBLY

AIL
FEEL

AND

PITCH
FEEL

Hydraulic indicators show a pressure drop (Figure EP-6).

Figure EP-6. Hydraulic Panel

Phase 1
1.

Autopilot and Yaw Damper .................................................. DISENGAGE


Hold the control column while the autopilot is being disengaged.
Disengage the autopilot and yaw damper by depressing the yaw damper
button on the center console. The AP light should come on. Press the
autopilot button on the back of the control wheel to clear the AP light and
the autopilot disengagement message on the ID 802.

2.

Airspeed.............................................. 260 KIAS/.76 MACH MAXIMUM


Whenever hydraulic power is removed from the flight control servos,
reduce the airspeed or Mach number. Control of the aircraft will be easier
when flown below these speeds.

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Phase 2
1.

Avoid high-pitch attitudes and zones of air turbulence.


Very slight movements of the control surfaces are called for, making
gentle bank and pitch changes. If at all possible, avoid any known areas of
turbulence and high wind conditions.

LANDING PREPARATION
1.

Flaps + Slats Handle ...................................................................... CLEAN


Since there is no hydraulic pressure to the systems, the flaps + slat handle
must not be actuated.

2.

Landing Gear ........................................................................... FREEFALL


With no hydraulic pressure available to lower the gear normally, freefall or
manual extension of the gear is required.

3.

Normal Landing Gear Handle......................................................... DOWN

4.

Emergency Hydraulic Gear Control .................................................. PULL


Push in on the latching mechanism to release the lock holding the handle
against the panel, and pull the handle aft to its mechanical stop.

5.

Airspeed .............................................................. 160 KNOTS MINIMUM


Maintain an airspeed of 160 to 190 knots to facilitate manual gear
lowering. Extend the main landing gear first.

CAUTION
Rapidly alternating large rudder applications in combination with large side-slip angles may result in
structural failure at any speed .
Extend the main gear first, one at a time:
6.

LH Main Manual Gear release handle............................................... PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the left while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the left green gear down light is illuminated. Maintain wings
level with appropriate aileron input.

EP-32

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NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down ligh may take
more than 30 seconds with full rudder deflection.
Gently come back to neutral rudder .
7.

RH Main Manual Gear Release Handle ........................................... PULL


Gently apply up to full rudder to the left while accelerating (190 KIAS
max) until the left green gear down light is illuminated . Maintain wings
level with appropriate aileron input.

NOTE
Illumination of the green gear down light may take
more than 30 seconds with full rudder deflection .
Gently come back to neutral rudder .
8.

Nose Gear Manual Release Handle .................................................. PULL

Accelerate until illumination of the green gear light


KIAS max).

is achieved (190

NOTE
Free fall extension of the three landing gear may
take approximately two minutes to complete.

CAUTION
Do not actuate the landing gear controls, hydraulic
or mechanical, once the landing gear is down and
locked.
9.

Approach Speed ........................................................... VREF + 30 KNOTS


This is the minimum speed prescribed to maintain the safety margin from
stall when flying the aircraft in the clean-wing configuration.

NOTE
In the likelihood where high lift devices are already
extended, observe the following approach speeds:

Slats only ............................... V REF + 20 KNOTS

7 Flaps + Slats..................... V REF + 20 KNOTS

20 Flaps + Slats .................. V REF + 15 KNOTS

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10.

40 Flaps + Slats .................. V REF + 10 KNOTS

Vertical Speed ............................................. APPROXIMATELY 300 FPM


If possible, do not exceed a 300-foot-per-minute rate of descent on final
approach for landing.

CAUTION
The landing distance will be twice the nominal charted
40 flaps + slats landing distance.

AFTER TOUCHDOWN
1.

Full Reverse Thrust .............................................................................. SET


In the event of a total hydraulic failure of the main systems, there may still
be accumulator hydraulic pressure available for at least one deployment of
the thrust reverser.

2.

Parking Brake..................................... INTERMEDIATE DETENT ONLY


If the #2 P. BK light is not flashing, there should be hydraulic pressure
stored in the parking brake accumulator circuit for up to five applications
of the parking brake. Flashing of the #2 P. BK light indicates only one
more brake application is possible. Be careful when deploying the parking
brake handle to the first detent. Be sure the aircraft is aimed as straight as
possible down the runway before pulling the brake handle. If possible,
limit the number of pulls on the brake handle to one, for best effective use
of the stored hydraulic pressure.

CAUTION
The hydraulic power-off condition requires greater
pilot forces. Landing requires greater caution
because directional control is available mainly by
rudder and differential forward thrust.

NOTE
During actual flight without hydraulic power, aircraft
maneuverability is reduced but remains sufficient in
all three axes when flight is maintained within the prescribed flight envelope (260 KT/MI 0.76).

EP-34

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Pitch attitude is controlled essentially with the horizontal stabilizer.


Loss of hydraulic power causes an upward deflection
of both ailerons, which produces a slight pitch-up moment that is easily counteracted with pitch control.
If the aircraft is not perfectly trimmed in roll when
hydraulic power is lost, it is difficult to keep the
wings level while accelerating to 260 knots; in this
case, it is best to decelerate, recenter the control,
then reaccelerate.
The rudder is the most maneuverable control surface when hydraulic power is lost. The aircraft can
be turned by induced roll using the rudders.
At speeds below 200 knots, the aircraft maneuverability improves.
Approach is made at a shallow angle to land in a
clean configuration at V REF + 30 knots.

LOSS OF ALL THREE GENERATORS


GEN 1

GEN 2

AND

GEN 3

NOTE
Simultaneous illumination of these three lights indicates that the three engine generators have been disconnected from the main DC buses. The generator
switches may be tripped off.
1.

Bus Voltages ............................................................................. CHECKED


Check the voltmeter on each bus side to determine the voltage being
supplied to the buses.

2.

Generator and Battery Ammeters ............................................. CHECKED


Check the ammeters for each of the generators and batteries to determine
which unit is supplying the bus and the load being supplied.

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If the generators have tripped, and if the batteries are the only source of electrical power:
3.

Battery Load ......................................... SHED AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE


Turn off nonessential electrical equipment to conserve battery power.
Monitor the voltmeters and ammeters while attempting to reset
the generators.

CAUTION
To limit the battery load, accomplish the following
in the sequence shown:
a. Booster Pump Switches (3)............................................................. OFF
b. Windshield Heat (3)........................................................................ OFF
In icing conditions, it is imperative to keep the following switches on:
Pilot Windshield Heating System
Engine and Wing Anti-icing System
4.

Pilot and Copilot Pitot Heater .............................................................. OFF

Do not switch off the standby pitot heat.


5.

Right Avionics Master.................................................................. OFF (IN)

6.

Lavatory and Galley Master Circuit Breakers ................................... PULL

7.

Unnecessary Lights .............................................................................. OFF

Attempt to reset the last generator that failed:


8.

Bus-Tied Switch.......................................................... FLIGHT NORMAL


If not already in that position, ensure that the bus-tied switch is in the
flight normal position to isolate the left and right electrical buses.

9.

BAT Switch (On Side Concerned)..................................... ON/CHECKED


On the side for which the generator is to be reset, ensure that the BAT
switch is on and the volts/amps are checked.

EP-36

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10.

Power Lever (of Engine Concerned) .................................................. IDLE

11.

Engine at Idle Setting............................................................ STABILIZED


The reset attempt should be deferred until the engine is operating at flight
idle power to enhance the reset attempt.

12.

GEN Switch (of Generator Concerned)................................................. ON


There are two alternatives to follow. Follow alternative 1 or 2 below.
Carefully observe the voltmeter and ammeter while resetting the generator.

Alternative 1
If the voltmeter deviates to maximum attempting the reset:
1.

GEN Switch (of Generator Concerned) ............................................... OFF


Turn and leave the GEN switch off should an overvoltage condition exist.

2.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Before tying the buses, check the ammeter and voltmeter of each bus. Tie
the buses together unless a short is detected on one of the buses and check
that the bus-tied light is on. If a short is detected on one bus, do not tie the
buses. The battery supplying that bus will be depleted rapidly and
probably should be turned off.

3.

Reduce the electrical load to the minimum required for flight.


Switch off as many systems as possible to maintain a minimum demand
on battery power.

4.

FMS 2................................................................................................... OFF

5.

IRS 2 ................................................................................................... OFF

6.

Power Lever (of Generator Concerned)..................... NORMAL THRUST

7.

Avoid icing conditions.


If at all possible, avoid icing conditions, as electrical control of some antiicing valves is necessary for proper operation. Without this control, antiicing capability will be lost, and the aircraft may begin to build ice on the
wings and engines. Pitot-static heating may also be lost.

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8.

Land as soon as possible.


Land at the nearest suitable airport for inspection and repair.

Alternative 2
If voltmeter is within the green band:
1.

Power Lever (of Generator Concerned)..................... NORMAL THRUST

2.

Bus-Tied Switch ................................................................................. TIED


Before tying the buses, check the ammeter and voltmeter of each bus for
normal values. Check that the bus-tied light is on.

3.

Turn on previously shed items.

4.

Monitor voltmeter and ammeter indications.

After load-shedding, the batteries in good condition will provide for:


40 minutes of operation with an average load of 25 amps per battery in nonicing conditions.
20 minutes of operation with an average load of 45 amps per battery in icing conditions.

NOTE
The following items are recommended for loadshedding to help prolong battery life even longer:
Cabin Entrance Light .......................................... OFF
Anticollision Light .............................................. OFF
Landing/Taxi/Wing Lights ................................. OFF
Navigation Lights.......... NAV INTERMITTENTLY
Unnecessary Instrument Panel Lighting .......... OFF
Pull the following right-panel circuit breakers:
All navigation section
All radio section
All miscellaneous section

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CAUTION
Do not pull the fire warning circuit breakers. Pull the
following left-panel circuit breakers:

Navigation section:
AFCS 1, (4)
RAD ALT 1, ALT 1, FMS 1, CDU 1
IRS 3 BAT, IRS 3
R/T WR, MFD/WRD
SG 3
GPWS

Radio section:
HF I (2)
FLITE FONE
ADF 1

Pull the following center-panel circuit breakers:

Lights, miscellaneous section:


RH CABIN READING
LH CABIN READING

CAUTION
If in icing conditions, do not pull the circuit breakers for anti-ice of the engines and wing. Additionally,
do not pull the circuit breaker for the pilots windshield heat.

NOTE
Operation of the flaps and slats, airbrakes, and landing gear appreciably increase the electrical demand
on the batteries.

REDUCED LOAD ON BATTERIES (SAFT 2376)


In Nonicing Conditions
The load corresponds to a total output from the batteries of 35 amps at 24 volts
that ensures 59 minutes of operation with two 23-Ah batteries charged at 75%
of their capacity.

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In Icing Conditions
The load corresponds to a total output from the batteries of 82 amps at 24 volts
that ensures 25 minutes of operation with two 23-Ah batteries charged at 75%
of their capacity.

During Approach
During the last five minutes of flight, the load is increased. It can therefore
be considered that two 23-Ah batteries, charged at 75% of their capacity, provide sufficient reserve power in the following conditions:
In nonicing conditions, for 57 minutes of operation, including five minutes during approach
or
In icing conditions, for 24 minutes of operation, including five minutes during approach

RAPID DEPRESSURIZATION
Phase 1
1.

Crew Oxygen Masks ........................................................ 100% DONNED


The crew oxygen masks must be put on immediately upon detection of
smoke. Be careful of eye glasses when putting on the masks to avoid
personal injury or to avoid a poor fit of the masks around the glasses.
The mask must fit tightly around the face to ensure smoke does not
penetrate the mask and enter the breathing passages. Ensure that the
NORMAL-100% oxygen selector button on the front of the mask is in
the 100% position.

2.

Microphone Selector........................................................................ MASK


For hot mike communications within the cockpit, speakers must be
selected, and the mask and CPIT buttons on the pilot and copilot audio
panels must be pushed on. To communicate with an outside agency, select
the proper radio microphone button on the audio panel and depress the
MIC button on the top inside of either control wheel.

3.

Fasten Belts and No Smoking Light Pushbuttons ................................. ON

4.

Oxygen Controller and Passenger Masks.............. OVERRIDE/DONNED


On the copilots right console, move the selector switch on the passenger
oxygen panel clockwise to OVERRIDE and check that the pneumatic
PASS ON indicator is fully open. this drops the passenger oxygen masks

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from their storage bins at each passenger position and allows a flow of
oxygen when the passenger pulls the mask down and then dons it.
5.

Emergency Descent.................................................................. INITIATED


Simultaneously, as the airbrake is deployed and as the throttles are brought
to idle, begin the descent by rolling the aircraft to a 45 angle of bank. This
will expedite entry into the descent without adversely affecting G-loading of
the aircraft. The initial descent angle should be approximately a 20
nosedown pitch attitude. After the 20 nosedown pitch attitude is achieved,
remove all bank, hold the 20 pitch down until MMO/VMO is attained, and
then adjust pitch to approximately 10 of nosedown pitch, which should
maintain the aircraft at MMO/VMO in the descent.

EMERGENCY DESCENT
CAUTION
This procedure assumes normal structural integrity
of the aircraft. If structural integrity is questionable,
limit the airspeed to the lowest practical value, and
avoid high maneuvering loads.
1.

Autopilot ............................................................................ DISENGAGED


Disengage the autopilot, and hand-fly the aircraft throughout this
procedure. Disengagement is achieved by pressing the AP pushbutton on
the control wheel. Check for the AP light on. Press the AP pushbutton
again to clear the disengagement message on the ID 802 and the AP light.

2.

Power Levers ...................................................................................... IDLE


It is advisable to turn on the airstart ignition for all three engines, to
prevent an engine flameout, before retarding the throttles to idle. This is
especially true when performing an emergency descent from high altitudes.

3.

Airbrake Handle ..................................................................... POSITION 2


Position the airbrake handle to position 2 to assist in making as rapid a
descent as possible while remaining within the MMO/VMO limits.

4.

Descent........................................................................................ INITIATE
Simultaneously, as the airbrake is deployed and as the throttles are brought
to idle, begin the descent by rolling the aircraft to a 45 angle of bank. This
will expedite entry into the descent without adversely affecting G-loading of
the aircraft. The initial descent angle should be approximately a 20
nosedown pitch attitude. After the 20 nosedown pitch attitude is achieved,
remove all bank, hold the 20 pitch down until MMO/VMO is attained, and

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then adjust pitch to approximately 10 of nosedown pitch, which should


maintain the aircraft at MMO/VMO in the descent.
5.

Airspeed (Smooth Air)............................................................... MMO/VMO


Lead the desired level-off altitude by at least 2,000 feet. Reduce the rate of
descent to a maximum of 2,000 feet per minute. Lead the final level-off
altitude at an altitude which is 10% of the rate of descent. Descend to
14,000 feet, the assigned altitude, or to the minimum safe altitude for the
route flown.

6.

Transponder ............................................................................. CODE 7700


Advise ATC of your emergency and set the transponder to emergency
to ensure identification, priority handling, and a safe airspace throughout
this emergency.

FORCED LANDING
PREPARATION
1.

Communications Transmission............................. TRANSMIT MAYDAY


On the most recently used communications radio, transmit mayday to
the monitoring communications agency. If you havent been talking to a
communications agency on an assigned frequency, or if you do not know
what the correct frequency is, change to 121.5 Mz and transmit your
distress message on that frequency.

2.

Transponder ............................................................................. CODE 7700


Unless directed otherwise, set the transponder to code 7700, the
emergency distress code.

3.

Passenger Emergency Briefing............................................... COMPLETE


If carried, use the cabin attendant to prepare the passengers for this
emergency. If a cabin attendant is not carried, use the PA system to instruct
the passengers on their roles during this emergency. The passengers should
have already been prebriefed, prior to departure, on the conduct of
emergency procedures and the location and use of emergency equipment.

4.

Fasten Belts/No Smoking Signs ............................................................ ON


All cabin and cockpit occupants must have their seat belts tightly fastened
and, where applicable, have shoulder harnesses properly fastened and
locked. Smoking is prohibited throughout the aircraft.

EP-42

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5.

AFT CABIN ISOL Light ..................................................................... OFF


On aircraft with the midcabin separation door, this door must be open and
the AFT CABIN ISOL light must be out.

6.

Cockpit Jump Seat (If Possible) ............. UNOCCUPIED AND STOWED

NOTE
If possible, the jump seat should not be occupied in
the event of a forced landing. It must be stowed to
allow for the emergency egress of the pilots.

APPROACH
7.

Wing Anti-ice....................................................................................... OFF


This is one of many procedures designed to close off the bleed-air systems
of the aircraft before landing.

8.

Crew and Passenger Bleed Switches.................................................... OFF


This is done to isolate the cabin from engine bleed-air sources and to
prevent pressurization of the cabin.

9.

HP 1, PRV 2, and PRV 3 Bleed-Air Switches ..................................... OFF


This is done to further isolate engine bleed-air systems.

10.

Pressurization Switch....................................................................... DUMP


On the emergency pressurization control panel, lower the guard on the
DUMP switch and move the switch down to dump the cabin pressure. This
has a dual purpose:
To release any residual pressure in the cabin that could prevent the
opening of the emergency exits after landing
To release any residual pressure in the cabin in an attempt to keep
the cabin intact upon landing. If residual pressure was present in
the cabin upon touchdown, this pressure might cause more severe
damage to the structure when subjected to the forces of landing and
deceleration.

11.

Landing Gear.......................................................................... EXTENDED


The landing gear should be extended either by normal, emergency or
gravity means. This is intended to help cushion the landing when effecting
a forced landing on any type of surface, except water. If all the landing

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gear cannot be extended, it is desirable that as many gear as possible be


extended to help cushion the landing. A belly landing is the last resort.
12.

Flaps + Slats.............................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


If possible, the maximum flap setting should be used to fly the aircraft as
slow as possible for the landing.

13.

Approach Speed .................................................................................. VREF


With the flaps/slats set at 40 FLAPS + SLATS, fly the final approach at
the charted VREF speed.

JUST BEFORE TOUCHDOWN


14.

Vertical Speed ............................................. APPROXIMATELY 300 FPM


If possible, control the rate of descent to a maximum of 300 feet per
minute to minimize impact forces.

15.

Fuel Shutoff Switches (3) ....................................................... ACTUATED


On the FIRE PANEL, raise all three guards and raise the fuel shutoff
switches up to shut off the fuel supply to the engines at the respective
fuel tanks.

16.

GEN Switches (3) ................................................................................ OFF


Move all three generator control switches to off to cut off the generated
electrical power supply to the buses.

17.

BAT Switches (2) ................................................................................. OFF


This removes the remaining electrical power supply to the electrical buses
to prevent electrical sparking and fire. The aircraft will no longer be
powered except for any emergency battery power that, if possible, should
probably be turned off as well to prevent any fire after landing.

18.

Power Levers (3) .......................................................................... CUTOFF


This ensures manual shutoff of fuel to the engines at the fuel control of
each engine.

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AFTER THE AIRPLANE HAS COME TO A STOP


19.

Engine Fire Extinguisher Switches (3)................................... POSITION 2


Break the safety wire on the three engine fire extinguisher switches and
move them up through position 1 to position 2. The battery bus will fire
the four extinguisher bottles to the engines to extinguish any fire that may
be started as a result of the impact of the forced landing.

20.

Cockpit Jump Seat ...................................................................... STOWED


If it hasnt already been stowed, stow it to clear the way for cockpit
evacuation.

21.

Emergency Exit................................................................................. OPEN


Open the emergency exit located over the right wing and evacuate the
aircraft. Be cautious for fire that may have erupted about the aircraft.
Selection of the proper emergency exit should depend on a careful
evaluation of the total situation.

NOTE
At night, it is recommended that the aircraft be evacuated by way of the wing emergency exit.
22.

Main Cabin Door .............................................................................. OPEN


An alternate means of evacuating the aircraft is through the main cabin
door. However, fully opening the main cabin door may not be possible,
dependent upon where the aircraft came to rest or whether or not the nose
landing gear is extended. Another alternative for evacuation is the pilots
direct-vision window. This should be used as a last resort if all other exits
fail to open or are covered by fire.

23.

Evacuate the aircraft.

DITCHING
PREPARATION
1.

Communications Transmission............................. TRANSMIT MAYDAY


On the most recently used communications radio, transmit mayday to
monitoring communications agency. If you have not been talking to a
communication agency on an assigned frequency, or if you do not know
what the correct frequency is, change to 121.5 Mz and transmit your
distress message on that frequency.

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2.

Transponder ............................................................................. CODE 7700


Unless directed otherwise, set the transponder to code 7700, the
emergency distress code.

3.

Passenger Emergency Briefing............................................... COMPLETE


If carried, use the cabin attendant to prepare the passengers for this
emergency. If a cabin attendant is not carried, use the PA system to instruct
the passengers on their roles during this emergency. The passengers should
have already been prebriefed, prior to departure, on the conduct of
emergency procedures and the location and use of emergency equipment.

4.

Life Jackets ............................................................. DONNED/CHECKED


Direct the passengers and crew to remove the life jackets from storage and
put them on. Life jackets are not to be inflated until the crew and
passengers evacuate the aircraft.

5.

Fasten Belts/No Smoking Signs ............................................................ ON


All cabin and cockpit occupants must have their seat belts tightly fastened
and, where applicable, have shoulder harnesses properly fastened and
locked. Smoking is prohibited throughout the aircraft.

6.

AFT CABIN ISOL Light ..................................................................... OFF


On aircraft with the midcabin separation door, this door must be open and
the AFT CABIN ISOL light must be out.

7.

Cockpit Jump Seat (If Possible) ............. UNOCCUPIED AND STOWED

NOTE
If possible, the jump seat should not be occupied in
the event of a ditching. It must be stowed for safety
and to allow for the emergency egress of the pilots.
8.

Audio Warning A and B Circuit Breakers (2).............................. PULLED


Pull out the AUDIO WARN A circuit breaker, located on primary bus A1,
and the AUDIO WARN B circuit breaker, located on primary bus B1, to
shut off the audio warning that would sound when the landing gear is left
up and the slats-flaps are placed to 40 FLAPS + SLATS for landing.

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APPROACHPARALLEL TO THE MAJOR SWELL


9.

Wing Anti-ice....................................................................................... OFF


This is one of many procedures designed to close off the bleed-air systems
of the aircraft before ditching. This, and other bleed-air isolation actions,
provides airtight systems and subsystems for enhancement of the flotation
characteristics of the aircraft.

10.

Crew and Passenger Bleed Switches.................................................... OFF


This is done to further isolate the cabin from engine bleed-air sources and
to prevent pressurization of the cabin.

11.

BLEED AIR BAG Switch........................................................... ISOLATE


This will isolate the cabin and baggage compartment by closing the
baggage compartment heating valve and the cabin isolation valve. Check
BAG ISOL light on.

12.

HP 1, PRV 2, and PRV 3 Switches ...................................................... OFF


This is done to further isolate engine bleed-air systems.

13.

Pressurization Switch....................................................................... DUMP


On the emergency pressurization control panel, lower the guard on the
DUMP switch, and move the switch down to dump the cabin pressure.
This has a dual purpose:
To release any residual pressure in the cabin that could prevent the
opening of the emergency exits after ditching.
To release any residual pressure in the cabin in an attempt to keep
the cabin intact upon ditching. If residual pressure was present in
the cabin upon contact with the water, this pressure might cause
more severe damage to the structure when subjected to the forces
of ditching and deceleration.

14.

Landing Gear........................................................................ RETRACTED


Ensure that the landing gear is retracted prior to ditching. Ditching with
the gear down will cause immediate loss of aircraft control upon first
contact with the water. The bottom of the aircraft should be kept
streamlined for entry into the water for better aircraft control.

15.

Flaps + Slats Handle ................................................. 40 FLAPS + SLATS


If possible, the maximum flap setting should be used to fly the aircraft as
slow as possible for the ditching.

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16.

Approach Speed .................................................................................. VREF


With the slats/flaps set at 40 FLAPS + SLATS, fly the final approach at
the charted VREF speed. Because the gear is not down and locked, the gear
warning horn will sound and cannot be silenced unless the audio warning
A and the audio warning B circuit breakers are pulled.

JUST BEFORE TOUCHDOWN


17.

Rate of Descent ........................................... APPROXIMATELY 300 FPM


If possible, control the rate of descent to a maximum of 300 feet per
minute to minimize impact forces.

18.

Fuel Shutoff Switches (3) ....................................................... ACTUATED


On the FIRE PANEL, raise all three guards and raise the fuel shutoff
switches up to shut off the fuel supply to the engines at the respective
fuel tanks.

19.

GEN Switches ...................................................................................... OFF


Move all three generator control switches to off to cut off the generated
electrical power supply to the buses.

20.

BAT Switches (2) ................................................................................. OFF


This removes the remaining electrical power supply to the electrical buses
to prevent electrical sparking and fire. The aircraft will no longer be
powered except for any emergency battery power which, if possible,
should be turned off to prevent any fire after ditching.

21.

Contact the water on the crest, parallel to the swell, and with a noseup
attitude of 12 to 15.5.
If possible, fly into the wind at the lowest possible airspeed. Fly parallel to
the main swell, and contact the water on the crest of the main swell.

AFTER TOUCHDOWN
22.

Power Levers (3) .......................................................................... CUTOFF


The engines should be kept running until after touchdown to provide for
controlled flight until the proper spot is picked for ditching. This ensures
manual shutoff of fuel to the engines at the fuel control of each engine.

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23.

Cockpit Jump Seat ...................................................................... STOWED


If it has not already been stowed, stow it to clear the way for cockpit
evacuation.

24.

Emergency Exit................................................................................. OPEN


Open the emergency exit located over the right wing, and evacuate the
aircraft. Deploy the life line to the anchor point on the right wing next to
the gravity-fueling cap. Inflate the life rafts only when they are outside the
aircraft. The life raft may be secured to the ring holding the life line to the
wing to keep it in place until all occupants are on board. Crew and
passengers should not inflate their life vests until they are clear of the
window or door.
Selection of the proper emergency exit, either the emergency exit over the
wing or the main cabin door, should depend on a careful evaluation of the
total situation.

25.

Main Cabin Door .............................................................................. OPEN


An alternate means of evacuating the aircraft is through the main cabin
door, dependent upon the attitude of the aircraft in the water. Another
alternative for evacuation is the pilots direct-vision window. This should be
used as a last resort if all other exits fail to open or are covered by water.
26.

Evacuate the aircraft.

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LIMITATIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS


CONTENTS
Page
LIMITATIONS ................................................................................. LIM-1
General.................................................................................... LIM-1
WeightStructural ................................................................. LIM-1
WeightPerformance ............................................................ LIM-1
Center of Gravity .................................................................... LIM-2
Loading ................................................................................... LIM-2
OPERATING LIMITATIONS.......................................................... LIM-3
Kind of Operation ................................................................... LIM-3
Altitude ................................................................................... LIM-7
Maneuvering Flight Load Factors........................................... LIM-7
Takeoff and Landing ............................................................... LIM-7
Minimum Flightcrew .............................................................. LIM-8
Maximum Number of Passengers........................................... LIM-8
Airbrakes................................................................................. LIM-8
Airspeed.................................................................................. LIM-8
SYSTEM LIMITATIONS .............................................................. LIM-11
Fuel System .......................................................................... LIM-11
Powerplant ............................................................................ LIM-12
Lubrication System............................................................... LIM-14
SYSTEMS...................................................................................... LIM-15
Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) Garrett GTCP 36-150 (F) ...... LIM-15
Automatic Pilot (Sperry DFZ 800)....................................... LIM-16
Anti-ice ................................................................................. LIM-16
Baggage Compartment ......................................................... LIM-17
Cabin Pressurization............................................................. LIM-17

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Hydraulic ..............................................................................
Electrical...............................................................................
INSTRUMENT MARKINGS........................................................
Airspeed Indicator Markings................................................
Engine Instrument Markings ................................................
Miscellaneous Instrument Markings ....................................

LIM-ii

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LIM-17
LIM-18
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ILLUSTRATION
Figure
LIM-1

Title
Page
Temperature and Altitude Limits ................................ LIM-7

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LIMITATIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS


LIMITATIONS
GENERAL
The limitations presented in this chapter focus primarily on the operational
capabilities of the aircraft. Specific system limitations are provided in the individual systems chapters with the exception of instrument markings which
are presented in this chapter. Refer to the FAA-approved AFM for complete
limitations listings.

WEIGHTSTRUCTURAL
Maximum ramp ............................................................... 45,700 lb (20,730 kg)
-5AR .....................................................45,700 lb or 46,700 lb (with SB 139)
-5BR ......................................................................................................46,700 lb
Maximum takeoff............................................................ 45,500 lb (20,639 kg)
-5AR .....................................................45,500 lb or 46,500 lb (with SB 139)
-5BR ......................................................................................................46,500 lb
Maximum landing ........................................................... 42,000 lb (19,051 kg)
Maximum zero fuel......................................................... 28,220 lb (12,800 kg)
-5AR .....................................................28,200 lb or 30,870 lb (with SB 139)
-5BR ......................................................................................................30,870 lb
Minimum flight weight .................................................... 20,700 lb (9,390 kg)

NOTE
Zero fuel weight may change based on SN of aircraft

WEIGHTPERFORMANCE
General
The approved maximum weights indicated above may be reduced for compliance with certification performance requirements, as follows:

Takeoff
The takeoff weight is limited by the most restrictive of the following:
Balanced field length

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Brake energy
Climb gradients

Landing
The landing weight is limited by the following:
Approach and landing climb gradients
Available landing field length

CENTER OF GRAVITY
General
The center-of-gravity limits are expressed in percent of MAC (mean aerodynamic chord). The landing gear position has no effect on the center of
gravity. Refer to the center-of-gravity limits chart in the Limitations
section of the AFM.

Datum
Datum is 25% of MAC; it is marked on the aircraft exterior and coincides with
fuselage station (FS) 420.43 inches (10,679 mm). FS 0 is the forward end of
the aircraft nose cone.

Mean Aerodynamic Chord


Length is 113.69 inches (2,887.7 mm).
Zero percent MAC is at FS + 392 inches (9,957 mm).

LOADING
The aircraft must be loaded in compliance with the center-of-gravity limits
chart in the Limitations section of the AFM. Information for control of the
aircrafts weight and balance are included in Loading Manual DTM9821.
The following baggage compartment values must not be exceeded while loading the aircraft: 2,866 lb (1,300 kg), not to exceed 123 lb/sq ft (600 kg/sq m).

LIM-2

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OPERATING LIMITATIONS
KIND OF OPERATION
This aircraft is certified in the transport category and is eligible for the following kinds of operations when the appropriate instruments and equipment
required by the authorities and/or operating regulations are installed and approved and are in operable condition :
Day and night VFR, if permitted by the regulations of the country overwhich the aircraft is flying
IFR and automatic approaches to category I and II weather minimums
Extended overwater
Icing conditions
The overflight of polar regions is limited to north and south latitudes
less than 85
The overflight of polar regions is authorized when SPERRY FMZ 800
FMS computer software is identified 9102 ( or 9112)
Flight in the former USSR airspace:

The aircraft is not allowed to fly on routes equipped only with ATC
secondary radars operating in UVD mode.

For aircraft without M1846: the aircraft can fly only on routes
equipped with VOR/DME . The VOR/DME ruptures are limited to
one hour and 20 minutes on routes which are 5 km (2.7 NM)
width, and two hours and 40 minutes on routes which are 10 km
(5.4 NM) width.

For aircraft with M1846 ( equipped with 2 GPS): if GPS system is


inoperative, the aircraft can fly only on routes equipped with
VOR/DME. In that case, the VOR/DME ruptures are limited to 1
hour and 20 minutes on routes which are 5 km (2.7 NM) width,
and two hours and 40 minutes on routes which are 10 km (5.4 NM)
width.

Aircraft equipped with LASERREF II IRS :


When crossing directly over the north or south pole, the IRS longitude requires 20 to 30 seconds to make the 180 transition.
APU must be disengaged when crossing the pole . Fly across the pole
with wings level until the FMS bearing pointer is stabilized at or near
the desired FMS track.
Do not use heading select or heading hold since these modes are
subject to the 180 change of heading at the pole.

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RVSM
Reduced vertical separation minimum (RVSM) requirements are met provided
aircraft complies with SB F900-186.
In addition to SB F900-186, specific approval from the registration authority is needed prior to RVSM operation .

NOTE
In normal operation for RVSM areas, select ATC on
the coupled side.
Minimum equipment list for RVSM operations is provided in F900 MMEL.

RNP 10
In accordance with FAA Order 8400.12 A, paragraph 12 B, RNP 10 airworthiness
requirements are met provided aircraft is equipped with dual operative:
FMS NZ2000 software 4.1 or later and either of the following modes:

GPS
IRS (6.2 hours after last aligment or 5.7 hours after radio updating)

OR
FMS FMZ 800 series and the following mode:

IRS (6.2 hours after last aligment or 5.7 hours after radio updating)

OR
FMS NZ 920 and the following mode :

IRS (6.2 hours after last aligment or 5.7 hours after radio updating)

NOTE
DME/DME and VOR/DME FMS navigation modes
are B-RNAV/RNP5 approved and therefore are RNP
10 compliant under radio navaids coverage.

LIM-4

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B-RNAV
Basic RNAV(B-RNAV) airworthiness requirements are met provided aircraft
is equipped with:
FMS HONEYWELL FMZ 800 or FMZ 920 or FMZ 2000, and no DR
or DGRAD is present on FMS CDU, and either of the following navigation mode:

GPS type HG 2021 GB/GD


DME/DME
VOR/DME
IRS (two hour time limit after last IRS aligment)

NOTE

When GPS remains the unique means of B-RNAV


navigation source (GPS stand-alone), use of GPS
integrity monitoring (RAIM) prediction program
is mandatory before B-RNAV operation.

GPS stand-alone not authorized for FMS FMZ 800


and FMZ 920.

At least one VOR/DME must be available as NAV


source (DC 820) on PFD.

P-RNAV
Precision RNAV (P-RNAV) airworthiness requirements are met according to
JAA TGL 10 provided aircraft is equipped with:
FMS HONEYWELL FMZ 920 or FMZ 2000 operating with no DR or
DGRAD warning on FMS CDU and either of the following navigation mode:

GPS
DME/DME
VOR/DME
IRS (30 minutes time limit after last IRS aligment)

Compliance with TGL 10 has been shown only for Dassault Aviation installations.
Only GPS HONEYWELL HG2021GB01 and HG2021GD02 are TSO C 129()
compliant.

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NOTE
Select FMS approach procedure must not be manually modified.
US terminal and enroute area navigation (RNAV) operations (AC 90-100) and
AC100 airworthiness requirements are met provided aircraft is equipped with:
FMS HONEYWELL FMZ 920 or FMZ 2000 operating in either :

GPS
DME/DME
VOR/DME
Navigation mode without any DR or DGRAD warning and all
NOTAM navaid entered in the FMS NOTAM page.

R NAV airworthiness approval has not accounted for database accuracy or compatibility.
RNP flight operations are subject to GPS satellite availability and/or navaid
coverage for the selected route. Navigation based on DME/DME or VOR/DME
updating modes is permitted but may be restricted by the availability or performance of the applicable ground navaid. Crew should deselect ( NOTAM)
ground navaids that are not to be used for navigation.

LIM-6

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ALTITUDE
Maximum operating altitude is 51,000 feet (Figure LIM1).
ALTITUDE (x 1,000 ft)

50

51

44
ISA
40
34
30

20

10
TAKE-OFF AND
LANDING
1.5
0

-1

-75
-80

-54
-60

-40

-20

20

40

60

STATIC AIR TEMPERATURE (C)

Figure LIM-1. Temperature and Altitude Limits

MANEUVERING FLIGHT LOAD FACTORS


Clean ................................................................................................ +2.53 to 1 g
Flaps extended .................................................................................... +2.0 to 0 g
These load factors limit the angle of bank permitted in turns and limit the severity of pull-up maneuvers.

TAKEOFF AND LANDING


Weights ......................................................................... See WeightStructural
Airport pressure altitude ................................................ 1,000 to 14,000 feet
Runway slope ............................................................................................. 2.5%

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Demonstrated crosswind ....................................................................... 30 knots


Tailwind component at takeoff:
Aircraft fitted with tires for 210 mph:
Pressure altitude of airport from 1000 to 10,000 ft ...............10 knots
Pressure altitude of airport more than 10,000 ft .........................4 knots
Aircraft fitted with 6 tires approved for 225 mph ........................10 knots
Tailwind component at landing:
Aircraft fitted with tires approved for 210 and/or 225 mph .......10 knots
Ambient temperature ......................................... Refer to the temperature and
altitude limitations chart in the
Limitations section of the AFM
Runway surface .......................................................... Paved and hard-surfaced

MINIMUM FLIGHTCREW
The minimum flightcrew is one pilot and one copilot.

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PASSENGERS


The maximum number of passengers is 19.

AIRBRAKES
Airbrakes must not be extended in flight within 300 feet AGL.

AIRSPEED
General
Unless otherwise specified, airspeed limits are expressed in terms of indicated
values. Instrument error is assumed to be zero.

Maximum Operating Speed Limit (VMO/MMO)


VMO:
Sea level to 10,000 feet ..................................................... 350 to 370 knots
10,000 to 25,000 feet ..................................................................... 370 knots

MMO:
Above 35,000 pounds:
25,000 to 33,000 feet............................................................... 0.87 Mach

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33,000 to 37,000 feet ................................................. 0.87 to 0.84 Mach


Above 37,000 feet .................................................................... 0.84 Mach
Below 35,000 pounds:
25,000 to 37,000 feet............................................................... 0.87 Mach
37,000 to 42,000 feet ................................................. 0.87 to 0.84 Mach
Above 42,000 feet .................................................................... 0.84 Mach

CAUTION
The maximum operating speed limit (VMO /M MO )
must not be deliberately exceeded in any regime of
flight (climb, cruise, descent) unless a higher speed
is authorized for flight test or pilot training.
For the purpose of crew training of flight test these
limits may be exceeded with the instructions given
in supplement No. 7 Airworthiness Flight Test Data.

Maneuvering Speed (VA)


Maximum maneuvering speed (VA ) is 228 KIAS.

CAUTION
Full application of rudder or aileron controls, as well
as maneuvers that involve angle of attack near the stall
must be confined to speeds below VA .

NOTE
Rapidly alternating large rudder applications in combination with large side-slip angles may result in
structural failure at any speed.

High-Lift Devices Operating or Extended Speed (VFE)


V FE +7 flaps + slats ........................................................................... 200 KIAS
V FE +20 flaps + slats ......................................................................... 190 KIAS
V FE +40 flaps + slats ......................................................................... 180 KIAS

CAUTION
Above 20,000 feet do not establish or maintain a
configuration with the flaps or the slats extended.

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CAUTION
Do not intentionally fly the aircraft slower than the
initial stall warning onset.

Maximum Landing Gear Operating Speed (VLO/MLO)


V LO ........................................................................................................ 190 KIAS
M LO ............................................................................................................. 0.70 M
V LO /M LO is the maximum speed at which it is safe to extend or retract the
landing gear.

Maximum Landing Gear Extended Speed (VLE/MLE)


V LE ......................................................................................................... 245 KIAS
M LE ............................................................................................................. 0.75 M
V LE is the maximum speed at which the aircraft can be safely flown with the
landing gear extended and locked.

Minimum Control Speed (VMCA)


VMCA (A/C with TFE 731-5AR-1C) .................................................. 83 KCAS
VMCA (A/C with TFE 731-5BR-1C)............................................... 85.5 KCAS
Demonstrated Crosswind .................................................................... 30 KCAS

Miscellaneous Limit Speeds


Windshield wiper operating............................................................... 215 KIAS
Direct vision window opening........................................................... 215 KIAS
Tire speed:
With tires approved for 210 mph............. 182 KIAS (GROUND SPEED)
With all six tires
approved for 225 mph ............................... 195 KIAS (GROUND SPEED)
Brake kinetic energy limit (per brake) ................................... 13,274,460 FT/LB
(18,000 KJ)
Nosewheels must be equipped with chined tires.

LIM-10

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SYSTEM LIMITATIONS
FUEL SYSTEM
The total usable fuel quantity is 2,845 U.S. gallons (10,769 liters), i.e., 19,065
pounds (8,648 kg) at a density of 6.7 pounds per U.S. gallon.
This total quantity is distributed as shown in the following chart.
LITERS

KG

U.S. GAL

LB

Left wing and left centerwing tanks

3,422

2,748

904

6,058

Right wing and right centerwing tanks

3,422

2,748

904

6,058

Front and rear fuselage tanks

3,925

3,152

1,037

6,949

Pressure fueling maximum feed pressure: 50 psi/3.5 bars/350 Kpa

Fuel used must conform to the following specifications. This following chart
is representative of the fuel definition on the date: December, 1987.

Designation

ALLIEDSIGNAL
EMS 53111

KEROSENE
EMS 53112

WIDE CUT
TYPE
FUEL

EMS 53113

HIGH FLASH
POINT TYPE
FUEL

EMS 53116

CIS
FUELS

GOST
10227-86

Specification
Equivalence
(for info.)
ASTM D 1655
JET A
CAN 2-3.23
JET A

Freezing
point
(C)

JET A1
ASTM D 1655
JET A1
CAN 2-3.23
AVTUR
DERD 2494
AVTUR/FSii
DERD 2453
JP8
MIL-T-83133

AIR 3405C

AIR 3405 C
JET B
ASTM D 1655
JET B
CAN 2-3.22
MIL-T-5624
JP4
AIR 3407B

DERD 2486
AVTAG
DERD 2454 AVTAG/FSii
CAN 2-3.22

AIR 3404C

AIR 3404C

DERD 2498
AVCAT
MIL-T-5624
JP5
DERD 2452
AVCAT/FSii
CAN 3GP24

CAN 3GP24

T1
TS1 regular
TS1 premium
T2
RT

Additives
Anti-ice

Anti-static

NATO
code

*
*

*
WITH

*
*
WITHOUT
WITH
WITH
WITHOUT
WITH
*
*
WITH
WITH
WITHOUT
WITH
WITH

*
WITH
WITH
WITH
*
*
*
*
WITH
WITH
*
*
WITHOUT
WITH

F35
F34
F34
F35
F34

F40
F40

F40
F40

WITHOUT
WITH
WITHOUT
WITH
WITH
WITHOUT
WITH

*
*
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
*
*

F43
F44
F43
F44
F44
F43
F44

WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT

WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT
WITHOUT

40

47

50
50

58

46

60
60
60
60
55

* Information to be checked with the fuel supplier.

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POWERPLANT
Garrett TFE 731-5AR-1C Engine
Thrust Ratings (Uninstalled, Sea Level, ISA):
Takeoff ............................................................................... 4,500 lb (2,002 daN)
Maximum continuous ...................................................... 4,500 lb (2,002 daN)

Thrust Setting
The engine low-pressure rotor speed N 1 is used as the thrust setting parameter.
Takeoff thrust (5-minute time limit)

Maximum Engine Rotor SpeedsN1 and N2


CONDITION OF USE

N1

N2

TakeoffMaximum continuous

100%*

101%*

Transient (5 seconds maximum allowable)

103%

103%

* 100% N1 = 21,000 rpm


* 101% N2 = 29,989 rpm

Maximum Interstage Turbine Temperature: ITT


Starting, ground/air

Normal

952C

Takeoff (with increased thrust)

Normal (5 minutes maximum)

974C

Takeoff (without increased thrust)

Normal (5 minutes maximum)

952C

Takeoff Transient

Normal (5 seconds maximum)

984C

Maximum continuous

924C

Generator Load:
To 43,000 feet ..................................................................................... 300 AMPS
Above 43,000 feet ............................................................................. 260 AMPS
One minute transient ......................................................................... 350 AMPS

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Starting Time
Groundstart and starter-assist airstart
from 10% N2 speed to light-off

10 seconds maximum

Windmilling airstart
from windmilling N2 speed to 60% N2

45 seconds maximum

Groundstart
from light-off to idle

60 seconds maximum

Fuel Control Computers


The engine fuel control computers must be operative for takeoff.

Thrust Reverser
The thrust reverser is approved for ground-use only.

Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1C Engine


Thrust Ratings (Uninstalled, Sea Level, ISA):
Takeoff ............................................................................... 4,750 lb (2,114 daN)
Maximum continuous ...................................................... 4,634 lb (2,062 daN)

Thrust Setting
The engine low-pressure rotor speed N 1 is used as the thrust setting parameter.
Takeoff thrust (5-minute time limit)

Maximum Engine Rotor SpeedsN1 and N2


CONDITION OF USE

N1

N2

TakeoffMaximum continuous

100%*

100.8%*

Transient (5 seconds maximum allowable)

103%

103%

* 100% N1 = 21,000 rpm


* 100.8% N2 = 30, 540 rpm

Maximum Interstage Turbine Temperature (ITT)


Starting, ground/air

Normal

978C

Takeoff (with increased thrust)

Normal (5 minutes maximum)

996C

Takeoff (without increased thrust)

Normal (5 minutes maximum)

978C

Takeoff Transient

Normal (5 seconds maximum)

1,006C

Maximum continuous

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

968C

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Generator Load:
To 43,000 feet ..................................................................................... 300 AMPS
Above 43,000 feet ............................................................................. 260 AMPS
One minute transient ......................................................................... 350 AMPS

Starting Time
Groundstart and starter-assist airstart
from 10% N2 speed to light-off

10 seconds maximum

Windmilling airstart
from windmilling N2 speed to 60% N2

45 seconds maximum

Groundstart
from light-off to idle

60 seconds maximum

Fuel Control Computers


The engine fuel control computers must be operative for takeoff.

Thrust Reverser
The thrust reverser is approved for ground-use only.

LUBRICATION SYSTEM
Approved Oils
Type II oils are Aeroshell/Royco Turbine Oil 500 and 560, Castrol 5000,
Exxon/Esso 2380 Turbo Oil, Mobil Jet Oil II and Mobil 254 in accordance
with AlliedSignal Engines EMS 53110 type II.
These brands may be mixed.

Oil Pressure
THRUST
SETTING

MINIMUM
PRESSURE

MAXIMUM
PRESSURE

Takeoff or maximum continuous

38 psi

46 psi

Idle

25 psi

Transient

46 psi
55 psi less than 3 minutes

NOTE
The OIL 1, OIL 2, and OIL 3 lights in the warning
panel illuminate for an oil pressure below 25 psi.

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Oil Temperature
OPERATIONAL LIMITS
From sea level to 30,000 feet

127C maximum

Above 30,000 feet

140C maximum

Transient all altitudes

149C maximum, less than 2 minutes

Minimum for exceeding idle power

30C

SYSTEMS
AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU)
GARRETT GTCP 36-150 (F)
The APU must be operated on the ground only.
Operation of the APU with passengers in the cabin and no crewmember monitoring is not authorized.
Maximum N 1 speed..................................................................................... 110%
EXHAUST GAS TEMPERATURE LIMIT (T5)
Starting

Between 870 and 985C (1,600F/1,805F) maximum,


less than 10 seconds

Stabilized

679C (1,255F)

NOTE
The duration of operation on amber range
(679C/732C to 1,255F/1,350F) must be as short
as possible.
Maximum generator output:
Transient (1 minute maximum) ........................................................... 350 A
Stabilized................................................................................................ 300 A
Refer to approved fuels and oils for the engine.

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AUTOMATIC PILOT (SPERRY DFZ 800)


The autopilot must not be engaged for takeoff or landing.
The autopilot is certified to the minimum height as follows:
Mininum height radio altimeter operative ................................................ 50 ft
Mininum height radio altimeter inoperative........................................... 150 ft
Minimum decision height .......................................................................... 200 ft
Minimum height for autopilot
operation, except during approach ....................................................... 1,000 ft
Minimum height for use during an FMS approach ................................ 300 ft

CAUTION
On aircraaft equipped with FMS computer software
9004, before use of the APP mode, the mode VNAV
must be disengaged before APP mode engagement.

ANTI-ICE
Icing Conditions
Icing conditions exist when the OAT on the ground and for takeoff, or
TAT in flight is 10C or below, and visible moisture in any form is present
(such as clouds, fog with visibility of one mile or less, rain, snow, sleet, and
ice crystals).
Icing conditions also exist when the OAT on the ground and for takeoff is 10C
or below when operating on ramps, taxiways or runways where surface snow,
ice, standing water or slush may be ingested by the engines or freeze on engines, nacelles, or engine sensor probes.

Engine Anti-ice
Engine anti-ice systems (ENG ANTI-ICE ) should be switched ON in flight
or on ground when icing conditions exist or are anticipated, except during climb
and cruise when the temperature is less than 40C SAT or TAT more than
+10C (50F).
However, flying in vicinity or through cumuliform clouds can result in rapid
variation of SAT with SAT increasing above 40C. In such case, anticipate
icing conditions by selecting the anti-icing system ON.
Do not rely on airframe visual cues to turn anti-icing system ON. Use the temperature and visible moisture criteria specified.

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Conclusion
During climb and cruise, the pneumatic anti-ice system shall be turned ON:
Below +10C (50F) TAT and above 40C
and
In visible moisture.
If both of these conditions are not met, the anti-ice should be turned OFF.

Wing Anti-ice
The wing anti-ice system must not be used with total air temperature in excess of +10C. It must not be used on ground except for maintenance checks
conducted in accordance with Maintenance Manual instructions.

BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
The lavatory-baggage compartment door must be closed and latched during
any operation above 41,000 feet.

CABIN PRESSURIZATION
Maximum differential pressure ............................ 9.6 psi/662 mbar/66.2 kPa
(pressure-relief valve setting)

HYDRAULIC
Hydraulic fluid approved for use must conform to MIL-H-5606 specification
(NATO codes H515 for H520).

ELECTRICAL
Maximum voltage of DC system ................................................................ 32 V
Maximum generator output:
Transient (1 minute maximum) ........................................................... 350 A
Up to 43,000 ft ....................................................................................... 300 A
Above 43,000 ft ..................................................................................... 260 A
Battery temperature:
Before SB F900-94-1:
Amber light (WARM) at or above................................. 120F (48.9C)
Red light (HOT) at or above .......................................... 150F (65.5C)

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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After SB F900-94-1:
Amber light (WARM) at or above................................. 120F (48.9C)
Red light (HOT) at or above .......................................... 160F (71.1C)

NOTE
Any popped CB can be reset only if it is less than 5
amps strictly rated.

INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
AIRSPEED INDICATOR MARKINGS

ENGINE INSTRUMENT MARKINGS


Instrument Color Codes
Maximum operating limit ..................................................................... Red line
Precautionary range .......................................... Amber or yellow range or arc
Normal operating range....................................................... Green range or arc

N1 RPM
Green arc................................................ 24% to 100%
Red trapezoid ...................................... 100% to 103%
Blue test point .................................................... 106%

ITT
Green arc:
TFE 731-5AR-1C........................ 250 to 924C
TFE 731-5BR-1C ........................ 250 to 968C
Yellow arc:
TFE 731-5AR-1C........................ 924 to 974C

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TFE 731-5BR-1C ........................ 968 to 996C


Red line:
TFE 731-5AR-1C ..................... 952 and 974C
TFE 731-5BR-1C ..................... 978 and 996C
Blue test point:
TFE 731-5AR-1C .................................. 1,000C
TFE 731-5BR-1C .................................. 1,040C

N2 RPM
Green arc................................................ 48% to 100%
Red trapezoid ...................................... 100% to 103%
Blue test point .................................................... 106%

Oil Temperature and Pressure


Temperature
Green arc (sea level to FL 300)........... 30 to 127C
Yellow arc (above FL 300) ................ 127 to 140C

Pressure
Red line (minimum at idle) .............................. 25 psi
Yellow arc (idle range) ........................... 25 to 38 psi
Green arc (normal operating range) ...... 38 to 46 psi
Yellow arc (transient
[maximum < three minutes]) ................. 46 to 55 psi
Red line (maximum < three minutes)............. 55 psi

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MISCELLANEOUS
INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
Fuel Quantity
Left and Right Quantity Indicators
Yellow arc ............................................... 0 to 1,000 lb

Center Quantity Indicator


Aircraft with electric transfer valve XTK2:
Yellow arc ....................................... 0 to 1,000 lb
Yellow arc ............................... 2,200 to 2,400 lb
Green arc ................................. 3,100 to 3,500 lb
Green arc ................................. 4,300 to 4,500 lb
Aircraft without electric transfer valve XTK2:
Yellow arc ....................................... 0 to 1,000 lb

Cabin Pressure
Cabin Rate of Climb
Green arc .................................... 495 to +715 ft/min

Cabin Altitude
Yellow arc ...................................... 8,000 to 10,000 ft
Red arc ......................................... 10,000 to 50,000 ft

Cabin Differential Pressure


Yellow arc .............................................. 9.4 to 9.7 psi
Red arc ..................................................... 9.7 to 10 psi

Hydraulic System
Quantity
Green range .................................................. 1/4 to 1/1
Red range ......................................................... 0 to 1/4
Thick white line...................................................... 1/1

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Pressure
Green range ................................... 2,800 to 3,200 psi

Electrical System
Battery Temperature
Green range .......................................... 100 to 120F
Yellow range ........................................ 120 to 150F
Red range .............................................. 150 to 190F
Aircraft above SNs 132 and aircraft below 132 with
SB-94 applied:
Yellow range ................................ 120 to 160F
Red range ...................................... 160 to 190F

DC Voltmeter
Green arc ............................................... 24 to 26 volts
Green arc ........................................ 28.2 to 28.8 volts
Maximum voltage .......................................... 32 volts

AmmeterMaximum Load
Yellow triangle ............................................ 250 amps
Red line......................... Approximately at 300 amps

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Flight Control Trim


Aileron
White range ..................................................... 0 to 5%

Rudder
White range................................................. 5 to +5%

Stabilizer
Green range ............... 4 30' aft to 7 30' forward

Oxygen
Red arc ...................................................... 0 to 200 psi
Yellow arc ............................................ 250 to 700 psi
White arc ........................................... 700 to 2,000 psi
Yellow arc...................................... 2,000 to 2,200 psi

APU
N1 RPM
Green arc................................................ 95% to 105%
Yellow arc............................................ 105% to 110%
Red line ............................................................... 110%

T5 Temperature
Green arc .............................................. 150 to 679C
Yellow arc ............................................ 679 to 732C
Red line .............................................................. 732C

Angle of Attack
Green arc .......................................................... 0 to 0.6
Yellow arc ..................................................... 0.6 to 0.8
Red arc .......................................................... 0.8 to 1.0

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MANEUVERS AND PROCEDURES


CONTENTS
Page
AIRWORK MANEUVERS .......................................................... MAP-1
Takeoff with Engine Failure after V1.................................... MAP-1
AirworkSteep Turns.......................................................... MAP-1
AirworkUnusual Attitudes................................................ MAP-1
Coordination Maneuver ........................................................ MAP-3
Approach-to-Stall Series....................................................... MAP-4
Emergency Descent .............................................................. MAP-7
INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROFILES ..................................... MAP-7
ILS ApproachThree Engines ............................................ MAP-7
Nonprecision ApproachThree Engines........................... MAP-10
Circling ApproachThree Engines ................................... MAP-12
Missed ApproachThree Engines..................................... MAP-14
ILS ApproachOne Engine .............................................. MAP-14
Nonprecision ApproachOne Engine Inoperative............ MAP-16
Circling ApproachOne Engine Inoperative .................... MAP-18
Missed ApproachOne Engine Inoperative...................... MAP-20

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAP-i

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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
MAP-1
MAP-2
MAP-3
MAP-4
MAP-5
MAP-6
MAP-7
MAP-8
MAP-9

Title
Page
Takeoff Flight Path ........................................................ MAP-2
Typical ILS ApproachThree Engines ........................ MAP-9
Typical Nonprecision ApproachThree Engines ...... MAP-11
Typical Circling ApproachThree Engines................ MAP-13
Missed ApproachThree Engines .............................. MAP-14
Typical ILS ApproachOne Engine Inoperative ........ MAP-15
Typical Nonprecision Approach
One Engine Inoperative................................................ MAP-17
Circling ApproachOne Engine Inoperative.............. MAP-19
Missed ApproachOne Engine Inoperative .............. MAP-20

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAP-iii

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MANEUVERS AND PROCEDURES


AIRWORK MANEUVERS
TAKEOFF WITH ENGINE FAILURE AFTER V1
If an engine failure occurs after V 1 , during the takeoff roll, continue the takeoff using the rudder to maintain directional control and runway alignment
(Figure MAP-1). Perform the following procedure:
1.
2.

3.
4.

5.

6.

Rotate at the charted V R speed to the appropriate attitude for the flaps
20/7 + slats.
Maintain the charted V 2 speed throughout the first and second segments of climb. If a speed slightly higher than the charted V 2 speed
is attained, accept that speed and climb out on it rather than an increased
pitch attitude in order to lower the speed.
When a positive rate of climb is established as indicated by both the
altimeter and vertical velocity indicators, retract the landing gear.
At the altitude selected to retract the flaps, normally a minimum of
400 feet above the airport elevation or 35 feet above close-in obstacle,
whichever is higher, begin acceleration to V 2 +25 knots.
Retract the slats and flaps, accelerate to the final segment climb speed
(1.43 V S), reduce the power on the operating engines to maximum continuous thrust, and climb at 1.43 V S to 1,500 feet above the airport
elevation.
Engine shutdown procedures may commence during the final segment
climb if the situation allows.

AIRWORKSTEEP TURNS
Steep turns may be accomplished at altitudes of 5,000 feet above ground level
and higher to a maximum altitude of 18,000 feet. Desired airspeed throughout the maneuver is 250 10 knots; bank angle is 45 5. Turns should be made
through a minimum of 180 to a maximum of 360 of travel.

AIRWORKUNUSUAL ATTITUDES
Unusual attitudes will be accomplished at an altitude of at least 10,000 feet
AGL, but not above 18,000 feet MSL.
Primary consideration should be given to smooth, unhurried recovery with a
minimum gain/loss of altitude. A minimum of two unusual attitude situations
will be given, one nose high with decreasing airspeed below 200 knots and
the other nose low with increasing airspeed above 300 knots.
Nose-high maneuvers should be given with the aircraft altitude not to exceed
30 noseup with a moderate angle of bank. Recovery is made with power, and
an increase in angle of bank not to exceed 90, in the same direction of the

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAP-1

MAP-2
MAX CONTINUOUS THRUST

TAKEOFF THRUST
(5 MINUTES MAX)

SLATS/FLAPSTAKEOFF POSITION
LANDING GEARUP
TAKEOFF GRADIENT 2.7% MIN.
SPEEDV2

SPEED1.43 VS

NT

ME

EG

S
FF

EO

AK
LT

A
FIN
3RD SEGMENT
GM

EN

SLATS/FLAPSTAKEOFF POSITION
LANDING GEARDOWN
TAKEOFF GRADIENT .3% MIN.
SPEEDV2
EN

2N

SE

1,500 FT MIN.

M
SE
T
1S

GROUND ROLL

400 FT
MIN.

REF 0

LANDING
GEARUP

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

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RETRACTION IF SLATS/FLAPS
ACCELERATE TO V2 +25 KT
LANDING GEARUP

SLATS/FLAPSRETRACTED
CLIMB GRADIENT 1.5% MIN.
LANDING GEARUP
SPEED1.43 VS

Figure MAP-1. Takeoff Flight Path

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turn. This type of recovery allows the nose of the aircraft to descend to the
horizon with a positive G condition, thus avoiding the adversities of negative
G forces.
Nosedown maneuvers will be given by placing the aircraft in a moderate
bank with the nose down no more than 30 below the horizon. Recovery
should be smooth, reducing power to idle, leveling the wings, and using
noseup elevator to ease the nose to the horizon. The airbrakes may be used
as required.
Proper evaluation of instrument presentations is imperative in all cases.
Verify attitude indicator presentations with the copilots and/or standby horizon. If the attitude indicator is inoperative, evaluate data given by the airspeed,
altimeter, and vertical velocity indicators.

COORDINATION MANEUVER
The objective of this maneuver is to sharpen the coordination and control skills
of the pilot while flying Dassault Aircraft and Level C simulators. This maneuver is especially helpful for pilots undergoing initial training in either the
aircraft or simulator. It is also useful for pilots undergoing current training
to assist in the application of coordination skills to the flying of the Level C
simulator.
For initial training pilots, this maneuver is performed during the first training ride in the Level C simulator; accomplishment of the maneuver is
recommended but is optional dependent upon individual pilot proficiency.
This maneuver is not a specific requirement of the FAA nor is it specified by
the aircraft manufacturer. It is designed for training use only and, through experience, has proven to be most effective in enhancing aircraft and Level C
simulator controllability of pilots in training.
This maneuver is normally accomplished after the steep turn maneuvers and
prior to the stall series. It is accomplished at the same altitude as prescribed
for the stall series. It is set up and performed as follows:
1.

2.

3.

4.

Begin a slowdown from 250 to 160 knots using airbrakes and a power
reduction. When airspeed tapers to 160 knots, retract the airbrakes and
adjust power to maintain 160 knots and assigned altitude.
Establish a 60 arc on the pilots flight director by setting the heading bug on one heading and the course arrow on a heading 60 left or
right of the heading bug. The aircraft/Level C simulator should be on
a heading within the lateral limits of the 60 arc set on the flight
director.
When established at 160 knots in the clean configuration, establish a
15 angle of bank turning maneuver alternating left and right between the lateral limits of the 60 arc. Maintain assigned altitude and
160 knots airspeed.
At the second reversal on the arc, and for each subsequent turn reversal,
incrementally configure the aircraft/Level C simulator to the landing

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MAP-3

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configuration. While in the landing configuration, closely monitor


engine instruments to preclude exceeding limitations. It may become
necessary to retract one notch of flaps to prevent exceeding these
l i m i t a t i o n s . A f t e r t h e l a n d i n g c o n fi g u r a t i o n i s e s t a b l i s h e d ,
incrementally retract gear, flaps, and leading-edge devices at each succeeding turn reversal until the clean configuration is once again
established. Maintain assigned altitude, 160 knots airspeed, and the
15 angle of bank left and right on the 60 arc.
5. The maneuver is completed after reaching the clean configuration with
one subsequent turn reversal.
Performance criteria are:
Angle of bank ....................................................................................... 15
Airspeed ................................................................................ 160 5 knots
Altitude...................................................................... Assigned 100 feet
Power limits............................................................... Not to be exceeded

APPROACH-TO-STALL SERIES
General
The approach-to-stall series should be performed at an altitude above 10,000
feet above ground level and below flight level 180. To approximate flight conditions and satisfy FAA requirements, the stall series is to be performed in
the clean, takeoff, and landing configurations. These procedures are developed for training use in the aircraft and Level C simulator.
Emphasis must be placed on proper approach-to-stall recognition, smooth and
positive aircraft control, and proper recovery procedures.
Proper recognition of an approaching stall regime can be gained through
observation of any one of the following indications:
Activation of the audible stall warning system
Illumination of the igniter lights
Onset of low-speed buffet
An angle-of-attack indicator with its pointer at the low-speed buffet
reference mark (on aircraft so equipped)
Smooth and positive aircraft control is mandatory throughout the execution
of the approach-to-stall series. Power, pitch, and bank inputs must not be abrupt
or erratic.
Prior to beginning the approach to stall series, compute the V REF and set the
airspeed bugs accordingly.

MAP-4

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Clean Configuration
This maneuver is performed while turning in a constant 15 angle of bank.
Airspeed at start of maneuver is 190 knots. Maintain assigned altitude. In a
Level C simulator, this may be performed at normal traffic pattern altitudes
to present realism.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Power setting50% N 1
TrimDo not use stabilizer trim below an airspeed which is 10 knots
above expected stall indication speed.
Stall indication normally occurs at a speed of V REF +20 knots.
RecoveryAt the first indication of stall:
a. Maximum powerSmoothly advance power levers to maximum
power setting. Copilot monitors limitations.
b. Simultaneously and smoothly roll the wings level. This action
lowers the stall speed.
c. Smoothly maintain pitch only enough to stop the stall warning
or buffet and minimize altitude excursions. It is expected that assigned altitude be maintained throughout this maneuver. Avoid
abrupt control movements to preclude secondary stall warnings.
d. Accelerate to and hold 190 knots airspeed.

Takeoff Configuration
This maneuver is performed while turning in a constant 15 angle of bank,
preferably in a direction opposite from the one used in the previous maneuver. Airspeed at start of maneuver is 190 knots. Maintain assigned altitude.
In a Level C simulator, this may be performed at normal traffic pattern
altitudes to present realism.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Landing gearUp
Flaps/leading-edge devicesSet flaps 20 + slats.
Power settingAfter flaps/leading-edge devices are extended:
60% N 1 .
TrimDo not use stabilizer trim below an airspeed which is 10 knots
above expected stall indication speed.
Stall indication normally occurs at V REF 15 knots.
RecoveryAt the first indication of stall:
a. Maximum powerSmoothly advance power levers to maximum
power setting. Copilot monitors limitations.
b. Simultaneously and smoothly roll the wings level.
c. Smoothly maintain pitch only enough to stop the stall warning
or buffet and minimize altitude excursions. It is expected that
assigned altitude be maintained throughout this maneuver. Avoid
abrupt control movements to preclude secondary stall warnings.
d. Accelerate to and hold 190 knots airspeed. Do not retract flaps
or leading edge devices.

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MAP-5

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Landing Configuration
This maneuver is performed while holding a constant heading. Airspeed at
start of maneuver is 190 knots. Maintain assigned altitude while configuring
the aircraft and setting power.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Landing gearExtend in normal landing sequence prescribed.


Flaps/leading-edge devicesSet flaps +40 + slats.
Power settingAfter landing configuration is established: 70% N 1 .
After the power is set, allow the aircraft/simulator to slow to the V REF
speed. Descend on V REF to a simulated decision height (DH) at least
500 feet below the originally assigned altitude. When reaching the arbitrary DH, level the aircraft/simulator at this altitude, and without
adjusting the power, allow the aircraft/simulator to slow to the first
indication of a stall. In a Level C simulator this maneuver may be done
in the traffic pattern while on final instrument approach, inside the
final approach fix.
TrimDo not use stabilizer trim below an airspeed which is 10 knots
above expected stall indication speed.
Stall indication normally occurs at V REF 20 knots.
RecoveryAt the first indication of stall:
a. Maximum powerSmoothly advance throttles to maximum power
setting. Copilot monitors limitations.
b. Simultaneously retract flaps one notch to 20.
c. Smoothly maintain pitch only enough to stop the stall warning
or buffet and minimize altitude excursions.
d. As airspeed increases to V REF , execute normal go-around procedures: Climb on V REF to the original altitude, retract the landing gear upon a positive indication of climb, and retract the flaps
and leading-edge devices in accordance with prescribed aircraft
procedures. V REF may be exceeded in the climb only to preclude
exceeding a 20 angle. In a Level C simulator, fly published
missed-approach procedure.
e. Accelerate to and hold 190 knots airspeed with the aircraft in the
clean configuration.

5.
6.
7.

Performance Standards
Smooth and positive aircraft control throughout the series
No altitude excursions during entry; minimal altitude excursions
during recovery except for the descent and ascent required during the
landing configuration stall procedures
Recovery without entry into the secondary stall regime

MAP-6

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EMERGENCY DESCENT
This maneuver affords training in the recommended procedures for establishing
the highest practical rate of descent possible during emergency conditions arising from an uncontrollable fire, sudden loss of pressurization, or any other
situation dictating an immediate and rapid descent.
This procedure assumes structural integrity of the airplane. If integrity is suspect, reduce the rate of descent and avoid high load factors.
The following procedure is prescribed by the AFM:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

8.

Disengage the autopilot.


Retard power levers to idle.
Extend the airbrakes to position 2.
Descent airspeed: M MO /V MO , smooth air conditions
ATC Transponder, MAYDAY codeSquawk 7700.
Ensure that landing gear is up.
To start the descent, the initiation of a 45 bank will expedite entry
to the descent without adversely affecting the G-loading of the aircraft. The initial descent angle should be 20 nosedown pitch on the
ADI. After the 20 nosedown is achieved, remove all bank as necessary. Contnue in a 20 nosedown pitch angle until VMO/MMO is attained.
At this time, a reduction to a nosedown pitch angle of 10 should ensure maintenance of V MO /M MO throughout the descent to the leveloff altitude.
At 1,000 feet above the level-off altitude, reduce nosedown pitch
angle to achieve a vertical velocity of not more than 2,000 feet per
minute. Retract the airbrakes, if necessary, at 500 feet above the leveloff altitude. Begin level-off to assigned altitude at 10% of the indicated
vertical velocity in the descent.

INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROFILES


ILS APPROACHTHREE ENGINES
Figure MAP-2 illustrates the ILS ApproachThree Engines.
1.

2.

3.

Review the approach chart for the approved procedure and prescribed
minimums. Conduct the ILS approach in accordance with these charted
procedures and as prescribed by the controlling ATC agency.
The Descent checklist should be accomplished prior to entry for the
approach. Set all instruments for the approach, and ensure that the approach briefing has been completed prior to being cleared for approach.
Tune and identify the VOR and ADF radios that will be used for the
approach. Heading and course values will be set on the respective
instruments in preparation for the approach. Ensure that the RMI
pointers have been properly selected.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAP-7

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4.

5.

6.

7.
8.

9.

MAP-8

Prior to crossing high station outbound, slow the aircraft to 190 knots
in the clean configuration. If using the flight director for the approach,
the heading mode should be selected on the flight director control panel
until the aircraft is aligned within 90 of the inbound course and the
aircraft is proceeding inbound for course intercept.
At high station outbound, set the slats/flaps to S +20, and complete
the Approach checklist. Slow the aircraft to 150 knots, and maneuver through the procedure turn as prescribed on the approach chart.
When inbound from procedure turn and established for course intercept (normally a 45 intercept heading), select the approach mode on
the flight director control panel (if flight director is used for approach). Intercept the final approach course, and proceed inbound to
the final approach fix or glide-slope intercept point at the prescribed
altitude.
When the glideslope is alive and reaches 1 dot low, select the landing
gear down, and call for the Before Landing checklist.
When intercepting glideslope, extend the flaps to 40 and establish a
final approach speed of V REF plus the wind correction (1/2 the steady
wind plus the full gust, not to exceed 20 knots). Maintain the glideslope with elevator and airspeed with minor power adjustments. The
pilot making the approach will handle the throttles.
Cross-check instruments at 1,000, 500, and 100 feet above charted minimums. The pilot making the approach should remain on instruments
throughout the final approach. When a visual contact is definitely
established and a safe landing can be made, as verbally indicated by
the pilot not flying the approach, continue to the runway visually for
landing.

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LEGEND
IN THE FOLLOWING APPROACH FLOW CHARTS, THE APPROACH HAS BEEN BROKEN DOWN INTO TWO
AREAS. FIRST THE MANEUVERING AREA WHEREIN THE SPEED FOR EACH CONFIGURATION ALLOWS
THE PILOT TO USE STANDARD RATE TURNS FOR MANEUVERING WITH A COMFORTABLE MARGIN. SECOND THE NONMANEUVERING OR FINAL APPROACH AREA WHICH IS BASED ON THE AIRPLANE BEING
STABILIZED IN THE APPROACH OR LINED UP WITH THE RUNWAY, SO THAT ANY CORRECTIONS REQUIRE ONLY A SMALL BANK ANGLE.

THE MANEUVERING IS DEPICTED ON CHARTS AS A LIGHT SHADED AREA.


THE NONMANEUVERING OR FINAL APPROACH IS DEPICTED AS A DARK
SHADED AREA.

WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

1 DOT HIGH GEAR DOWN


LANDING CHECKLIST)............
SPEED

150 KTS

AT THE FINAL FIX*


WING
SPEED

SLATS +40
VREF + WIND

* WING FLAPS MAY BE

EXTENDED TO 40
UPON INTERCEPTING
GLIDESLOPE.

Figure MAP-2. Typical ILS ApproachThree Engines

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAP-9

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NONPRECISION APPROACHTHREE ENGINES


Figure MAP-3 illustrates the Nonprecision ApproachThree Engines.
1.

2.

3.

4.
5.

6.

7.

MAP-10

Review the approach chart for the approved procedure and prescribed
minimums. Conduct the nonprecision approach in accordance with
these charted procedures and as prescribed by the controlling ATC
agency.
The Descent checklist should be accomplished prior to entry for the
approach. Set all instruments for the approach, and ensure that the
approach briefing has been completed prior to being cleared for the
approach.
Tune and identify the VOR and/or ADF radios that will be used for
the approach. Heading and course values will be set on the respective
instruments in preparation for the approach. Ensure that the RMI
pointers have been properly selected.
Prior to crossing high station outbound, the aircraft should be slowed
to 190 knots in the clean configuration.
At high station outbound, set the slats/flaps to S +20, and complete
the Approach checklist. Slow the aircraft to 150 knots, and maneuver through the procedure turn as prescribed on the approach chart.
At the completion of procedure turn and prior to the final approach
fix (FAF), select the landing gear down, and complete the Before
Landing checklist. Maintain the airspeed at 150 knots, and cross the
FAF at this speed with all checklists accomplished.
At the FAF, start the timing; if the missed approach point is so based,
begin a descent to the minimum descent altitude (MDA) at a rate not
to exceed 1,000 feet per minute and at a speed of 150 knots. When MDA
is reached, fly the aircraft at MDA until visual contact with the runway is made or the missed approach point (MAP) is reached. If visual
contact is achieved and landing is assured, extend the flaps to 40, and
slow the aircraft to the V REF speed plus the wind correction for landing. If not visual prior to reaching the designated MAP, execute the
published missed approach procedure.

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WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

PRIOR TO THE FIX


GEAR

DOWN
(LANDING CHECKLIST)............
SPEED

150 KTS

AT THE FINAL FIX


START TIMING..........................
SINK RATE 1,000 F.P.M.
SPEED

150 KTS

MINIMUMS

LANDING ASSURED AND


LINED UP WITH RUNWAY
WING
SPEED

SLATS +40
VREF + WIND

Figure MAP-3. Typical Nonprecision ApproachThree Engines

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CIRCLING APPROACHTHREE ENGINES


Figure MAP-4 illustrates the Circling ApproachThree Engines.
Although the Falcon 900 is considered a Category C aircraft in the true definition as obtained from the TERPS Manual, it is recommended that Category
D minimums be used for circling to an airport. This affords a higher ceiling
and .6 of a mile greater maneuvering airspace.
The typical three-engine ILS and nonprecision approach profiles are flown
except that circling approaches are flown to published circling minimums with
slats/flaps set at S +20 and at an airspeed of 150 knots. When visual in the
circle for landing, and on the downwind leg, select the landing gear down,
and complete the Before Landing checklist. Maintain 150 knots, and follow
normal VFR landing pattern procedures.
When on final approach, at or above 500 AGL, and slow to VREF plus the normal
wind corrections.

MAP-12

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RECOMMENDED USE CATEGORY D MINIMUMS


WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

AT THE FINAL FIX


START TIMING..........................
SINK RATE 1,000 F.P.M.
SPEED

150 KTS

(AT MINIMUMS)
............
SPEED

150 KTS
90
LANDING ASSURED AND
LINED UP WITH RUNWAY
15 SEC

SPEED

150 KTS
GEAR

DOWN
(LANDING CHECKLIST).....

WING
SPEED

SLATS +40
VREF + WIND

15 SEC

SPEED

150 KTS

Figure MAP-4. Typical Circling ApproachThree Engines

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MISSED APPROACHTHREE ENGINES


Figure MAP-5 illustrates the Missed ApproachThree Engines. When decision height is reached on an ILS approach, or when reaching the missed approach point as specified for a nonprecision approach, and visual contact with
the airport or landing runway cannot be made, execute a missed approach (goaround).
Follow the missed approach instructions as depicted on the appropriate instrument approach plate used for approach.
Simultaneously apply maximum thrust to the engines, rotate the aircraft to
the go-around 14 pitch attitude, airbrakes zero, and retract the flaps to 20.
When a positive rate of climb is indicated on both the altimeter and the vertical velocity indicators, retract the landing gear. At 400 feet minimum above
airport elevation and at V REF +25 knots, retract the slats/flaps and reduce the
power to normal climb thrust. Accelerate to the normal enroute climb speeds
while climbing to the missed-approach or assigned altitude.

(5 MINUTES MAX)
MAXIMUM THRUST

S L AT S + 4 0

PITCH14/FLAPS +20
POSITIVE RATEGEAR UP
CLIMB GRADIENT3.2%

+ 10 KT
0

NORMAL CLIMB THRUST

SPEED250 KT
SPEED200 KT

SPEEDVREF +25 KT
FLAPS + SLATSAFTER
TAKEOFF CHECKLIST

3,000 FT
400 FT MINIMUM
GO AROUND

AIRPORT

Figure MAP-5. Missed ApproachThree Engines

ILS APPROACHONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE


Figure MAP-6 illustrates the ILS ApproachOne Engine Inoperative.
1.

2.

MAP-14

Review the approach chart for the approved procedure and prescribed
minimums. Conduct the ILS approach in accordance with these charted
procedures and as prescribed by the controlling agency.
The Descent checklist should be accomplished prior to entry for the
approach. Set all instruments for the approach, and ensure that the approach briefing has been completed prior to being cleared for approach.

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3.

4.
5.

6.

Tune and identify the VOR and ADF radios that will be used for the
approach. Heading and course values will be set for the respective
instruments in preparation for the approach. Ensure that the RMI
pointers have been properly selected.
Prior to crossing high station outbound, slow the aircraft to 190 knots
in the clean configuration.
At high station outbound, set the slats/flaps to S +20, and complete
the Approach checklist. Slow the aircraft to 150 knots, and maneuver through the procedure turn as prescribed on the approach chart.
When inbound from the procedure turn, on the ILS course inbound,
and approaching the glideslope at the 1 dot low indication, select the
landing gear down, and call for the Before Landing checklist. Maintain
the airspeed at V REF +5 knots + the wind correction, if any. Use of
40 of flaps when runway is in sight is optional at this point, and such
use should be judiciously considered in light of aircraft weight and
weather conditions. A stabilized approach from the FAF to touchdown
may be the best choice.

WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

1 DOT HIGH GEAR DOWN


(LANDING CHECKLIST)............
SPEED

150 KTS

AT THE FINAL FIX


WING

FLAPS +20
SPEED

V REF +5
RUNWAY IN SIGHT...................
SPEED VREF +5 + WIND

Figure MAP-6. Typical ILS ApproachOne Engine Inoperative

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MAP-15

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NONPRECISION APPROACH
ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE
Figure MAP-7 illustrates the Nonprecision ApproachOne Engine Inoperative.
1.

2.

3.

4.
5.

6.

7.

8.

MAP-16

Review the approach chart for the approved procedure and prescribed
minimums. Conduct the nonprecision approach in accordance with
these charted procedures and as prescribed by the controlling agency.
The Descent checklist should be accomplished prior to entry for the
approach. Set all instruments for the approach, and ensure that the
approach briefing has been completed prior to being cleared for
approach.
Tune and identify the VOR and/or ADF radios that will be used for
the approach. Heading and course values will be set on the respective
instruments in preparation for the approach. Ensure that RMI pointers have been properly selected.
Prior to crossing high station outbound, slow the aircraft to 190 knots
in the clean configuration.
At high station outbound, set the slats/flaps to S +20, and complete
the Approach checklist. Slow the aircraft to 150 knots, and maneuver through the procedure turn as prescribed on the approach chart.
After completion of the procedure turn, and just prior to the final
approach fix, select the gear down, and complete the Before Landing
checklist. Cross the FAF at 150 knots.
At the FAF, start approach timing; descend at a rate not to exceed 1,000
feet per minute, and maintain a speed of 150 knots to the minimum
descent altitude. When MDA is reached, fly the aircraft at MDA until
visual contact with the runway is made or the missed approach point
is reached.
When landing is assured, slow the aircraft to V REF +5 knots + the wind
correction for landing. An option exists to select 40 of flaps once the
landing is assured. This option is based upon the best assessment of
the overall situation as determined by the Captain.

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WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

PRIOR TO THE FIX

AT THE FINAL FIX

GEAR

DOWN
LANDING CHECKLIST)............
SPEED

150 KTS

START TIMING..........................
SINK RATE 1,000 F.P.M.
SPEED

150 KTS

MINIMUMS

LANDING ASSURED AND


LINED UP WITH RUNWAY
WING
SPEED

SLATS +20
VREF +5 + WIND
OR

WING
SPEED

SLATS +40
VREF + WIND

Figure MAP-7. Typical Nonprecision Approach


One Engine Inoperative

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CIRCLING APPROACHONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE


Figure MAP-8 illustrates the Circling ApproachOne Engine Inoperative.
Although the Falcon 900 is considered a Category C aircraft as defined in the
TERPS Manual, it is recommended that Category D minimums be used for
circling to an airport. This affords a higher ceiling and a .6 of a mile greater
maneuvering airspace.
The typical two-engine ILS and nonprecision approach profiles are flown except
that circling approaches are flown to published circling minimums with
slats/flaps set to S +20 and at an airspeed of 150 knots until visual and
established on downwind leg for landing. At this point, extend the landing
gear, and accomplish the Before Landing checklist. Maintain an airspeed of
150 knots until established on final approach. When aligned on the final approach to the runway, begin to slow the airspeed to V REF +5 knots + the wind
correction, if any. Again, the option to extend the flaps to 40 rests with the
Captain.

MAP-18

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RECOMMENDED USE CATEGORY D MINIMUMS


WING
SPEED

CLEAN
190 KTS

WING

SLATS +20
SPEED

150 KTS
(APPROACH CHECKLIST)

AT THE FINAL FIX


START TIMING..........................
SINK RATE 1,000 F.P.M.
SPEED

150 KTS

(AT
MINIMUMS)............
SPEED

150 KTS
90

LANDING ASSURED AND


LINED UP WITH RUNWAY
WING
SPEED

SLATS +20
VREF +5 + WIND
OR

WING
SPEED

15 SEC

SLATS +40
VREF + WIND

15 SEC
SPEED

150 KTS
GEAR

DOWN
(LANDING CHECKLIST).....

SPEED

150 KTS

Figure MAP-8. Circling ApproachOne Engine Inoperative

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MISSED APPROACHONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE


When decision height is reached on an ILS approach, or when reaching the
missed approach point as specified for a nonprecision approach, and visual
contact with the airport or landing runway cannot be made, execute a missed
approach (go-around). Figure MAP-9 illustrates a Missed approachOne
engine inoperative.
Follow the missed approach instructions as depicted on the appropriate
instrument approach plate used for the approach.
Simultaneously apply maximum thrust to the operating engine, and rotate the
aircraft to a 13 pitch attitude. The flaps are assumed set at 20 as prescribed
on the one-engine inoperative approach profile. When a positive rate of climb
is indicated on both the altimeter and the vertical velocity indicators, retract
the landing gear. Maintain the charted V REF speed throughout these actions
until a minimum altitude of 400 feet above airport elevation is attained. At
this altitude, accelerate to VREF +25 knots, and retract the slats/flaps. Accelerate
to 1.43 V S , clean configuration, reduce the engine power to maximum continuous, and climb the aircraft to the prescribed missed-approach altitude.

(5 MINUTES MAX)
MAXIMUM THRUST
S L AT S + 2 0

MAX CONTINUOUS

PITCH13/FLAPS+20
POSITIVE RATEGEAR UP
SPEEDVREF +5 KT

+ 10 KT
0

SPEEDVREF +25 KT
FLAPS + SLATSAFTER
TAKEOFF CHECKLIST

SPEED1.43 VS
SPEED1.43 VS

1,500 FT
400 FT MINIMUM
GO AROUND

AIRPORT

Figure MAP-9. Missed ApproachOne Engine Inoperative

MAP-20

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WEIGHT AND BALANCE


CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................ WB-1
WEIGHT AND BALANCE ............................................................. WB-1
Definitions............................................................................... WB-1

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WEIGHT AND BALANCE


INTRODUCTION
It is the responsibility of the airplane operator to ensure that the airplane
is properly loaded. At the time of delivery, the manufacturer provides the
necessary weight and balance data to compute individual loadings. All subsequent changes in airplane weight and balance are the responsibility of the
airplane owner and/or operator. Information in this chapter begins with
weight and balance definitions.
The second portion of this chapter covers performance abbreviations and
definitions and supplies acceptable performance guidelines.

WEIGHT AND BALANCE


DEFINITIONS
Maximum Gross WeightThe maximum gross weight to which the airplane has been certified in compliance with the Federal Air Regulations.
PayloadWeight of passengers, baggage, and cargo (does not include crew
and usable fuel)
Center of Gravity (CG)The point at which the mass of an object is considered to be concentrated
Arm (or Moment Arm)The horizontal distance along the longitudinal
axis from the datum to the point where a force is applied. Normally measured
in inches, aft of the datum is plus (+), and forward of the datum is minus ().
MomentThe product of a weight or force and its moment arm (M = W A)
DatumArbitrary reference plane selected by the manufacturer from which
all measurements are made for weight and balance computations. The F-900
Datum is 25% of the mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) which coincided with
fuselage station (FS) 420.43 in (10,670 mm) (fuselage station +0 is the forward end of the airplane nose cone.
Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC)An imaginary constant section airfoil
that produces the same aerodynamic characteristics as the real airfoil. Due
to its constant dimensions, the MAC can be assigned fuselage station numbers for its leading and trailing edges, and all calculations and measurements
can be referenced from those points. The center of gravity is sometimes expressed as a percent of MAC. This defines the CG location as being the leading and trailing edge MAC at a certain percentage of the total distance.

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Example
Although seemingly complex at times, all weight and balance problems are
handled by use of the following moment equation.
(1)

Moment = Weight X Arm

This equation is the basic equation used to find the center-of-gravity location of an airplane and/or its components. By rearrangement of this equation
to the following forms,
(2)

Weight = Moment, and (3) Arm = Moment


Arm
Weight

with any two known values, the third value can be found.
In the airplane weight and balance problem, the moment equation is used many
times in calculating moments for each individual item. When all weights and
moments have been totaled, the charts provided in the Performance section
of this chapter should be used to determine CG.

WB-2

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PERFORMANCE
CONTENTS
Page
DEFINITIONS................................................................................ PER-1
ACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE GUIDELINES ........................ PER-2

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PERFORMANCE
DEFINITIONS
Takeoff PathExtends from a standing start to a point 1,500 feet above the
takeoff surface
Takeoff DistanceThe horizon distance along the takeoff path from the
start to a point 35 feet above the takeoff surface following an engine failure,
or 115% of all engines operating to a point 35 feet above the takeoff surface
(this includes a legal clearway)
Accelerate StopThe distance required to accelerate to V 1 and bring the aircraft to a full stop, assuming that one engine failed at V 1 plus a delay of two
seconds (this includes a legal stopway)
Balanced FieldWhen the takeoff distance is equal to the accelerate stop
distance
V 1 The speed at which, if an engine failure occurs, the aircraft will:
Reach 35 feet above the takeoff surface, or
Come to a full stop on the takeoff surface plus any legal stopway
V R The speed at which rotation is initiated; attains V 2 at or prior to reaching
35 feet
V 2The takeoff safety speed selected by the manufacturer so that the required
climb gradient is attained
V FR The minimum speed to initiate flap retraction, V 2 +25 knots
V MIN The minimum speed at which the takeoff may be continued. This
speed is always greater than V MCG .
V ENGINE OUT CLIMB1.43 V S and the speed used from the end of a
transition segment
V REF 1.3 V S in the landing configuration
V MCAMinimum flight speed at which the aircraft is controlled, with a maximum of 5 bank, if one lateral engine suddenly becomes inoperative
V MBE (Maximum Brake Energy Speed)Maximum decision speed, V 1 , at
which the maximum demonstrated brake energy is not exceeded. V MBE is not
limiting for takeoff in the slats + flaps 20 configuration.
V MCG Is not stated for 900A or B models.

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V MIN Replaces V MCG


Landing DistanceThe horizontal runway surface necessary to cross the
threshold from 50 feet at V REF , maintaining a steady 3 glide to the landing
surface, and come to a full stop using brakes, and airbrakes
Landing Field LengthLanding distance multiplied by 1.67

ACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE GUIDELINES


Steep turns100 feet, 5 bank, 10 knots, 10 heading
Approach to stallRecognize perceptible stall/warning device indication;
recover at first indication, striving for minimum altitude
loss.
Holding100 feet, 10 knots
IFR approachesInitial: 100 feet, 10 knots
Final: 0 +10 knots
DH/MDA: 0 +50 feet, +5 knots 1 dot 5 knots
CirclingNot to exceed 30 bank, MDA 0 feet +100 feet
Missed approachDH/MDA: 0 feet (except in instances when runway
environment is in sight)
Engine failureV 1 : V 2 KIAS, runway heading, 0 +10 knots
Clean climb: V FS KIAS, 0 +10 knots
In flight: Shutdown/restart 20 heading, 100 feet, or 5
KIAS on driftdown
LandingsTraffic pattern: 10 knots, altitude 100 feet threshold:
V REF 0 10 knots

PER-2

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CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


CONTENTS
CREW CONCEPT BRIEFING GUIDE ........................................
Introduction ..............................................................................
Common Terms ........................................................................
Pretakeoff Briefing (IFR/VFR) ................................................
Crew Coordination Approach Sequence ..................................
ALTITUDE CALLOUTS ..............................................................
Enroute ....................................................................................
ApproachPrecision ..............................................................
ApproachNonprecision ........................................................
Significant Deviation Callouts..................................................

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Page
CRM-1
CRM-1
CRM-1
CRM-3
CRM-3
CRM-6
CRM-6
CRM-6
CRM-7
CRM-8

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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
CRM-1
CRM-2
CRM-3
CRM-4

Title
Situational Awareness in the Cockpit ......................
Command and Leadership ........................................
Communication Process ..........................................
Decision-Making Process ........................................

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Page
CRM-2
CRM-2
CRM-4
CRM-4

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CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


(CRM)
CREW CONCEPT BRIEFING GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
Experience has shown that adherence to SOPs helps to enhance individual and
crew cockpit situational awareness and will allow a higher performance level
to be attained. Our objective is for standards to be agreed upon prior to flight
and then adhered to, such that maximum crew performance is achieved. These
procedures are not intended to supercede any individual company SOP, but
rather are examples of good operating practices.

COMMON TERMS
PIC

Pilot in Command
Designated by the company for flights requiring more than one pilot.
Responsible for conduct and safety of the flight. Designates pilot
flying and pilot not flying duties.

Pilot Flying
Controls the aircraft with respect to assigned airway, course, altitude, airspeed, etc., during normal and emergency conditions.
Accomplishes other tasks as directed by the PIC.

Pilot Not Flying


Maintains ATC communications, copies clearances, accomplishes
checklists and other tasks as directed by the PIC.

Both

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CAPTAIN
INDIVIDUAL
S/A

COPILOT
INDIVIDUAL
S/A

GROUP
S/A

Remember
2+2=2
- or 2+2=5
(Synergy)

IT's UP TO YOU!

CLUES TO IDENTIFYING:

HUMAN

OPERATIONAL

Loss of Situational Awareness


Links in the Error Chain
1. FAILURE TO MEET TARGETS
2. UNDOCUMENTED PROCEDURE
3. DEPARTURE FROM SOP
4. VIOLATING MINIMUMS OR LIMITATIONS
5. NO ONE "FLYING AIRPLANE"
6. NO ONE "LOOKING OUT WINDOW"
7. COMMUNICATIONS
8. AMBIGUITY
9. UNRESOLVED DISCREPANCIES
10. PREOCCUPATION OR DISTRACTION
11. CONFUSION OR EMPTY FEELING
12.

CRM-1. Situational Awareness in the Cockpit

LEADERSHIP STYLES
AUTOCRATIC AUTHORITARIAN
STYLE
LEADERSHIP
(EXTREME)
STYLE

DEMOCRATIC
LEADERSHIP
STYLE

LAISSEZFAIRE
STYLE
(EXTREME)

PARTICIPATION
LOW
Command
Leadership

HIGH

Designated by Organization
Cannot be Shared
Shared among Crewmembers
Focuses on "What's right," not "Who's right"

CRM-2. Command and Leadership

CRM-2

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PRETAKEOFF BRIEFING (IFR/VFR)


NOTE
The following briefing is to be completed during
item 1 of the pretakeoff checklist. The pilot flying will
accomplish the briefing.
1.

Review the departure procedure (route and altitude, type of takeoff,


significant terrain features, etc.)

2.

Review anything out of the ordinary

3.

Review required callouts, unless standard calls have been agreed upon,
in which case a request for "Standard Callouts" may be used

4.

Review the procedures to be used in case of an emergency on departure

5.

As a final item, ask if there are any questions

6.

State that the pretakeoff briefing is complete

CREW COORDINATION APPROACH SEQUENCE


NOTE
The following crew coordination approach sequence
should be completed as early as possible, prior to initiating an IFR approach. These items are accomplished
during the APPROACH (IN RANGE) checklist.
FRequests the pilot not flying to obtain destination weatherTransfer of
communication duties to the pilot flying may facilitate the accomplishment of this task.
NAdvises the pilot of current destination weather, approach in use, and special information pertinent to the destination

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CRM-3

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

INTERNAL
BARRIERS

NEED

EXTERNAL
BARRIERS

SEND

INTERNAL
BARRIERS

RECEIVE

OPERATIONAL
GOAL

FEEDBACK

ADVOCACY: to increase others' S/A


State Position
Suggest Solutions
Be Persistent and Focused
Listen Carefully

THINK:
Solicit and give
feedback
Listen carefully
Focus on behavior,
not people
Maintain focus on
the goal
Verify operation
outcome is
achieved

INQUIRY: to increase your own S/A


Decide What, Whom, How to ask
Ask Clear, Concise Questions
Draw Conclusions from
Valid Information
Keep an Open Mind

REMEMBER
Questions enhance communication flow.
Don't give in to the temptation to ask questions when Advocacy is required.
Use of Advocacy or inquiry should raise a "red flag."

CRM-3. Communication Process

EVALUATE
RESULT

RECOGNIZE
NEED

IDENTIFY
AND
DEFINE
PROBLEM

IMPLEMENT
RESPONSE

COLLECT
FACTS
SELECT A
RESPONSE

IDENTIFY
ALTERNATIVES
WEIGH IMPACT
OF ALTERNATIVES

HINTS:
Identify the problem:
Communicate it
Achieve agreement
Obtain commitment
Consider appropriate SOP's
Think beyond the obvious
alternatives
Make decisions as a result
of the process
Resist the temptation to
make an immediate decision
and then support it with facts

CRM-4. Decision-Making Process

CRM-4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FRequests the pilot not flying to perform the approach setup


NAccomplishes the approach setup and advises of frequency tuned, identified and course set
FTransfers control of the aircraft to the pilot not flying, advising, You have
control, heading ____________ , altitude ____________ and special instructions. (Communications duties should be transferred back to the
pilot not flying at this point.)
NResponds, I have control, heading ___________ , altitude ___________ .
FAdvises, "Approach briefing."
FAt the completion of the approach briefing, the pilot flying advises,
Approach briefing complete.
FAdvises, I have control, heading ___________ , altitude ___________ .
NConfirms You have control, heading ___________, altitude ___________ .
FBefore Landing checklist.
NBefore Landing checklist complete.

NOTE
The above sequence should be completed prior to
the FAF.

NOTE
During the above sequence, the terms F and N have
not been reversed during the time that transfer of
control occurs.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CRM-5

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ALTITUDE CALLOUTS
ENROUTE
1,000 Feet Prior to Level-Off
N

State altitude leaving and assigned


level-off altitude
100 above/below

ROGER
LEVELING

APPROACHPRECISION
N

F
At 1,000 feet above minimums

1,000 feet above minimums

DH __________

At 500 feet above minimums


500 feet above minimums

NO FLAGS

At 100 feet above minimums


100 feet above minimums

APPROACHING
MINIMUMS

At decision height (DH)


Minimums, approach lights at
(clock position)"

CONTINUING

OR
Minimums, runway at
(clock position)

CONTINUING

OR
Minimums, runway not in sight

CRM-6

GO AROUND

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

APPROACHNONPRECISION
N

F
At 1,000 feet above minimums

1,000 feet above minimums

MDA _____________

At 500 feet above minimums


500 feet above minimums

NO FLAGS

At 100 feet above minimums


100 feet above minimums

APPROACHING
MINIMUMS

At minimum descent altitude (MDA)


Minimums

LEVEL
At missed approach point (MAP)

Approach lights at (clock position)

CONTINUING

OR
Runway at (clock position)

CONTINUING
OR

Runway not in sight

GO AROUND

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CRM-7

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SIGNIFICANT DEVIATION CALLOUTS


N

F
IAS 10 KIAS

V REF ______

CORRECTING TO ________
Heading 10 enroute, 5 on approach

Heading ________ degrees left/right

CORRECTING TO ________

Altitude 100 feet enroute, +50/0 feet on final approach


Altitude _________ high/low

CORRECTING TO ________

CDI left or right one dot


Left/right of course ________ dot

CORRECTING

RMI course left or right 5


Left/right of course ________ degrees

CORRECTING

Vertical descent speed greater than 1,000 fpm on final approach


Sink rate _________

CORRECTING
Bank in excess of 30

Bank ________ degrees

CRM-8

CORRECTING

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
SR-1
SR-2
SR-3
SR-4
SR-5
SR-6
SR-7
SR-8
SR-9
SR-10
SR-11
SR-12
SR-13
SR-14
SR-15
SR-16
SR-17
SR-18
SR-19
SR-20
SR-21
SR-22
SR-23
SR-24

Title
DC Distribution Buses ................................................
Normal Flight Configuration ......................................
Battery Bus CircuitsTypical....................................
Reservoir Fluid Level Indication ................................
No. 1 and No. 2 Hydraulic Systems Operating ..........
Standby Pump Pressurizing No. 2 System ................
Standby Pump Pressurizing No. 1 System ................
Landing Gear Retraction ............................................
Landing Gear Extension ............................................
Gear Emergency Hydraulic Extension ......................
Position and Warning IndicationsEmergency
Hydraulic and Gravity Extensions..............................
Displays and Warnings during
Landing Gear Extension ............................................
Normal Braking with AntiskidAircraft
without SB F-900-42 ..................................................
Normal Braking with Antiskid
Aircraft with SB F-900-42..........................................
Emergency Brake Operation ......................................
Emergency/Parking Brakes ........................................
Leading Edge Slats ....................................................
Normal Slat Extension................................................
Slats Controls and Indications in Flight
Handle in CLEAN ......................................................
Slat Controls and Indications in Flight
Handle out of CLEAN................................................
Automatic Extension of Outboard Slats
Handle in CLEAN ......................................................
Automatic Retraction of Inboard Slats
Extended with Control Handle ..................................
Emergency Extension of Outboard Slats....................
Tank Pressurization and Quantity Indication..............

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Page
SR-11
SR-12
SR-13
SR-14
SR-15
SR-16
SR-17
SR-18
SR-19
SR-20
SR-21
SR-22
SR-23
SR-24
SR-25
SR-26
SR-27
SR-28
SR-29
SR-30
SR-32
SR-33
SR-34
SR-35

SR-i

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SR-25
SR-26
SR-27
SR-28
SR-29
SR-30
SR-31
SR-32
SR-33
SR-34
SR-35
SR-36
SR-37
SR-38
SR-39
SR-40
SR-41
SR-42
SR-43
SR-44
SR-45
SR-46
SR-47
SR-48

SR-ii

Fuel Distribution ........................................................


Crossfeed X-BP1
3Pump 1 Inoperative........
Crossfeed X-BP1
3Pump 3 Inoperative........
Crossfeed X-BP1
2 and 3
2Normal Configuration ..........................................
Crossfeed X-BP1
2 and 3
2Pump 1 or 3 Inoperative ......................................
Crossfeed X-BP1
2 and 3
2
Pumps 2 Inoperative ..................................................
Refueling System Controls and Indicators ................
Pressure Refueling......................................................
Gravity Distribution....................................................
Bleed-Air OperationAnti-icing Off ........................
Bleed-Air OperationAnti-icing On ........................
Distribution System Normal Operation
Flight (Heating) ..........................................................
Distribution System Normal Operation
Flight (Cooling) ..........................................................
Bleed-Air SystemPower Lever to Takeoff..............
No. 3 Nacelle Anti-icing Operation............................
No. 1 Nacelle and Ram-Air Inlet
Anti-icing Operation ..................................................
No. 2 Nacelle and S-Duct Anti-icing Operation ........
Wing Leading-Edge Slats Anti-icing..........................
Normal OperationGround or Slow
Flight (Cooling) ..........................................................
Normal OperationFlight (Heating) ........................
Temperature Control Operation..................................
Air SourceEmergency Pressurization ....................
Pitot-Static System ....................................................
Pitot-Static/Air Data Instruments Location ................

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-36
SR-37
SR-38
SR-39
SR-40
SR-41
SR-42
SR-43
SR-44
SR-45
SR-46
SR-47
SR-48
SR-49
SR-51
SR-52
SR-53
SR-54
SR-55
SR-56
SR-57
SR-58
SR-59
SR-60

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

TABLES
Table
SR-1
SR-2
SR-3
SR-4

Title
Page
Electrical Power Sources .............................................. SR-1
Start-Assist Logic ........................................................ SR-9
Sequential Start-Assist Logic .................................... SR-10
No. 1 and No. 3 Engine Nacelle Anti-icing
Logic System .............................................................. SR-50

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-iii

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES


LEFT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS A1
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
FIRE
WARNING

AUDIO WARN A

Audio warning

WARN LIGHTS A
PANEL

Warning panel

WARN LIGHTS A
EX

Light test
D/N

EXTING 1

Fire

DETECT 1

Fire

LIGHTS WARN
A-B

NAVIGATION

IRS 1 BAT

IRS 1 battery

IRS 1

IRS 1

TEMP PROBE

Probe heating

HRZN ST BY

Standby
horizon

LH AV MASTER

Left avionics

RADIO

NAVIGATION

UTILIZATION

ATC1*

ATC 1

VOR1*

VOR-DME 1

DME1*

VOR-DME 1

ADF1*

ADF 1

DDRMI1*

Pilotcopilot RMI

ADC1*

Pilot ADC 1

SG1*

Pilot EFIS

EADI LH*

Pilot EFIS

EHSI LH*
EFIS CTL1*

Pilot EFIS
Pilot EFIS

*Isolated by the LH AV MASTER pushbutton

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-1

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)

FIRE
WARNING

LEFT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)


PRIMARY BUS A2
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

EXTING 3

Fire

HF 1
CONTROL*

HF 1

DETECT 3

Fire

PHONE*
SAT COM*

Option
Option

BAG COMP

Fire

BAT TEMP

Battery
temperature

AFCS 1
CMPTR*

Pilot FGC*

AFCS 1
ADVIS*

Servoactuator

RAD ALT 1*

Radioaltimeter

FMS 1*

Pilot FMS

CDU 1*

Pilot FMS

BLOWER LH

Ventilation

TEST WARN A-B

NAVIGATION

RADIO

RADIO

NAVIGATION

IRS 3

IRS 3

SG 3*

MFD

IRS 3 BAT (Option)

IRS 3 battery

MFD/WRD*

MFD

ANNUNC LH

Radio nav
lighting

R/T WR*

Radar

AFCS 1 AP

Pilot FGC

GPWS

Option

AFCS 1 YD

Pilot FGC

ICS LH

Intercom

VHF 1

VHF 1

HF 1 PWR

HF 1

*Isolated by the LH AV MASTER pushbutton

SR-2

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS A1
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

FUEL

ANTICOL FIN

Anticollision
lights

LH EXT
LIGHT

UTILIZATION

L/G CONTROL

Landing gear
control

External
lighting

STBY PUMP

Standby
hydraulic pump

CKPT LH
READING

Lighting

HYDR 1 INDIC

Hydraulic

NAV

Navigation
lights

STROBE

Strobe
lights

WSHLD FRONT
LH

Windows

CENTER

Lighting

LH PITOT HEAT

Probe heat

INSTR LH

Instrument
lighting

LH STATIC
HEAT

Probe heat

INV (115V/60 Hz)


or 115-VAC master

Option

CONDG CREW

Conditioning

IGNTR AUTO

Starting

CABIN PRESS

Cabin
pressure

ENG FAIL 2

Takeoff
warning

LH AOA HEAT

Probe
heat

N2 1
N1 ITT 2

Indicators
Turbine temp

ENGINE 1

Anti-icing

AIR FR

Wing
anti-icing

HP BLEED 1

Wing
anti-icing

A/B CONTROL
PITCH FEEL

Airbrakes
Arthur

STAB EMERG
TRIM INDIC
SLAT INDIC
LH AUTO SLAT

Horiz stab
Trim
Slats
Slats

CMPTR

Engine
Computer

IGNTR 1
OIL 1

Start
Engine
control

BOOST 1
FUEL FLOW 1
XBP 2-3
GAGES LH
LO FUEL

Fuel BP
Flowmeter
Fuel
Qty indicators
Tank level

HYDR

ANTIICE
CONDG

FLT
CONTROL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-3

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS A2
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

FUEL

HYDR

SR-4

BELTS NO
SMKG

Passenger
signs

ANTIICE
CONDG

UTILIZATION

ENGINE 3

Anti-icing

DV WINDOW

Window

ENTRY

Entrance
lighting

SHIELD

Glareshield
lighting

PRV 3

Wing
anti-icing

DRAIN HEAT

Drain
anti-icing

CAB TEMP
CONTROL

Temperature
control

LANDING LH

Lights

STBY PITOT

Probe heat

WIPER LH

Wipers

FLAP A/B
INDIC

Flaps

N2 3

Indicators

CMPTR 3

Engine
computer

IGNTR 3

Starting

TRIM AILERON
TRIM RUDDER

Trim
Trim

OIL 3

Engine
control

STICK SHAKER

Stick Shaker
M889
Incorporated

FUEL 2
SHUT OFF

Fire

STBY BOOST 2

Fuel

FUEL FLOW 3

Flowmeter

LEVEL

Tank level

ANTISKID

Brakes

L/G IND EMER

Landing gear
indication M1406
incorporated

FLT
CONTROL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS B1
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
FLT
CONTROL

ANTIICE
CONDG

STAB NORMAL

Horiz stab

AIL FEEL

RH AUTO SLAT

ENGINES

UTILIZATION

N2 2

Indicators

Arthur
monitoring

N1 ITT 1

Turbine
temperature

Slats

CMPTR 2

Engine
computer

IGNTR 2

Starting
Engine
control
Engine
computer

ENGINE 2

Anti-icing

OIL 2

AFT SIDE
WINDOW

Window

CMPTR 1
STBY PWR

WIPER RH

Wiper

LIGHTS

LAV MASTER

28-VDC
system

MISC

HYDR

FUEL

CONDG CABIN

Conditioning

OVERHEAD

Lighting

BOOTSTRAP

Bootstrap

FWD CABIN
INDIRECT

Cabin
lighting

RH AOA HEAT

Probe heat

RH CABIN
READING

Reading
lights

L/G INDIC

Landing gear

CKPT RH
READING

Lighting

HYDR 2 INDIC

Hydraulic
TAXI

Lights

NORM BOOST 2

Fuel

FUEL FLOW 2

Flowmeter

XBP 1-3

Fuel

GAGES RH

Qty indicators

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-5

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS B2
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

GALLEY MASTER

Galley

LANDING RH

BOOST 3

Fuel

Lights

GAGES CENTER

Qty indicators

ANTICOL BELLY

Anticollision
lights

XBP1-2

Fuel

RH EXT LIGHT

Right external
lights

PRESSURE
FUELING

Refueling

INSTR RH

Instrument
lighting

PEDESTAL

Instrument
lighting

HYDR

NOSE WHL

Steering

ANTIICE
CONDG

CKPT TEMP
CONTROL

Temperature
control

BAG PRESS

Pressurization

VALANCE OR
AFT CABIN
INDIRECT

Cabin
lighting

LH CABIN
READING

Reading
lights

APU

APU

WSHLD FRONT
RH

Window

N1 ITT 3

Turbine
temperature

RH PITOT HEAT

Probe heat

FUEL 1
SHUT OFF

Fire

RH STATIC
HEAT

Probe heat

ROLL EMERG

Trim

FLAP CONTROL

Flaps

REVERSE
CONTROL

Engine 2
reverser

REVERSE WARN

FUEL 3
SHUT OFF

SR-6

FUEL

UTILIZATION

FLT
CONTROL
Fire

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


RIGHT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS B1
DESIGNATION
FIRE
WARNING

AUDIO WARN B

Audio warning

WARN LIGHT B
PANEL

Warning panel

WARN LIGHTS B
EX

NAVIGATION

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION
RADIO

Light testing
D/N

EXTING 2

Fire

DETECT 2

Fire

APU

Fire

NAVIGATION

UTILIZATION

VOR 2*

DME 2

DME 2*

VOR-DME 2

ADF 2*

ADF 2

ATC 2*

ATC 2*

VHF 3*

VHF 3

SG 2*

Copilot EFIS

EFIS CTL2*

Copilot EFIS

EHSI RH*

Copilot EFIS

EADI RH*

Copilot EFIS

IRS 2 BAT

IRS 2 battery

DDRMI 2*

Copilot and
pilot EFIS

IRS 2

IRS 2

ADC 2*

Copilot ADC 2

RH AV MASTER

Right avionics

AOC 2

*Isolated by the RH AV MASTER pushbutton

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-7

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table SR-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


RIGHT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS B2
DESIGNATION UTILIZATION
DESIGNATION
MISC

NOSE FAN

Ventilation

BLOWER RH

RADIO

HF 2
CONTROL*

HF 2

Ventilation

VHF 2*

VHF 2

CREW SEATS

Crew seats

SELCAL*

Selcal

EMERG LIGHTS

Emergency
light
batteries

AFCS 2
CMPTR*

Copilot FGC

NAVIGATION
RADIO

NAVIGATION

HF 2 PWR

HF 2

AFCS 2
ADVIS*

Copilot FGC

PUBLIC
ADDRESS

Public
address

FMS 2*

Copilot FMS

ICS RH

Intercom

CDU 2*

Copilot FMS

OMEGA*

Omega

AFCS 2 AP

Copilot FGC

AFCS 2 YD

Copilot FGC

ANNUNC RH

Radio nav
instrument
lighting

FLIGHT RECORDER*

Flight recorder

VOICE RECORDER*

Cockpit voicerecorder
Radio altimeter

RAD ALT 2*

*Isolated by the RH AV MASTER pushbutton

SR-8

UTILIZATION

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Table SR-2. START-ASSIST LOGIC


T
AR
ST EN
G

APU

XX

XX

OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON

G3 APU APU G1 G3 APU APU

G2

B1
G3 G2
B2

G3 G2 G2
G1

G3

G1 G1 G1

G3

B1

G3

G2 APU APU G1 G2 APU APU

B2

G2

B1

G3 APU G3 G1 G1 G1

G2 APU APU G3 G2 APU APU

G1

B2

G2

B1

G2 APU G2 G1 G1 G1

G2 APU G2 G3 G3 G3
G1

B2

G3

international

SR-9

FlightSafety

BAT
LIGHTS
START
ASSIST
MAIN
BUS
POWER

XX

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

OFF
ON

XX

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
OFF X X
XX
X X X X X X X X
2
ON
XX
XX
X X X X X X X X
OFF X X X X X X X X
XXXX
3
ON
XXXX
X X X X X X X X
OFF X X X X
XXXX
XXXX
1
ON
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

APU

XX

SR-10

Table SR-3. SEQUENTIAL START-ASSIST LOGIC


T
AR
ST EN
G

XX

OFF
ON

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX
XX
XX
XX
X X X X X X X
2
XX
XX
X X X X X X X X
OFF X X X X X X X X
XXXX
3
ON
XXXX
X X X X X X X X
OFF X X X X
XXXX
XXXX
1
ON
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
OFF
ON

XX

XX

XX

OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON ON ON ON ON ON

G2 APU APU G1 G2 APU APU

G3 APU APU G1 G3 APU APU

G2

B1
G3 G2
B2

G3 G2 G2
G1

G3

G1 G1 G1

G3

B1

G3
B2

G2

B1

G3 APU G3 G1 G1 G1

G2 APU APU G3 G2 APU APU

G1

B2

G2

B1

G2 APU G2 G1 G1 G1

G2 APU G2 G3 G3 G3
G1

B2

G3

international

FlightSafety

BAT
LIGHTS
START
ASSIST
MAIN
BUS
POWER

XX

XX

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

APU

APU

BATTERY BUS

SLATS

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

23CM

(71L1)

(71L2)

(1W)

71L2 (LIGHTS 2)
BAG COMP DOOR CONT
COCKPIT DOME LIGHTS
NOSE CONE (INSP LIGHT)
MECHANICS PANEL
AISLE LIGHT
BAG COMP DOME LIGHT
71L1 (LIGHTS 1)
FUELING
FR 5 UTILITY LIGHT (BAT)
ENG MONITOR
REAR COMPT LTS
FWD TOILET LIGHT
AFT TOILET LIGHT
AISLE LIGHTS
STEP LIGHTS
FR 5 STAIR LIGHTS
LH (RH) PYLON LT
FR 5 BAG LIGHT
FUEL COUPLING LT
FUEL PANEL CTL LT
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
POWER SUPPLY
COPILOT FRONT
WINDSHIELD B3
(SPARE) B4

international

FlightSafety

SR-11

Figure SR-1. DC Distribution Buses

130A
80A
80A
130A

R BUS
TIED

STANDBY HYDRAULIC
PUMP A5

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

PILOT FRONT
WINDSHIELD A3

L BUS
TIED
130A
130A
80A
150A
150A
150A

RIGHT CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL

OFF
R AV
MASTER
L AV
MASTER

OFF

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AVIONIC
MASTER
AVIONIC
MASTER

START BUS

BUS B2

BUS B1
BUS A2
BUS A1

CENTER
CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL
LEFT CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL

FLIGHT
NORM
(14P)

(4PA) BUS TIED


TO EXT
POWER
CONTACTOR

25
25

RIGHT MAIN BUS


225A
LEFT MAIN BUS

V 30

BAT
GEN

20

MAIN BUS-TIE
ROTARY SELECTOR
V 30

BAT
GEN

20

FLIGHT NORM

BRIGHT

SR-12

CONDITIONS:
GENERATORS 1, 2, AND 3 OPERATING. BOTH
BATTERY SWITCHES ON. BUS TIE OPEN,
POWER SELECTOR SWITCH IN NORMAL.

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

START

APU

APU

TEST
LIGHTS

DIM

FIRE

STOP
GEN 1 BAT 1

OIL

BAT 2 GEN 2

GEN
GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 3

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

WARNING
PANEL

DC SYSTEM

NORM

TO
AMMETER

EXT POWER

GENERATOR 1
G1

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY
START
CONTACTOR

150A
REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3
G3

BATTERY 1

APU

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

START
CONTACTOR

WINDOWS
A3

150A

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4
HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
150A A5
GALLEY 2 BAR
A6
LH MAIN BUS

BUS-TIE
RELAY
225A

LEGEND
GENERATOR POWER
BATTERY POWER

STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

B2
80A

G2

Figure SR-2. Normal Flight Configuration

B1

130A
WINDOWS
B3

international

130A
TO
AMMETER
GENERATOR 2

GROUND

FlightSafety

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

BATTERY
BUS

TO
AMMETER

BUS A2

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

GPU CONTACTOR

GPU RECEPTACLE

BATTERY 2

BUS A1

130A

G
TO
AMMETER

COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

TO
AMMETER

130A

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

OVERHEAD PANEL

SINGLE-POINT
REFUELING

BAT 1

FUEL COUPLING
NOSE CONE LIGHT
AND CONTROL
BOX LIGHTING
COCKPIT
APU CRASH
(SNs 16 AND
DOME LIGHTS
LOGIC
SUBSEQUENT)
BAGGAGE COMPT
STEPS
DOME LIGHT
LH PYLON LIGHT
LIGHT
FR5 BAG LIGHT

15

15

REAR
COMPT LIGHTS
ENGINE MONITOR

E
R

Y
16

B
U
BAT 2

10

11

12

13

14

**

FIRE EXTINGUISHING

FR 5 STAIR LIGHT
FR 5 UTILITY LIGHT (BAT)
BAGGAGE
DOOR CONTROL
MECHANICS PANEL
AISLE LIGHTS
FWD AND AFT TOILET
LIGHT

MAIN ELECTRICAL BOX 6-PA

SLATS
GEN 1 EXCITATION
GEN 2 EXCITATION
GEN 3 EXCITATION

international

FlightSafety

SR-13

MAIN DC BOX COMPONENTS


1. BAT 1 MAKE-AND-BREAK
2. GEN 1 LINE CONTACTOR
3. GEN 3 LINE CONTACTOR
4. BUS-TIE RELAY
5. GEN 2 LINE CONTACTOR
6. APU LINE CONTACTOR
7. BAT 2 MAKE-AND-BREAK
8. BAT 1 LINE CONTACTOR
9. ENG 1 START RELAY
10. ENG 3 START RELAY
11. APU LINE CONTACTOR
12. ENG 2 START RELAY
13. APU START RELAY
14. BAT 2 TO START BUS CONTACTOR
15. CURRENT LIMITERS
16. BAT 1 CONTROL CB
17. BAT 2 CONTROL CB
* GEN 1 AND GEN 3 LINE SWITCHES
** GEN 2 AND APU GEN LINE SWITCHES

17

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

OVERHEAD PANEL

Figure SR-3. Battery Bus CircuitsTypical

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

VOLUME
(LITERS)

VOLUME
(LITERS)

90C (194F)
8
20C (68F)

90C (194F)

7
40C (-40F)
20C (68F)
40C (40F)

90C (194F)

20C (68F)

LEVEL
INDICATOR

90C (194F)
6

LEVEL
INDICATOR

20C (68F)

5
40C (40F) 3

2
PRESSURIZED

UNPRESSURIZED

3
PRESSURIZED

UNPRESSURIZED

40C (40F) 4

0
NO. 1 RESERVOIR

0
NO. 2 RESERVOIR

Figure SR-4. Reservoir Fluid Level Indication

SR-14

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

TEST

PUMP 1

PUMP 2

PUMP 3

ST/BY
PUMP

L R
ASKID

#1

ON

#2

OFF

#1

OFF

HYDR
1/1

HYDR
1/1

4
3

1/2

1/2

0
0
QTY PSI X 1000

NO. 2 RESERVOIR
ON

BRAKE

AUTO
4
2

OFF

ST-BY
PUMP

0
0
QTY PSI X 1000

P3

P1

PRESSURE-HOLDING
VALVE

P2

STANDBY PUMP SELECTOR

ACCUMULATOR
EP

PRESSURE
SWITCH
NO. 1 SYSTEM
ACCUMULATOR

SYSTEM
PRESSURE
TRANSMITTER

PRESSURE
SWITCH
ELEVATOR

SYSTEM
PRESSURE
TRANSMITTER

LEGEND

RUDDER
ELEVATOR
ARTHUR
SLATS

NO. 2 SYSTEM ACCUMULATOR


SERVOACTUATOR
AILERON ARTHUR Q
AIRCRAFT < 165
OUTBOARD
SLATS
(EMERGENCY MODE)

THRUST
REVERSER

FLAPS

QUICK DISCONNECT

AIRBRAKES
NORMAL BRAKES
AND ANTI-SKID

EMERGENCY
BRAKES

LANDING GEAR
AND DOORS

NOSEWHEEL
STEERING

Figure SR-5. No. 1 and No. 2 Hydraulic Systems Operating

PARKING
BRAKES

international

SR-15

FILTER WITH SELF-SEALING VALVE


AND CLOGGING INDICATOR
CHECK VALVE
RELIEF VALVE

SERVOACTUATOR
SERVOACTUATORS

FlightSafety

NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE


NO. 2 SYSTEM PRESSURE
RETURN
SUPPLY FLUID
NITROGEN
ELECTRICAL
EXTERNAL HYDRAULIC POWER

AILERON

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NO. 1 RESERVOIR

SR-16

TEST

L R

ASKID
#1
#2
#1

ON
OFF
OFF

PUMP 1

PUMP 2

PUMP 3

ST/BY
PUMP

HYDR
1/1

HYDR
4
2
1

BRAKE

0
QTY PSI X 1000

AUTO
4

ON

3
1/2

OFF

ST-BY
PUMP

0
0
QTY PSI X 1000

28 VDC

NO. 2 RESERVOIR

60 SEC
TIME
DELAY

IN FLIGHT
POSITION

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

P3

P1

1/1

3
1/2

FLIGHT
GROUND
DELAY
AIRBRAKE
EXTENSION
CONTROL

P2

STANDBY PUMP
SELECTOR
CONTROL
RELAY

EP

LEGEND

QUICK DISCONNECT

SERVOACTUATORS

RUDDER

SERVOACTUATOR
AILERON ARTHUR Q
AIRCRAFT < 165
OUTBOARD
SLATS
(EMERGENCY MODE)

THRUST
REVERSER

FLAPS
AIRBRAKES
EMERGENCY
BRAKES
NOSEWHEEL
STEERING

Figure SR-6. Standby Pump Pressurizing No. 2 System

PARKING
BRAKES

international

FILTER WITH SELF-SEALING VALVE


AND CLOGGING INDICATOR
CHECK VALVE
RELIEF VALVE

SERVOACTUATOR

AILERON

FlightSafety

AUXILIARY PRESSURE
RETURN
SUPPLY FLUID
NITROGEN
ELECTRICAL
EXTERNAL HYDRAULIC POWER

ELEVATOR

TEST

L R

ASKID
#1
#2
#1

PUMP 1

PUMP 2

PUMP 3

ST/BY
PUMP

HYDR

ON
OFF
OFF

1/1

HYDR
4
2
1

BRAKE

0
QTY PSI X 1000

AUTO
4

ON

3
1/2

OFF

ST-BY
PUMP

0
0
QTY PSI X 1000

NO. 2 RESERVOIR

60 SEC
TIME
DELAY

IN FLIGHT
POSITION

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

P3

P1

1/1

3
1/2

28 VDC
FLIGHT
GROUND
DELAY
AIRBRAKE
EXTENSION
CONTROL

P2

STANDBY PUMP
SELECTOR
EP

LEGEND

QUICK DISCONNECT

SERVOACTUATOR

AILERON

SERVOACTUATORS

RUDDER

SERVOACTUATOR
AILERON ARTHUR Q
AIRCRAFT < 165
OUTBOARD
SLATS
(EMERGENCY MODE)

THRUST
REVERSER

AIRBRAKES
EMERGENCY
BRAKES
NOSEWHEEL
STEERING

Figure SR-7. Standby Pump Pressurizing No. 1 System

PARKING
BRAKES

international

SR-17

FILTER WITH SELF-SEALING VALVE


AND CLOGGING INDICATOR
CHECK VALVE
RELIEF VALVE

FlightSafety

AUXILIARY PRESSURE
RETURN
SUPPLY FLUID
NITROGEN
ELECTRICAL
EXTERNAL HYDRAULIC POWER

ELEVATOR

CONTROL
RELAY

SR-18

HYDRAULIC UNIT
EMERGENCY

NORMAL

LANDING GEAR
ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE
RETRACTION

G
E
A
R

DOOR ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE
EXTENSION

OPENING

U
N
L
O
C
K

P
U
S
H

CLOSING

P
U
L
L

STOWED

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AUTOMATIC
WHEEL
BRAKING

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
UNIT

MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

RETRACTION
MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

LEGEND

RETRACTION
NOSE GEAR
ACTUATOR
RETRACTION

TELESCOPIC
LOCKING
TUBE

OPENING

LEFT MAIN

DOOR
ACTUATOR
DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

OPENING
NOSE

Figure SR-8. Landing Gear Retraction

RIGHT MAIN

international

DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

RETRACTION

FlightSafety

DOOR
ACTUATOR

NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE


GEAR RETRACT
DOOR OPEN
RETURN
MECHANICAL
RESTRICTOR
SHUTTLE VALVE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NORMAL/EMERGENCY
GEAR SELECTOR
VALVE

HYDRAULIC UNIT
LANDING GEAR
ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE
RETRACTION

G
E
A
R

DOOR ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE
EXTENSION

OPENING

U
N
L
O
C
K

P
U
S
H

CLOSING

P
U
L
L

STOWED

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
UNIT

MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

EXTENSION

LEGEND

MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

EXTENSION

DOOR
ACTUATOR

EXTENSION

TELESCOPIC
LOCKING
TUBE

NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE


GEAR RETRACT
DOOR OPEN
RETURN
MECHANICAL
RESTRICTOR
SHUTTLE VALVE

DOOR
ACTUATOR
DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

OPENING
NOSE

LEFT MAIN

RIGHT MAIN

Figure SR-9. Landing Gear Extension

international

OPENING

DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

EXTENSION

FlightSafety

NOSE GEAR
ACTUATOR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NORMAL/EMERGENCY
GEAR SELECTOR
VALVE

SR-20

HYDRAULIC UNIT
EMERGENCY

NORMAL

G
E
A
R

DOOR ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE

LANDING GEAR
ELECTRIC
SELECTOR VALVE

U
N
L
O
C
K

P
U
S
H
P
U
L
L

HANDLE LIGHT
FLASHING

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
BOX

GEAR
UPLOCK
UNIT

MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

EXTENSION
MAIN GEAR
BRACING
CYLINDER

LEGEND

EXTENSION

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NORMAL/EMERGENCY
GEAR SELECTOR
VALVE

PULLED

EXTENSION

NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE


NOSE GEAR
ACTUATOR

DOOR OPEN, GEAR EXTENDED

EXTENSION

TELESCOPIC
LOCKING
TUBE

MECHANICAL
RESTRICTOR
SHUTTLE VALVE

LEFT MAIN

DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

OPENING
NOSE

Figure SR-10. Gear Emergency Hydraulic Extension

RIGHT MAIN

international

OPENING

DOOR
UPLOCK
BOX

DOOR
ACTUATOR

FlightSafety

RETURN
DOOR
ACTUATOR

*WHEN THE SLAT/FLAP CONTROL IS SET TO 40,


THE WARNING VOICE CANNOT BE SILENCED
WITH ALL GEAR NOT LOCKED DOWN.

G
E
A
R
U
N
L
O
C
K

LANDING GEAR
NOSE

REDUCED
POWER

MAIN

IAS < 160KT


SLAT/FLAP
CONTROL

CONFIGURATION
PANEL

HORN WARNING
SILENCE VOICE

MOVING

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR
TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

40 FLAPS + SLATS

P
U
L
L

40
*

FLASHING

CLEAN

MOVING

7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

40 FLAPS + SLATS

40
*

FLASHING

NOSE GEAR
EMERGENCY
CONTROL

MOVING

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

40 FLAPS + SLATS

Figure SR-11. Position and Warning IndicationsEmergency Hydraulic and Gravity Extensions

international

SR-21

40
*

FlightSafety

MAIN GEAR
EMERGENCY
CONTROL

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

P
U
S
H

20 FLAPS + SLATS

SR-22

*WHEN THE SLAT/FLAP CONTROL IS SET TO 40,


THE WARNING VOICE CANNOT BE SILENCED.

BEFORE GEAR
EXTENSION
LANDING GEAR
NOSE

MAIN

EXTENSION

HORN WARNING
SILENCE VOICE

SLAT/FLAP
CONTROL

CONFIGURATION
PANEL
MOVING

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST

NOSE

RH

IAS <160 KT

AIRPLANE
IN
FLIGHT

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FLASHING
LIGHT
MOVING

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST

LH

NOSE

RH

MOVING

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST

40 FLAPS + SLATS

LH

NOSE

RH

MOVING

40 FLAPS + SLATS

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

CLEAN
7 FLAPS + SLATS

LANDING GEAR

LH

NOSE

RH

40 FLAPS + SLATS

Figure SR-12. Displays and Warnings During Landing Gear Extension

THIRD PHASE
DOORS
CLOSING

AIRPLANE
ON THE
GROUND

international

20 FLAPS + SLATS

TEST

SECOND PHASE
GEAR
EXTENSION

FlightSafety

MOVING

40 FLAPS + SLATS

FIRST PHASE
DOORS
OPENING

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NORMAL GEAR
EXTENSION
CONTROL

LH

40 FLAPS + SLATS

REDUCED
POWER

NORMAL CONTROL
HANDLE

PILOT PEDALS

COPILOT PEDALS

GEAR
EXTENDED

FLEXIBLE CABLES

K
PAR

UN

K
LOC

H
PUS

K
BRA

#2 P BK
PARKING BRAKE
SELECTOR VALVE

PARKING BRAKE
ACCUMULATOR

NORMAL/EMERGENCY
BRAKE CONTROL
VALVE

AUTOMATIC
BRAKING

NORMAL
CHAMBER
NO. 2
SYSTEM

#2 P BK
EMERGENCY
CHAMBER
ANTISKID
SERVOVALVES

SHUTTLE
VALVE

LEGEND
NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE
NORMAL BRAKING PRESSURE
RETURN
ELECTRICAL

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EMERGENCY
SELECTOR VALVE
NORMAL SELECTOR VALVE
(DEENERGIZED OPEN)

GROUND
CHECK VALVE
RELIEF VALVE

WHEEL
OMETER
ERATOR

TEST L R

WHEEL
TACHOMETER
GENERATOR

PUMP 1
PUMP 3

ASKID
#1

ON

HYDRAULIC PANEL

BRAKES

SR-23

Figure SR-13. Normal Braking with AntiskidAircraft Without SB F-900-42

international

BRAKES

HYDR
1/
4

FlightSafety

SEWHEEL
HOMETERS

SR-24

PARK BRAKE HANDLE

ACCUMULATOR

PILOT BRAKE
PEDALS

COPILOT BRAKE
PEDALS

FLEXIBLE CABLES

EMERGENCY
SELECTOR VALVE

#2 P BK

NO. 2
SYSTEM

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NORMAL PRESSURE
EMERGENCY PRESSURE

AUTOMATIC BRAKING
DURING
RETRACTION

PARK
BRAKE
DISTRIBUTOR

CONTROL PRESSURE

RETURN
NO. 1 SYSTEM SUPPLY

NO. 1
SYSTEM

NO. 2 SYSTEM SUPPLY


NORMAL
SELECTOR
VALVE

ELECTRICAL
GROUND

+28 VDC ST BY
BUS A1 PUMP

ANTISKID
+28 VDC
BUS A2

GEAR
NORMAL CONTROL
(2GA)
GEAR DOWN

BRAKE

ANTISKID
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL BOX
SOL

DOUBLE
BRAKING
PC BOARD

ANTISKID
SERVO VALVE

ANTISKID
SERVO VALVE

#2 P. BK

#2 P. BK

TACHOMETER
GENERATORS

TACHOMETER
GENERATORS

BRAKES

BRAKES

Figure SR-14. Normal Braking with AntiskidAircraft With SB F-900-42

international

NOSEWHEEL
TACHOMETER
GENERATORS

FlightSafety

NO. 1 OR
NO. 3 ENGINE
FULL POWER

#1 ON
#2 OFF
#1 OFF

NORMAL/
EMERGENCY
SELECTOR
VALVE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

LEGEND

NORMAL CONTROL
HANDLE

HYDRAULIC
PANEL

PILOT PEDALS

COPILOT PEDALS

ASKID
1
#1

ON

#2

OFF

#1

OFF

/4

BRAKE

/2

PARK

FLEXIBLE CABLES

GEAR
EXTENDED
+

CK
UNLO

PUSH

E
BRAK

#2 P BK

PARKING BRAKE
ACCUMULATOR

PARKING BRAKE
SELECTOR VALVE
NORMAL/EMERGENCY
BRAKE CONTROL
VALVE

AUTOMATIC
BRAKING

NORMAL SELECTOR VALVE


(ENERGIZED CLOSED)

NORMAL
CHAMBER

NO. 2
SYSTEM
NO. 1
SYSTEM

#2 P BK

#2 P BK

EMERGENCY
CHAMBER

SHUTTLE
VALVE

LEGEND
NO. 1 SYSTEM PRESSURE
NO. 2 SYSTEM PRESSURE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EMERGENCY SELECTOR VALVE


(ENERGIZED OPEN)

ANTISKID
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL
BOX

EMERGENCY BRAKING PRESSURE


RETURN
NITROGEN
GROUND
CHECK VALVE
PUMP 1
TEST

L R

RELIEF VALVE
PUMP 3

1
#1

ON

/4

HYDRAULIC PANEL

SR-25

Figure SR-15. Emergency Brake Operation

international

HYDR

ASKID

FlightSafety

ELECTRICAL

SR-26

HYDRAULIC NORMAL CONTROL


HANDLE
PANEL

EMERGENCY/PARKING
BRAKE HANDLE

PILOT PEDALS

COPILOT PEDALS

ASKID
#1

ON

#2

OFF

#1

OFF

/4

1/

BRAKE

PUSH

GEAR
EXTENDED
+

PARK

FLEXIBLE CABLES

UNLO

E
BRAK

CK

#2 P BK PARKING BRAKE

PARKING BRAKE
SELECTOR VALVE

ACCUMULATOR

NO. 2
SYSTEM

NO. 1
SYSTEM

#2 P BK

#2 P BK

SHUTTLE
VALVE

LEGEND
NO. 2 SYSTEM PRESSURE OR
ACCUMULATOR PRESSURE
EMERGENCY/PARKING
BRAKE PRESSURE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EMERGENCY SELECTOR VALVE


(DEENERGIZED CLOSED)

ANTISKID
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL
BOX

RETURN
ELECTRICAL
CHECK VALVE
RELIEF VALVE
PUMP 1
TEST

L R
PUMP 3

ON

HYDR

1/
4

HYDRAULIC PANEL

Figure SR-16. Emergency/ Parking Brakes

international

ASKID
#1

FlightSafety

GROUND

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

WARNING PANEL
L AOA

R AOA
R PITOT

HOT
BAT
XTK 2
OPEN
AIL
ZERO

ST BY
PITOT
L WHL
OVHT
AUTO
SLATS
XTK 2
CLOSED
AIL
FEEL

AP

MISTRIM

NOSE
CONE OVHT
REAR
DOORS

BLEED
APU
T/O
CONFIG.

L PITOT

R WHL
OVHT
FLAP
ASYM
BAG
ACCESS
PITCH
FEEL
MACH
TRIM
BAG
ISOL

SLAT/FLAP
CONFIGURATION PANEL
AIR
BRAKE

FLAPS

UP
0

SLAT
POSITION
INDICATOR

DN 40

20

SLATS
MOVING

CENTER
CIRCUITBREAKER PANEL

LANDING GEAR
TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

SLAT/FLAP CONTROL BOX

21CF
10

CLEAN

SLAT LH AUTO
SLAT
INDIC

7 FLAPS + SLATS
20 FLAPS + SLATS
40 FLAPS + SLATS

EMERGENCY
SLATS
(OUTBOARD)

EMERG
SLATS

FLT CONTROL

(FOR A/C 162)

5
AOA RH AUTO
SLAT
INDIC

INBOARD
SLAT

SLAT
ACTUATOR
EMERGENCY
ACTUATOR

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK
VANES

OUTBOARD
SLAT

Figure SR-17. Leading-Edge Slats

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-27

SR-28

LEFT
INBOARD

LEFT OUTBOARD
R

RIGHT
INBOARD

RIGHT OUTBOARD
E

LEFT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

AOA
LESS
THAN 23
ADC 1
IAS LESS THAN
265 KT

INBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

OUTBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

AOA
LESS
OUTBOARD THAN 23
VALVE
BOX

NO. 1 PRESSURE
EXTEND

RESTRICTOR
RESTRICTOR

ELECTRICAL

Figure SR-18. Normal Slat Extension

international

EMERGENCY
SLATS

LEGEND
SLATS/FLAP
CONTROL BOX

RIGHT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

FlightSafety

AUTOMATIC
DISTRIBUTOR

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS
20 FLAPS-SLATS
40 FLAPS-SLATS

SLAT
EMERGENCY
SOLENOID
ADC 2
IAS LESS THAN SELECTOR
VALVE
265 KT

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

INBOARD
VALVE
BOX

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

AIRPLANE
AOA

CONTROL
1

SLATS
POSITION

INDICATIONS

AOA = 11
INCREASING

GREEN
FLASHING LIGHT

A
CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS

AIR
BRAKE

FLAPS

UP
0
7
20

DN 40

SLATS
MOVING

20 FLAPS-SLATS

IGN

40 FLAPS-SLATS

LANDING GEAR
TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT
CLEAN
2

AOA = 11
DECREASING

OUT

AIR
BRAKE

CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS

FLAPS

UP
0
7

DN 40

20

SLATS
MOVING

20 FLAPS-SLATS
40 FLAPS-SLATS

IGN

LANDING GEAR
TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT
CLEAN

AIRPLANE 1
ANGLE OF
ATTACK
INITIAL
CONFIGURATION
AIRPLANE IN CLEAN
CONFIGURATION,
SLAT/FLAP HANDLE
IN CLEAN

AOA
11
(INCREASING)

AOA
11
(DECREASING)

EXTENSION OF OUTBOARD SLATS

RETRACTION OF OUTBOARD SLATS

RED SLAT-MOVING LIGHT ON

GREEN FLASHING LIGHT OUT,


RED LIGHT ON
AUDIO WARNING CUTS OFF

AUTOMATIC IGNITION, IGN


LIGHT ON
AUDIO WARNING
WHEN OUTBOARD SLATS ARE EXTENDED, RED LIGHT GOES OUT;
GREEN LIGHT FLASHES.

AUTOMATIC IGNITION CUTS OFF


AFTER TEN SECONDS.
IGN LIGHT OUT
WHEN OUTBOARD SLATS ARE
RETRACTED, RED LIGHT
GOES OUT

Figure SR-19. Slats Controls and Indications in Flight


Handle in CLEAN

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-29

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FLAPS
CONTROL 7+SLATS

AIRPLANE
AOA

SLATS
POSITION

INDICATION

GREEN
STEADY LIGHT

A
B
CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS

AOA < 165

AIR
BRAKE

CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

FLAPS

UP
0
7

DN 40

20

SLATS

20 FLAPS-SLATS
40 FLAPS-SLATS

MOVING

LANDING GEAR
TEST

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT

LH

NOSE

RH

AOA = 165
INCREASING

GREEN
STEADY LIGHT

A
B
CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS
20 FLAPS-SLATS

AIR
BRAKE

FLAPS

UP
0
7

DN 40

40 FLAPS-SLATS

20

SLATS

IGN

MOVING

LANDING GEAR

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

AOA = 23
INCREASING
GREEN
FLASHING LIGHT

A
B

CLEAN

CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

7 FLAPS-SLATS
20 FLAPS-SLATS

AIR
BRAKE

FLAPS

UP
0
7

40 FLAPS-SLATS
DN 40

20

SLATS

IGN

MOVING

LANDING GEAR

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

Figure SR-20. Slat Controls and Indications in FlightHandle


out of CLEAN (Sheet 1 of 2)

SR-30

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FLAPS
CONTROL7+SLATS
4

AIRPLANE
AOA

SLATS
POSITION

INDICATION

AOA = 23
DECREASING

GREEN
FLASHING LIGHT

A
B

CLEAN

AIR
BRAKE

CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

7 FLAPS-SLATS
20 FLAPS-SLATS

FLAPS

UP
0
7

DN 40

40 FLAPS-SLATS

20

SLATS
MOVING

IGN

LANDING GEAR
TEST

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT

LH

NOSE

RH

GREEN
STEADY LIGHT

A
B

AOA = 165
CLEAN

DECREASING

7 FLAPS-SLATS
20 FLAPS-SLATS

AIR
BRAKE

CROSS-SECTION A
INBOARD SLAT

FLAPS

UP
0
7

DN 40

40 FLAPS-SLATS

20

SLATS
MOVING

LANDING GEAR

CROSS-SECTION B
OUTBOARD SLAT

INITIAL 1
CONFIGURATION
SLAT/
FLAP
CONTROL
OUT OF
CLEAN

TEST
LH

NOSE

RH

AIRPLANE ANGLE-OF-ATTACK
3
4
5
AOA
AOA
AOA
AOA
165
165
23
23
(INCREASING) (INCREASING) (DECREASING) (DECREASING)
2

AOA
<165

ALL SLATS
EXTENDED

ALL SLATS
EXTENDED

GREEN LIGHT
STEADY

AUDIO
WARNING ON

RETRACTION
OF INBOARD
SLATS

INBOARD
SLATS
RETRACTED

INBOARD
SLATS
REEXTEND.
AUTOMATIC
IGNITION CUTS
OFF AFTER
TEN SECONDS.

AUTOMATIC
IGNITION

AUTOMATIC
IGNITION

GREEN LIGHT
STEADY

IGN LIGHT ON

IGN LIGHT ON

AUTOMATIC
IGNITION

AUDIO
WARNING ON

AUDIO
WARNING ON

IGN LIGHT ON

GREEN LIGHT
FLASHING

GREEN LIGHT
FLASHING

IGN LIGHT OUT


AUDIO
WARNING OFF
GREEN LIGHT
STEADY

Figure SR-20. Slat Controls and Indications in FlightHandle


out of CLEAN (Sheet 2 of 2)

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-31

SR-32

LEFT
INBOARD

LEFT OUTBOARD

RIGHT
INBOARD
E

RIGHT OUTBOARD

AOA
LESS
THAN 23

LEFT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

ADC 1
IAS LESS THAN
265 KT

INBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

OUTBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

SLAT
EMERGENCY
SOLENOID
ADC 2
IAS LESS THAN SELECTOR
VALVE
265 KT

AOA 11

AOA 12.2

AUTOMATIC
DISTRIBUTOR

OUT OF
CLEAN

AOA
LESS
OUTBOARD THAN 23
VALVE
BOX

EMERGENCY
SLATS

40 FLAPS-SLATS

LEGEND
NO. 1 PRESSURE

RETURN

RESTRICTOR

EXTEND

RESTRICTOR

ELECTRICAL

NO. 2 PRESSURE

Figure SR-21. Automatic Extension of Outboard SlatsHandle in CLEAN

international

20 FLAPS-SLATS

FlightSafety

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS

RIGHT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

INBOARD
VALVE
BOX

LEFT
INBOARD

LEFT OUTBOARD

RIGHT
INBOARD
E

RIGHT OUTBOARD

AOA
ABOVE
23

LEFT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

ADC 1
IAS LESS THAN
265 KT

INBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

OUTBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

SLAT
EMERGENCY
SOLENOID
ADC 2
IAS LESS THAN SELECTOR
VALVE
265 KT

AOA 11

AOA 12.2

AUTOMATIC
DISTRIBUTOR

AOA
ABOVE
23
EMERGENCY
SLATS

20 FLAPS-SLATS
40 FLAPS-SLATS

LEGEND

SR-33

NO. 1 PRESSURE

NO. 2 PRESSURE

RESTRICTOR

EXTEND

RESTRICTOR

ELECTRICAL

RETURN

Figure SR-22. Automatic Retraction of Inboard SlatsExtended with Control Handle

international

OUT OF
CLEAN

OUTBOARD
VALVE
BOX

FlightSafety

CLEAN
7 FLAPS-SLATS

RIGHT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

INBOARD
VALVE
BOX

SR-34

LEFT
INBOARD

LEFT OUTBOARD
R

RIGHT
INBOARD

RIGHT OUTBOARD
E

EMERGENCY
ACTUATOR

EMERGENCY
ACTUATOR

LEFT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

AOA
LESS
THAN 23

INBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

ADC 1
IAS LESS THAN
265 KT

OUTBOARD
SLAT
SOLENOID
SELECTOR
VALVE

AOA
LESS
THAN 23

20 FLAPS-SLATS
40 FLAPS-SLATS

LEGEND
NO. 2 PRESSURE

RETURN

RESTRICTOR

EXTEND

RESTRICTOR

ELECTRICAL

Figure SR-23. Emergency Extension of Outboard Slats

EMERGENCY
SLATS

international

7 FLAPS-SLATS

OUTBOARD
VALVE
BOX

RIGHT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
VANE

FlightSafety

AUTOMATIC
DISTRIBUTOR

CLEAN

SLAT
EMERGENCY
SOLENOID
ADC 2
SELECTOR
IAS LESS THAN
VALVE
265 KT

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

INBOARD
VALVE
BOX

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

* NOT FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

LEVEL LESS
THAN 1,000 LB
XTK

LEVEL LESS THAN 200 LB


FUEL 1
LO
FUEL 1

BLEED
OVHT

FUEL 2
LO
FUEL 2

BOOSTER

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

X.BP

FUEL 3

FRONT TANK

LO
FUEL 3

XTK 2

REV
UNLOCK

FUELING

ECU
OVHT

COND G
OVHT

-2P BK

CABIN

CENTER WING
TANK

SUMP DRAIN

VENT VALVE

BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

LEVEL

X.BP

PROBE
ENG 1

ENG 2

ENG 3

FUEL SYSTEM

GRAVITY FUELING
G2

G1

159

WING NEGATIVE
PRESSURE
RELIEF VALVE

G3

FLAPPER
VALVE

G2
NO. 1 ENGINE LP AIR

VALVE BOXES

PRESSURE
GAGE

AUTOMATIC
DRAIN

REAR TANK

LEGEND
TANK PRESSURIZATION
ELECTRICAL CONNECTION

HOT AIR
FILTER

DRAIN
BOWL
PRESSURE REDUCER
AUTOMATIC DRAIN
NO. 2 ENGINE LP AIR

CHECK
VALVE

Figure SR-24. Tank Pressurization and Quantity Indication

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-35

SR-36

PROBE
FRONT TANK

CENTER
WING TANKS

JET
PUMP

G2
FILLER
PORT

FILLER
PORT
INTERCONNECTION
VALVE
(NORMALLY CLOSED)

G3

A/C 159
FUEL
TEMPERATURE
PROBE
(IF INSTALLED)
R3 CROSSFEED
VALVE

NEGATIVE
PRESSURE
RELIEF
VALVE

DRAIN VALVE
(AIRCRAFT
PRIOR TO SN 96)

R1 CROSSFEED
VALVE
GROUP 1 INTERCONNECTION
MANIFOLD
TRANSFER VALVE
(ON SOME AIRCRAFT)
GROUP 1
CROSSFEED
MANIFOLD

FUEL
SHUTOFF
VALVE

NEGATIVE
PRESSURE
RELIEF
VALVE

GROUP 3 INTERCONNECTION
MANIFOLD

FUEL
GROUP 1 SHUTOFF
CROSSFEED VALVE
VALVE

DRAIN VALVE (AIRCRAFT PRIOR TO SN 96)


FUEL SHUTOFF VALVE
GROUP 3 CROSSFEED MANIFOLD

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

G1

FLAPPER
VALVE

CROSSFEED VALVE
ONE-THIRD
TANK LEVEL
PIPE

DEFUELING/
REFUELING
VALVE

DRAIN
VALVE

LEGEND
GROUP 1 FUEL

GROUP 2
CROSSFEED
MANIFOLD

G2

REAR
TANK

GROUP 2 FUEL
GROUP 3 FUEL
TRANSFER FUEL
GRAVITY FLOW TRANSFER FUEL

NO. 1 ENGINE

BOOST NO. 2 ENGINE


PUMPS
AND APU

NO. 3 ENGINE

SUMP DRAIN
FUEL PROBE
FILTER

Figure SR-25. Fuel Distribution

international

MOTIVE FLOW

FlightSafety

GROUP 2
FUEL
MANIFOLD

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

XTK

G3

BOOSTER

BP3

BOOSTER
LEVEL

X.BP

LEVEL

BP1
C

G1

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

XTK

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED
X.BP

R1
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
XTK
X-BP
BP1
BP3

R3

LIGHTS
XTK
X-BP

NEUTRAL
OPEN
OFF
ON

G1

TANK
INTERCONNECTION

OUT
ON

ENGINE 3
ENGINES 1 AND 3
SUPPLY

G3

NO
INTERCONNECTION

ENGINE 3

G3

ENGINE 1

BOOST PUMP 1 FAILURE

FLOW
XTK

G3

BOOSTER

BP3

BOOSTER
LEVEL

X.BP

LEVEL

BP1
C

G1

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

XTK

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED
X.BP

R3

R1
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
XTK
X-BP
BP1
BP3

RIGHT
OPEN
OFF
ON

LIGHTS
XTK
X-BP

G1

TANK
INTERCONNECTION

ON
ON

G1

G3

G3

ENGINE 3
ENGINES 1 AND 3
SUPPLY
G3

ENGINE 3
ENGINE 1

LEVEL EQUALIZATION
LEGEND
GROUP 3 BOOST

Figure SR-26. Crossfeed X-BP1

FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


* NOT
ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

3Pump 1 Inoperative

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-37

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

XTK

G3

BOOSTER

BP3

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

X.BP

BP1
C

G1

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

XTK

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

LEVEL

X.BP

R3

R1
ENG 1

ENG 2

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

FUEL SYSTEM

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
XTK
X-BP
BP1
BP3

LIGHTS

NEUTRAL
OPEN
ON
OFF

XTK
X-BP

G1

TANK
INTERCONNECTION

OUT
ON

ENGINE 3
ENGINES 1 AND 3
SUPPLY

G3

NO
INTERCONNECTION

ENGINE 1

G1

ENGINE 3

BOOST PUMP 3 FAILURE

FLOW
XTK

G3

BOOSTER

BP3

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

X.BP

BP1
C

G1

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

XTK

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED
X.BP

R1
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
XTK
X-BP
BP1
BP3

LEFT
OPEN
ON
OFF

R3

LIGHTS
XTK
X-BP

G1

TANK
INTERCONNECTION

ON
ON

G1

G3

G3

ENGINE 3
ENGINES 1 AND 3
SUPPLY
G1

ENGINE 1
ENGINE 3

LEVEL EQUALIZATION
LEGEND
GROUP 1 BOOST

Figure SR-27. Crossfeed X-BP1

SR-38

FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


* NOT
ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

3Pump 3 Inoperative

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

XTK
BOOSTER
X.BP

BP3

BP1

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

BP2

X.BP

ST-BY NORM
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

ENGINE 2 ENGINE 3

LEGEND
GROUP 1 BOOST
GROUP 2 BOOST

FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


* NOT
ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
BP1
BP2
BP3
X-BP 12
X-BP 23

ON
NORM
ON
CLOSED
CLOSED

GROUP 3 BOOST

G1
TANK
INTERCONNECTION

LIGHTS

G2 G3

NO
INTERCONNECTION
X-BP
X-BP

OFF
OFF

Figure SR-28. Crossfeed X-BP1


Configuration

2 and 3

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ENGINES 1, 2,
AND 3 SUPPLY
G1

ENGINE 1

G2

ENGINE 2

G3

ENGINE 3

2Normal

SR-39

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

XTK
BOOSTER

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEGEND

BP1

BP3

GROUP 2 BOOST

LEVEL

X.BP

GROUP 3 BOOST
C

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

ENG 1

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

BP2

X.BP

ENG 2

ST-BY NORM

ENG 3

FUEL SYSTEM

FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


* NOT
ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2
POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
BP1
BP2
BP3
X-BP 12
X-BP 23

OFF
NORM
ON
OPEN
CLOSED

ENGINE 1

ENGINE 2 ENGINE 3

ENGINES 1, 2,
AND 3 SUPPLY

LIGHTS

ENGINE 1
G2

ENGINE 2
X-BP
X-BP

ON
OFF

ENGINE 3

G3

BOOST PUMP 1 FAILURE OR G1/G3 LEVEL EQUALIZING


XTK

LEGEND
BOOSTER

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

X.BP

BP1

BP3

GROUP 1 BOOST
GROUP 2 BOOST

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

LEVEL

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

BP2

X.BP

ST-BY NORM
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

ENGINE 2 ENGINE 3

NOT FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
BP1
BP2
BP3
X-BP 12
X-BP 23

ON
NORM
OFF
CLOSED
OPEN

ENGINES 1, 2,
AND 3 SUPPLY

LIGHTS
G1

ENGINE 1
ENGINE 2

X-BP
X-BP

OFF
ON

G2

ENGINE 3

BOOST PUMP 3 FAILURE OR G1/G3 LEVEL EQUALIZING

Figure SR-29. Crossfeed X-BP1


2 and 3
Pump 1 or 3 Inoperative
SR-40

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

XTK
BOOSTER

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEGEND

BP3

BP1

GROUP 1 BOOST

LEVEL

X.BP

GROUP 3 BOOST
C

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

LEVEL

ENG 1

BP2

X.BP

ENG 2

ST-BY NORM

ENG 3

FUEL SYSTEM

FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


* NOT
ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2
POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
BP1
BP2
BP3
X-BP 12
X-BP 23

ENGINES 1, 2,
AND 3 SUPPLY

LIGHTS

ON
OFF
ON
OPEN
CLOSED

ENGINE 2 ENGINE 3

ENGINE 1

ENGINE 1
G1

ENGINE 2
X-BP
X-BP

ON
OFF

ENGINE 3

G3

BOOST PUMPS 2 FAILUREENGINE 2 FED FROM PUMP 1


XTK

BP1
BOOSTER

BP3

BOOSTER
LEVEL

LEVEL

X.BP

XTK 2
BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF
X.BP

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

LEVEL

BP2

X.BP

ST-BY NORM
ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

ENG 3

ENGINE 1

POSITION OF
THE CONTROLS
BP1
BP2
BP3
X-BP 12
X-BP 23

ENGINE 2 ENGINE 3

NOT FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT


ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2

ON
OFF
ON
CLOSED
OPEN

ENGINES 1, 2,
AND 3 SUPPLY

LIGHTS
G1

ENGINE 1
ENGINE 2

X-BP
X-BP

OFF
ON

G3

ENGINE 3

BOOST PUMPS 2 FAILUREENGINE FED FROM PUMP 3

Figure SR-30. Crossfeed X-BP1


Pumps 2 Inoperative

2 and 3

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-41

SR-42

MAINTENANCE PANEL
(COCKPIT, COPILOT SIDE)
BAG 1 COMP 1
BLEED AIR

ISOL

STABILIZER
RELAY TEST

ANTI-SKID

COOLING
FAN

CAUTION

SG3

SG1

EADI1

EASI1

FGC1

FMS1

MFD

SG 2

EADI2

EASI2

FGC 2

FMS 2

HEAT
ON
TEST

NORM

OFF
FUEL FLOW
TEST

GRAVITY
FUELING

DG IDIC
TEST

RESET

A/P TEST

FUEL TYPES: JET A - A1 - B - JP4 - JP5


FOR ADDITIVES SEE
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
1 CHECK STOP FUELING LIGHT ILLUMINATED
2 PULL SAFETY LEVER AND REMOVE
COUPLING CAP
3 CONNECT GROUND TERMINAL
4 CONNECT COUPLING ONLY IF FUELING OK
LIGHT ILLUMINATED

FUELING

PRESSURE FUELING PANEL


ON

FULL
10
5
0

ON

ON

FULL
OFF

15
LBS
X 100

FULL
OFF

LEFT

20

OFF

CENTER

RIGHT
CLOSED

FULL
FUEL QTY

STOP
FUELING

ON
VENT
VALVE TEST

PARTIAL

FUELING
ON

OFF

OPEN

GROUNDING
RECEPTACLE

GROUP 2
INDICATION

LEFT REFUELING
SWITCH

CENTER REFUELING
SWITCH
RIGHT REFUELING
SWITCH

PRESSURE FUELING PANEL


ON

GROUP 1 INDICATION

15

STOP
FUELING LIGHT

LEFT

REFUELING MODE
SELECTOR
(OPTIONAL)

OFF

CENTER

RIGHT
CLOSED

STOP
FUELING

ON
VENT
VALVE TEST

PARTIAL

FUELING
OK

GROUP 3
INDICATION

FULL

OPEN

OFF

VENT VALVE
TEST SOCKETS
DEFUELING
SWITCH

PARTIAL REFUELING
SELECTOR
FUELING
OK LIGHT

REFUELING
AUTOMATIC STOP
TEST PUSHBUTTON

VENT VALVE
TEST SOCKETS

Figure SR-31. Refueling System Controls and Indicators

international

LBS X 1000

ON

OFF
TEST

FULL

20

ON

FULL
OFF

FUEL QTY

FULL

FlightSafety

10

1 LEFT AND CENTER AND RIGHT SWITCHES ON


2 CHECK FUELING PRESSURE AT TRUCK (30-50PSI)
3 DURING FUELING PUSH TEST BUTTON
FUELING SHOULD STOP WITHIN 5 SEC
IF NOT: STOP FUELING AND ALERT CREW
4 IF STOP FUELING LIGHT ILLUMINATES
5 LEFT AND CENTER AND RIGHT SWITCHES: OFF
5 REINSTALL COUPLING CAP
USABLE FUEL CAPACITY 2845 US GAL

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

GRAVITY FUELING
SWITCH

PRESSURIZATION
INTERCONNECTION
CENTER WING
TANK

G2 END-OF-FUELING THERMISTOR
FRONT
TANK

G2

VENT VALVE
G3 END-OF-REFUELING
THERMISTOR

G1 END-OF-REFUELING
THERMISTOR

G3

REFUELING
VALVES

TO DEFUELING/
REFUELING
VALVE

PRESSURE FUELING PANEL


ON

FULL

ON

ON

OFF

OFF

FULL
OFF

LEFT
FULL

FULL

CENTER
TEST

STOP
FUELING

FUELING
OK

REFUELING
MANIFOLD

RIGHT
CLOSED

OFF
DEFUELING

G2

REAR
TANK

international

LEGEND
PRESSURE REFUELING

SR-43

FlightSafety

OPEN

LEVER
COUPLING

PRESSURE
REFUELING

ON
VENT
VALVE TEST

PARTIAL

RESTRICTOR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

G1

ELECTRICAL

Figure SR-32. Pressure Refueling

SR-44

VENT
VALVE

EL
U

JE

P4
,

FRONT
TANK

P5

: PRESSURIZE
ION
DT
UT
AN
, JET A1, JET B
CA
K
,J
TA

GRAVITY
FUELING
AL

RC
AI
I
AL
EL
TOT
FU
FOR

RA
FT
US
45
U
US
28
ABL
AN
IN
E QUANTITY
ST
GM
RUC
TIONS SEE OPER

AL

NG

G2 END-OF-REFUELING THERMISTOR
QUANTITY GAGE
G2

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

REFUELING
VALVES

DEFUELING/
REFUELING
VALVE

XTK

BOOSTER
CROSSFEED
MANIFOLD
CROSSFEED
VALVE

MAINTENANCE PANEL
STABILIZER
RELAY TEST

BAG 1 COMP 1
BLEED AIR

ANTI-SKID

COOLING
FAN

DRAIN
VALVE

BOOSTER

BOOSTER
LEVEL

REFUELING
MANIFOLD

XBP

LEVEL

C
XTK 2

ISOL

BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF

HEAT

*
AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

G3

G1

ON

G2
OFF
FUEL FLOW
TEST

GRAVITY
FUELING

ENG INDIC
TEST

REAR
TANK

RESET

ENG 1

ENG 2
FUEL SYSTEM

PRESSURE FUELING PANEL


FULL

FULL

TEST

RIGHT
CLOSED

STOP
FUELING

ON
VENT
VALVE TEST

ELECTRIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2


PARTIAL

Figure SR-33. Gravity Distribution

OFF

CENTER

FUELING
OK

OPEN

OFF
DEFUELING

X.BP

ENG 3

international

OFF

LEFT

* NOT FEATURED ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT

FULL

FULL
OFF

GROUP 3 BOOST

ON

ON

ON

GROUP 1 BOOST

LEVEL

FlightSafety

LEGEND

ELECTRICAL

X.BP

AIR INTAKE
ANTI-ICING

NO. 3
ENGINE

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

AUXILIARY HP
BLEED PORT
MAIN LP
BLEED PORT

MAIN LP
BLEED
PORT
FULL-OPENING
SOLENOID VALVE
OVERHEAT
TEMPERATURE PROBE

PRV3

AUXILIARY HP
BLEED PORT

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MAIN HP
BLEED
PORT

WING ANTI-ICING SYSTEM


APU
CREW AIR-CONDITIONING
VALVE
FUEL TANK PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM

AIR
INTAKE
ANTIICING

NO. 2
ENGINE

APU
BLEED
VALVE

PRESSURIZATION JET PUMP


OVERHEAT TEMPERATURE PROBE
PASSENGER CABIN
AIR-CONDITIONING VALVE
LP1 BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE
PROBE
MAIN LP
BLEED
PORT
MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

NO. 1
ENGINE

HP1
BLEED VALVE

NO. 2 ENGINE
S-DUCT ANTI-ICE
SYSTEM

PRV2

LEGEND
HP BLEED AIR

FULL-OPENING
SOLENOID VALVE

LP BLEED AIR

SR-45

AUXILIARY LP
BLEED PORT

Figure SR-34. Bleed-Air OperationAnti-icing Off

AUXILIARY HP PRESSURE
AMBIENT AIR

international

MIXED BLEED AIR


AUXILIARY HP
BLEED PORT

FlightSafety

AIR INTAKE
ANTI-ICING

ISOLATION VALVE

LP2
BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

OVERHEAT
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

AUXILIARY LP
BLEED PORT

LP3
BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE PROBE

SR-46

WARNING PANEL

OVERHEAD PANEL
HP1

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

BLEED
OVHT

PRV2

PRV3

BLEED
APU

APU
ISOL

LP

NO. 3
ENGINE

AIR INTAKE
ANTI-ICING

LP
ISOLATION

AUTO
ON
OFF
PASSENGER

MAIN LP
BLEED PORT

NORM

CREW

HEAT
ISOL
BAG

MAIN LP
BLEED
PORT

BLEED AIR

OVERHEAT
TEMPERATURE PROBE

PRV3
LP3
BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE PROBE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FULL-OPENING
AUXILIARY HP SOLENOID VALVE
BLEED PORT

AUXILIARY HP
BLEED PORT

AUXILIARY LP
BLEED PORT

MAIN HP
BLEED
PORT

WING ANTI-ICING SYSTEM


APU

CREW AIR-CONDITIONING
SYSTEM
FUEL TANK PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM

PASSENGER
AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM
LP1 BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

NO. 1
ENGINE
AUXILIARY HP
BLEED PORT

HP1
BLEED VALVE

LP2
BLEED-AIR
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

LEGEND
PRV2
FULL-OPENING
SOLENOID VALVE

NO. 2 ENGINE
S-DUCT ANTI-ICE
SYSTEM

Figure SR-35. Bleed-Air OperationAnti-icing On

HP BLEED AIR
LP BLEED AIR
MIXED BLEED AIR
AUXILIARY HP PRESSURE
AMBIENT AIR

international

AUXILIARY LP
BLEED PORT

ISOLATION
VALVE
OVERHEAT
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

OVERHEAT
TEMPERATURE
PROBE

FlightSafety

MAIN LP
BLEED
PORT

NO. 2
ENGINE

APU
BLEED
VALVE

PRESSURIZATION JET PUMP

AIR INTAKE
ANTI-ICING

AIR
INTAKE
ANTIICING

COPILOT
GASPER

NOSE CONE
ISOLATION
VALVE
(PRIOR TO SNs 69)

CABIN
FLOOR
HEAT

TWO-WAY
MANIFOLDS

PILOT
FOOTWARMERS
PASSENGER
FLAPPER DOOR
HEATING
VALVE

PASSENGER TEMPERATURE
SENSOR/AMPLIFIER

CREW
CONDITIONED
AIR DUCT

CREW
THERMAL
SWITCH

INTERCONNECT
FLAP
(SNs PRIOR TO 163)

PASSENGER
GASPERS

CREW
DUCT
SENSOR

ENGINE
AND FLIGHT
CONTROL
HEATING

CREW
VENTURI
F
25

1
2
3

GASPER PICK-OFF
THIRD CREW MEMBER

NOSE
CONE
BLOWER

DEFOG
OUTLETS

EFIS VENTILATION
AIR OUTLETS
PASSENGER
VENTURI

MANUAL
DISTRIBUTOR
CONTROL

PILOT
GASPER

FLAPPER
VALVE
CREW
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR

TWO-WAY
DUCT
FRONT GROUND
CONDITIONING
FLAP

PASSENGER
CONDITIONED
AIR DUCT

LEGEND
HOT AIR
COOLED AIR

CONDITIONED AIR (HEATED)


RECIRCULATING AIR

AIR SOURCES:
1. COOLED AIR FROM TURBOCOOLER
2. BLEED AIR TO CREW JET PUMP

CABIN
FLOOR
HEATING
DUCTS

LAVATORY
HEATING

PASSENGER
THERMAL
SWITCH

PASSENGER
DUCT
SENSOR

REAR GROUND
CONDITIONING
FLAP
3. RECIRCULATED AIR IN TWO-WAY DUCTS
4. BLEED AIR TO PASSENGER JET PUMP

FLIGHT CONTROL
AND ENGINE POWER
CONTROL HEATING
(AFTER SB 900-115)

international

SR-47

FlightSafety

EFIS
COLD AIR

AFT WINDOW
VENTILATION DUCT
(PRIOR TO SN 116)

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

EFIS
BLOWERS

Figure SR-36. Distribution System Normal OperationFlight (Heating)

SR-48

PILOT
FOOTWARMERS

CREW
CONDITIONED
AIR DUCT

TWO-WAY
MANIFOLDS

COPILOT
GASPER

PASSENGER
DOOR
FLAPPER
HEATING
VALVE

PASSENGER
GASPERS

ENGINE
AND FLIGHT
CONTROL
HEATING

CREW
THERMAL
SWITCH

CABIN
FLOOR
HEAT

CREW
VENTURI
F
25

EFIS
BLOWERS
1
2

NOSE
CONE
BLOWER

GASPER PICK-OFF
THIRD CREW MEMBER

3
4

DEFOG
OUTLETS

PASSENGER
VENTURI

EFIS VENTILATION
AIR OUTLETS
EFIS
COLD AIR

CREW
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR

AFT WINDOW
VENTILATION DUCT
(PRIOR TO SN 116)

FLAPPER
VALVE

LEGEND
CONDITIONED AIR (COOLED)

FRONT GROUND
CONDITIONING
FLAP
PASSENGER
CONDITIONED
AIR DUCT

AIR SOURCES:
1. COOLED AIR FROM TURBOCOOLER
2. BLEED AIR TO CREW JET PUMP

CABIN
FLOOR
HEATING
DUCTS

LAVATORY
HEATING

PASSENGER
THERMAL
SWITCH
REAR GROUND
CONDITIONING
FLAP

3. COLD AIR FROM GASPER PRESSURE REGULATOR


4. HOT AIR TO PASSENGER JET PUMP

Figure SR-37. Distribution System Normal OperationFlight (Cooling)

PASSENGER
DUCT
SENSOR

FLIGHT CONTROL
AND ENGINE POWER
CONTROL HEATING
(AFTER SB 900-115)

international

HOT AIR
COLD AIR

TWO-WAY
DUCT

FlightSafety

MANUAL
DISTRIBUTOR
CONTROL

PILOT
GASPER

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NOSE CONE
ISOLATION
VALVE
(PRIOR TO SN 69)

INTERCONNECT
FLAP
(SNs PRIOR TO 163)

CREW
DUCT
SENSOR

PASSENGER TEMPERATURE
SENSOR/AMPLIFIER

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

OVERHEAD PANEL
HP1

PRV2

AIR
INTAKE
ANTIICING

PRV3

APU

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

LP

MAIN LP
BLEED PORT

PRESSUREREGULATING
VALVE 3

AIR
INTAKE
ANTIICING

635F (335C)

AUXILIARY LP
BLEED PORT
MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

LP
ISOLATION

WING ANTI-ICING SYSTEM


AUTO
ON
OFF
PASSENGER

APU

NORM

CREW

CREW AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM


FUEL TANK
PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM
PRESSURIZATION JET PUMP

HEAT
ISOL
BAG

BLEED AIR

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT

MAIN HP
BLEED PORT
MAIN LP
BLEED PORT

BLEED
APU

ON IF:
APU BLEED VALVE OPEN IN FLIGHT
APU BLEED VALVE OPEN ON THE
GROUND AND POWER LEVER AT
A POSITION ABOVE 54 FCU

AIR
INTAKE
ANTIICING

635F
(335C)

MAIN LP
BLEED PORT

HP1
BLEED
VALVE
NO. 1
ENGINE

NO. 2
ENGINE
S-DUCT
ANTI-ICE
SYSTEM

PRESSUREREGULATING
VALVE 2

LEGEND
HP BLEED AIR
LP BLEED AIR

SR-49

Figure SR-38. Bleed-Air SystemPower Lever to Takeoff

international

AUXILIARY HP PRESSURE

FlightSafety

FLASHING IF
CORRESPONDING
SWITCH
OFF

635F
(335C)

PASSENGER
AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM

WARNING PANEL

BLEED
OVHT

NO. 2
ENGINE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ON IF
ISOLATION
VALVE
CLOSED

ISOL

NO. 3
ENGINE

NOTE:
CONDITIONS:
CREW AND PASSENGER AIR ALL BLEED SWITCHES ON
CONDITIONING VALVES CLOSE WHEN ONE APU OFF
OR MORE POWER LEVERS ARE ADVANCED POWER LEVER TO TAKEOFF
THROUGH 54 PLA AND AIRCRAFT IS ON
ANTI-ICE OFF
THE GROUND.

SR-50

Table SR-4. NO. 1 AND NO. 3 ENGINE NACELLE ANTI-ICING LOGIC SYSTEM

PT2TT2
SENSOR

AIR INTAKE
ANTI-ICING
PRV

Off

Not energized

Closed

On
On

Energized
Energized

Opening
Regulating

On
On

Energized
Energized

Off
Off

Not energized
Not energized

LOW
PRESSURE

HIGH
PRESSURE

ENG1/ENG 3
LIGHT

None

None

Out

Lower than 4 psi


Higher than 4 psi

Lower than 90 psi

Amber Steady
Green

Higher than 90 psi

Amber steady
Amber Flashing

Initial Status

Activation

Abnormal Conditions
Regulating
Lower than 4 psi
Fully open (no regulation)
Higher than 4 psi
Switch to Off
Closing
Closed

Higher than 4 psi


Lower than 4 psi

Amber
(single flash)
Out

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ENG1/ENG 3
SWITCH

Abnormal Conditions
Not closed

Higher than 4 psi

Amber flashing

international

FlightSafety

Off

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ENG 1

ENG 2

WING

ENG 3

ANTI-ICE

PRINTED CIRCUIT
BOARD

PYLON

PT2 TT2
PROBE

NO. 3 ENGINE

FLOW
LIMITER

LP PRESSURE
SWITCH

HP PRESSURE
SWITCH

PRESSURE-REGULATING
VALVE

LEGEND
AUXILIARY HP BLEED AIR
ELECTRICAL POWER

Figure SR-39. No. 3 Nacelle Anti-icing Operation

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-51

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ENG 1

ENG 2

ENG 3

WING

ANTI-ICE

PRINTED CIRCUIT
BOARD
ECU HEAT
EXCHANGER
RAM-AIR INLET
ANTI-ICING

PRESSURE-REGULATING
VALVE

PYLON

PT2 TT2
PROBE
NO. 1 ENGINE
FLOW
LIMITER

LP PRESSURE
SWITCH

HP PRESSURE
SWITCH

HP
BLEED
PORT

LEGEND
AUXILIARY HP BLEED AIR
ELECTRICAL POWER

Figure SR-40. No. 1 Nacelle and Ram-Air Inlet Anti-icing Operation

SR-52

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

HP
HP11 PRV 2

LEGEND
HP BLEED AIR
LP BLEED AIR
INTAKE LIP

APU

HP/LP MIX

NO. 2
ENGINE

PRV 3

ENG 2

ISOL

ELECTRIC POWER

S-DUCT

AMBIENT

LP

LP

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ENGINE
NACELLE
PRV

PRINTED
CIRCUIT
BOARD

ISOLATION
AUTO
ON
OFF
PASSENGER

CENTER
PEDESTAL

BLEED AIR

HP
PRESSURE
SWITCH

FLOW
LIMITER
S-DUCT
ANTI-ICE
VALVE

APU

NO. 2
ENGINE

PT2 TT2
PROBE

NO. 3 ENGINE
MANIFOLD
PICCOLO TUBE
LP PRESSURE
TO
SWITCHES
WING
NO. 1 ENGINE

CHECK
VALVE

LP 2
SENSOR

PRV
2
FULL OPENING
SOLENOID

international

SR-53

FlightSafety

TO PASSENGER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
ISOLATION
VALVE

NORM
HEAT
ISOL
CREW BAG

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

AUXILIARY HP BLEED AIR

Figure SR-41. No. 2 Nacelle and S-Duct Anti-icing Operation

SR-54

LEGEND
WING

ANTI-ICE
PANEL

HP 1 PRV 2

PRV 3

HP BLEED AIR

MAIN
HP
BLEED
AIR

LP BLEED AIR

APU

HP/LP MIX

ISOL

ELECTRIC POWER

MANIFOLD

PRV3
FULL-OPENING
SOLENOID
VALVE
PRV3

MAIN LP
BLEED AIR
(LP3)

LP

ISOLATION
AUTO
ON
OFF
PASSENGER

CREW

BLEED AIR

WING
ANTI-ICING
VALVE

192.5C
POWER LEVER SWITCHES
FIXED
WING ROOT
LEADING EDGE

PEDESTAL

PRINTED
CIRCUIT
BOARD
ISOLATION
VALVE

CREW AIR
192.5C CONDITIONING

NORM

HEAT
ISOL
BAG

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

RIGHT WING
PRESSURE
SWITCH

LP

AMBIENT

NO. 3 ENGINE

APU AND
NO. 2 ENGINE
HP1 VALVE
MAIN HP
BLEED AIR

OUTBOARD SLAT

MANIFOLD

MAIN LP BLEED
AIR (LP1)

NO. 1 ENGINE

SKIN AND
SHROUD

GLASS WOOL
SLAT INNER CASING

Figure SR-42. Wing Leading-Edge Slats Anti-icing Operation

WING
STRUCTURE

international

TELESCOPIC
TUBES

FlightSafety

LEFT WING PRESSURE


SWITCH

LP WATER
SEPARATOR

HP WATER
SEPARATOR

ANTI-ICING
SENSOR

COMPRESSOR
TURBOCOOLER
TURBINE

CREW AIRCONDITIONING
DUCT

ECU
SNs PRIOR TO 96
OVERHEAT
SENSOR BATTERY
COMPARTMENT
COLD AIR SUPPLY
ELECTRICAL
VALVE
(SB F900-125)

BAGGAGE
BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT COMPARTMENT
VENTURI
HEAT VALVE
NO. 3 ENGINE
HP/LP
BLEED AIR

CREW
COLD AIR
CABIN
COLD AIR
OR
SUCTION
COLD AIR
PRESSUREREGULATING
VALVE

CREW AIRCONDITIONING
VALVE

FLOW
LIMITER

NO. 2 ENGINE S-DUCT


ANTI-ICING VALVE
PASSENGER AIRCONDITIONING
VALVE

COLD AIR
OR
SUCTION
LOWPRESSURE
AIR INLET

WATER
INJECTOR

CABIN

NO. 1 ENGINE PYLON


RAM AIR INLET

NO. 1 ENGINE
HP/LP
BLEED AIR

ANTI-ICING
TURBINE
BYPASS
VALVE
EMERGENCY
VALVE
ANTI-ICING
TURBOFAN
ELECTRIC VALVE
(SB F900-131)

COOLING UNIT
AIR OUTLET

SR-55

BLEED AIR

TURBOCOOLER
COMPRESSED AIR

CONDITIONED AIR

TEMPERED AIR

TURBOCOOLER
TURBINE AIR

RAM AIR

WATER

PASSENGER TEMPERATURE
REGULATING DUAL
CONTROL VALVE

Figure SR-43. Normal OperationGround or Slow Flight (Cooling)

international

LEGEND

MAIN HEAT
EXCHANGER

PRIMARY HEAT
EXCHANGER

FlightSafety

PASSENGER AIRCONDITIONING
DUCT

ISOLATION VALVE
NO. 2
ENGINE
HP/LP BLEED AIR
APU BLEED AIR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

WING ANTI-ICING
VALVE
CREW TEMPERATUREREGULATING DUAL
CONTROL VALVE
OZONE
CATALYSER

SR-56

LP WATER
SEPARATOR
ANTI-ICING
DUCT SENSOR

HP WATER
SEPARATION

ECU OVERHEATING
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
COMPRESSOR
TURBO-COOLER
TURBINE

CREW AIRCONDITIONING
CIRCUIT

SNs PRIOR TO 96
BATTERY
COMPARTMENT
COLD AIR SUPPLY
ELECTRICAL
VALVE
(SB F900-125)

BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT
VENTURI

BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
HEATING ELECTRIC VALVE
NO. 3 ENGINE
HP/LP
BLEED AIR

COLD AIR
OR
SUCTION

OZONE
CATALYSER

COLD AIR
PRESSUREREGULATING
VALVE

CREW AIRCONDITIONING
VALVE

FLOW
LIMITER

PASSENGER AIRCONDITIONING
VALVE

COLD AIR
OR
SUCTION

WATER
INJECTOR

LOW-PRESSURE
AIR INLET

MAIN HEAT
EXCHANGER

CABIN

ISOLATION VALVE
ANTI-ICING
VALVE

NO. 1 ENGINE PYLON


RAM AIR INLET

BLEED AIR
TEMPERED AIR

TURBOCOOLER
COMPRESSED AIR
TURBOCOOLER
TURBINE AIR

TURBINE
EMERGENCY
ANTI-ICING
ELECTRIC VALVE
(SB F900-131)

NO. 1 ENGINE
HP/LP
BLEED AIR

BYPASS
ELECTRIC VALVE

COOLING UNIT
AIR OUTLET
RECIRCULATED AIR

RAM AIR

CONDITIONED AIR (HEATED)

WATER

Figure SR-44. Normal OperationFlight (Heating)

PASSENGER TEMPERATURE
REGULATING DUAL
ELECTRIC VALVE

international

LEGEND

PRIMARY HEAT
EXCHANGER

TURBOFAN

FlightSafety

PASSENGER AIRCONDITIONING
CIRCUIT

NO. 2
ENGINE
HP/LP BLEED AIR
APU BLEED AIR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CREW TEMPERATUREREGULATING DUAL


ELECTRIC VALVE

CREW
COLD AIR
CABIN

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

PC BOARD
55%
FULLY HOT
LIMITATION

INTERCONNECT
FLAP

MANUAL

THERMAL SWITCH

AUTO
SNs PRIOR TO 96

COCKPIT

CREW
SENSOR
AMPLIFIER

CABIN
CONTROLS
(OPTIONAL)

DUCT
SENSOR
RECYCLED
AIR

CREW AIR-CONDITIONING
NO. 3
VALVE
ENGINE
(HP/LP)

BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT
HEAT
VALVE
COLD
AIR
GENERATION

OZONE
CATALYSER
CREW TEMPERATURE
REGULATING DUAL
ELECTRIC VALVE

PASSENGER
SENSOR

THERMAL DUCT
SWITCH SENSOR

NO. 1
ENGINE
(HP/LP)

OZONE
CATALYSER
NO. 2
ENGINE
(HP/LP)
OR APU

PC BOARD
REMOTE
55%
OR AUTO
FULLY HOT
LIMITATION MANUAL
PASSENGER
AIR-CONDITIONING
VALVE

PASSENGER
TEMPERATURE
REGULATING DUAL
ELECTRIC VALVE

LEGEND
BLEED AIR
CONDITIONED AIR
AUTO

REMOTE

COLD AIR

Figure SR-45. Temperature Control Operation

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SR-57

SR-58

LP WATER
SEPARATOR

ANTI-ICING
DUCT SENSOR

TURBOCOOLER
HP WATER
SEPARATION

BAGGAGE
BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT COMPARTMENT
HEATING
VENTURI
ELECTRIC VALVE
COLD AIR SUPPLY
CREW TEMPERATURE
ELECTRICAL VALVE
REGULATING DUAL
(SB F-900-125)
ELECTRIC VALVE
SNs
PRIOR
TO 96
ANTI-ICING
NO. 3 ENGINE
VALVE
HP/LP BLEED AIR

ECU OVERHEATING
TEMPERATURE
BATTERY
SENSOR
COMPARTMENT

COMPRESSOR
TURBINE

CREW-AIR
CONDITIONING
CIRCUIT

OZONE
CATALYSER

CABIN
COLD AIR

CREW AIRCONDITIONING VALVE

COLD AIR
OR SUCTION
COLD AIR
PRESSUREREGULATING
VALVE

FLOW
LIMITER

CABIN
PRESSURIZED

PASSENGER AIRCONDITIONING VALVE

COLD AIR
OR SUCTION

ISOLATION VALVE

PASSENGER
COLD AIR

PASSENGER
AIR-CONDITIONING
CIRCUIT

LEGEND
BLEED AIR
RAM AIR

LOW-PRESSURE
AIR INLET

NO. 1 ENGINE
PYLON RAMAIR INLET

RECIRCULATED AIR

NO. 1 ENGINE
HP/LP BLEED AIR
COOLING UNIT
AIR OUTLET

TURBOFAN

PASSENGER TEMPERATURE
REGULATING DUAL ELECTRIC
VALVE

MAIN HEAT
EXCHANGER

Figure SR-46. Air SourceEmergency Pressurization

international

PRIMARY HEAT
EXCHANGER

WATER
INJECTOR

BYPASS
ELECTRIC
VALVE

FlightSafety

TURBINE
EMERGENCY
ANTI-ICING
ELECTRIC
VALVE

NO. 2 ENGINE
HP/LP BLEED AIR
APU BLEED AIR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CREW COLD
AIR

STANDBY STATIC

STANDBY STATIC

RAM AIR
TEMPERATURE SENSOR

STANDBY PITOT
TRIPLE INDICATOR
(CABIN ALT, P, AND
RATE-OF-CLIMB)

PILOT PITOT

AILERON
ARTHUR Q UNIT

COPILOT PITOT
PILOT STATIC

COPILOT STATIC

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ELEVATOR
ARTHUR

STANDBY
ALTIMETER

ELEVATOR
ARTHUR
UNIT

ADC 1
MACH SPEED
INDICATOR 1
(OPTION)
HOR STAB
CRUISE STOP

ID 802 ANNUNCIATOR 1
(TAT, SAT, TAS)

AILERON ARTHUR Q
MONITORING A/C SNs UP TO 178
AILERON ARTHUR CONTROL
A/C SNs 179 AND HIGHER
SLAT
MONITORING

COPILOT STATIC

ADC 2

MACH SPEED
INDICATOR 2
(OPTION)
CABIN
PRESSURIZATION
CONTROL

ID 802 ANNUNCIATOR 2
(TAT, SAT, TAS)
(OPTION)

ELECTRIC
ALTIMETER
1

EFIS 1

ELECTRIC
ALTIMETER
2

VERTICAL SPEED
INDICATOR 1

FMS 1

VERTICAL SPEED
INDICATOR 2

LEGEND
PILOT PITOT
COPILOT PITOT
PILOT STATIC
COPILOT STATIC
STANDBY PITOT
STANDBY STATIC
ELECTRICAL
LANDING GEAR
CONTACTS

IRS 1

VMO/MMO
WARNING

VMO/MMO
WARNING

EFIS 2

SLAT
CONTACTS

LANDING GEAR
CONTACT

FMS 2

IRS 2

ATC 1
CONTROL PANEL

TURBOFAN
CONTROL

SR-59

Figure SR-47. Pitot-Static System

ATC 2
CONTROL PANEL

international

ALTITUDE
WARNING

SLAT
MONITORING
AILERON ARTHUR Q MONITORING
A/C SNs BELOW 165,
AND 179 AND HIGHER
AILERON ARTHUR CONTROL
A/C SNs 165 TO 178

FlightSafety

SLAT
CONTACTS

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

STANDBY MACH
SPEED INDICATOR

PILOT STATIC

SR-60

LEFT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL RIGHT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL

PILOT ID 802 ANNUNCIATOR


BRT

20c SAT 25C TAT 175 KTAS


L AFCS FAIL
R AFCS MASTER
AP ENGAGED

RESET

L AFCS

COPILOT ID 802 ANNUNCIATOR


(OPTION 22.10.01)

R AFCS

XXX
2.5

XXX
2.5

ADC
1

ADC
2

NAVIGATION

RESET

L AFCS

20c SAT 25C TAT 175 KTAS


L AFCS FAIL
R AFCS MASTER
AP ENGAGED

COPILOT EADI

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ASEL

3000

20

VASL

180
160
120

ASEL

180

180

G
S
10

80

20

00

X
I
R
S

60
400
350

66

IAS

230

COPILOT
ALTIMETER
0

ALT

3
4

180
BARO

1 2

VERTICAL SPEED

UP

DOWN

ALT

1000 FT PER
MIN

3
4

PILOT VERTICAL
SPEED INDICATOR
5

1 2

STANDBY
MACH SPEED
INDICATOR
5

3
4

80

ADC 2

100

400
350

120

300
250 200

ADC 1

60

1 00
00 0

VMO/MMO
TEST
PUSHBUTTONS

140

160
180

-1 0 1 2

1
0
1

CABIN

40

COPILOT MACH
SPEED INDICATOR*
60

5
6
7
8
9
10
20

400
350

66

ADC 1

80
100
120

300

140

250
230

IAS

160

KT

200

180

* PILOT AND COPILOT ELECTRIC MACH SPEED INDICATORS ARE OPTION NO. 34.10.01.

Figure SR-48. Pitot-Static/Air Data Instruments Location

STANDBY
PITOT
PRESSURE
PROBE

international

DOWN

VERTICAL SPEED

UP

1000 FT PER
MIN

STANDBY
ALTIMETER

TRIPLE
INDICATOR
(ALT, P, AND
CABIN RATE-OF-CLIMB)

RAM-AIR
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
LEFT
STANDBY
STATIC
PRESSURE
PORTS

FlightSafety

BARO

PILOT
PITOT
PRESSURE
PROBE

COPILOT VERTICAL
SPEED INDICATOR

PILOT
ALTIMETER
28 7 20

LEFT
STATIC
PRESSURE
PORTS

28 7 20

8
7

160

KT

200

FORWARD
PRESSURE
BULKHEAD

140

250

LEFT ANGLEOF-ATTACK
SENSOR

20

00

80
100
120

300

10

80

PILOT MACH
SPEED INDICATOR*

G
S

100

100

3000

20
10

10

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

LNAV HDG

VASL

180
160
120

R AFCS

SPERRY

LNAV HDG

BRT

NAVIGATION

PILOT EADI
SPERRY

ADC 2

BUS A1

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

MASTER WARNING SYSTEM


TABLES
Table
MWS-1
MWS-2
MWS-3
MWS-4
MWS-5
MWS-6
MWS-7
MWS-8
MWS-9
MWS-10
MWS-11

Title
Page
Annunciator Illumination Causes ............................ MWS-1
Fire Panel Illumination Causes ................................ MWS-6
Hydraulic Control and Indicator Panel
Illumination Causes .................................................. MWS-7
Battery Temperature Indication
Illumination Causes .................................................. MWS-7
ENG 2 FAIL Illumination Causes ............................ MWS-8
ITT Light Illumination Causes ................................ MWS-8
Audio Warning Causes ............................................ MWS-9
Audio Warning Testing .......................................... MWS-13
Configuration Panel and Landing Gear
Control Handle Illumination Causes ...................... MWS-14
Thrust Reverser Indicator Lights
Illumination Causes................................................ MWS-15
Overhead Panel Light Illumination Causes............ MWS-16

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-i

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION

CMPTR 1

The control switch of the indicated computer is in the OFF


or MAN position.

CMPTR 2

The indicated computer has failed (electrical power supply


failure, internal failure, or incorrect data).

CMPTR 3
FWD
DOORS

The light comes on if: (Specific light to aircraft incorporating


M880A modification).
The main entrance door is not locked or the front lavatory
compartment service door is not locked (on aircraft equipped
with this lavatory compartment).

L. AOA

The indicated heating systems are not on.


Angle-of-attack heating has failed.

R. AOA

OIL 1

The oil pressure of the indicated engine is lower than 25 psi


(1.72 bar).

OIL 2

Chips are detected in the indicated engine oil system.

OIL 3

L. PITOT

Red light with M880A

The indicated heating systems are not on.


Pitot or static pressure probe heating has failed.

R. PITOT
ST BY
PITOT

The indicated heating system is not on.


Standby pitot pressure probe heating has failed.

GEN 1

The indicated generator is not tied to the power system (the


associated reverse current relay is open, or the start relay
remains closed at the end of a start sequence).

GEN 2
Red light with M880A

GEN 3

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-1

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


ANNUNCIATOR
L. WHL
OVHT

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


An overheat condition is detected in the left or right landing gear
wheel well.

R. WHL
OVHT

BAT 1

The indicated battery is not connected to the aircraft power


system through its make-and-break switch.

BAT 2

BUS TIED
HOT
BAT

The main left and right buses are tied or the battery 2 paralleling
contactor remains closed.
The temperature of one of the batteries exceeds 150F
(65.5C) for aircraft prior to SN 172 with SB-94 not applied.
The temperature of one of the batteries exceeds 160F
(71.1C) for aircraft SN 172 and subsequent, and aircraft prior
to SN 172 with SB-94 applied.
The HOT light located on the battery temperature indicator is
illuminated.

AUTO
SLATS

There is a discrepancy between the two slat control


flight/ground contacts.
There is a discrepancy between these two contacts and the
nose and left landing gear flight/ground contacts, inhibiting
gear retraction.
The discrepancy between the two angle-of-attack sensors
exceeds +5 (in-flight configuration only).
One of the ADC contacts controlling the slats detects an IAS
lower than 265 knots, whereas the ADC monitoring contacts
detect an IAS of 280 knots.

FLAP
ASYM

MWS-2

An asymmetry between the left and right flap position exists.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION

FUEL 1

The pressure switch located on the indicated engine fuel supply


LP line indicates a pressure drop (pressure less than or equal to
4.6 psi [approximately 320 mb]).

FUEL 2
FUEL 3

XTK 2
OPEN

The front-to-rear tank transfer valve is open when it should be


closed.

Aircraft with transfer valve XTK2.

XTK 2
CLOSED

The front-to-rear tank transfer valve is closed when it should be


open.

Aircraft with transfer valve XTK2.

BAG
ACCESS

The cabin baggage compartment access door is not closed.

LO
FUEL 1

A fuel level below 200 pounds is detected in tank group G1


or G3.

LO
FUEL 3
LO
FUEL 2

For aircraft SNs 1 to 11A fuel level below 200 pounds is


detected in tank group G2 (or below 1,100 pounds if booster
pumps 2 are off).
For aircraft SNs 12 and subsequentA fuel level below
200 pounds is detected in tank group G2.

AIL
ZERO

The emergency aileron actuator is not in the neutral position.

AIL
FEEL

A discrepancy is detected between the IAS output of the air data


computer and the position information supplied by the linear
potentiometer on the aileron Arthur actuator.

PITCH
FEEL

There is a discrepancy between the position of the elevator


Arthur actuator and the position of the horizontal stabilizer, or
there is an elevator Arthur box malfunction.
Red light with M880A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-3

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION

AFT CABIN
ISOL

The light comes on if:


The foldable door of the partition at frame 16 is not latched open
when the No smoking passenger call sign is activated.

(option 25-21-01)

REV
UNLOCK

The thrust reverser clamshell doors are not locked in the stowed
position.
NOTE
The light normally illuminates during the thrust reverser retraction
phase.

FUELING

One of the two fuel vents is not closed.


The defueling/refueling valve is not closed.
The refueling connector access door is not closed.
The refueling control panel access door is not closed.
The GRAVITY FUELING switch is set to ON.
Bus B-2 has failed.
The DEFUELING switch is set to ON.
The vent valve control lever is raised.

AP

The autopilot has failed or has automatically disengaged.


On aircraft incorporating M880C, when this light flashes, the
audio warning sounds.

MISTRIM

MWS-4

The AP trim coupler system has failed.

MACH
TRIM

The Mach trim system is disengaged or has failed.

BLEED
OVHT

An overheat of HP/LP bleed air is detected (temperature higher


than or equal to 635F [335C], or 545F [285C] if anti-icing has
been activated).

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


ANNUNCIATOR
ECU
OVHT

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


An overheat (446F or 230C) is detected at the compressor
outlet of the turbocooling unit.
The turbofan bypass valve is not closed, and the airplane is
on the ground or flight with the landing gear down and locked.

CONDG
OVHT

Overheating is detected in one of the cabin or cockpit supply


ducts (air temperature higher than or equal to 203F [95C]).

NOSE
CONE OVHT

Overheat is detected in the nose cone (temperature higher than


or equal to 158F [70C]).

BLEED
APU

The APU bleed-air valve is not completely closed with the bleed
switch off or one of the power levers positioned to 54 or greater.

BAG ISOL

The baggage compartment electric isolation valve is not open. In


this condition the baggage compartment is not pressurized.

#2 P BK

Steady illumination: Hydraulic system No. 2 pressure is


applied to the brakes (pressure higher than 261 psi
[approximately 18 bars]).
Flashing illumination: When the park brake accumulator
pressure is between 1,305 to 1,102 psi or below, the brakes
can be applied only once.

CABIN

With audio warning:


Cabin altitude is greater than or equal to 10,000 feet.
Without audio warning:
The main entrance door is not locked.
The front lavatory compartment service panel door is not
closed (if this option is installed).
Light on only with audio warning on aircraft with M880A.

REAR
DOORS

The baggage compartment outside door is unlocked.


The rear compartment door is unlocked.
Red light with M880A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-5

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION

T/O
CONFIG

The light illuminates and the audio warning sounds if the aircraft
is on the ground, with at least one of the power levers advanced
beyond 82 and one of the following modes present:

The slat/flap control is in CLEAN.

Flap deflection is higher than or equal to 22.

The airbrakes are not retracted.

The horizontal stabilizer is out of the authorized green takeoff


range between 4 30' and 7 30'.

The slats are not extended.

On aircraft incorporating M880C, the park brake handle is


pulled and the dual braking system is not activated.

Table MWS-2. FIRE PANEL ILLUMINATION CAUSES


ANNUNCIATOR
FIRE 1

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


Fire is detected in the indicated engine compartment.

FIRE 2
FIRE 3

FIRE
BAG COMP
FIRE APU

Fire or smoke is detected in the baggage compartment.

Fire is detected in the APU compartment.

A fault is detected in the associated detection loop.

FAULT

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

During fuel shutoff valve transit or if there is a discrepancy


between the position of the valve and the position of the control
switch.

TRANS

MWS-6

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-3. HYDRAULIC CONTROL AND INDICATOR


PANEL ILLUMINATION CAUSES
ANNUNCIATOR
PUMP 1

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


The pressure of the indicated pump is lower than 1,500 psi
(approximately 103 bars).

PUMP 2
PUMP 3

ST BY
PUMP

The standby pump selector located in the rear compartment


is not in the normal flight position.
The standby pump cycle time is longer than 60 seconds.

L R

Pressure supplying the left or right brake units becomes


higher than or equal to 232 psi (approximately 16 bar)
increasing in system No. 1.
The lights extinguish when the brakes are released and
pressure becomes lower than or equal to 160 psi (11 bars)
decreasing in system No. 1).

Table MWS-4. BATTERY TEMPERATURE INDICATOR


ILLUMINATION CAUSES
ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATOR

WARM

The No. 1 and/or No. 2 battery overheats. (The light illuminates


when the battery internal temperature is higher than 120F
[48.9C]).

HOT

The No. 1 and/or No. 2 battery overheats. The light illuminates


when the battery internal temperature is:

Over 150F (65.5C) for aircraft prior to SN 172 with SB-94


not applied, or

Over 160F (71.7C) for aircraft SN 172 and subsequent, and


for aircraft prior to SN 132, with SB-94 applied.

NOTE
This light is connected in parallel with the red HOT BAT light on
the warning panel.
On aircraft with SB-125, the aircraft on the ground, the MASTER
APU switch set to ON, and the COND BATT switch on, this light
illuminates when the battery cooling electric valve is fully open.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-7

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-5. ENG 2 FAIL ILLUMINATION CAUSES


ANNUNCIATOR
ENG 2 FAIL

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


The aircraft is on the ground and the No. 2 engine power
lever is at the 84 setting and the No. 2 engine power is less
than 85% N1.
The No. 2 engine S-duct access door is not properly closed.
A second light is installed on the copilot instrument panel on
aircraft with M880B incorporated.

ECU
A/I

On aircraft with SB-131, this pushbutton light is illuminated


when the turbine emergency anti-icing valve is closed.

Table MWS-6. ITT LIGHT ILLUMINATION CAUSES


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


The light flashes if the associated engine ITT reaches 952C
on TFE-731-5AR-1C or 980C on TFE-731-5BR-1C.
If the power increase function is used, the light flashes at
974C on TFE-731-5AR-1C or 996C on TFE-731-5BR-1C.

PWR
INC

MWS-8

The light indicates the correct operation of power increase system


control relays for high altitude takeoff (approximately 5,000 feet)
and hot weather conditions (over 18.5C).

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Table MWS-7. AUDIO WARNING CAUSES

WARNING

TYPE OF
SOUND

SIMULTANEOUS
WARNING OR
INDICATION

CAUSE

HORN
SIL

Continuous varying sound


with frequency varying
between 660 Hz and
3,330 Hz during a one-second
period

Readings on both EFISs

VMO/MMO exceeded

No

Cabin pressure

Warning voice CABIN

Red CABIN light on warning


panel and cabin altitude
reading higher than 10,000
feet on cabin altimeter

Cabin altitude higher than


10,000 feet

Yes

Fire

Continuous two-pitch audiblbe


500-Hz tone for 150 ms and
then 555 Hz for 150 ms

Illumination of at least one red


FIRE light on the fire panel

Fire is detected by:


Engines 1, 2, and 3 fire detectors
APU fire detector
Baggage compartment smoke
detector

Yes

Stall

Intermittent 1,660-Hz sound


(beep beep)on for 100 ms
and off for 100 ms

Illumination of the three IGN


lights on the overhead panel
Flashing of green slat light

Aircraft angle of attack is


greater than 11

No

international

MWS-9

FlightSafety

SLATS NOT EXTENDED

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

VMO/MMO

MWS-10

Table MWS-7. AUDIO WARNING CAUSES (Cont)

WARNING

TYPE OF
SOUND

SIMULTANEOUS
WARNING OR
INDICATION

CAUSE

HORN
SIL

Stall

Intermittent 1,660-Hz sound


(beep beep)on for 100 ms
and off for 100 ms

Illumination of the three IGN


lights on the overhead panel
Steady green slat light
Activation of stick-shaker on
aircraft with M889

Aircraft angle of attack is greater


than 16.5

Altitude deviation

Warning voice ALTITUDE

Illumination of the amber


altitude warning light on the
pilot and copilot altimeters

From a given altitude, the aircraft


flies to the altitude selected on the
control unit. When within 1,000 feet
of this altitude, the audio warning
sounds, and the light on each
altimeter illuminates.

The altitude selected on the


ASEL box of each EADI
changes color.

No

No

Continuous clacker sound


with pulse frequency at
12.5 Hz

Horizontal stabilizer position


indicator needle is in movement on the trim panel.

Movement of horizontal stabilizer,


whatever the operation mode.

No

international

Horizontal
Stabilizer
in movement

FlightSafety

Once the preset altitude is reached,


the audio warning sounds and the
altimeter lights illuminate if altitude
deviation exceeds 250 feet.

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SLATS EXTENDED

Table MWS-7. AUDIO WARNING CAUSES (Cont)

WARNING

TYPE OF
SOUND

CAUSE

HORN
SIL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SLATS EXTENDED
Landing gear

Warning voice GEAR

Red light on landing gear


gear control handle
flashes.

The control handle is in the gear


downlocked or uplocked position,
IAS is lower than 160 knots, at least
one of the power levers is in the
reduced power position (but not on
STOP on aircraft with M881), and
at least one of the three gears is
not downlocked.

Yes

The control handle is in the downlocked or uplocked position, the


flaps are extended to 40, and at
least one of the three gears is not
downlocked.

No

Letters DH appear on both


EADIs.

Preset decision height is reached.

Yes

Autopilot (Aircraft
with M880C)

Warning voice AUTOPILOT

Illumination of the AP light on


the warning panel

Failure or disengagement of the


autopilot

No

MWS-11

international

Warning voice MINIMUM

FlightSafety

Decision height

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SIMULTANEOUS
WARNING OR
INDICATION

MWS-12

Table MWS-7. AUDIO WARNING CAUSES (Cont)

WARNING

TYPE OF
SOUND

CAUSE

HORN
SIL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

SLATS EXTENDED
Illumination of the T/O CONFIG
light on the fire panel

The aircraft is on the ground, at


least one of the power levers is
advanced beyond 82, and (one of
the following conditions):
Flaps are out 22 or more
Flap/slat control is at CLEAN
Airbrakes are not retracted
Horizontal stabilizer is out of the
4 30' to 7 30' position
Slats are not extended
Park brake handle pulled and
dual braking system not activated
(aircraft with M880C).

Yes

Red lights on warning


panel that do not have
their own audio
warnings and ENG 2
FAIL red lights
(aircraft with M880C).

770 Hz gong for 0.4s.

Illumination of one of
the red lights.

Check possible causes of warning


light concerned

No

international

Warning voice
NO TAKE-OFF

FlightSafety

Takeoff Configuration

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

SIMULTANEOUS
WARNING OR
INDICATION

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-8. AUDIO WARNING TESTING


ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION

VMO/MMO

Depressing ADC 1 or ADC 2 pushbuttons on the pedestal

Cabin altitude

Depressing the test pushbutton on the cabin pressure controller


accompanied by illumination of the CABIN light on the warning
panel

Fire

Setting the warning panel LIGHTSTESTFIRE switch to FIRE


(all the FIRE lights on the fire panel illuminate)

Stall

On the ground depressing the STALL 1 or STALL 2 pushbutton

Horizontal
stabilizer in
movement

Action on the pitch trim control

Landing gear

Depressing the landing gear test pushbutton on the slat/flap


landing gear configuration panel

Takeoff

On the ground, reproducing configuration the conditions that


cause the warning panel T/O CONFIG light to illuminate

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-13

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-9. CONFIGURATION PANEL AND LANDING GEAR


CONTROL HANDLE ILLUMINATION CAUSES
ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


The control handle is in the gearup position, and the three
gears are not yet uplocked.
The control handle is in the down position, and the landing
gear is not fully downlocked.
The control handle is in the up position, speed is lower than
160 knots, at least one of the power levers is at a reduced
setting, but not on STOP for aircraft incorporating M881, and
at least one of the three gears is not downlocked.

AIR
BRAKE

Steady illumination
At least one of the six airbrakes is not in the retracted
position.
Flashing
After automatic retraction of the airbrakes, as long as the
handle is in the extended position while the airbrakes are
retracted.

SLATS

Steady illumination
All the slats are extended.
Flashing
Only the outboard slats are extended.
During any movement of the slats or if any one of the slats has
failed to either extend or retract.

The indicated landing gear is downlocked.


LH NOSE RH
MOVING

Main gear:
The corresponding door is not closed and locked.
Nose gear:
The gear is not uplocked.
The gear is not downlocked while the doors are open.
The landing gear is downlocked, and one of the doors is
not fully open.

MWS-14

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-10. THRUST REVERSER INDICATOR


LIGHTS ILLUMINATION CAUSES
ANNUNCIATOR
TRANSIT

DEPLOYED

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


The clamshell doors are in movement or are not locked or
reverser lock latches are released.
The synchronizing bell crank controlling the clamshell doors has
reached the fully deployed position.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-15

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-11. OVERHEAD PANEL LIGHT


ILLUMINATION CAUSES
ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


APU PANEL

MASTER

Steady illumination: It is depressed to on.

APU

Flashing: In the event of automatic shutdown of the APU by


flight/ground contact, ECU overheat, faulty generator
regulation, or starting faults

OIL

The light illumination indicates low oil pressure or high oil


temperature.

GEN

The APU generator is off the line.

DC SYSTEM PANEL

The APU generator has excitation voltage. The APU generator


switch is on.

APU

ENGINES PANEL
IGN 1

IGN 2

IGN 3

The igniter unit of the indicated engine is energized.

FUEL SYSTEM PANEL

XTK
X.BP

The side tank group interconnection valve is not closed.


One of the 13 or 31 crossfeed valves is not closed.

(CENTER AMBER
LIGHT)

LEVEL
(3 AMBER LIGHTS)

X.BP

The fuel level in the associated tank (left or right centerwing tank)
is lower than 1,000 pounds or the fuel level in the rear tank is
lower than 1,100 pounds.
One of the associated crossfeed valves (12 or 32) is not
closed.

(2 LH AND RH
AMBER LIGHTS)

BLEED-AIR PANEL

ISOL

MWS-16

The bleed-air isolation valve is closed.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-11. OVERHEAD PANEL LIGHT


ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)
ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


ANTI-ICING PANEL

ENG 1

ENG 2

ENG 3

Green light: The ENG 1, ENG 2 or ENG 3 switch is in the on


position, and all the required conditions for proper operation
are satisfied (temperature and pressure for the No. 2 engine
and pressure for the No. 1 or No. 3 engine).
Amber light (steady): The ENG 1, ENG 2 or ENG 3 switch is
in the on position, and a pressure drop is detected in the
corresponding system.
Amber light (flashes): Overpressure is detected in the No. 1 or
No. 3 engine, or overtemperature or overpressure is detected
in the No. 2 engine.

WING

Green light: The WING switch is set to on and all the required
conditions for proper operation are satisfied.
Amber light (steady): The WING switch is set to on and a
pressure drop is detected in the system.
Amber light (flashes):
Overtemperature is detected in the system.
NOTE
On aircraft with wing-brake heating, the illumination conditions of
the green and amber lights are the same, whether the switch is
set to WING or WING-BRK.
WINDSHIELD PANEL

XFR

LDG

Either pilot or copilot regulation circuit is defective, and detection


and regulation is transferred to the opposite system (pilot or
copilot).
EXTERIOR LIGHTS PANEL

The LANDING switch is set to on.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

MWS-17

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table MWS-11. OVERHEAD PANEL LIGHT


ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)
ANNUNCIATOR

CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION


INTERIOR LIGHTS PANEL

FASTEN
BELTS

The FASTEN BELTS passenger ordinance sign is illuminated.

EMERG
LIGHTS

The EMERG LIGHTS selector is in the ON or OFF position, and


the aircraft is electrically powered.
The no smoking ordinance sign is illuminated.

LH
AVIONICS

RH
AVIONICS

OFF

OFF

MASTER

MASTER

AVIONIC MASTER SWITCHES

Switch illuminates when associated avionics is off.

MWS-18

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

APPENDIX B
Appendix B presents a color representation of all
the annunciator lights in the aircraft.
Please remove page APP-3, align to the right of page
APP-1 and leave it open for ready reference as the
annunciators are cited in the text.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

APP-i

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

BRIGHT

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

TEST
LIGHTS

ENG 2 FAIL
FIRE

PWR
INC
DISCH
2
1

DIM
CMPTR 1

CMPTR 2

L AOA

CMPTR 3

OIL 1

OIL 2

OIL 3

L. PITOT

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

FUEL 1

FUEL 2

FUEL 3

LO
FUEL 1

LO
FUEL 2

LO
FUEL 3

AOA
PROBE
HOT
BAT
XTK 2 *
OPEN
AIL
ZERO

ST BY
PITOT
L. WHL
OVHT
AUTO
SLATS
XTK 2 *
CLOSED
AIL
FEEL

REV
UNLOCK
ECU
OVHT

FUELING

AP

MISTRIM

BLEED
OVHT

COND'G
OVHT

#2 P BK

CABIN

NOSE
CONE OVHT
REAR
DOORS

BLEED
APU
T/O
CONFIG

R. AOA
R. PITOT
R. WHL
OVHT
FLAP
ASYM
BAG
ACCESS
PITCH
FEEL
MACH
TRIM

RESET

L AFCS

20c SAT 25c TAT 175KTAS


L AFCS FAIL
R AFCS MASTER
AP ENGAGED

BRT

R AFCS

400 600
ITT
C

400 600
800

200

ITT
C

FAULT

DISCH
2
1

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

FAULT
FIRE APU

0
TRANS

FAULT

FIRE 1

TRANS
FAULT

FIRE 2

FIRE 3

FIRE
BAG COMP

RH
AVIONICS

OFF

OFF

MASTER

MASTER
RESET

* ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT ELECTRONIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK2,THESE LIGHTS ARE NOT FEATURED.

200

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

DISCH
2
1

TRANS

LH
AVIONICS

BAG ISOL

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

L AFCS

20c SAT 25c TAT 175KTAS


L AFCS FAIL
R AFCS MASTER
AP ENGAGED

BRT

R AFCS

400 600
800

200

ITT
C

800
AFT
CAB LAV
SMK SMK

BRT
IRS

IAS
M

SG

OFF
COMPOS

XFR

HSI

ADI
TGT

TGT

GCR

RCT

TEST
WX
50
100
STBY
200
GMAP 25
OFF
10
300
PRESET
GAIN
MODE
RANGE

TEST

L R

1/1

#2

ON
OFF

#1

OFF

1/2

BRAKE

PUMP 3

ST BY
PUMP

HYDR

ASKID
#1

PUMP 2

+15

TILT

_15

PASS ON

0
QTY PSI

4
3
2
1
0
X 1000

1/1
1/2
0
QTY PSI

HORN SIL

X 1000

TILT

_15

IAS
M

SG

OFF
COMPOS
HSI

ATC 1

E BAT 1

E BAT 2

OFF

ON OFF

ON OFF

ST-BY
PUMP

AUTO

AUTO

MAN

MAN

ON

IRS

XFR

E BAT
TONE
RESET

AUTO

4
3
2
1
0

+15
0

BRT

GALLEY
ON OFF

TRANSIT

HYDR

RCT

DEPLOYED
PUMP 1

GCR

TEST
WX
50
100
STBY
200
GMAP 25
OFF
10
300
PRESET
GAIN
MODE
RANGE

ADI

888

ATC 2

BATTERY 1
HOT

WARM

888
BATTERY 2

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

TEST

A/C 172

APP-1

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

AIR
BRAKE

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FLIGHT
NORM

FLAPS
UP

SLATS

DN

40

0
120

20

100

20

N
%

800

NOSE

IRS 1

START

+ 100

100

GEN

+ 100

200
300
350

BAT 1

GEN 1

E BAT 2
TEST

XTK

P
U
L
L

CMPTR 2

MAN

LEVEL
APU

CMPTR 3

MAN
OFF
IGN 2

ISOL

IGN 3

AIR START
GRD

XTK 2

START

BOOSTER
NORM
ST-BY
OFF

MOTOR-START STOP
PRESS TO START

CABIN
CALL

SELCAL

FWD
AFT

VHF 1
VHF 2

X.BP

LP

LP

AUTO
OPEN
CLOSED

LEVEL

ISOLATION

X.BP

SPARE

HF 1
HF 2
VHF 3

AUTO

NORM

ON

HEAT

OFF

HOLD TO MOTOR

LAV
ATNDT

300
350

PRV 3

PRV 2

HP 1

X.BP

LEVEL

AUTO

OFF
IGN 1

200

100

BOOSTER

EXT POWER

AUTO

?0
_

GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

BOOSTER

CMPTR 1

GEN 2

DC SYSTEM

NORMAL

P
U
S
H

BAT 2

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

APU

U
N
L
O
C
K

25
BAT
GEN

V _ 30

HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

?0
_

OIL

APU

RH

G
E
A
R

STOP

APU

TEST

V 30

200
400

600

MASTER

LANDING GEAR

T5
C

1000

40

80 60

20

BAT
GEN

MOVING

LH

25

20

0
7

ENG 1

FUEL SYSTEM

ENGINES

ISOL

PASSENGER

ENG 3

ENG 2

CREW

BAG

BLEED AIR
XFR

SPARE
PILOT

ST-BY

COPILOT

ENG 1

ENG 2

ENG 3

PILOT

WING

COPILOT

SIDE

MAX
NORM
OFF

WARM

OFF

OFF

180

180

160

160

140

140

120
F

120
F

BAT. TEMP.

A/C <172

ANTI-ICE

PITOT

LESS 50 F
HOT

PILOT
NAV
FAST
SLOW
OFF

ANTICOL
NAV
NAV-LOGO
OFF

TEST

WIPER

LDG
LANDING

ALL
RED
OFF
EXTERIOR LIGHTS

TAXI

WINDSHIELD

WING

FASTEN
BELTS
DOME

EMERG
LIGHTS

COPILOT
ARMED
ON
OFF

INTERIOR LIGHTS

FAST
SLOW
OFF

CABIN
ENTRANCE
OFF
WIPER

* *ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT ELECTONIC TRANSFER VALUE XTK2,THE OVERHEAD PANEL DOES NOT FEATURE THE BLOCK DIAGRAM AND XTK2 SWITCH.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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COURSEWARE SUPPORTHURST

8900 Trinity Blvd.

Hurst, Texas 76053

(817) 276-7500

Fax (817) 276-7501

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL, VOLUME 2


Record of Revision No. 4.04
This is a revision of the Falcon 900 Pilot Training Manual, Volume 2.
A solid vertical line in the margin indicates the content of the adjacent text or figure has been
changed. A vertical line adjacent to a blank space indicates material has been deleted.
Any page affected by the revision is marked Revision 4.04 in the lower left or right corner.
If a page has Revision 4.04 in the lower left or right corner and no vertical line in the margin, it is a page in which format only has been changed.
The changes made in this revision will be further explained at the appropriate time in the
training course.

the best safety device in any aircraft is a well-trained crew. . .

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900
PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
VOLUME 2
AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

FlightSafety International, Inc.


Marine Air Terminal, LaGuardia Airport
Flushing, New York 11371
(718) 565-4100
www.flightsafety.com

Courses for the Falcon 900 and other Dassault aircraft are taught at the following
FlightSafety learning centers:
FlightSafety International
Teterboro Learning Center
Teterboro Airport
100 Moonachie Avenue
Moonachie, New Jersey 07074
Phone: (201) 528-0100
Toll-Free: (800) 827-8058
Fax: (201) 528-0101
FlightSafety International
Paris Learning Center
BP 25, Zone dAviation dAffaires
Bldg. 404, Aeroport du Bourget
93352 Le Bourget, CEDEX
FRANCE
Phone: +33 (1) 49-92-19-19
Fax: +33 (1) 49-92-18-92

Copyright 1987 by FlightSafety International, Inc.


All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

NOTICE
The material contained in this training manual is based on information obtained
from the aircraft manufacturers Airplane Flight Manual, Pilot Manual and Maintenance Manuals. It is to be used for familiarization and training purposes only.
At the time of printing, it contained then-current information. In the event of conflict
between data provided herein and that in publications issued by the manufacture
or the FAA, that of the manufacturer or the FAA shall take precedence.
We at FlightSafety want you to have the best training possible. We welcome any
suggestions you might have for improving this manual or any other aspect of our
training program.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CONTENTS
Chapter 1

AIRCRAFT GENERAL

Chapter 2

ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS

Chapter 3

LIGHTING

Chapter 4

MASTER WARNING SYSTEM

Chapter 5

FUEL SYSTEM

Chapter 6

AUXILIARY POWER UNIT

Chapter 7

POWERPLANT

Chapter 8

FIRE PROTECTION

Chapter 9

PNEUMATICS

Chapter 10

ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION

Chapter 11

AIR CONDITIONING

Chapter 12

PRESSURIZATION

Chapter 13

HYDRAULIC POWER SYSTEMS

Chapter 14

LANDING GEAR AND BRAKES

Chapter 15

FLIGHT CONTROLS

Chapter 16

AVIONICS

Chapter 17

MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS

WALKAROUND
APPENDIX
ANNUNCIATOR

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CHAPTER 1
AIRCRAFT GENERAL
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 1-1
GENERAL............................................................................................................................... 1-1
STRUCTURES........................................................................................................................ 1-2
General ............................................................................................................................. 1-2
Fuselage........................................................................................................................... 1-5
Empennage....................................................................................................................... 1-9
Wing............................................................................................................................... 1-10
AIRPLANE SYSTEMS ....................................................................................................... 1-10
General........................................................................................................................... 1-10
Electrical Power Systems .............................................................................................. 1-10
Lighting.......................................................................................................................... 1-11
Master Warning System................................................................................................. 1-11
Fuel System.................................................................................................................... 1-11
Auxiliary Power Unit..................................................................................................... 1-12
Powerplant ..................................................................................................................... 1-12
Fire Protection................................................................................................................ 1-12
Pneumatics ..................................................................................................................... 1-12
Ice and Rain Protection.................................................................................................. 1-13
Air Conditioning ............................................................................................................ 1-13
Pressurization................................................................................................................. 1-13

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Hydraulic Power Systems .............................................................................................. 1-13


Landing Gear and Brakes .............................................................................................. 1-14
Flight Controls ............................................................................................................... 1-14
Avionics ......................................................................................................................... 1-14
Oxygen System .............................................................................................................. 1-14
LIMITATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 1-15
General........................................................................................................................... 1-15
Weight (Structural)......................................................................................................... 1-15
Weight (Performance).................................................................................................... 1-15
Center of Gravity ........................................................................................................... 1-15
Loading .......................................................................................................................... 1-15
Operating ....................................................................................................................... 1-16
Airbrakes........................................................................................................................ 1-16
Airspeed ......................................................................................................................... 1-16

1-ii

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4.04

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Title

Page

1-1

Falcon 900................................................................................................................ 1-2

1-2

General Dimensions ................................................................................................ 1-3

1-3

Composite Structures............................................................................................... 1-4

1-4

Fuselage Sections..................................................................................................... 1-5

1-5

Nose Cone................................................................................................................ 1-5

1-6

Cockpit Layout (Typical).......................................................................................... 1-6

1-7

Nose Wheel Well Ceiling Door ................................................................................ 1-7

1-8

Cockpit Windows..................................................................................................... 1-7

1-9

Cabin Interior (Typical)............................................................................................ 1-7

1-10

Main Entry Door ...................................................................................................... 1-8

1-11

Emergency Exit........................................................................................................ 1-8

1-12

Cabin Windows........................................................................................................ 1-8

1-13

Aft Fuselage ............................................................................................................ 1-9

1-14

Baggage Compartment........................................................................................... 1-10

1-15

Empennage............................................................................................................. 1-11

1-16

Wing ....................................................................................................................... 1-11

Revision 4.04

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CHAPTER 1
AIRCRAFT GENERAL

INTRODUCTION
This training manual provides a description of the major airframe and engine systems
installed in the Falcon 900. This information is intended as an instructional aid only; it
does not supersede, nor is it meant to substitute for, any of the manufacturers system
or operating manuals. The material presented has been prepared from the basic design
data. All subsequent changes in airplane appearance or system operation will be covered during academic training and subsequent revisions to this manual.
Chapter 1 covers the structural makeup of the airplane and gives an overview of the systems. It also contains operating limitations and a pictorial walkaround of the airplane.
Appendix B in this manual displays all light indications and should be folded out for
reference while reading this manual.

GENERAL
The Falcon 900 is manufactured by Avions
Marcel Dassault-Breguet Aviation. It is a
metal, low-wing, long-range, trijet monoplane with three Garrett TFE731-5AR or
-5BR turbofan engines. The No. 1 and No. 3

Revision 3

engines are pylon-mounted on the aft fuselage; the No. 2 engine is housed inside the aft
fuselage. The Falcon 900 is designed to accommodate up to 19 passengers. The airplane
features wing leading-edge slats which are
controlled from the cockpit or are controlled
automatically by the angle-of-attack sensors.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

1-1

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

The airplane is certificated in the transport


category for two-pilot operation and is approved for all-weather operation to a maximum
altitude of 51,000 feet. Extended overwater operations are authorized when the required
equipment is installed and operational.

STRUCTURES
GENERAL
The structural design of the airplane (Figure 11) conforms to the fail-safe structural concept.

The structure meets damage tolerance requirements and, therefore, as a whole, has no
life limit. The airplane is of all-metal semimonocoque construction, using sheet metal,
aluminum alloy, steel, glass fiber, plastics,
Kevlar, fabric, and other materials for secondary structure. The structure consists of
fuselage, wings, and empennage. The discussion on the fuselage includes the doors and
windows. The wings include integral (wet)
fuel tanks; fuselage tanks form a structural
part of the fuselage. General dimensions are
shown in Figure 1-2; Figure 1-3 shows the
areas of the airplane which use lightweight
structural materials.

Figure 1-1. Falcon 900

1-2

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

63 FT 5 IN.
(19.33 m)

14 FT 7 IN.
(4.44 m)

24 FT 9 IN.

(7.55 m)

25 FT 2 IN.

(7.67 m)

WITHOUT SATCOM ANTENNA

25 FT 11 IN.
(7.90 m)
66 FT 4 IN.
(20.21 m)

WITH SATCOM ANTENNA

25 FT 11 IN.
(7.90 m)
66 FT 4 IN.
(20.21 m)
TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS
OVERALL LENGTH
OVERALL HEIGHT (EMPTY WEIGHT)
BEFORE SB F900-176
AFTER SB F900-176
SPAN
SWEEP AT QUARTERCHORD
GROSS WING AREA
EXTERNAL FUSELAGE DIAMETER
PASSENGER CABIN LENGTH
(WITH BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT)
CABIN WIDTH
CABIN FLOOR WIDTH
CABIN HEADROOM

20,21 m

66 FT 4 IN.

7,55 m
7,67 m
19,33 m

24 FT 9 IN.
25 FT 2 IN.
63 FT 5 IN.
29/2450'

49,00 m
2,50 m

11,90 m
2,34 m
1,86 m
1,87 m

527,44 SQ FT
98,4 IN.
468,0 IN.
92 IN.
73,1 IN.
74 IN.

PASSENGER CABIN VOLUME


COCKPIT VOLUME
MAIN ENTRANCE DOOR SIZE
FLOOR HEIGHT ABOVE GROUND
(MAXIMUM HEIGHT)
EMERGENCY EXIT SIZE
CABIN WINDOW SIZE
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT DOOR SIZE
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT VOLUME
WHEEL BASE
WHEEL TRACK
MINIMUM TURNING RADIUS
WITH NOSEWHEEL STEERING

36 m2
3,75 m2
0,8 M x 1,72 m

1271 CU FT
132,4 CU FT
31,50 IN. x 67,72 IN.

1,64 m
0,53 M x 0,91 m
0,38 M x 0,30 m
0,95 M x 0,75 m
3,6 m2
7,90 m
4,44 m

64.57 IN.
21 IN. x 36 IN.
15,08 IN. x 11,81 IN.
37,40 IN. x 29,53 IN.
127 CU FT
25 FT. 11 IN.
14 FT. 7 IN.

14,55 m

47 FT. 9 IN.

Figure 1-2. General Dimensions

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

1-3

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

LEGEND
KEVLAR
CARBON
KEVLAR AND CARBON
METAL ON
AIRCRAFT SN 157>

METAL ON
AIRCRAFT SN 78>

BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT
DOOR SKIN
(METAL ON
AIRCRAFT SN 80>)

REVERSER

Figure 1-3. Composite Structures

1-4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FUSELAGE

Nose Cone

General

When unlatched by five latches, the pressurized nose cone can be slid forward and locked;
it can then be swung upwards for increased access and locked open by the action of the compensating rod (Figure 1-5). The nose cone
houses radar, avionics, and other equipment.

The fuselage is of all-metal, semi-monocoque


construction with circular bulkheads. It is divided into three major sections (Figure 1-4).
The nose section extends the length of the
radome to the forward cockpit bulkhead. The
center section extends from the forward cockpit bulkhead to the baggage compartment partition and includes the cockpit, passenger
cabin, lavatory, wing attach points, and front
and rear fuel tanks. The aft fuselage section
includes the baggage compartment and the
rear structure, which bears the empennage,
the aft equipment compartment, the APU, and
the three engines. The baggage compartment
is pressurized and accessible in flight.

Center Section
General
The center section is pressurized and includes
the cockpit, passenger cabin, and lavatory
(See Figure 1-4). The cockpit seats two pilots.
The main entry door is located on the left side
of the airplane immediately aft of the cockpit. The emergency exit is located on the right
side of the passenger cabin over the wing.
The lavatory is normally located aft of the
passenger cabin.

FUSELAGE
NOSE

AFT
FUSELAGE

CENTER
SECTION

CONE
COCK-

PASSENGER
CABIN

PIT

LAV

BAG

EMPENNAGE

COMP

EMERGENCY
EXIT (RIGHT SIDE)

COMPENSATING
ROD

AFT

LEGEND

MAIN
ENTRY
DOOR

FUEL TANKS

BAGGAGE
DOOR

PRESSURIZED AREA

Revision 3

APU
EQUIP
COMP COMPARTMENT/
NO. 2 ENGINE
COMPARTMENT
WITH THRUST
REVERSER

NOSE CONE
IN OPEN
POSITION
SLIDE

Figure 1-4. Fuselage Sections

Figure 1-5. Nose Cone

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

1-5

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

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and passenger service units (oxygen masks,


gaspers, passenger ordinance signs and reading lights).

Cockpit
General
The cockpit is separated from the passenger
cabin by a partition and a sliding door. It is
sound-proofed and has thermal insulation.
Included is a coat closet on the left side and
either a second closet or a lavatory on the right
side. A jump seat is provided. The general layout
of the cockpit is shown in Figure 1-6. Some
instruments and equipment shown in the figure
are installed to meet customer requirements and
preferences and may vary from standard
configuration. A small door on the top of the
nose wheel well (Figure 1-7) allows
maintenance access to the instruments behind
the instrument panel.

Windshield and Windows


Cockpit windows include a three-part
windshield, a left sliding window, a right side
window, and two rear windows (Figure 1-8). The
windshield sections incorporate impact- and
shatter-resistant, electrically heated panels. The
side and rear windows are stretched acrylic. The
pilots forward side window may be opened on
the ground. If necessary, the window may be
opened in flight to aid in evacuation of smoke
and fumes or during landing if forward vision is
obscured. The window has a positive lock on the
inside of the window frame.
Seats
Two crew seats are easily adjusted for support
and comfort. The seats include quick-disconnect
combination lap belts and shoulder harnesses
with inertia reels, adjustable lumbar supports,
and vertical and horizontal adjustments. The seat
cushions are removable.

Cabin

Figure 1-6. Cockpit Layout (Typical)

1-6

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

General
The passenger cabin extends from the cockpit partition to the rear lavatory. It is thermally insulated and is equipped with side and
ceiling panels, consoles, window trim panels,

Interior seating arrangements (Figure 1-9) are


available for up to 19 passengers. Interior arrangements vary among airplanes because of
customer requirements and preferences. The
items which can be customized and tailored for
a customer include:
The arrangement of decorating elements
(furniture, partitions, seats, sofas, etc.)
The material used for trim paneling
Cabin equipment (galley, stereo, video,
refrigerator, bar, tables, etc.)
Cabin lighting
Location of front and/or rear lavatory
and the cabinetry

Main Entry Door


The main entry door is located on the left side of
the cabin immediately aft of the cockpit (Figure
1-10). It opens outward and down. Integral stairs
and handrail are provided. Door opening is
dampened by glass fiber leaf springs and two
telescopic rods which limit travel. The door may
be opened from either the inside or outside. A
key lock is provided on the exterior for security
when the airplane is unattended. The CABIN
light in the cockpit illuminates when the door is
not fully closed and locked.
Emergency Exit
An emergency exit is located on the right side
of the cabin at the eighth window aft (Figure 111). The exit is locked in a frame and includes
a quick-unlock mechanism which can be
operated from either inside or outside the
airplane. Unlocking is controlled from the
inside with a handle and from the outside by
means of a pushbutton which is in permanent
contact with the inside handle. The emergency
exit is not connected to the door (open)
warning system. A REMOVE BEFORE
FLIGHT pin can be installed for ground
security to prevent hatch opening.

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Figure 1-7. Nose Wheel Well Ceiling Door

Figure 1-8. Cockpit Windows

Figure 1-9. Cabin Interior (Typical)

Revision 1

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1-7

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Cabin Windows
Twenty-four stretched acrylic windows are
installed in the cabin (Figure 1-12). The eighth
window aft on the right side is installed in the
emergency exit.

Lavatory
The rear lavatory is located immediately aft
of the passenger cabin. It includes a toilet
with outside drain (right side) and a vanity cabinet on the left side equipped with a water
tank. The tank is filled from the outside and
is drained through a heated mast.

Figure 1-11. Emergency Exit

Figure 1-12. Cabin Windows


Figure 1-10. Main Entry Door

1-8

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Aft Fuselage
General
The aft fuselage section (See Figures 1-4 and 113) includes the baggage compartment and the
rear structure which bears the empennage, the aft
equipment compartment, the APU, and the three
engines. The pressurized baggage compartment
is located in the forward part of the aft section
and is accessible in flight. The unpressurized aft
equipment compartment is located immediately
aft of the baggage compartment and houses the
No. 2 engine electronic fuel computer and
hydraulic and air-conditioning components.
Access to the aft equipment compartment is
through a door with an attached step ladder on
the underside of the airplane. The door is
connected to the REAR DOORS (open) warning
light. The auxiliary power unit is located in a
fire-proof compartment under the No. 2 engine
air intake.

Baggage Compartment
Access to the pressurized baggage compartment (Figure 1-14) is through the door located in the aft partition of the lavatory and the
exterior door on the left side of the airplane.
The exterior door closes electrically and has

an integral ladder which, when stowed, contacts a microswitch located under the third
step, allowing the door motor to be powered.
The door has a key lock for security. Door
opening is annunciated in the cockpit by the
REAR DOORS light.
The exterior door is closed using the UP switch
located inside the door control access panel left
of the door. Note the placard on the panel: BEFORE CLOSING DOOR STOW LOWER
STEP. The door handle must be manually rotated to unlock and lock the door.

NOTE
When the UP button is pushed, the
motor runs for 15 seconds. Power to
the motor can be interrupted by positioning the locking handle to
LOCKED or operating the DOWN
button located inside the door access panel. Power for the motor is directly from the battery bus.

EMPENNAGE
The empennage (Figure 1-15) consists of the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. The horizontal

Figure 1-13. Aft Fuselage


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stabilizer is mounted midway on the vertical fin


away from airflow disturbance caused by the
No. 1 and No. 3 engine exhausts. Both the vertical and horizontal stabilizers are metal, using
spars and stressed-skin construction. The leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer is moveable for pitch trim, actuated by an electrically
operated jackscrew. The rudder is trimmed
through normal trim motor operation.

WING
The Falcon 900 wing (Figure 1-16) has a double-sweep tapered design and is mounted low
on the fuselage. It has machined forward and
aft spars sandwiched between milled upper
and lower load-bearing skin panels. The flight
controls attached to each wing include:
One inboard and one outboard leadingedge slat
Three airbrake panels on the top surface
Two flaps on the trailing edge
One aileron
The wing box structure forms one large integral (wet) fuel tank in each wing. The aft spar
of the box supports the main landing gear; the
forward spar supports the rollers for the leading-edge slats.

AIRPLANE SYSTEMS
GENERAL
The following is a brief introduction to the
major airplane systems on the Falcon 900.
Detailed descriptions and operation of these
systems are contained within the individual
chapters of this training manual.

ELECTRICAL POWER
SYSTEMS
Figure 1-14. Baggage Compartment

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The airplane electrical system is a 28.5-VDC


(nominal) system which receives power from
three starter-generators connected through a split
bus bar system. An additional starter-generator
is available from the APU for ground operation.

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Two batteries provide normal electrical system backup power and a power source for internal engine starting. A ground receptacle
provides for electrical supply from an external DC ground power unit. Equipment which
requires stabilized 115-VAC, 400-Hz or 26VAC, 400-Hz power is provided by inverters
within each component that require AC power,
or by inverters installed as customer options.

LIGHTING
The Falcon 900 has standard navigation, anticollision, wingtip strobe, landing and taxi
lights. A wing ice inspection light is mounted
on each side of the fuselage. Interior lighting
includes cockpit, cabin, lavatory, baggage
compartment and nose cone lighting. Cockpit
lighting includes general illumination and
specific lighting for instruments and map reading. Cabin lighting provides illumination for
warning signs and specific area illumination
for passenger safety and convenience.

TIP FAIRING
AILERON

OUTBOARD
SLAT

MASTER WARNING SYSTEM


The Falcon 900 warning system provides warning to the crew of airplane equipment malfunctions, indications of unsafe operating
conditions which require immediate attention, and indications that a particular system
is in operation. Aural warning is also used to
draw attention to selected situations. The master warning panel is mounted in the left center instrument panel.

FUEL SYSTEM

Figure 1-15. Empennage

During normal operations, the Falcon 900 fuel


system consists of three separate subsystems:
the left, center, and right. Each subsystem
normally supplies fuel to its respective engine. Interconnect and crossfeed valves allow
fuel transfer between tanks and engine fuel
feed from any tank in the event of fuel imbalance or boost pump failure. The airplane may
be pressure- or gravity-refueled.
Fuel storage consists of three tank groups: the
left wing and center wing, the forward and rear
fuselage, and the right wing and center wing

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LOAD-CARRYING
UPPER PANELS
FLAPS

AIRBRAKES
AFT SPARS

INBOARD
SLAT

FORWARD SPAR

LOAD-CARRYING
LOWER PANELS

Figure 1-16. Wing

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tanks. Total usable fuel capacity is 19,065


pounds; an additional 119 pounds is unusable.
Low-pressure fuel is supplied to the enginedriven fuel pumps by combined pressurization
and boost pumps. In addition, the submerged
boost pumps supply fuel for crossfeed operations, tank-to-tank transfer, and motive-flow
fuel for fuel transfer. Fuel quantity is monitored
by a DC-operated capacitance system. Singlepoint pressure refueling may be accomplished
for full or partial tanks. Gravity refueling ports
are located in the left and right wings. Drain
valves are provided to check for fuel contamination. All tanks are automatically pressurized
by low-pressure bleed air as soon as either the
No. 1 or the No. 2 engine is started.

AUXILIARY POWER UNIT


A Garrett auxiliary power unit is located in a
fire-proof compartment in the tail cone beneath
the No. 2 engine air intake. It is certificated for
ground use only. The APU provides DC electrical power when the engine generators are
not on the line, charges the airplane batteries
when the unit is operating, and may be used to
assist engine starting to prolong battery life. The
APU provides reduced starting time, starting
when the battery is low, and satisfactory cold
weather starting. In addition, the APU supplies
bleed air to the airplanes environmental system for ground heating and cooling.

POWERPLANT
Thrust is supplied by two aft-fuselage, pylonmounted engines and one centerline-mounted
engine inside the tail cone. The engines are
manufactured by Garrett Turbine Company at
Phoenix, Arizona, a division of the AlliedSignal Aerospace Company. The engines are
designated TFE731-5AR-1C or TFE731-5BR1C and are forward fan, two spool (low and
high pressure) engines which develop 4,500
pounds of static thrust at sea level at 73.4F
(23C) for the TFE731-5AR-1C and 4,750
pounds of static thrust at sea level at 77F
(25C) for the TFE731-5BR-1C. Each engine
includes a lubrication system, fuel and ignition systems, fire detection and extinguishing
systems, and engine anti-ice systems. Highly

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efficient fuel scheduling is accomplished by


an electrohydromechanical fuel control and a
digital engine electronic fuel computer. The
fuel computer automatically maintains an economical and precise fuel schedule throughout
the entire spectrum of atmospheric and thrust
requirements. High- and low-pressure bleed air
is extracted from the compressors for pressurization, air conditioning, anti-icing, and
other airplane systems. The No. 2 engine only
is equipped with a thrust reverser.

FIRE PROTECTION
Fire/overheat can be detected in the three engines, auxiliary power unit, and main landing
gear wheel wells. The baggage compartment
has an optical smoke alarm installed. Visual
warning is displayed on the cockpit fire extinguisher panel and master warning panel; an
audible warning is provided by a warning
horn. Wheel well overheat (from retraction
of a hot brake) is indicated by annunciator
lights only. Five fixed Freon (Halon 1301 in
the United States) fire extinguishers are controlled by the extinguisher control switches located on the cockpit fire extinguisher panel.
For the No. 1 and No. 3 engines, a single bottle is fired. For the No. 2 engine, two extinguisher bottles are fired simultaneously
because of the greater nacelle area. The fifth
bottle is for use in either the baggage compartment or APU area. Two portable fire extinguishers are located in the cockpit and
cabin, respectively.

PNEUMATICS
High- and low-pressure engine bleed air is
extracted from each engine compressor and is
used to maintain the desired cabin and cockpit temperature and pressurization. A single
engine is capable of furnishing bleed air to support the total conditioning and pressurization
system. APU bleed air is available when on the
ground. Bleed air is also used for wing leading-edge slat heating, engine air intake antiicing, and No. 2 engine S-duct anti-icing.
Low-pressure bleed air (from main or auxiliary source) is available as soon as an engine
is started. There are no low-pressure bleed-air

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shutoff valves. High-pressure bleed air is controlled by valves activated from the cockpit.
Bleed system operation is monitored
by sensors that cause illumination of lights on
the master warning panel.

ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION


The Falcon 900 is approved for flight into
known icing conditions when the required
equipment is installed and operational. The
wing leading-edge slats and the No. 2 engine
S-duct are anti-iced by engine bleed air supplied from the engine low-pressure and highpressure bleed ports. Each engine nacelle is
anti-iced from the related engine high-pressure
bleed-air port. An electropneumatic valve either isolates or supplies the system. The three
front windshield panels are heated by 28 VDC
from two separate buses: A3 for the pilots window and the left half of the center window
and B3 for the copilots window and the right
half of the center window. The side windows
are electrically heated by two bus systems
separate from the windshield heating: bus A2
supplies power to heat the forward side windows, and bus B1 supplies heating power for
both aft windows. The pitot-static, angle-ofattack, and temperature probes are electrically heated from buses A1 and B2. The pilots
and copilots windshield wipers are powered
from buses A2 and B2, respectively.

AIR CONDITIONING
Air supply for air conditioning is taken from
the low- and high-pressure bleeds of each engine. The air passes through a ram-air heat exchanger and then an environmental control
unit (ECU). Precooling of engine bleed air is
accomplished in the ram-air heat exchanger either by ram air when in flight or by the turbofan
when on the ground or during slow airspeeds.
The bleed air then flows to the turbocooler
where the conditioned air temperature is regulated by the amount of air allowed to pass
through the turbine. The more air that passes
through the turbocooler, the cooler the temperature of the conditioned air. The more air
that is allowed to bypass the turbocooler, the
warmer the temperature. The conditioned air
is then routed through a water separator to reRevision 3

move moisture. Any engine or APU bleed air


can be used for the air-conditioning system
when on the ground; only engine bleed air can
be used when airborne. Full-range manual
control of temperature is available in the event
of malfunction of automatic features.

PRESSURIZATION
The cabin is pressurized by engine bleed air
through the air-conditioning system. In automatic mode, the system ensures a maximum
cabin altitude of 8,000 feet at a pressure altitude of 51,000 feet. Zero cabin altitude can be
maintained up to 25,300 feet. Maximum differential pressure is 9.6 psi. Cabin pressure is
automatically controlled by two outflow/safety
valves installed in the rear partition of the lavatory above the baggage compartment door.
Both valves are pneumatically connected and
operate together by the difference between
cabin and ambient pressures. These valves
govern the exhausting of cabin air to the atmosphere. Safety devices completely shut off
the outflow when the cabin altitude reaches a
preset value. The nose cone has its own overpressure safety system. Full-range manual control of pressurization is available in the event
of malfunction of the automatic features.

HYDRAULIC POWER SYSTEMS


The airplane has two independent hydraulic
systems which cannot be interconnected and
an auxiliary system. The systems use hyd r a u l i c f l u i d s p e c i fi c a t i o n M I L - H - 5 6 0 6
(NATO codes H515 or H520) or AIR 3520B.
Main hydraulic power is supplied by three
self-regulating pumps driven by the corresponding engine accessory gearbox. Each
pump delivers a regulated pressure output of
2,987 50 psi (200 3.5 bars). An electric
motor-driven standby pump is used to provide standby (auxiliary) pressure to the No.
2 system should the engine-driven pump fail.
It can also be used for testing either system
on the ground; selection of the test mode is
made with a selector located in the aft equipment compartment. External hydraulic cart
connections are provided for ground checks
and maintenance testing of each system. The
hydraulic power systems provide pressure for

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actuation of the landing gear, slats, flaps,


wheel brakes, emergency and parking brakes,
a i r b r a k e s , n o s ew h e e l s t e e r i n g , a i l e r o n ,
e l eva t o r, r u d d e r s e r vo a c t u a t o r s , aileron
Arthur Q unit and elevator Arthur unit, and
thrust reverser.

LANDING GEAR AND BRAKES


The Falcon 900 has retractable tricycle landing
gear consisting of a dual-wheel main gear and
a dual-wheel, steerable nose gear. The landing
gear, wheel brakes, and nosewheel steering are
all actuated by hydraulic pressure. When retracted, all gears are completely enclosed by
doors. The nose gear will turn 60 either side
of center and features an antishimmy system.
The nose gear is self-centering after lift-off.
The antiskid system is available with the normal braking system only; it modulates brake
pressure from touchdown to low speed to minimize braking distances. The hydraulic brakes
are used for normal and emergency braking and
for parking.

FLIGHT CONTROLS
Primary flight controls include ailerons, rudder, and elevators. All are hydraulically
boosted but can be manually actuated in the
event all hydraulic systems fail. Aileron and
rudder trim is hydraulic, initiated by electric
motors. All gust damping is hydraulic, but is
not dependent on hydraulic pressure, and will
operate automatically if a hydraulic system
fails. A hydraulically actuated, autopilot servocontrolled yaw damper dampens yaw oscillations. The movable horizontal stabilizer is
trimmed electrically. The secondary flight
controls consist of trailing-edge flaps, leading-edge slats, and airbrakes. They are electrically controlled and hydraulically actuated.

AVIONICS
The Falcon 900 avionics consists of the pitotstatic and air data systems, the automatic flight
guidance and control system, and other associated avionics and communications systems.
Many optional avionics are available for installation to satisfy special customer requirements and preferences in equipment.
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The pitot-static system includes three pitot


probes, six static air ports, and a ram-air temperature sensor, which serve the air data computers, selected airplane systems, and
associated pilot and copilot instruments.
The standard automatic flight guidance and
control system includes the air data system, the
autopilot and flight director, the inertial reference system, and the Sperry EFIS electronic
flight instrument system. The flight director
function can be used independently of the autopilot with the pilot steering the airplane to
satisfy the flight director commands as programmed, or the autopilot may be coupled to
automatically steer the airplane to satisfy
flight director commands as programmed. The
yaw damper system operates independently of
the autopilot and may be engaged with or without the autopilot engaged.
The Sperry flight management system is a
comprehensive computer which integrates the
use of multiple navigation systems and sensors
and blends them into a single integrated position, using the best characteristics of each
type of sensor.
Falcon 900 communications equipment includes interphone, public address, air-toground, and navigation systems.

OXYGEN SYSTEM
The Falcon 900 oxygen system provides oxygen for crew and passenger use from one highpressure steel cylinder located aft of the
entrance door under the left-side floor. In flight,
oxygen is available to each pilot at all times
through a quick-donning mask with a built-in
regulator and microphone. The passengers
oxygen is available automatically at high cabin
altitudes or manually any time at the pilots discretion. Passengers can receive two different
pressures, depending on the controller setting
on the copilots console. Oxygen for therapeutic purposes is available at all times at selected cabin outlets. The pressure gage is
installed on the copilots side panel and reads
cylinder high pressure. The gage is used as a
quantity gage and is scaled from 0 to 2,200 psi.

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Takeoff and accelerate-stop distance

LIMITATIONS

Brake energy

GENERAL

Climb gradients

The limitations presented in this chapter focus


primarily on the operational capabilities of
the airplane. Specific system limitations are
provided in the individual systems chapters
with the exception of instrument markings
and placards which are presented in this chapter. Refer to the FAA-approved AFM for complete limitations listings.

Landing

WEIGHT (STRUCTURAL)

General

Maximum ramp:
5AR .................... 45,700 lb (20,730 kg) or
46,700 lb (21,183 kg)
5BR ........................ 46,700 lb (21,183 kg)

The center-of-gravity limits are expressed in


percent of MAC (mean aerodynamic chord). The
landing gear position has no effect on the center
of gravity. Refer to the Center-of-Gravity Limits
chart in the Limitations section of the AFM.

Maximum takeoff:
5AR .................... 45,500 lb (20,639 kg) or
46,500 lb (21,092 kg)
5BR ........................ 46,500 lb (21,092 kg)

Datum

Maximum landing .... 42,000 lb (19,051 kg)


Maximum zero fuel:
5AR .................... 28,200 lb (12,800 kg) or
30,870 lb (14,002 kg)
5BR ........................ 30,870 lb (14,002 kg)
Minimum
flight weight .............. 20,700 lb (9,390 kg)

WEIGHT (PERFORMANCE)
General
The approved maximum weights indicated
above may be reduced for compliance with
certification performance requirements, as
follows.

Takeoff

The landing weight, as limited by:


Approach and landing climb gradients
Available landing field length

CENTER OF GRAVITY

Datum is 25% of MAC; it is marked on the airplane exterior and coincides with fuselage
station (FS) 420.43 inches (10,679 mm). (FS)
0 is the forward end of the airplane nose cone.

Mean Aerodynamic Chord


Length is 113.69 inches (2,887.7 mm).z
Zero percent MAC is at FS +392 inches
(9,957 mm).

LOADING
The airplane must be loaded in compliance
with the Center-of-Gravity Limits chart in
the Limitations section of the AFM.
Information for control of the airplanes
weight and balance is included in Loading
Manual DTM9821.
The following baggage compartment values
must not be exceeded while loading the airplane: 2,866 lb (1,300 kg), not to exceed 123
lb/sq ft (600 kg/sq m).

The takeoff weight, as limited by the most restrictive of the following:

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OPERATING
Types of Operation
This airplane is certificated in the transport
category and is eligible for the following
kinds of operation when the appropriate
equipment and instruments required by the
airworthiness and/or operating regulations
are installed and approved and in operable
condition:
Day and night VFR if permitted by the
flight regulations of the country over
which the airplane is flying
IFR and automatic approaches to
Category I and II weather minimums
Extended overwater operation
Flight into icing conditions

Altitude
Maximum operating altitude is 51,000 feet.

Flight Maneuvering
Load Factors
Flaps retracted ..................... +2.53 to 1 g
Flaps extended ......................... +2.0 to 0 g
These load factors limit the permissible
bank angles in turns and the severity of pullup
maneuvers.

Enroute
Ambient temperature ............... Refer to the
Temperature and Altitude
Limitations chart in the
Limitations section of
the AFM.
One or two engines
inoperative ...... Refer to the Performance
section of the AFM.

Minimum Flight Crew


The minimum flight crew is one pilot and one
copilot.

AIRBRAKES
Airbrakes must not be extended in flight within
300 feet AGL.

Takeoff and Landing


Weights............. See Weight (Performance)
in Limitations, this chapter.
Airport pressure
altitude .................. 1,000 to +14,000 feet
Runway slope ................................. 2.5%
Tailwind component at takeoff:
Airplanes fitted with tires approved for
210 mph
Pressure altitude of airport from
1,00010,000 feet . . . . . . . .10 knots

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Pressure altitude of airport


>10,000 feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 knots
Airplanes fitted with six tires
approved for 225 mph . . . . . . . 10 knots
Tailwind component at landing:
Airplanes fitted with
tires approved for 210
and/or 225 mph . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 knots
Ambient temperature .............. Refer to the
Temperature and Altitude
Limitations chart in the
Limitations section of
the AFM.
Runway surface ................. Paved and hard

AIRSPEED
General
Unless otherwise specified, airspeed limits
are expressed in terms of indicated values.
Instrument error is assumed to be zero.

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Maximum Operating Speed


Limit (VMO/MMO)

V LO /M LO is the maximum speed at which it


is safe to extend or retract the landing gear.

Refer to the V MO /M MO Envelope chart in the


Limitations section of the AFM.

Maximum Landing Gear


Extended Speed (VLE/MLE)
V LE .......................................... 245 KIAS

CAUTION

M LE .............................................. 0.75 m

The maximum operating speed limit


(V MO /M MO ) must not be deliberately exceeded in any regime of flight (climb, cruise,
descent) unless a higher speed is authorized
for flight test or pilot training in compliance
with approved procedures.

V LE is the maximum speed at which the airplane can be safely flown with the landing
gear extended and locked.

Maneuvering Speed (VA)

Minimum Control Speed


(VMCA)

Maximum maneuvering
speed (VA ) ................................ 228 KIAS

CAUTION
Full application of rudder or
aileron controls, as well as maneuvers that involve angles of
attack near the stall, must be
confined to speeds below VA .

High-Lift Devices Operating or


Extended Speed (VFE)

VMCA with
TFE731-5AR-1C engines ............ 83 KCAS
VMCA with
TFE731-5BR-1C engines ......... 85.5 KCAS

Miscellaneous Limit Speeds


Windshield wiper operating ....... 215 KIAS
Direct vision
window opening ........................ 215 KIAS
Tire speed .............. 182 knots groundspeed

Flaps 7 + Slats ......................... 200 KIAS


Flaps 20 + Slats ....................... 190 KIAS
Flaps 40+ Slats ........................ 180 KIAS

With Type VI tires .. 195 knots groundspeed

Stall Speed

CAUTION

CAUTION

Above 20,000, feet do not establish or maintain a configuration


with the flaps or the slats extended.

Do not intentionally fly the airplane


slower than initial stall warning
onset.

Maximum Landing Gear


Operating Speed (VLO/MLO)
V LO .......................................... 190 KIAS
M LO .............................................. 0.70 m

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CHAPTER 2
ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 2-1
GENERAL .............................................................................................................................. 2-1
DC POWER SYSTEM ............................................................................................................ 2-2
General............................................................................................................................. 2-2
Distribution Buses............................................................................................................ 2-2
Protection ......................................................................................................................... 2-5
Indication and Warning.................................................................................................... 2-5
Batteries ........................................................................................................................... 2-7
APU Generator .............................................................................................................. 2-12
Generators...................................................................................................................... 2-13
Ground Power Unit........................................................................................................ 2-20
DC POWER DISTRIBUTION.............................................................................................. 2-20
General........................................................................................................................... 2-20
Priority Distribution....................................................................................................... 2-23
Avionic Masters ............................................................................................................. 2-23
ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES..................................................................................... 2-25
LIMITATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 2-25
General........................................................................................................................... 2-25
Electrical........................................................................................................................ 2-25
Battery Temperature ...................................................................................................... 2-25
QUESTIONS......................................................................................................................... 2-34

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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Title

Page

2-1

DC Power System Components and Locations........................................................ 2-2

2-2

DC Distribution Buses.............................................................................................. 2-3

2-3

Circuit-Breaker Panels.............................................................................................. 2-4

2-4

Overhead Switch Panel ............................................................................................ 2-5

2-5

Warning Panel .......................................................................................................... 2-6

2-6

Battery Installation and Ventilation.......................................................................... 2-6

2-7

Battery Temperature Monitoring System................................................................. 2-7

2-7A

Battery Temperature Indicator (A/C 172).............................................................. 2-8

2-8

Batteries Installed and Connected, All Switches Off............................................... 2-9

2-9

Battery 1 Switch On, All Other Switches Off........................................................ 2-10

2-10

Battery 2 Switch On, All Other Switches Off........................................................ 2-10

2-11

Both Battery Switches On, Bus Tie Open.............................................................. 2-11

2-12

Battery 2 Switch On, Bus-Tie Switch Closed ........................................................ 2-11

2-13

Battery Bus Circuits (Typical) ............................................................................... 2-12

2-14

APU Generator Installation.................................................................................... 2-13

2-15

APU Generator Operation...................................................................................... 2-14

2-16

Generator Cooling Airflow .................................................................................... 2-14

2-17

Generator 3 Operation............................................................................................ 2-16

2-18

Generators 2 and 3 Operation ................................................................................ 2-18

2-19

Normal Flight Configuration ................................................................................. 2-19

2-20

GPU Components .................................................................................................. 2-21

2-21

GPU Operation....................................................................................................... 2-22

2-22

Priority Circuits...................................................................................................... 2-24

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TABLE
Table
2-1

2-iv

Title

Page

Electrical Power Sources .................................................................................... 2-26

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CHAPTER 2
ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS

G
EN PL
#1 IL
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DC
#1 EN
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#1 SYS
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INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the electrical power systems of the Falcon 900 series airplanes. All values
used for voltage, amperage, and tolerance are for illustrative purposes only. Actual values must
be obtained from the manuals and publications issued by, or on behalf of, the airplane manufacturer, the certification agency of the country of origin, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

GENERAL
The Falcon 900 uses DC power for control,
operation, and indication of the various systems
installed in the airplane.
DC power is provided by conventional nicad or
optional lead-acid batteries and engine-driven
starter-generators. An APU-driven startergenerator and a GPU generator may be used to
power the DC system when the airplane is on the
ground.

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The Falcon 900 is unique since it does not use


conventional inverters to provide the 115- and
26-volt requirements of the airplane. The equipment requiring AC power contains integral
inverters which produce the required power for
operation of this particular equipment. Solid state
inverters may be installed to satisfy various customer options.

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DC POWER SYSTEM
GENERAL
The DC power system of the Falcon 900 is a
conventional 24- to 28.5-volt system, which has
four power sourcesbatteries, engine-driven
starter-generators, and an APU-driven startergenerator for ground operation only. Provisions
are also incorporated to provide DC power from
a ground power unit (GPU).
The batteries provide the basic source of DC
power to the entire distribution system, surge
damping for the generators, as well as power
for starting the engines. The batteries are also
capable of an emergency in-flight source of
power for a limited period if the engine-driven
generators fail.
Any engine-driven generator is capable of powering the entire DC system, providing battery
charging, and, through a logic system, assisting engine starting.

The APU-driven starter-generator is also capable of powering the entire DC system, in addition to charging the batteries and assisting in
engine starting, while the airplane is on the
ground.
An approved GPU may be used for prolonged
periods to power the DC system to facilitate
maintenance and servicing. The GPU may also
be used for engine starting, but it cannot be used
to charge the batteries, unless a GPU aircraft
battery charging system option is installed on the
aircraft.
Figure 2-1 depicts the major electrical components
of the DC power system and their locations.

DISTRIBUTION BUSES
DC power distribution is achieved by a multiplebus system consisting of eight separate buses,
as follows: battery bus, starter bus, left main
bus, right main bus, bus A1, bus A2, bus B1,
and bus B2 (Figure 2-2).

STARTER-GENERATORS

GROUND
RECEPTACLE

CIRCUIT-BREAKER
PANEL

APU AND ENGINE


GENERATOR CONTROL
UNITS

OVERHEAD
PANEL

MAIN ELECTRICAL BOX


BATTERIES
STARTER-GENERATORS

RIGHT CABINET
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS
ELECTRICAL RELAYS

Figure 2-1.

2-2

LEFT CABINET
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS
ELECTRICAL RELAYS

DC Power System Components and Locations

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 3.01

SLATS

BATTERY BUS
RIGHT MAIN BUS

(SPARE) B4

COPILOT FRONT
WINDSHIELD B3

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
POWER SUPPLY

71L1 (LIGHTS 1)
FUELING
FR 5 UTILITY LIGHT (BAT)
ENG MONITOR
REAR COMPT LTS
FWD TOILET LIGHT
AFT TOILET LIGHT
AISLE LIGHTS
STEP LIGHTS
FR 5 STAIR LIGHTS
LH (RH) PYLON LT
FR 5 BAG LIGHT
FUEL COUPLING LT
FUEL PANEL CTL LT

71L2 (LIGHTS 2)
BAG COMP DOOR CONT
COCKPIT DOME LIGHTS
NOSE CONE (INSP LIGHT)
MECHANICS PANEL
AISLE LIGHT
BAG COMP DOME LIGHT

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

23CM

(71L2)
(71L1)
(1W)

130A

80A
80A

PILOT FRONT
WINDSHIELD A3
GALLEY 2 BAR
A6
GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

OFF
R AV
MASTER
L AV
MASTER

international

FlightSafety

AVIONIC
MASTER
AVIONIC
MASTER

DC Distribution Buses

2-3

Figure 2-2.

RIGHT CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL
CENTER
CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL
LEFT CIRCUITBREAKER
PANEL

130A

R BUS
TIED
START BUS

STANDBY HYDRAULIC
PUMP A5

(4PA) BUS TIED

OFF
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

L BUS
TIED
130A

130A

80A
150A

150A
150A

TO EXT
POWER
CONTACTOR

BUS B2
BUS B1
BUS A2
BUS A1

FLIGHT
NORM
(14P)

25
25
Revision 3

V 30
0

225A
LEFT MAIN BUS

V 30

BAT
GEN

20
MAIN BUS-TIE
ROTARY SELECTOR
BAT
GEN

20

2-4

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

international

FlightSafety

Circuit-Breaker Panels
Figure 2-3.

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

The DC distribution system normally operates


as independent left and right systems. These two
systems may be interconnected, when and if
required, by a selective bus-tie system. The bus
tie must be selected closed for APU and engine
starting. The bus tie automatically closes when
a GPU is connected and selected for operation.
This will be described in detail later in this
chapter.

PROTECTION
Circuit protection is provided by conventional
trip-free circuit breakers (Figure 2-3) located
above the overhead panel. Feeder cables are protected by current limiters. Special anticrush

sheathing is provided for the battery cables,


which can provide thermal protection up to a
temperature of 250C.

INDICATION AND WARNING


Voltmeters and ammeters on the overhead switch
panel (Figure 2-4) provide crew indication for
the DC power system. The voltmeters are
directly connected to their left or right main bus.
The ammeters are selective, and each is controlled by an associated three-position ammeter
selector switch located below the instrument.
Lights on the warning panel (Figure 2-5 and
Appendix B) alert the crew to malfunctions in
the system.

NOTE:
ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT ELECTRONIC TRANSFER VALVE XTK2, THE OVERHEAD PANEL
DOES NOT FEATURE THE BLOCK DIAGRAM AND XTK2 SWITCH.

Figure 2-4.

Revision 3

Overhead Switch Panel

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-5

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

NOTE:
ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT TRANSFER VALVE XTK 2, LIGHTS XTK 2 OPEN AND XTK 2 CLOSED ARE NOT USED.

Figure 2-5.

Warning Panel

BAT 1

BAT 2

BLOWER
VENT LINE
SKIN LINE

Figure 2-6.

2-6

Battery Installation and Ventilation

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 3

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

BATTERIES
General
Two 26-volt, 23-ampere-hour, steel-cased,
nickel-cadmium batteries are mounted near the
main electrical box (Figure 2-6) in the rear compartment. Batteries with a capacity of 36 ampere
hours are also available as an option. Each
battery contains 20 cells. The batteries are
connected by standard quick-disconnect
adapters.

protrudes through the lower fuselage skin. The


protruding section is scarfed to create a low pressure in the vent duct during flight, resulting in
continuous ventilation.
On the ground the battery blower is operational
when the BAT 2 switch is on and the power
selector switch is at the NORMAL position.

Monitoring
Aircraft <172

Ventilation
The batteries are ventilated on the ground and
in flight. An electrical battery blower (Figure
2-6) provides ventilation on the ground. The
blower forces air through the battery cases,
which exhausts into a Y-shaped duct. The duct

Battery temperature is continuously monitored


by probes installed between battery cells. The
temperature signals are amplified and transmitted to a dual-scale, dual-needle gage (Figure 2-7)
located on the lower right side of the copilots
instrument panel. The scales are calibrated in
degrees up to 190F and are color-coded

A/C <172

ILLUMINATES
AT 120F
LIGHT

WARM

OFF
180

OFF
180

160

160

140

140

120

120

BAT.

LESS 50F
HOT
LIGHT ILLUMINATES AT
150F (SNs PRIOR TO 172 WITHOUT SB-94)
OR AT 160F (SNs 172 AND SUBSEQUENT)
2

TEMP.
TEST

Figure 2-7.

Revision 4

Battery Temperature Monitoring System

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-7

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

green, amber, and red. The green range extends


from 100 to 120F, the amber range from 120 to
150F, (SNs 132 and subsequent to 160F) and the
red range from 150 to 190F (SNs 132 and subsequent from 160F to 190F). The dial face has two
lights, one amber and one red. The amber light
comes on when a battery temperature exceeds
120F. The red light comes on when a battery temperature exceeds 150F (SNs prior to 172 without
SB-94) or 160F (SNs 172 and subsequent).
This red light operates in conjunction with the
HOT BAT light on the warning panel (Appendix
B). The instrument may be tested by a pushbutton switch labeled TEST near the gage.
When this switch is pushed and held, the needles
move up scale, and the amber and red lights
come on as the needles pass through 120 and
150F, respectively.
The word OFF is printed at the top of each
scale. If the sensors on the battery are disconnected, the affected scale needle will go to
the OFF position. The battery-temperaturesensing system includes an extended-range
selector push-button switch, labeled LESS
50F, located near the gage. When battery temperature is low, pushing this button adds 50F to
the battery temperature indication, so subtract
50F from the indicated test reading to obtain
the actual battery temperature.

Aircraft 172
Temperature level is sensed by a thermistor
installed at a corner of each battery between two
elements. The thermistors are connected to a
battery temperature indicator on the copilot
instrument panel (Figure 2-7A). This thermistor
controls a digital temperature indicator graduated from 32 to 200F.

A HOT light illuminates to indicate that the relevant battery temperature is 160F. This light is
coupled to the HOT BAT light on the warning
panel.
A TEST test button located next to the indicator
allows testing of the battery temperature indicator. If the test is correct, the indicator displays
TEST GOOD otherwise it displays TEST ERR.
In case of thermistor short-circuit or open circuit (thermistor disconnected), the indicator
displays ERR.

Control
The batteries are controlled by individual twoposition magnetic switches labeled BAT 1 and
BAT 2 on the overhead switch panel (Figure
2-4). These switches trip to the off (down)
position when the associated make-and-break
switch opens due to excessive current flow to the
batteries. The switches also act as reset switches
for the make-and-break switches when moved to
the on (up) position, provided that the cause of
the trip has cleared.
When both battery switches are off (down) and
both batteries are installed and connected, their
output is supplied directly and in parallel to the
battery bus through a circuit breaker and diode
for each battery. Battery power is now available
for certain essential services, which will be described later under DC power Distribution.

888
BATTERY 1
HOT

888

When the relevant battery temperature is <32F


(0C), the indicator displays COLD. When the
relevant battery temperature is >200F (93.3C),
the indicator displays HOT.
A WARM light illuminates to indicate that the
relevant battery temperature is 120F.

BATTERY 2

TEST BUTTON TESTS


THE BATTERY TEMPERATURE
INDICATOR

Figure 2-7A.

2-8

WARM

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

TEST

Battery Temperature
Indicator (A/C 172)
Revision 4

FlightSafety

FlightSafety

international

international

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

WINDOWS
B3

B2
REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

Figure 2-8.

GENERATOR 2

G2

START
CONTACTOR
TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

BATTERY
BUS

GPU RECEPTACLE

GPU CONTACTOR

TO
AMMETER

APU

BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

G3

GENERATOR 3
TO AMMETER

START CONTACTOR

START
CONTACTOR

START
CONTACTOR
TO
AMMETER

G1

GENERATOR 1

DC SYSTEM

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2
COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 1

NORM

EXT POWER

GEN

GEN 1

BAT 1

GEN 3

STARTING
BUS

APU
BAT 2
GEN 3
GEN 2
GEN 2
BAT 2
BAT 1
GEN 1
STOP

Batteries Installed and Connected, All Switches Off

80A

130A

130A

B1

GROUND

BATTERY POWER

225A

RH
MAIN BUS

BUS-TIE
RELAY

LH MAIN BUS

150A

130A

LEGEND

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

WINDOWS
A3

150A

80A
REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY
GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

WARNING
PANEL
APU

OIL

Battery power is available directly to the singlepoint refueling panel, the fire extinguisher system,
the outboard slats, and the generator excitation circuits regardless of battery or generator switch
position. In addition, both batteries supply
power directly to the main electrical box in the
rear compartment; however, this power is not

APU

The battery bus is a hot bus since it is continuously


powered when either battery is installed and
connected.

START

Battery Bus Circuits

130A

150A
HOT
BAT
BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 3
GEN 2

BUS TIED

GEN 1

DIM

NOTE
The battery power distribution as described
in Figures 2-9, 2-10, 2-11, and 2-12 is not
to be construed as procedural. Indiscriminate use of battery power produces
rapid depletion of the batteries. A charging source must be made available for the
batteries as soon as practical.

BUS A2

FIRE
TEST
LIGHTS

The left and right voltmeters indicate the voltage of battery 2.

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

When the airplane is on the ground and the BAT


2 switch is on, the battery ventilation blower is
operating. Unlike battery 1, battery 2 does not
connect directly to the start bus when the BAT 2

Figure 2-12 depicts that the power selector


switch is in the NORMAL position, the BAT
1 switch is off, and the BAT 2 switch is on. Battery 2 is connected to all DC buses except the
start bus. The bus tie in this case is closed; therefore, battery 2 is powering the entire DC system.

A
IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

Figure 2-10 depicts that the BAT 2 switch is on,


the power selector switch is at NORMAL, and
all other switches are off. The battery 2 makeand-break RCR closes and connects battery 2
to the right main bus. Power from the right main
bus is supplied to bus B1 and bus B2 through
current limiters. The left main bus is not powered
since the bus tie is open. When the battery
2 make-and-break RCR closes, it removes a
ground from the BAT 2 light, which goes out,
indicating that battery 2 is connected to the right
main bus. The voltage of battery 2 is indicated
on the right voltmeter.

BRIGHT

Figure 2-9 depicts that the BAT 1 switch is on,


the power selector switch is at NORMAL and
all other switches are off. The battery 1 contactor and battery 1 make-and-break switch simultaneously close. The battery 1 contactor connects
battery 1 to the start bus, and the make-and-break
reverse current relay (RCR) connects the start
bus and battery 1 to the left main bus. The battery 1 contactor and the battery 1 make-andbreak RCR each remove a ground from the BAT
1 light, which goes out, indicating that battery
1 is powering the start bus and the left main bus.
The power from the left main bus is supplied
through current limiters and feeder cables to bus
A1 and bus A2 (Figure 2-2). The right main bus
is not powered since the bus tie is open. The left
DC voltmeter indicates the voltage of battery 1.
The power selector switch must be in the NORMAL position since the control power for both
the battery 1 contactor and the battery 1 makeand-break RCR is routed through the NORMAL
contacts of this switch.

Figure 2-11 depicts that both battery switches


are on, the power selector switch is at NORMAL
and the bus-tie switch is open. Battery 1 is powering
the left main bus and buses A1 and A2,
as previously described in Figure 2-9. Battery
2 is powering the right main bus and buses B1
and B2, as shown in Figure 2-10. Since the bus
tie is open, there is no connection between the
left and right bus systems.

FLIGHT NORM

Figure 2-8 depicts that the batteries are installed


and connected. They are supplying the battery
bus in parallel through a circuit breaker and
diode for each battery. Essential features such as
baggage door motor operation and lighting are
only available when any battery or engine generator switch is on.

switch is turned on. It does, however, supply the


start bus (through the battery 2 contactor) during
engine and APU starting. For information
on engine and APU starting, see Chapter 7,
Powerplant, or Chapter 6, Auxiliary Power
Unit in this training manual.

OVERHEAD PANEL

Operation

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

BUS A1

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-9

2-10

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A
IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN

OIL

BAT 1
GEN 1

BAT 2

GEN 3

DC SYSTEM

GEN 3

GEN 2

APU

NORM

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

CONDITIONS:
BUS TIE OPEN, POWER
SELECTOR SWITCH
IN NORMAL

150A
BUS A1

G1
130A
TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

BUS A2

G3

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

WINDOWS
A3

150A

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

150A

TO
AMMETER

LH MAIN BUS

START
CONTACTOR

APU

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
BUS-TIE
RELAY

TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

GPU CONTACTOR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

TO
AMMETER

EXT POWER

225A
COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS

GROUND
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS

FlightSafety

STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

BATTERY 2

130A
B1

TO
AMMETER

START
CONTACTOR

GENERATOR 2

130A

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

B2

TO
AMMETER

WINDOWS
B3

G2

Figure 2-9.

international

80A

Battery 1 Switch On, All Other Switches Off

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3


START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

OIL

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN
GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

DC SYSTEM
NORM

TO
AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

150A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

BUS A1

G1
130A
TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

CONDITI0NS:
BUS TIE OPEN. POWER
SELECTOR SWITCH
IN NORMAL

G3

BUS A2

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

WINDOWS
A3

150A

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

150A

START
CONTACTOR

APU
TO
AMMETER

LH MAIN BUS
BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
BUS-TIE
RELAY

TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

GPU CONTACTOR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXT POWER

225A
COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS

GROUND
STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS
130A
B1

TO
AMMETER
GENERATOR 2

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

130A
B2

TO
AMMETER

G2

Figure 2-10.

Battery 2 Switch On, All Other Switches Off

WINDOWS
B3

international

Revision 4.01

80A

FlightSafety

BATTERY 2

Revision 4

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3


START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

OIL

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN
GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

GEN 3

DC SYSTEM
NORM

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

150A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

BUS A1

G1
130A
CONDITIONS:
POWER SELECTOR SWITCH
IN NORMAL. ALL
GENERATORS OFF

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

BUS A2

G3

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

WINDOWS
A3

150A

START CONTACTOR

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

150A

TO
AMMETER

LH MAIN BUS

START
CONTACTOR

APU

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
BUS-TIE
RELAY

TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

GPU CONTACTOR

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

TO
AMMETER

EXT POWER

225A
COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS

GROUND
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS

FlightSafety

STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

BATTERY 2

130A
B1

TO
AMMETER

START
CONTACTOR

GENERATOR 2

130A

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

B2

TO
AMMETER

WINDOWS
B3

G2

Figure 2-11.

international

80A

Both Battery Switches On, Bus Tie Open

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3


START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

OIL

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN
GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

DC SYSTEM
NORM

TO
AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

150A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

BUS A1

G1
130A

CONDITION:
POWER SELECTOR
SWITCH IN NORMAL

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

G3

BUS A2

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

150A

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

150A

APU
TO
AMMETER

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4
HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5
GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

LH MAIN BUS
BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
BUS-TIE
RELAY

TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

START
CONTACTOR

WINDOWS
A3

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXT POWER

GPU CONTACTOR
225A

COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS

GROUND
STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS
130A
B1

TO
AMMETER
GENERATOR 2

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

130A
B2

TO
AMMETER

G2

2-11

Figure 2-12.

Battery 2 Switch On, Bus-Tie Switch Closed

WINDOWS
B3

international

80A

FlightSafety

BATTERY 2

FlightSafety

FlightSafety

international

international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

2-12

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

GEN 2 EXCITATION

GEN 3 EXCITATION
MAIN DC BOX COMPONENTS
1. BAT 1 MAKE-AND-BREAK
2. GEN 1 LINE CONTACTOR
3. GEN 3 LINE CONTACTOR
4. BUS-TIE RELAY
5. GEN 2 LINE CONTACTOR
6. APU LINE CONTACTOR
7. BAT 2 MAKE-AND-BREAK
8. BAT 1 LINE CONTACTOR
9. ENG 1 START RELAY
10. ENG 3 START RELAY
11. GPU LINE CONTACTOR
12. ENG 2 START RELAY
13. GPU START RELAY
14. BAT 2 TO START BUS CONTACTOR
15. CURRENT LIMITERS
16. BAT 1 CONTROL CB
17. BAT 2 CONTROL CB
* GEN 1 AND GEN 3 LINE SWITCHES
** GEN 2 AND APU GEN LINE SWITCHES

BAT 2

GEN 1 EXCITATION

8
16

SLATS

FIRE EXTINGUISHING

10
9

3
2
1

Battery Bus Circuits (Typical)

OVERHEAD PANEL

12
11

5
4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Figure 2-13.

13

14

17

**

MAIN ELECTRICAL BOX 6-PA

FR 5 STAIR LIGHT
FR 5 UTILITY LIGHT (BAT)
BAGGAGE
DOOR CONTROL
MECHANICS PANEL
AISLE LIGHTS
FWD AND AFT TOILET LIGHT

REAR
COMPT LIGHTS
ENGINE MONITOR
15

BAT 1

For APU starting, control, and operation, see


Chapter 6, Auxiliary Power Unit, in this
training manual.

The APU generator is rated at 30 volts, 300


amps and is regulated at 28.5 volts by an
associated generator control unit (GCU)
mounted in the rear compartment. The APU
generator is available for ground operation only
since the APU is not certificated for flight operation. The APU generator GCU provides a number of operations, including overvoltage and
overcurrent protection for the APU generator.

Rating

Following an APU start and acceleration to 97%


+ 4 seconds, the APU generator RCR closes
and connects the generator directly to the right
main bus and also supplies buses B1 and B2.
Since the bus tie is already closed (to enable
APU starting), the APU generator also supplies
the left main bus and buses A1 and A2. In addition, battery 1 is charged and the battery bus is
powered through the battery 1 make-and-break
switch and the battery 1 line contactor. The start
bus is also powered from the left main bus
through the battery 1 make-and-break switch.
Battery 2 is charged (and the battery bus receives
power) from the right main bus through the battery 2 make-and-break switch. In this configuration, battery 2 does not supply the start bus. The
APU generator may be paralleled with any or all
engine-driven generators.

15

A combination starter-generator is mounted on


the accessory drive section of the APU (Figure
2-14). The generator includes an integral fan
which induces cooling air through the generator from a flush intake on the left side of the rear
fuselage.

Unlatching the APU generator switch while the


APU is operating causes loss of the excitation
circuit; the APU generator drops off the line,
and the APU electronic control unit transmits
a stop signal to the APU causing it to shut down.

General

The switch must be in the latched position with


the switchlight on and the bus-tie switch must
be in the tied position before the APU can be
started. The APU generator switchlight goes out
when the GCU senses an overvoltage or overcurrent condition.

APU GENERATOR

The APU generator excitation and control is


achieved by a green switchlight labeled APU,
located on the DC SYSTEM section of the overhead switch panel. It has two positions: latched
(pushed in) with the green light illuminated and
unlatched (out) with the light extinguished.

Figure 2-13 depicts a typical installation for battery bus circuits. Other optional circuits may be
installed by the operator; if so, they will be listed
in the AFM supplements.

Control

NOSE CONE LIGHT


FUEL COUPLING
SINGLE-POINT
AND CONTROL
APU
CRASH
REFUELING
COCKPIT
BOX LIGHTING
LOGIC
DOME LIGHTS
(SNs 16 AND
STEPS
SUBSEQUENT) LIGHT
BAGGAGE COMPT
DOME LIGHT
LH PYLON
LIGHT
FR5 BAG LIGHT

available to all the installed circuitry unless at


least one battery switch or one generator switch
is on. In addition, if the GPU is connected and
operating and the GPU switch is in the EXT
POWER position, all of the installed circuits are
powered from the ground power source, including the battery bus.

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Revision 4.01

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Indication

FLIGHT
NORM

DISCH
2
1
0

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

1
0

0
120

FAULT

100

FIRE APU

FIRE 3

N
%

1000

40

800

T5
C
600

START

V 30

200
400

IRS 1

APU

V _ 30

APU
_

100

GEN

STOP

1
0
FIRE
BAG COMP

25
BAT
GEN

HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

+ 100

OIL

20

BAT
GEN

20

80 60

MASTER

TRANS

FAULT

25

20

200
300
350

E BAT 2
TEST

GEN 1

BAT 1

20

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 3

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

25
BAT
GEN

V _ 30

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

DC SYSTEM

APU

HP 1

PRV 3

PRV 2

APU

ISOL

TEST

BRIGHT

LP

LIGHTS

LP

FIRE

DIM

ISOLATION

AUTO

NORM

ON

HEAT

OFF
PASSENGER

BUS TIED

ISOL
CREW

BLEED AIR

FUEL 2

BAG

While the APU is operating, the green switchlight labeled MASTER APU is on, and the
amber lights labeled OIL and GEN are both
off. These lights are located on the APU control
section of the overhead switch panel. The green
excitation switchlight labeled APU, located
above the GEN 3 control switch, is also on. If
the APU generator disconnects from the line for
any reason, the GEN light comes on. This light
also comes on, in some cases, when the APU
generator is providing a start-assist for an engine
since the APU start relay is closed for the duration of the start; however, the APU generator
may disconnect from the distribution system.
The light, if on, must go out when the engine
start terminates; if it does not, the APU start
relay has failed to open and corrective action is
required. The APU load to the buses may be determined by moving the right ammeter selector
to the APU position. The left and right voltmeters indicate bus voltage.

NOTE

NO. 2
ENGINE
(REF)

APU
GEN
VENTILATION
AIR INLET

Revision 4

At the same time, the BAT 2 switch is also on,


closing the associated make-and-break switch
supplying APU power to the battery bus and to
battery 2 for charging. The GEN 1, GEN 2,
GEN 3, and BUS TIED lights on the warning
panel are all on.

GENERATORS

BLEED
APU

Figure 2-14.

in and illuminated. When the APU accelerates


to 97% + 4 seconds, the APU generator RCR
closes, connecting the generator to the right main
bus and the associated B1 and B2 buses. The amber GEN light on the APU control panel goes
out, indicating that the APU generator is on line.
Since the bus tie must be closed for APU starting, the left main bus and its associated A1 and
A2 buses are all powered from the right main
bus. The BAT 1 switch is on; therefore, the battery 1 contactor and its associated make-andbreak switch are both closed, allowing the APU
generator power to supply the start bus and battery bus and provide charging for battery 1.

APU Generator Installation

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

The amber APU generator RCR light is


armed for operation only when the green
APU MASTER switchlight is latched
in. It remains on during APU starting and
acceleration to 97% + 4 seconds. Then it
goes off and comes on again, only if the
APU generator disconnects from the line
for any reason or if the APU start relay
fails to open, either following an APU start
or after an APU generator-assisted start
of any engine.

APU generator amperage to the right main bus


may be selected on the right ammeter by moving
the selector switch located below the right
ammeter to the APU position. The charge or discharge rates of the batteries are indicated when
the ammeter selector switches are in the center
BAT positions.

Operation
Figure 2-15 depicts that the APU is operating,
the green APU MASTER switchlight is on, and
the APU (green) excitation switchlight is latched

General
A combination DC starter-generator is mounted
on and driven by the accessory gear of each engine. The generators are attached to the accessory case by a quick-disconnect adapter.

Cooling
The generators are cooled by air directed from
the fan duct. The air is circulated through the
generator case (Figure 2-16), the brush ring, and
brush housing, thus providing cooling and brush
dust elimination.

Rating
The generators are rated at 30 volts and 300
amps. A generator control unit (GCU) provides
regulation and protection for each generator. The
associated solid-state GCU regulates the generator at 28.5 volts and provides a field weakening system to maintain generator torque when
being used as an engine starter. The integral protection systems in the GCUs provide automatic
equalization for all three engine-driven generators

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-13

2-14
NORM

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY


COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 1

CONDITIONS:
BOTH BATTERY SWITCHES
ON, BUS TIE CLOSED.
BOTH BATTERIES
CHARGING

STOP

GEN

EXT POWER

OIL

APU

START

GEN 1

BAT 2

G3

GENERATOR 3

G1

GENERATOR 1

DC SYSTEM

BAT 1

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

GPU CONTACTOR

GEN 2
BUS TIED

BAT 1

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

DIM

BAT 2

GEN 3

BRIGHT

GEN 1

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

WARNING
PANEL

APU Generator Operation

START
CONTACTOR

STARTING
BUS

Figure 2-15.

G2

GENERATOR 2

GPU RECEPTACLE

TO
AMMETER

APU

BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

START
CONTACTOR

GEN 3

APU

START
CONTACTOR

GEN 2

START CONTACTOR

TO AMMETER

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY
BUS

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

FLIGHT NORM

OVERHEAD PANEL

150A

130A

150A

80A

130A

150A

TEST

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

WINDOWS
A3

BUS A2

BUS A1

FIRE

80A

130A

130A

RH
MAIN BUS

WINDOWS
B3

B2

B1

GROUND

APU GENERATOR POWER

BATTERY POWER

LEGEND

225A

BUS-TIE
RELAY

LH MAIN BUS

HOT
BAT

LIGHTS

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Figure 2-16.
Generator Cooling Airflow

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY


Revision 4

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

and the APU generator if all four generators are


on and the bus tie is closed, or GEN 2 and the
APU generator are automatically paralleled on
the right main bus when on and the bus tie is
open. An overvoltage and overcurrent protection
system in the associated GCUs automatically trip
the affected generator whenever voltage is above
32 volts or if output current exceeds design limits.

Control
Each generator is controlled by a two-position
magnetic switch located on the DC SYSTEM
section of the overhead switch panel. The switch
positions are unlabeled. They must be on (up)
for all operation, including engine starting. Generator faults detected by the GCUs, such as overvoltage or overcurrent, cause these switches to
automatically trip to the off (down) position.
Physically moving a tripped generator switch to
the on (up) position will reset the generator, provided that the fault no longer exists. The generator switches should be turned off if an engine
is inoperative and windmilling in flight.
A guarded line disconnect control switch for
each generator is located on the main electrical
box in the rear compartment (Figure 2-13).
These switches provide the control circuits and
equalization for the generator line contactors
(RCRs) and are for maintenance use only.

The auto load-shed system is disabled through


the ground/flight relay circuit with the aircraft
on the ground.

Indication
The voltmeters located on the DC SYSTEM section of the overhead switch panel provide indication of voltage for the associated bus when the
bus tie is open or the highest bus voltage when the
bus tie is closed. The left and right ammeters are
selective through the three-position selector
switches located below the ammeters. The left
switch is labeled GEN 1BAT 1GEN 3, and
the right switch is labeled GEN 2BAT 2
APU. Moving a switch to any generator or
APU position facilitates reading the output of
the selected unit. When the switches are at the
BAT positions with a generator operating, the
ammeters indicate the charge rate of the associated battery. The switches are normally in the
BAT positions for all flight operations.
Three amber lights on the warning panel, labeled
GEN 1, GEN 2, and GEN 3, provide dual
indication for the associated generator. The
affected light comes on if the generator reverse
current relay opens, indicating that the generator
is off the line, or the affected start relay has failed
to open at the termination of the start cycle.

Operation
Automatic Cabin Electrical
Load-Shed System
In the event of the loss of one generators output, certain A6 bus items such as galley, lavatory, and cabin entertainment system operation
will automatically be load-shed.
After proper electrical load reduction by the
crew an AUTO LOAD SHED switch located on
the copilots side console may be placed in the
OVERRIDE position to allow power to be reapplied to the items previously shed.
In the event of a second generator failure, the
system will auto load-shed a second time with
no flight crew option to bring any of the loadshed items back on line.

Revision 4.01

Figure 2-17 depicts that the No. 3 engine has


been started, using the batteries. The start has
terminated and the generator 3 RCR is closed,
connecting generator 3 to the left main bus and
its associated A1 and A2 buses. Since the bus
tie is closed, generator 3 power is also transmitted to the right main bus and the associated
B1 and B2 buses. Battery 1 is being charged
through its make-and-break switch and the battery 1 contactor. Battery 2 is being charged
through its make-and-break switch. The warning panel shows that the BAT 1, BAT 2, and
GEN 3 lights are all off, while the GEN
1, GEN 2, and BUS TIED lights remain on.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-15

2-16

NORM

STOP

GEN

COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 1

G3

GENERATOR 3

G1

GENERATOR 1

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

G2

GEN 2
BUS TIED

BAT 1

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

DIM

BAT 2

GEN 3

BRIGHT

GEN 1

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

WARNING
PANEL

Generator 3 Operation

START
CONTACTOR

STARTING
BUS

Figure 2-17.

GENERATOR 2

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

START
CONTACTOR

GEN 3

APU

START
CONTACTOR

GEN 2

GPU CONTACTOR

APU

BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

TO
AMMETER

BATTERY
BUS

BAT 2

DC SYSTEM

BAT 1

START CONTACTOR

TO AMMETER

TO
AMMETER

GEN 1

GPU RECEPTACLE

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

CONDITIONS:
BUS TIE CLOSED. POWER SELECTOR
SWITCH IN NORMAL. BOTH BATTERY
SWITCHES ON. APU INOPERATIVE

EXT POWER

OIL

APU

START

FLIGHT NORM

OVERHEAD PANEL

150A

130A

150A

80A

130A

150A

TEST

80A

130A

130A

RH
MAIN BUS

225A

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

WINDOWS
A3

BUS A2

BUS A1

FIRE

WINDOWS
B3

B2

B1

GROUND

BATTERY POWER

GENERATOR POWER

LEGEND

BUS-TIE
RELAY

LH MAIN BUS

HOT
BAT

LIGHTS

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Revision 3.01

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Figure 2-18 depicts that the No. 2 engine has


been started. The start was assisted by generator 3, since the APU generator is not operating
(see Chapter 7, Powerplant, for starting
details). As the No. 2 engine start terminates, the
generator 2 RCR closes, connecting generator 2
to the right main bus; it automatically parallels
with generator 3 since the bus tie is closed. The
warning panel shows that the GEN 2, GEN 3,
BAT 1, and BAT 2 lights are all off while the
GEN 1 and BUS TIED lights remain on.

Generators 1 and 3 are operating in parallel on


the left main bus, which is also powering buses
A1 and A2, the start bus, and the battery bus
and charging battery 1. Generator 2 is powering the right main bus and the associated B1 and
B2 buses as a nonparalleled independent unit;
it is also powering the battery bus and charging
battery 2. The warning panel shows that all generator lights, both battery lights, and the BUS
TIED light are off, indicating a normal operating configuration.

Figure 2-19 depicts that all three engines are operating and all three engine-driven generators are
on line. The airplane is ready for takeoff; therefore, the bus-tie switch is in the FLIGHT NORM
position, separating the left and right distribution buses into separate and independent
systems.

If the No. 2 engine is shut down or if generator


2 fails, the bus tie must be closed to restore
power to the right main bus and the associated
B1 and B2 buses, and to provide charging for
battery 2.

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-17

2-18

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A
IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3

START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN

OIL

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

GEN 3

DC SYSTEM
NORM

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

150A
BUS A1

G1

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

130A
CONDITIONS:
BUS TIE CLOSED. BOTH BATTERY
SWITCHES ON. POWER SELECTOR
SWITCH IN NORMAL

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

G3

BUS A2

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

WINDOWS
A3

150A

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

150A

APU
TO
AMMETER

LH MAIN BUS

START
CONTACTOR

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

BUS-TIE
RELAY

GPU
CONTACTOR
225A

COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
GENERATOR POWER
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS
BATTERY 2

GROUND
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS
130A
B1

GENERATOR 2

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

130A
B2

G2

Revision 4

Figure 2-18.

Generator 2 and 3 Operation

WINDOWS
B3

international

80A

FlightSafety

STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

TO
AMMETER

TO
AMMETER

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXT POWER

Revision 4

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3


START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN

OIL

GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

GEN 3

DC SYSTEM
NORM

TO
AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1
START
CONTACTOR

150A

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

BUS A1

G1
130A
CONDITIONS:
GENERATORS 1, 2, AND 3 OPERATING. BOTH
BATTERY SWITCHES ON. BUS TIE OPEN,
POWER SELECTOR SWITCH IN NORMAL.

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

G3

BUS A2

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

150A

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

150A

APU
TO
AMMETER

START
CONTACTOR

GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR
BUS-TIE
RELAY

GPU CONTACTOR
REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
GENERATOR POWER
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS
STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

GROUND
RH
MAIN BUS
130A
B1

TO
AMMETER
GENERATOR 2

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

130A
B2

TO
AMMETER

G2

2-19

Figure 2-19.

Normal Flight Configuration

WINDOWS
B3

international

80A

FlightSafety

BATTERY 2

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5

LH MAIN BUS

225A
COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

G
TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

WINDOWS
A3

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXT POWER

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

GROUND POWER UNIT


General
An approved external power unit (GPU) (generator or rectifier) may be connected to the standard three-pin receptacle (Figure 2-20) located
externally on the aft right side of the airplane.
The unit should be a constant-voltage unit capable of negligible droop when operating at maximum load. The maximum rating should not
exceed 1,200 amps, and the voltage should be
regulated at 28 VDC.

Protection
Overvoltage protection is provided by a magnetic coil controlled by a PCB (printed circuit
board). When output voltage reaches approximately 31 1 VDC volts, the PCB energizes the
magnetic coil and disconnects the GPU from the
distribution system. A reset pushbutton is
provided at the main electrical box (Figure
2-20); momentarily pushing this switch resets
the GPU, provided that the fault no longer exists.

Control
The GPU is controlled by a two-position power
selector switch located on the overhead switch
panel (Figure 2-4). The switch positions are
labeled NORMAL and EXT POWER.
When in the EXT POWER position, the battery 1 contactor and battery 2 make-and-break
switch open, isolating both batteries (BAT 1 and
BAT 2 lights come on).
Figure 2-21 illustrates operation of the GPU.
The bus tie automatically closes (even if the bustie switch is off), and the BUS TIED light comes
on. The generators, including the APU generator,
are inhibited whenever external power is operating and is connected to the airplane. The
GPU contactor closes and connects the output
from the GPU to the start bus. A separate ground
is applied to the battery 1 make-and-break

2-20

switch, closing it and connecting the start bus


to the left main bus. This power is transmitted
to buses A1 and A2 and, through the bus tie,
to the right main bus and buses B1 and B2. The
GPU may now be used to start one or all engines, or it may be used for servicing and/or
checking the airplanes systems. As long as this
condition prevails, GEN 1, GEN 2, and GEN
3 lights remain on.
The bus tie interconnects the main buses and is
grounded independently by the EXT POWER
position of the power selector switch.
The battery bus is powered from the GPU
through the start bus.

DC POWER
DISTRIBUTION
GENERAL
The distribution buses are installed in the circuitbreaker panels (Figure 2-3) on the cockpit headliner aft of the overhead switch panel. They are
divided among the left, center, and right panels.
Four feeder cables (protected by current limiters)
route power from the main electrical box in the
rear compartment (Figures 2-1 and 2-13) to the
circuit-breaker panels. Two of these feeder cables
are routed along the left side of the fuselage to
buses A1 and A2 in the left circuit-breaker panel
and in the left section of the center circuitbreaker panel. Similar feeders are routed along
the right side of the fuselage to buses B1 and B2
in the right circuit-breaker panel and in the right
section of the center circuit-breaker panel.
The circuit breakers are grouped by systems on
the associated circuit-breaker panel and are enclosed by colored lines for ease of identification.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

FlightSafety
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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

POWER SELECTOR SWITCH

GPU RECEPTACLE

MAIN ELECTRICAL BOX

NO. 1 BATTERY
MAKE-AND-BREAK

GPU RESET BREAKER

Figure 2-20.

Revision 4

GPU CONTACTOR

GPU Components

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-21

2-22

OVERHEAD PANEL

TEST

BRIGHT
FLIGHT NORM

LIGHTS

FIRE

DIM
A

IRS 1 HRZN IRS 2 IRS 3


START

WARNING
PANEL

APU

APU

STOP
GEN 1

OIL

BAT 1

BAT 2

GEN 2

GEN 1

GEN 2

GEN 3

BAT 1

BUS TIED

BAT 2

HOT
BAT

GEN
GEN 1 BAT 1 GEN 3

GEN 3

GEN 2 BAT 2 APU

DC SYSTEM
NORM

TO
AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 1

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

START
CONTACTOR

150A
BUS A1

G1
130A
CONDITIONS:
POWER SELECTOR SWITCH
IN EXT POWER.

TO AMMETER

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GENERATOR 3

G3

BUS A2

80A
MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

START CONTACTOR

150A

BATTERY 1
BATTERY 1
CONTACTOR

130A

150A

TO
AMMETER

HYDRAULIC
STANDBY PUMP
A5
GALLEY 2 BAR
A6

BUS-TIE
ROTARY
SELECTOR

G
BUS-TIE
RELAY

TO
AMMETER

FIRE
EXTINGUISHERS

GALLEY 1 BAR
A4

LH MAIN BUS

START
CONTACTOR

APU

WINDOWS
A3

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EXT POWER

GPU CONTACTOR
225A

COCKPIT
DOME LIGHT

REVERSE
CURRENT RELAY

GPU RECEPTACLE

LEGEND
BATTERY POWER

BATTERY
BUS

EXTERNAL POWER
STARTING
BUS

BATTERY 2
CONTACTOR

MAKE-AND-BREAK SWITCH

RH
MAIN BUS

GROUND

130A
B1

TO
AMMETER
GENERATOR 2

START
CONTACTOR

REVERSE CURRENT RELAY

130A
B2

Revision 4

TO
AMMETER

G2

Figure 2-21.

GPU Operation

WINDOWS
B3

international

80A

FlightSafety

BATTERY 2

FlightSafety
international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

PRIORITY DISTRIBUTION

AVIONICS MASTERS

Certain circuits are given priority classification


and are normally powered from bus A1. If bus
A1 fails, these circuits are automatically powered from bus B1. The following systems are
included in this priority group:

Selective powering is available for the avionics


system, primarily to permit shutoff when on the
ground and the avionics system is not required.
Two latching push-on, push-off switches (Figures
2-2 and 2-3) labeled L/H AVIONICS
MASTER and R/H AVIONICS MASTER are
located, one each, on the lower side of the left
and right circuit-breaker panels. When either is
pushed in, two relays are energized, disconnecting power from the associated avionics system. A similar system installed as a customer
option provides for selective powering of the
respective flight management systems controlled by two FMS switches adjacent to the L/H
and R/H AVIONICS MASTER switches.

Warning lights
Lights and engine indicators test
Emergency lighting indicator light
Takeoff warnings
Fire panel
Refueling
Horizontal stabilizer position detector
Slat monitoring
Aileron and elevator Arthur monitoring
Audio warnings
Audio shutoff
Baggage compartment door detector
Center fuel tank monitoring

Figure 2-22 depicts the priority distribution


system in its normal configuration. The operating power supply is from A1. When power fails
on bus A1, the transfer relay is deenergized,
and the circuits are then powered from bus B1.

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-23

2-24

AIL FEEL
(31CW)

FAILURE B
WARN LIGHT B
(R1WW)

AILERON ARTHUR Q UNIT


MONITORING LIGHT (CONTROL CIRCUIT)

EMERGENCY
LIGHTING

AUDIO WARN B
(1WL2)

TAKEOFF WARNING

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

AUDIO
WARNING
FUELING

LIGHTS WARN A/B


(21WW)

28-VDC
POWER
SUPPLY

HORIZONTAL
STABILIZER
POSITION DETECTOR

EMERG
(1LW)

AUDIO SHUTOFF
EMERGENCY
LIGHTING

EMERGENCY
LIGHTING
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
DOOR DETECTOR
SLAT MONITORING
CENTER FUEL TANK
MONITORING

AUDIO WARN A
(1WL1)

ELEVATOR
ARTHUR MONITORING

WARN LIGHT A
(L1WW)

TEST WARN A/B


(31WW)

ENGINE
INDICATORS
TEST

FAILURE A

Figure 2-22.

Priority Circuits

international

Revision 4

NOTE:
AUDIO WARNING AND MAIN BUS
TYING ARE ALSO DUAL-POWER SUPPLIED.

FlightSafety

LIGHT
TEST
28-VDC
BUS
A1

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

FIRE PANEL

28-VDC
BUS
B1

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ELECTRICAL POWER
SOURCES
Electrical power sources for the avionics, flight
controls, and other airplane systems are listed
in Table 2-1. The table shows which circuitbreaker panel and primary bus a system is powered from. It also shows the circuit-breaker
designation listed on the circuit-breaker panel.

LIMITATIONS
GENERAL
The limitations contained in the approved AFM
must be complied with by law regardless of the
type of operation.

ELECTRICAL
Maximum voltage of
DC system............................................. 32 volts
Maximum generator output
(one minute maximum)...................... 350 amps
Maximum generator output
(up to 43,000 feet).............................. 300 amps
Maximum generator output
(above 43,000 feet)............................. 260 amps

BATTERY TEMPERATURE
Amber light (WARM)
at or above................................. 120F (48.9C)
Red light (HOT)
at or above................................. 150F (65.5C)
SNs prior to 172........................ 150F (65.5C)
SNs 172 and subsequent ........... 160F (71.1C)

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-25

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES


LEFT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS A1

FIRE
WARNING

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

AUDIO WARN A

Audio warning

WARN LIGHTS A
PANEL

Warning panel

WARN LIGHTS A
EX

Light test
D/N

EXTING 1

Fire

DETECT 1

Fire

LIGHTS WARN
A-B

NAVIGATION

IRS 1 BAT

IRS 1 battery

IRS 1

IRS 1

TEMP PROBE

Probe heating

HRZN ST BY

Standby
horizon

LH AV MASTER

Left avionics

DESIGNATION
RADIO

NAVIGATION

UTILIZATION

ATC1*

ATC 1

VOR1*

VOR-DME 1

DME1*

VOR-DME 1

ADF1*

ADF 1

DDRMI1*

Pilotcopilot RMI

ADC1*

Pilot ADC 1

SG1*

Pilot EFIS

EADI LH*

Pilot EFIS

EHSI LH*
EFIS CTL1*

Pilot EFIS
Pilot EFIS

*Isolated by the LH AV MASTER pushbutton

2-26

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


LEFT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS A2

FIRE
WARNING

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

EXTING 3

Fire

DETECT 3

Fire

BAG COMP

Fire

BAT TEMP

Battery
temperature

BLOWER LH

Ventilation

TEST WARN A-B

NAVIGATION

RADIO

RADIO

NAVIGATION

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

HF 1
CONTROL*

HF 1

PHONE*
SAT COM*

Option
Option

AFCS 1
CMPTR*

Pilot FGC*

AFCS 1
ADVIS*

Servoactuator

RAD ALT 1*

Radioaltimeter

FMS 1*

Pilot FMS

CDU 1*

Pilot FMS

IRS 3

IRS 3

SG 3*

MFD

IRS 3 BAT (Option)

IRS 3 battery

MFD/WRD*

MFD

ANNUNC LH

Radio nav
lighting

R/T WR*

Radar

AFCS 1 AP

Pilot FGC

GPWS

Option

AFCS 1 YD

Pilot FGC

ICS LH

Intercom

VHF 1

VHF 1

HF 1 PWR

HF 1

*Isolated by the LH AV MASTER pushbutton

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-27

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS A1

LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

FUEL

2-28

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

ANTICOL FIN

Anticollision
lights

L/G CONTROL

Landing gear
control

LH EXT
LIGHT

External
lighting

STBY PUMP

Standby
hydraulic pump

CKPT LH
READING

Lighting

HYDR 1 INDIC

Hydraulic

NAV

Navigation
lights

STROBE

Strobe
lights

WSHLD FRONT
LH

Windows

CENTER

Lighting

LH PITOT HEAT

Probe heat

INSTR LH

Instrument
lighting

LH STATIC
HEAT

Probe heat

INV (115V/60 Hz)


or 115-VAC master

Option

CONDG CREW

Conditioning

IGNTR AUTO

Starting

CABIN PRESS

Cabin
pressure

ENG FAIL 2

Takeoff
warning

LH AOA HEAT

Probe
heat

N2 1
N1 ITT 2

Indicators
Turbine temp

ENGINE 1

Anti-icing

AIR FR

Wing
anti-icing

HP BLEED 1

Wing
anti-icing

A/B CONTROL
PITCH FEEL

Airbrakes
Arthur

STAB EMERG
TRIM INDIC
SLAT INDIC
LH AUTO SLAT

Horiz stab
Trim
Slats
Slats

CMPTR

Engine
Computer

IGNTR 1
OIL 1

Start
Engine
control

BOOST 1
FUEL FLOW 1
XBP 2-3
GAGES LH
LO FUEL

Fuel BP
Flowmeter
Fuel
Qty indicators
Tank level

HYDR

ANTIICE
CONDG

FLT
CONTROL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS A2

LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

FUEL

HYDR

Revision 4

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

BELTS NO
SMKG

Passenger
signs

DESIGNATION
ANTIICE
CONDG

UTILIZATION

ENGINE 3

Anti-icing

DV WINDOW

Window

ENTRY

Entrance
lighting

SHIELD

Glareshield
lighting

PRV 3

Wing
anti-icing

DRAIN HEAT

Drain
anti-icing

CAB TEMP
CONTROL

Temperature
control

LANDING LH

Lights

STBY PITOT

Probe heat

WIPER LH

Wipers

FLAP A/B
INDIC

Flaps

N2 3

Indicators

CMPTR 3

Engine
computer

IGNTR 3

Starting

TRIM AILERON
TRIM RUDDER

Trim
Trim

OIL 3

Engine
control

STICK SHAKER

Stick Shaker
M889
Incorporated

FUEL 2
SHUT OFF

Fire

STBY BOOST 2

Fuel

FUEL FLOW 3

Flowmeter

LEVEL

Tank level

ANTISKID

Brakes

L/G IND EMER

Landing gear
indication M1406
incorporated

FLT
CONTROL

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-29

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER
CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PANEL (Cont)
(Cont)
CENTER
PRIMARY BUS
BUS B1
B1
PRIMARY

FLT
FLT
CONTROL
CONTROL

ANTIANTIICE
ICE
CONDG
CONDG

DESIGNATION
DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION
UTILIZATION

STAB NORMAL
NORMAL
STAB

Horiz stab
stab
Horiz

AIL FEEL
FEEL
AIL

RH AUTO
AUTO SLAT
SLAT
RH

DESIGNATION
DESIGNATION
ENGINES
ENGINES

UTILIZATION
UTILIZATION

NN22 22

Indicators
Indicators

Arthur
Arthur
monitoring
monitoring

ITT 11
NN11ITT

Turbine
Turbine
temperature
temperature

Slats
Slats

CMPTR 22
CMPTR

Engine
Engine
computer
computer

IGNTR 22
IGNTR

Starting
Starting
Engine
Engine
control
control
Engine
Engine
computer
computer

ENGINE 22
ENGINE

Anti-icing
Anti-icing

OIL 22
OIL

AFT SIDE
SIDE
AFT
WINDOW
WINDOW

Window
Window

CMPTR 11
CMPTR
STBY PWR
PWR
STBY

WIPER RH
RH
WIPER

Wiper
Wiper

LIGHTS
LIGHTS

LAV MASTER
MASTER
LAV

28-VDC
28-VDC
system
system

MISC
MISC

HYDR
HYDR

FUEL
FUEL

2-30

CONDG CABIN
CABIN
CONDG

Conditioning
Conditioning

OVERHEAD
OVERHEAD

Lighting
Lighting

BOOTSTRAP
BOOTSTRAP

Bootstrap
Bootstrap

FWD CABIN
CABIN
FWD
INDIRECT
INDIRECT

Cabin
Cabin
lighting
lighting

RH AOA
AOA HEAT
HEAT
RH

Probe heat
heat
Probe

RH CABIN
CABIN
RH
READING
READING

Reading
Reading
lights
lights

L/G INDIC
INDIC
L/G

Landing gear
gear
Landing

CKPT RH
RH
CKPT
READING
READING

Lighting
Lighting

HYDR 22 INDIC
INDIC
HYDR

Hydraulic
Hydraulic
TAXI
TAXI

Lights
Lights

NORM BOOST
BOOST 22
NORM

Fuel
Fuel

FUEL FLOW
FLOW 22
FUEL

Flowmeter
Flowmeter

XBP 1-3
1-3
XBP

Fuel
Fuel

GAGES RH
RH
GAGES

Qty indicators
indicators
Qty

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


CENTER CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS B2

LIGHTS
MISC

ENGINES

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

GALLEY MASTER

Galley

LANDING RH

Fuel

Lights

GAGES CENTER

Qty indicators

ANTICOL BELLY

Anticollision
lights

XBP1-2

Fuel

RH EXT LIGHT

Right external
lights

PRESSURE
FUELING

Refueling

INSTR RH

Instrument
lighting

PEDESTAL

Instrument
lighting

HYDR

NOSE WHL

Steering

ANTIICE
CONDG

CKPT TEMP
CONTROL

Temperature
control

BAG PRESS

Pressurization

VALANCE OR
AFT CABIN
INDIRECT

Cabin
lighting

LH CABIN
READING

Reading
lights

FUEL

UTILIZATION

BOOST 3

APU

APU

WSHLD FRONT
RH

Window

N1 ITT 3

Turbine
temperature

RH PITOT HEAT

Probe heat

FUEL 1
SHUT OFF

Fire

RH STATIC
HEAT

Probe heat

ROLL EMERG

Trim

FLAP CONTROL

Flaps

REVERSE
CONTROL

Engine 2
reverser

REVERSE WARN

FUEL 3
SHUT OFF

Revision 4

DESIGNATION

FLT
CONTROL
Fire

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-31

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


RIGHT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL
PRIMARY BUS B1

FIRE
WARNING

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

AUDIO WARN B

Audio warning

WARN LIGHT B
PANEL

Warning panel

WARN LIGHTS B
EX

NAVIGATION

DESIGNATION
RADIO

Light testing
D/N

EXTING 2

Fire

DETECT 2

Fire

APU

Fire

NAVIGATION

UTILIZATION

VOR 2*

DME 2

DME 2*

VOR-DME 2

ADF 2*

ADF 2

ATC 2*

ATC 2*

VHF 3*

VHF 3

SG 2*

Copilot EFIS

EFIS CTL2*

Copilot EFIS

EHSI RH*

Copilot EFIS

EADI RH*

Copilot EFIS

IRS 2 BAT

IRS 2 battery

DDRMI 2*

Copilot and
pilot EFIS

IRS 2

IRS 2

ADC 2*

Copilot ADC 2

RH AV MASTER

Right avionics

AOC 2

*Isolated by the RH AV MASTER pushbutton

2-32

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 2-1. ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCES (Cont)


RIGHT CIRCUIT-BREAKER PANEL (Cont)
PRIMARY BUS B2

MISC

DESIGNATION

UTILIZATION

NOSE FAN

Ventilation

BLOWER RH

DESIGNATION
RADIO

HF 2
CONTROL*

HF 2

Ventilation

VHF 2*

VHF 2

CREW SEATS

Crew seats

SELCAL*

Selcal

EMERG LIGHTS

Emergency
light
batteries

AFCS 2
CMPTR*

Copilot FGC

NAVIGATION
RADIO

NAVIGATION

UTILIZATION

HF 2 PWR

HF 2

AFCS 2
ADVIS*

Copilot FGC

PUBLIC
ADDRESS

Public
address

FMS 2*

Copilot FMS

ICS RH

Intercom

CDU 2*

Copilot FMS

OMEGA*

Omega

FLIGHT RECORDER*

Flight recorder

VOICE RECORDER*

Cockpit voicerecorder
Radio altimeter

AFCS 2 AP

Copilot FGC

AFCS 2 YD

Copilot FGC

ANNUNC RH

Radio nav
instrument
lighting

RAD ALT 2*

*Isolated by the RH AV MASTER pushbutton

Revision 4

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-33

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

QUESTIONS
1.

The majority of the DC electrical components are located in the:


A. Nose compartment
B. Cockpit headliner
C. Rear compartment
D. Underfloor area

6.

The line disconnect control switches for


the engine-driven generator are located:
A. In the nose cone compartment
B. On the main DC box
C. On the associated GCU
D. In the forward left cabinet

2.

The battery bus is a hot bus when:


A. The BAT 1 switch is on.
B. Either battery is installed and connected.
C. Any battery or generator switch is on.
D. The BAT 2 switch is on.

7.

3.

The DC voltmeters are directly connected to:


A. The battery shunts
B. A selector switch below each ammeter
C. Generator shunts
D. Their associated main bus

Ventilation for the nicad batteries during flight is provided by:


A. A line supplied by the bootstrap unit
B. A bleed-air-operated aspirator
C. A blower controlled by the landing
gear weight switches
D. Low-pressure ram air created at the vent
outlet

8.

The bus-tie control power source is


supplied:
A. From the hot battery bus
B. Directly from either battery
C. From the start bus
D. From the left or right main bus

The battery 2 contactor connects battery


2 to the:
A. Right main bus
B. Battery bus
C. Start bus
D. Associated make-and-break RCR

9.

If the batteries are fully charged, installed,


and properly connected, yet they will
not connect to the buses when the associated switches are turned on, a probable
cause is the:
A. Power selector switch is not at
NORMAL.
B. Power selector switch is not at EXT
POWER.
C. External power receptacle access door
is open.
D. Bus-tie switch is at FLIGHT NORM.

4.

5.

The AVIONICS MASTER switches are


located on the:
A. Main DC box
B. Center pedestal
C. Circuit-breaker panel
D. Pilots and copilots panels

2-34

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Revision 4

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

10. If both battery switches are on, the APU is


operating, and the APU GEN light comes
on when the No. 3 engine start switch is
pushed, the action required is:
A. Abort the start, and push in the APU
excitation switch.
B. None, since the APU GEN light
responds to the closed APU start relay
C. Rotate the bus-tie switch to the
horizontal position.
D. None, since the APU generator disconnects from the right main bus.

Revision 4

11. Generator output is limited to 260 amps


when:
A. Operating on the ground
B. Assisting during engine starting
C. Flying above 43,000 feet
D. Paralleled with the APU generator
12. If, during a battery start, the No. 2 engine
fails to crank when the No. 2 engine start
switch is pushed, a probable cause is:
A. The bus-tie switch is at FLIGHT NORM.
B. The No. 2 generator switch is off.
C. Weak batteries
D. Any one of the above

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

2-35

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CHAPTER 3
LIGHTING
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 3-1
GENERAL............................................................................................................................... 3-1
INTERIOR LIGHTING........................................................................................................... 3-3
Cockpit Lighting .............................................................................................................. 3-3
Passenger Cabin Lighting ................................................................................................ 3-4
Passenger Ordinance Signs .............................................................................................. 3-6
Baggage Compartment, Rear Compartment, and Nose Cone Lighting........................... 3-6
EXTERIOR LIGHTING ......................................................................................................... 3-6
Navigation Lights............................................................................................................. 3-6
Logo Lights ...................................................................................................................... 3-6
Anticollision Lights.......................................................................................................... 3-8
Strobe Lights .................................................................................................................... 3-8
Landing Lights ................................................................................................................. 3-8
Taxi Light ......................................................................................................................... 3-8
Ice Detection Lights ......................................................................................................... 3-9
LIGHTING BUS DEPENDENCY.......................................................................................... 3-9
EMERGENCY LIGHTING .................................................................................................... 3-9
QUESTIONS ......................................................................................................................... 3-11

Revision 3

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

3-i

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Title

Page

3-1

Cockpit Lighting Controls........................................................................................ 3-2

3-2

Cockpit Dome Lights ............................................................................................... 3-3

3-3

Cockpit Reading Lights............................................................................................ 3-3

3-4

Glareshield Lighting................................................................................................. 3-3

3-5

Circuit-Breaker Panel Lighting ................................................................................ 3-3

3-6

BRIGHTDIM Switch ............................................................................................. 3-4

3-7

Passenger Cabin Lighting Controls.......................................................................... 3-4

3-8

ENTRANCE Pushbutton.......................................................................................... 3-5

3-9

OCCUPIED Light .................................................................................................... 3-5

3-10

Passenger Lighting Control Switch.......................................................................... 3-5

3-11

Typical Reading and Table Lamp Switch................................................................. 3-6

3-12

Passenger Ordinance Signs ...................................................................................... 3-6

3-13

Nose Cone, Baggage Compartment, and Rear Compartment


Lighting Components ............................................................................................... 3-7

3-14

Exterior Light Locations .......................................................................................... 3-7

3-15

Navigation Lights and NAV Switch ......................................................................... 3-7

3-16

Anticollision Strobe Lights and ANTICOL Switch ................................................. 3-8

3-17

Strobe Lights ............................................................................................................ 3-8

3-18

Landing Lights and LANDING Switch ................................................................... 3-8

3-19

Taxi Light and TAXI Switch .................................................................................... 3-9

3-20

Ice Detection Lights and Control Switch ................................................................. 3-9

3-21

Emergency Lighting Power Supply Assembly ........................................................ 3-9

3-22

OFFONARMED Switch .................................................................................... 3-10

TABLE
Table
3-1
Revision 1

Title

Page

Lighting Bus Dependency .................................................................................... 3-9


FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

3-iii

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

CHAPTER 3
LIGHTING
;;;;;
;;;;
;;;;;
;;;;;
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INTRODUCTION
The Falcon 900 lighting system is divided into interior and exterior lighting. Interior
lighting includes cockpit, passenger compartment, baggage compartment, rear compartment, and nose cone lighting. Cockpit lighting includes general illumination and
specific lighting for instruments and map reading. Passenger compartment lighting
provides illumination for warning signs and specific area illumination for passenger
safety and convenience. Individual lights are provided for the rear compartment, baggage compartment, and nose cone. Exterior lighting consists of navigation, landing,
taxi, anticollision, wingtip strobe, and wing ice detection lights.

GENERAL
The cockpit employs several types of lighting. Rheostat controlled, integrated lights are
located in the instrument panel, pedestal, console, overhead panel, and digital displays. A
rheostat also controls pilot and copilot map
lights. Two-way switches control the pilot
Revision 3

and copilot dome lights. Push-button switches


control circuit-breaker panel spotlights.
Lighting intensity for various cockpit panels, indicators, and buttons is controlled with
the BRIGHTDIM switch located on the warning panel.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

3-1

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

The passenger compartment lighting consists of fluorescent lighting controlled by


pushbuttons or toggle switches for the entrance, lavatory, and both sides of the compartment. Passenger reading lights and call
sign lights are controlled by switchlights.

and white on the vertical stabilizer tip


fairing)
Two landing lights, one located in each
wing/fuselage fillet
One taxi light located on the nose gear

The nose cone, baggage, and aft compartments


have individual lights.

Two red strobe anticollision lights, one


mounted on top of the vertical stabilizer
and one on the bottom of the fuselage

The emergency lighting system ensures illumination of the cockpit, emergency exit, and
passenger compartment entrance door in case
of total electrical power failure.

Two strobe lights, one in each wingtip,


adjacent to the navigation lights

The airplane exterior lighting system is


equipped with the following lights:

Two wing ice detection lights, located


on either side of the forward fuselage to
detect ice accumulation on the wing
leading edges

Three navigation lights (red on the left


wingtip, green on the right wingtip,

Two vertical stabilizer logo lights, installed on the upper surface of the horizontal stabilizer

Figure 3-1. Cockpit Lighting Controls

3-2

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

INTERIOR LIGHTING
Interior lighting includes cockpit, passenger
compartment, baggage compartment, aft compartment, and nose compartment lighting.

COCKPIT LIGHTING
Cockpit lighting consists of dome, reading,
glareshield, circuit-breaker panel, overhead
panel, instrument, and indicator lights.
Lighting controls are located overhead on the
rheostat panels and the interior lights panel
(Figure 3-1).

Dome Lights
Two dome lights, one located on either side of
the overhead panel, are provided for general
illumination of the cockpit (Figure 3-2).
The dome lights are controlled with the DOME
switch located on the INTERIOR LIGHTS
control panel. Each dome light contains three
bulbs: one for normal operation and two for
emergency operation. The dome lights are operational on the ground, when the engines are
shut down and the electrical power supply is
cut off. They are supplied with 28 VDC from
the battery via the main electrical box located
in the rear compartment.
The lights are operational when the DOME
light push-button switch is on and one of the
generator or battery switches is turned on.

international

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Glareshield Lighting
The glareshield is illuminated by two white fluorescent tubes (Figure 3-4) supplied by a
power inverter located in the nose cone. They
are controlled with the SHIELD on-off rheostat located on the left rheostat support plate
(left of the overhead panel).

Circuit-Breaker Panel Lighting


The circuit-breaker panel is illuminated with
two spotlights (Figure 3-5) located on the wall
behind the pilot and copilot. They are controlled with the CB PANEL LIGHT pushbutton located on the right circuit-breaker panel.

Figure 3-2. Cockpit Dome Lights

Overhead Panel Integral


Lighting
The overhead panel integral lighting is controlled with the OVERHEAD on-off rheostat
located on the right rheostat support plate
(right of the overhead panel). The rheostat
controls a power supply adjusting box that
varies the light intensity of the overhead panel
and the standby compass.

Instrument Integral Lighting


Integral lighting for the instrument panel, the
consoles, and the pedestal operates on 5 VDC
provided by power supply boxes using 28VDC inputs.

Figure 3-3. Cockpit Reading Lights

The lights are inoperative when all generator


and battery switches are turned off (e.g.,
preparation for crash landing).

Reading Lights
The two swiveling reading lights (Figure 3-3)
are located on the cockpit headliner above the
pilots and copilots seats. The associated onoff rheostats are located on the left and right
rheostat support plate.
Figure 3-5. Circuit-Breaker Panel
Lighting

Revision 1

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Figure 3-4. Glareshield Lighting

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

3-3

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Pilot and Left Console Instrument


Lighting
This lighting is controlled with the PILOT onoff rheostat located on the left rheostat support
plate.

Copilot and Right Console


Instrument Lighting
This lighting is controlled with the COPILOT
on-off rheostat located on the right rheostat support plate.

PASSENGER CABIN LIGHTING


The passenger cabin is equipped with lighting
systems for the entrance, lavatory, individual
passenger lights, and passenger ordinance
signs. Passenger cabin lighting is controlled
with conveniently located groups of switchlights or switches located throughout the cabin
and on the cockpit interior lights panel. The
typical lighting controls are shown in Figures
3-1 and 3-7.

Center Instrument Panel Lighting


This lighting is controlled with the CENTER onoff rheostat located on the left rheostat support
plate.

Pedestal Lighting
This lighting is controlled with the PEDESTAL
on-off rheostat located on the right rheostat
support plate.
Figure 3-7. Passenger Cabin Lighting
Controls

Annunciator and
Indicator Lighting
This lighting is controlled with a single
BRIGHTDIM switch (Figure 3-6) located
on the upper section of the warning panel.
The switch controls the day and night relays
for each system.
In BRIGHT (daylight operation), the lighting intensity is not reduced. In DIM (night lighting),
the lighting intensity is reduced. If the main
buses are not energized, set the switch to the
DIM position to restore night lighting.

Entrance Lighting
The cabin entrance is illuminated by two fluorescent tubes. They are controlled with the
entrance pushbutton located to the left of the
passenger door. Passenger doorstep lights are
controlled by an entry light pushbutton (Figure
3-8). A galley pushbutton (Figure 3-7) controls
the galley front fluorescent tube.
The entrance fluorescent tubes are supplied
power from an inverter that uses a 28-VDC
battery bus input. The step lights are directly
supplied with 28-VDC battery bus power. The
galley front tube is supplied with power from
the normal 28-VDC system through an inverter.

Lavatory Lighting

Figure 3-6. BRIGHTDIM Switch

3-4

The lavatory lighting system consists of fluorescent tubes powered from an inverter-fed with
28 VDC. The rear lavatory lighting is controlled
by a pushbutton located on the partition at frame
21. The center fluorescent tube inverter power

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Passenger Indirect Lights


This indirect ceiling lighting system is powered from an inverter supplied with 28 VDC.
The ceiling lighting consists of four rows of
fluorescent tubes. The system is controlled
with individual control switches located in
the cabin entrance and cabin (Figure 3-10).

Passenger Reading Lights

Figure 3-8. ENTRANCE Pushbutton

source is the battery. Therefore, it is not affected by an electrical system power failure.
The six remaining tubes are supplied with 28
VDC from the normal electrical system via
115-VAC, 50-Hz inverters.

The passenger cabin is equipped with reading


lights and table spotlights located in the upper
part of the decor panels. This system is supplied with 28 VDC. Each reading light and
table lamp is separately controlled with a
nearby switch (Figure 3-11).

A light located on the lavatory door (Figure


3-9) indicates (when illuminated) that the toilet is occupied.
The front lavatory lighting system is controlled by a microswitch activated by the
door latch. The fluorescent tube is supplied with power via a 28-VDC-fed 115VAC, 50-Hz inverter.

Figure 3-9. OCCUPIED Light

Revision 1

Figure 3-10. Passenger Lighting


Control Switch

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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PASSENGER ORDINANCE
SIGNS
The Fasten seat belts (Figure 3-12) instruction
and the no smoking symbols appear on two luminous passenger ordinance signs in the passenger cabin and are visible from any seat.
The fasten seat belts signs are controlled by
the FASTEN BELTS switchlight located on the
INTERIOR LIGHTS panel of the cockpit overhead panel. The switchlight has a built-in bulb
test circuit.
The no smoking sign lights are controlled with
the switchlight engraved with the international no smoking symbol. The switchlight is located on the overhead cockpit interior lights
panel and has a built-in bulb test circuit.

BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT,
REAR COMPARTMENT, AND
NOSE CONE LIGHTING
This lighting consists of:
An inspection light for the nose cone
A dome light for the baggage compartment
Dome lights for the rear compartment
The system components are shown in Figure
3-13.
These systems have the same power supply as
the cockpit dome lights and are directly supplied
by the batteries through the main electrical box.
The nose cone inspection light is controlled
with a built-in switch. The rear compartment and
baggage compartment dome lights are controlled with a microswitch located on each door.

EXTERIOR LIGHTING
The exterior lighting consists of navigation,
anticollision, strobe, landing, taxi, and ice
detection lights. The exterior light locations
are shown in Figure 3-14.

NAVIGATION LIGHTS
Figure 3-11. Typical Reading and
Table Lamp Switch

There are three navigation lights (Figure 3-l5):


a red light on the left wingtip, a green light on
the right wingtip, and a white light on the
vertical stabilizer stub. These lights are controlled with the NAV switch located on the EXTERIOR LIGHTS panel.

LOGO LIGHTS (OPTION)


Two white lights are installed on the upper
surface of the horizontal stabilizer. These
lights are controlled by the three-position
OFFNAVLOGONAV switch, located on
the overhead panel. These lights illuminate the
vertical stabilizer surfaces located above the
horizontal stabilizer.
Figure 3-12. Passenger Ordinance Signs

3-6

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

ANTICOLLISION LIGHTS
(RED)

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75
STROBE LIGHT
(WHITE)

NAVIGATION LIGHT
(RIGHT LIGHT IDENTICAL)

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75

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20 ;;;;;
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120
;;;;; 10
RIGHT WING STROBE
LIGHT (WHITE)
(LEFT WING LIGHT
IDENTICAL)

REAR NAVIGATION
LIGHT
70
70

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REAR STROBE LIGHT


(WHITE) 180

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110
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LEFT WING TIP


LIGHT (RED)
(RIGHT WING TIP
LIGHT [GREEN]
IDENTICAL)

Figure 3-13. Nose Cone, Baggage Compartment, and


Rear Compartment Lighting Components

RIGHT LANDING
LIGHT

LEFT LANDING
LIGHT

TAXI
LIGHT

ICE DETECTION
LIGHT
RIGHT LANDING
LIGHT
REAR STROBE
LIGHT (WHITE)
ICE DETECTION
LIGHT

LANDING
LIGHT

10
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TAXI LIGHT

Revision 2

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75
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75

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75
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12

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ICE DETECTION
LIGHT
LEFT LANDING
LIGHT

12

40

FUSELAGE ANTICOLLISION
LIGHT (RED)

Figure 3-15. Navigation Lights and NAV Switch

Figure 3-14. Exterior Light Locations

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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ANTICOLLISION LIGHTS
There are two red anticollision strobe lights
(Figure 3-16): one centered on the fin fairing
and the other on the underside of the fuselage.

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Each light has an intensity rating of 100 candle power. The vertical fin and belly anticollision lights are supplied by power supply boxes
that deliver pulsating high-voltage current. The
two power supply boxes are synchronized so
that the two lights function simultaneously.

The lights are controlled with the threeposition ANTICOL switch that is also used
for the strobe lights. In OFF the anticollision
and strobe lights are extinguished. In RED
only the anticollision lights function. In ALL
both anticollision and strobe lights function.

STROBE LIGHTS
One white high-intensity light (400 candle
power) is mounted on each wingtip (Figure 317) in a common enclosure with the navigation
light. The lights are supplied by power supply
boxes that deliver high-voltage current in triggered pulses. The two power supply boxes are
synchronized to create simultaneous flashes.
The lights are controlled with the ANTICOL
switch (Figure 3-16) whose functions are described in the Anticollision Lights section.

LANDING LIGHTS
Two 600-watt white lights (Figure 3-18) are located in housings in either wing-to-fuselage
fairing. Each one is provided with a clear cover.
The lights are controlled with the LANDING
switch on the overhead panel.

TAXI LIGHT
The 150-watt white taxi light (Figure 3-19) is
mounted on the nose gear strut and illuminates
the area in front of the airplane during taxiing.
Control is accomplished with the taxi switch
located on the EXTERIOR LIGHTS panel.
This switch also controls a relay that enables
the taxi light power supply when the nose gear
is downlocked. Therefore, if the nose gear is
not downlocked, the taxi light is extinguished
regardless of switch position.

Figure 3-16. Anticollision Strobe Lights and ANTICOL Switch

STROBE LIGHT

3-8

Figure 3-17. Strobe Lights

Figure 3-18. Landing Lights and LANDING Switch

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

EMERGENCY LIGHTING
In case of total electrical power supply failure, the emergency lighting system ensures
illumination of the cockpit, emergency exit,
and main entrance door. This system is supplied by three power supply boxes, each containing a three-element nickel-cadmium
battery normally charged by the onboard electrical system. In case of electrical power failure, these batteries provide lighting for
approximately ten minutes. An emergency
lighting power supply assembly is shown in
Figure 3-21.
The power supply located behind the pilot
furnishes power to the:
Pilot dome light
Passenger door EXIT sign
Main entrance door spotlights

Table 3-1. LIGHTING BUS DEPENDENCY


PRIMARY BUS A1

PRIMARY BUS A2

Fin anticollision light

Radio navigation systems lighting

Left external lights

Passenger signs

Left cockpit reading light

Entrance lights

Navigation lights

Glareshield lights

Strobe lights

Left landing light

Center instrument lights


Left instrument and console lights

PRIMARY BUS B1

PRIMARY BUS B2

Lavatory lights

Radio navigation systems lighting

Overhead panel lights

Galley lights

Forward indirect cabin lights

Right landing light

Right cabin reading lights

Belly anticollision light

Right cockpit reading light

Right external lights

Taxi light

Right instrument and console lights


Pedestal instrument lights
Aft cabin indirect lights
Left cabin reading lights

Figure 3-19. Taxi Light and TAXI Switch

ICE DETECTION LIGHTS


Two 75-watt white lights (Figure 3-20) are
located on either side of the fuselage forward
section. They enable in-flight detection of ice
accumulation on the wing leading edges. The
lights are controlled with the WING switch located on the EXTERIOR LIGHTS panel.

LIGHTING BUS
DEPENDENCY
Table 3-1 lists the lights and buses that supply the electrical power.

Figure 3-20. Ice Detection Lights


and Control Switch
Figure 3-21. Emergency Lighting Power Supply Assembly

Revision 1

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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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The power supply located behind the copilot


furnishes power to the:
Copilot dome light
Passenger door ordinance sign
The power supply located on the right side to
the rear of the emergency exit furnishes power
to the:

In the OFF position, no power is furnished to


the emergency lighting system. In this condition, if the airplane electrical system is energized, the EMERG LIGHTS annunciator
illuminates.
In ON, the emergency lighting system is energized, and the EMERG LIGHTS annunciator illuminates. This position is used for
testing.

Emergency exit handle light


Emergency EXIT sign
Airplane evacuation light located on the
wings lower surface
Outside spotlight near the emergency
exit for wing lighting
In case of fuselage rupture, each power supply continues to supply the corresponding
lights.

In armed, the emergency lights remain off as


long as the airplanes electrical system is energized. The lights illuminate automatically in
the event of a total electrical system failure.
The EMERG LIGHTS annunciator is not illuminated in this condition. For normal inflight conditions the switch should be placed
to ARMED.

The emergency lighting system is controlled


with the OFFONARMED switch (Figure
3-22) located below the EMERG LIGHTS indicator on the interior lights panel.

Figure 3-22. OFFONARMED Switch

3-10

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QUESTIONS
1.

The cockpit dome lights are turned on


by:
A. A switch on the overhead panel or a
switch at the passenger entrance
B. A switch at the passenger entrance
C. A switch on the overhead panel
D. A rheostat on the copilots side console

4.

The emergency lights automatically illuminate when power to both primary


buses is lost and the emergency lighting switch is in the:
A. ON position
B. OFF position
C. ACTIVE position
D. ARMED position

2.

The emergency lighting switch positions are:


A. OFF, ON, ARMED
B. OFF, STANDBY
C. OFF, CHARGE
D. OFF, ARMED, STANDBY

5.

The wingtip strobe lights are turned on


with the:
A. Anticollision lights switch
B. Light switch labeled WING on
the overhead panel
C. Navigation lights switch
D. Strobe light switch

3.

After a total electrical failure, the emergency lights have battery power for approximately:

6.

The battery bus feeds power directly to


the:

A.
B.
C.
D.

Revision 3

5 to 10 minutes
10 to 20 minutes
25 to 35 minutes
40 to 45 minutes

A.
B.
C.
D.

Circuit-breaker panel lights


Emergency lights
Dome lights
Reading lights

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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CHAPTER 4
MASTER WARNING SYSTEM
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 4-1
GENERAL............................................................................................................................... 4-1
WARNING PANEL ................................................................................................................. 4-2
FIRE PANEL ........................................................................................................................... 4-5
HYDRAULIC CONTROL AND INDICATOR PANEL ........................................................ 4-6
BATTERY TEMPERATURE INDICATOR ........................................................................... 4-6
MISCELLANEOUS VISUAL WARNINGS .......................................................................... 4-7
ENG 2 FAIL Warning Light ............................................................................................ 4-7
Interstage Turbine Temperature Indicators ...................................................................... 4-7
AUDIO WARNINGS .............................................................................................................. 4-8
General ............................................................................................................................. 4-8
Priority Warnings ............................................................................................................. 4-8
Warning Voice .................................................................................................................. 4-8
INSTRUMENT PANEL INDICATOR LIGHTS .................................................................. 4-11
Configuration Panel and Landing Gear Control Handle................................................ 4-11
Thrust Reverser Indicator Lights ................................................................................... 4-12
OVERHEAD PANEL INDICATOR LIGHTS...................................................................... 4-13
OPERATION......................................................................................................................... 4-15
QUESTIONS......................................................................................................................... 4-16

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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Title

Page

4-1

Warning Panel ............................................................................................................ 4-2

4-2

Fire Panel .................................................................................................................... 4-5

4-3

Hydraulic Control and Indicator Panel ...................................................................... 4-6

4-4

Battery Temperature Indicator <172 .......................................................................... 4-6

4-4A

Battery Temperature Indicator 172 .......................................................................... 4-6

4-5

ENG 2 FAIL Light ...................................................................................................... 4-7

4-6

ITT Indicators.............................................................................................................. 4-7

4-7

HORN SIL Pushbutton .............................................................................................. 4-8

4-8

Configuration Panel and Landing Gear Control Handle .......................................... 4-11

4-9

Thrust Reverser Indicator Lights .............................................................................. 4-12

4-10

Overhead Panel Lights .............................................................................................. 4-13

TABLES
Table

Title

Page

4-1

Annunciator Illumination Causes................................................................................ 4-3

4-2

Fire Panel Illumination Causes .................................................................................. 4-5

4-3

Hydraulic Control and Indicator Panel Illumination Causes ...................................... 4-6

4-4

Battery Temperature Indicator Illumination Causes .................................................. 4-6

4-5

ENG 2 FAIL Illumination Causes .............................................................................. 4-7

4-6

ITT Light Illumination Causes.................................................................................... 4-7

4-7

Audio Warning Causes................................................................................................ 4-9

4-8

Audio Warning Testing ............................................................................................ 4-11

4-9

Configuration Panel and Landing Gear


Control Handle Illumination Causes ........................................................................ 4-12

4-10

Thrust Reverser Indicator Lights Illumination Causes ............................................ 4-12

4-11

Overhead Panel Light Illumination Causes .............................................................. 4-14

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CHAPTER 4
MASTER WARNING SYSTEM

TEST

INTRODUCTION
The master warning system on the Falcon 900 provides a warning of airplane equipment
malfunctions and unsafe operating conditions which require immediate attention or an
indication that a particular system is in operation. A system of aural tones is also used
to draw attention to certain system situations.

GENERAL
The warning system makes possible the presentation and testing of warning and indication circuits for the various airplane systems.
Included in the warning group are the warning panel, hydraulic control and indicator
panel, overhead panel, thrust reverser lights,
and interstage temperature lights.

Revision 1

A panel with 52 annunciator lights is mounted


in the center instrument panel in front of the
pilot. These annunciators and the ones on
associated panels, along with some aural tones,
are designed to alert the pilot to abnormal or
undesirable system conditions. The panel is
known as the warning panel, and the tones are
generated by the aural warning system.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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WARNING PANEL
The warning panel (Figure 4-1 and Appendix
B) provides a means of alerting the pilot to
certain system conditions or malfunctions. The
annunciators are either red or amber and illuminate for the causes listed in Table 4-1. Each
annunciator contains two bulbs and an engraved
legend identifying the corresponding system.

A TEST switch is provided to illuminate all annunciator lights and to verify bulb integrity.
Electric power is normally provided from the
A1 bus through circuit breaker EX WARN
LIGHTS A. In the event of a normal electric system failure, power is automatically transferred
to the B1 bus and fed through circuit breaker
EX WARN LIGHTS B. A BRIGHTDIM
switch is provided to dim some of the annunciators during night flight.

NOTE:
ON AIRCRAFT WITHOUT TRANSFER VALVE XTK2, THE WARNING
PANEL DOES NOT FEATURE XTK2 OPEN OR XTK2 CLOSED LIGHTS.

*FWD DOORS (WHERE INCORPORATED)

Figure 4-1.

4-2

Warning Panel

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Table 4-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES


Annunciator

Cause for Illumination

CMPTR 1

The control switch of the


indicated computer is in the OFF
or MAN position.

CMPTR 2

The indicated computer has


failed (electrical power supply
failure, internal failure, or
incorrect data).

CMPTR 3
FWD
DOORS

The light comes on if:


(Specific light to aircraft
incorporating M880A
modification).
The main entrance door is not
locked or the front lavatory
compartment service door is
not locked (on aircraft equipped
with this lavatory compartment).

L. AOA

The indicated heating systems


are not on.

R. AOA

Angle-of-attack heating has


failed.

OIL 1

The oil pressure of the indicated


engine is lower than 25 psi
(1.72 bar).

OIL 2

Chips are detected in the


indicated engine oil system.

OIL 3

Red light with M880A

Annunciator
L. WHL
OVHT

Cause for Illumination


An overheat condition is detected in
the left or right landing gear wheel
well.

R. WHL
OVHT
BAT 1
BAT 2

BUS TIED
HOT
BAT

The indicated battery is not


connected to the airplane power
system through its make-and-break
switch.

The main left and right buses are tied,


or the battery 2 paralleling contactor
remains closed.
The temperature of one of the
batteries exceeds 150 F
(65.5 C) for aircraft prior to
SN 172 with SB-94 not applied.
The temperature of one of the
batteries exceeds 160F (71.1 C)
for aircraft SN 172 and subsequent, and aircraft prior to
SN 172 with SB-94 applied.
The HOT light located on the
battery temperature indicator is
illuminated.

AUTO
SLATS

There is a discrepancy between


the two slat control flight/ground
contacts.

L. PITOT

The indicated heating systems


are not on.

R. PITOT

Pitot or static pressure probe


heating has failed.

There is a discrepancy between


these two contacts and the nose
and left landing gear flight/
ground contacts, inhibiting gear
retraction.

The indicated heating system is


not on.

The discrepancy between the


two angle-of-attack sensors
exceeds +5 (in-flight
configuration only).

ST BY
PITOT

Standby pitot pressure probe


heating has failed.

GEN 1
GEN 2
GEN 3

Revision 4

The indicated generator is not tied to


the power system (the associated
reverse current relay is open, or the
start relay remains closed at the end
of a start sequence).

One of the ADC contacts


controlling the slats detects an IAS
lower than 265 knots, whereas the
ADC monitoring contacts detect
an IAS of 280 knots.

FLAP
ASYM

An asymmetry between the left and


right flap position exists.

Red light with M880A

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Table 4-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


Annunciator
FUEL 1
FUEL 2

Cause for Illumination


The pressure switch located on the
indicated engine fuel supply LP line
indicates a pressure drop (pressure
less than or equal to 4.6 psi
[approximately 320 mb]).

Cause for Illumination

AFT CABIN
ISOL
(option 25-21-01)

REV
UNLOCK

FUEL 3
XTK 2
OPEN

Annunciator

The front-to-rear tank transfer valve


is closed when it should be open.

The light normally illuminates


during the thrust reverser retraction
phase.

FUELING

Aircraft with transfer valve XTK2.

BAG
ACCESS

The cabin baggage compartment


access door is not closed.

LO
FUEL 1

A fuel level below 200 pounds is


detected in tank group G1 or G3.

The refueling connector access


door is not closed.
The refueling control panel
access door is not closed.
The GRAVITY FUELING switch
is set to ON.

For airplanes SNs 1 to 11A


fuel level below 200 pounds is
detected in tank group G2 (or
below 1,100 lb if booster pumps
2 are off).

Bus B-2 has failed.

For airplanes SNs 12 and subsequentA fuel level below 200


pounds is detected in tank
group G2.

The vent valve control lever is


raised.

The DEFUELING switch is set


to ON.

AP
AIL
ZERO

The emergency aileron actuator is


not in the neutral position.

AIL
FEEL

A discrepancy is detected between


the IAS output of the air data
computer and the position
information supplied by the linear
potentiometer on the aileron Arthur
actuator.

PITCH
FEEL

There is a discrepancy between the


position of the elevator Arthur
actuator and the position of the
horizontal stabilizer, or there is an
elevator Arthur box malfunction.
Red light with M880A

4-4

One of the two fuel vents is


not closed.
The defueling/refueling valve is
not closed.

LO
FUEL 3
LO
FUEL 2

The thrust reverser clamshell doors


are not locked in the stowed
position.

NOTE

The front-to-rear tank transfer valve


is open when it should be closed.

Aircraft with transfer valve XTK2.

XTK 2
CLOSED

The light comes on if:


The foldable door of the partition at
frame 16 is not latched open when
the No smoking passenger call
sign is activated.

The autopilot has failed or has


automatically disengaged.
On aircraft incorporating M880C,
when this light flashes, the audio
warning sounds.

MISTRIM

The AP trim coupler system has


failed.

MACH
TRIM

The MACH trim system is disengaged or has failed.

BLEED
OVHT

An overheat of HP/LP bleed air is


detected (temperature higher than
or equal to 635 F [335 C], or 545
F [285 C] if anti-icing has been
activated).

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FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 4-1. ANNUNCIATOR ILLUMINATION CAUSES (Cont)


Annunciator
ECU
OVHT

Cause for Illumination


An overheat (446 F or 230 C)
is detected at the compressor
outlet of the turbocooling unit.

Annunciator
CABIN

NOSE
CONE OVHT

BLEED
APU

BAG ISOL

#2 P BK

The front lavatory compartment service panel door is


not closed (if this option is
installed).

Overheating is detected in one of


the cabin or cockpit supply ducts (air
temperature higher than or equal to
203 F [95 C]).
Overheat is detected in the nose
cone (temperature higher than or
equal to 158 F [70C]).

Light on only with audio warning on


aircraft with M880A

REAR
DOORS

The APU bleed-air valve is not


completely closed with the bleed
switch off or one of the power levers
positioned to 54 or greater.
The baggage compartment electric
isolation valve is not open. In this
condition the baggage compartment
is not pressurized.
Steady illumination: Hydraulic
system No. 2 pressure is applied
to the brakes (pressure higher
than 261 psi [approximately
18 bars]).
Flashing illumination: When the
park brake accumulator pressure
is between 1,305 to 1,102 psi or
below, the brakes can be applied
only once.

With audio warning:


Cabin altitude is greater than
or equal to 10,000 feet.
Without audio warning:
The main entrance door is
not locked.

The turbofan bypass valve is not


closed, and the airplane is on
the ground or flight with the
landing gear down and locked.

COND'G
OVHT

Cause for Illumination

T/O
CONFIG

LIGHTSCauses illumination of all


lights on the warning, hydraulic control and indicator, and overhead panels,
as well as the thrust reverser and interstage turbine temperature lights on each
ITT indicator
Center positionIs the normal off position of the switch
FIRECauses illumination of all FIRE
lights on the fire panel
The BRIGHTDIM switch is spring-loaded
to an unmarked center off position.
Figure 4-2. Fire Panel

The baggage compartment


outside door is unlocked.

BRIGHTMomentarily positioning
provides normal indicator lighting.

The rear compartment door


is unlocked.

CenterIs the normal inactive position


of the switch

Table 4-2. FIRE PANEL ILLUMINATION


CAUSES

Red light with M880A

DIMMomentarily positioning pro-

Annunciator

The light illuminates and the audio


warning sounds if the aircraft is on
the ground, with at least one of the
power levers advanced beyond 82
and one of the following modes
present:
The slat/flap control is in
CLEAN.
Flap deflection is higher than or
equal to 22.
The airbrakes are not retracted.
The horizontal stabilizer is out of
the authorized green takeoff
range between 4 30'
and 7 30'.
The slats are not extended.
On aircraft incorporating M880C
the park brake handle is pulled
and the dual braking system is
not activated.

Revision 4

The TEST switch is spring-loaded to an unmarked center position and has positions labeled LIGHTS and FIRE.

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

vides dimming of the indicator lights


through a self-locking relay.

NOTE
Another self-locking relay enables
dimming of the indicator lights and
buttons in the cockpit.

FIRE PANEL

FIRE 1

With the exception of the FAULT lights,


which have only one bulb, the fire panel lights
have two bulbs. The fire panel FIRE lights can
be tested by positioning the TEST switch on
the panel to FIRE, while the FAULT and
TRANS lights are tested by selecting the
TEST switch to LIGHTS. This switch is also
used to test the fire detection and extinguishing systems.

Fire is detected in the indicated


engine compartment.

FIRE 2
FIRE 3
FIRE
BAG COMP

The fire panel (Figure 4-2 and the Appendix


B) includes twelve lights: five red and seven
amber. When any of the five red lights illuminates, an audio warning sounds simultaneously. The audio sound can be silenced by
pressing the horn silence pushbutton located
on the pedestal. The annunciators illuminate
for the causes given in Table 4-2.

Cause for Illumination

FIRE APU

FAULT

FUEL
SHUT
OFF

Fire or smoke is detected in the


baggage compartment.

Fire is detected in the APU


compartment.

A fault is detected in the associated


detection loop.

During fuel shutoff valve transit or if


there is a discrepancy between the
position of the valve and the position
of the control switch.

TRANS

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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The fire panel lights cannot be dimmed, except for the three FUEL SHUT OFF valve
lights and the FAULT lights.

HYDRAULIC CONTROL
AND INDICATOR PANEL
The hydraulic control and indicator panel (Figure 4-3 and Appendix B) centralizes the display of hydraulic system malfunctions. The
panel includes four amber and two green lights.
Each light includes two bulbs. An engraved
label serves as identification of the associated system. The hydraulic control and indicator panel lights illuminate for the reasons
given in Table 4-3.
The lights on the hydraulic control and
indicator panel can be tested by positioning
the TEST switch located on the warning panel
to LIGHTS.

FALCON 900 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL

Table 4-3. HYDRAULIC CONTROL AND


INDICATOR PANEL
ILLUMINATION CAUSES
Annunciator
PUMP 1

international

The causes for illumination are given in


Table 4-4.

Table 4-4. BATTERY TEMPERATURE


INDICATOR ILLUMINATION
CAUSES
Annunciator

Cause for Illumination


The pressure of the indicated pump
is lower than 1,500 psi
(approximately 103 bars).

WARM

PUMP 2
HOT

PUMP 3
ST BY
PUMP

The standby pump selector


located in the rear compartment
is not in the normal flight position.

L R

The lights extinguish when the


brakes are released and pressure
becomes lower than or equal to
160 psi (11 bars) decreasing in
system No. 1).

The No. 1 and/or No. 2 battery


overheats. (The light illuminates
when the battery internal
temperature is higher than 120F
[48.9C]).
The No. 1 and/or No. 2 battery
overheats. The light illuminates
when the battery internal
temperature is:
Over 150 F (65.5C) for aircraft
prior to SN 172 with SB-94 not
applied, or

The standby pump cycle time is


longer than 60 seconds.
Pressure supplying the left or
right brake units becomes higher
than or equal to 232 psi
(approximately 16 bar)
increasing in system No. 1.

Cause for Illumination

Over 160 F (71.7C) for aircraft


SN 172 and subsequent, and for
aircraft prior to SN 132, with SB-94
applied.
NOTE
This light is connected in parallel
with the red HOT BAT light on the
warning panel.

Figure 4-4. Battery Temperature


Indicator Aircraft <172

On aircraft with SB-125, the aircraft


on the ground, the MASTER APU
switch set to ON and the COND
BATT switch on, this light illuminates
when the battery cooling electric
valve is fully open

BATTERY TEMPERATURE
INDICATOR
The battery temperature indicator (Figure
4-4, 4-4A, and Appendix B) displays the temperature of each battery. It includes:

888
BATTERY 1
HOT

A red HOT light connected in parallel


with the HOT BAT light located on
the warning panel
Figure 4-3. Hydraulic Control and
Indicator Panel

4-6

An amber WARM light


A test pushbutton which causes
illumination of the indicator WARM
and HOT lights and the warning panel
HOT BAT light and indicator pointers
displacement

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

WARM

888
BATTERY 2
TEST
TEST BUTTON TESTS
THE BATTERY TEMPERATURE
INDICATOR

Figure 4-4A. Battery Temperature Indicator Aircraft 172

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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MISCELLANEOUS
VISUAL WARNINGS
ENG 2 FAIL WARNING LIGHT
THE ENG 2 FAIL warning light (Figure 4-5 and
Appendix B) illuminates steady. The light and
causes for illumination are shown in Table 45.

INTERSTAGE TURBINE
TEMPERATURE INDICATORS
The three ITT indicators (Figure 4-6 and the
Appendix B) each include a graduated circular dial, a three-digit counter, and a red
engine overheat warning light. The lights
and their causes for illumination are shown
in Table 4-6.
The lights can be tested by positioning the TEST
switch located on the warning panel to LIGHTS.

Figure 4-5. ENG 2 FAIL Light


Figure 4-6. ITT Indicators
Table 4-5. ENG 2 FAIL
ILLUMINATION CAUSES
Annunciator
ENG 2 FAIL

Cause for Illumination


The airplane is on the ground and
the No. 2 engine power lever is at
the 84 setting and the No. 2 engine power is less than 85% N1.

Table 4-6. ITT LIGHT


ILLUMINATION CAUSES
Annunciator

The light flashes if the associated


engine ITT reaches 952 C on
TFE-731-5AR-1C or 980 C on
TFE-731-5BR-1C.

The No. 2 engine S-duct access


door is not properly closed.

If the power increase function is


used, the light flashes at 974 C on
TFE-731-5AR-1C or 996 C on
TFE-731-5BR-1C.

A second light is installed on the


copilot instrument panel on
aircraft with M880B incorporated.

ECU
A/I

Revision 4

On aircraft with SB-131, this


pushbutton light is illuminated
when the turbine emergency antiicing valve is closed

Cause for Illumination

PWR
INC

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

The light indicates the correct


operation of power increase system
control relays for high altitude
takeoff (approximately 5,000 feet)
and hot weather conditions (over
18.5 C).

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AUDIO WARNINGS

sound can be silenced are listed in Table 4-7.

PRIORITY WARNINGS

GENERAL
The audio warning system alerts the crew to configuration anomalies or certain operational conditions. The unit is located in the pedestal and
issues warning sounds through the cockpit loudspeaker or the pilot and copilot headsets.
The sounds are generated by a transistorized
audio warning unit which includes four
potentiometers. The potentiometers are designated for:

The stall and VMO /M MO warnings have priority over all others. They cannot be triggered
simultaneously with the other warnings, with
the exception of the horizontal stabilizer in
movement warning (rattle noise).
Next in priority is the fire warning. It cannot
be triggered simultaneously with other warnings, with the exception of the horizontal stabilizer-in-movement warning.

Loudspeaker output

WARNING VOICE

Pilot headset audio output

Single Warning

Copilot headset audio output

A single voice advisory is repeated every two


seconds until the corresponding signal disappears or the HORN SIL pushbutton is pressed.

Rattle noise output


In some cases, the warning sound or voice
can be silenced by pressing the HORN SIL
pushbutton (Figure 4-7) located on the
pedestal.
The warnings, descriptions of sound, associated warnings, causes of warning, and if the

Figure 4-7.

4-8

HORN SIL Pushbutton

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

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Table 4-7. AUDIO WARNING CAUSES


WARNING

SIMULTANEOUS
WARNING OR
INDICATION

TYPE OF
SOUND

CAUSE

HORN
SIL

VMO/MMO

Continuous varying
sound with frequency
varying between 660
Hz and 3,330 Hz
during a one-second
period

Readings on both
EFISs

VMO/MMO exceeded

No

Cabin pressure

Warning voice CABIN

Red CABIN light on


warning panel and
cabin altitude reading
higher than 10,000
feet on cabin altimeter

Cabin altitude higher than


10,000 feet

Yes

Fire

Continuous two-pitch
audible 500-Hz tone
for 150 ms and then
555 Hz for 150 ms

Illumination of at least
one red FIRE light on
the fire panel

Fire is detected by:


Engines 1, 2, and 3
fire detectors
APU fire detector
Baggage compartment smoke detector

Yes

Stall

Intermittent 1,660-Hz
sound (beep beep)
on for 100 ms and off
for 100 ms

SLATS NOT EXTENDED


Illumination of the
three IGN lights on
the overhead panel
Flashing of green
slat light

Airplane angle-of-attack is
greater than 11

No

No