14–20 March 2016

www.birmingham.ac.uk/artsandsciencefestival

Contents
4 Concerts
10 Exhibitions & Events
22 Performances
24 Timetable
27 Screenings
33 Talks & Lectures
44 Workshops
50 Coming Soon
51 How to find us

Contents

–2–

Welcome
Welcome to the University of Birmingham’s fourth Arts & Science Festival – a
week-long celebration of research, culture and collaboration. This year the festival
explores ‘memory and forgetting’ and brings together leading artists, thinkers
and scientists for a free programme of concerts, exhibitions, performances,
screenings, talks and workshops.
Professor Alice Roberts, author, broadcaster and anatomist, will discuss her
latest BBC series The Celts, revealing the origins, life and legacy of one of the
world’s most mysterious ancient civilisations (page 43).
The recent centenary of the start of World War One fuels a debate about
memory and commemoration. Audiences can contribute their reactions to
the now iconic installation of ceramic poppies at the Tower of London, Blood
Swept Lands and Seas of Red (page 47), and also join a discussion on how to
commemorate world-changing events in the 21st century (page 40).
We also welcome to campus a series of exhibitions and events reflecting on
Birmingham’s past: #Nicklin Unseen is an outdoor exhibition examining the work
of Phyliss Nicklin, a Lecturer at the University of Birmingham during the 1950s and
60s who took thousands of photographs from across the city (page 16); Sampad
South Asian Arts presents content from recent community heritage project My
Route, which captured the culturally rich heritage of Birmingham’s Stratford Road
(page 17); and Cadbury Research Library hosts a guest lecture providing the historical context for an exhibition of photographs, currently on display at Ikon Gallery,
by academic and documentary filmmaker Janet Mendelsohn, which depict the
Balsall Heath area of Birmingham in the late 1960s (page 43).
Finally, art meets science in a string of collaborative events for the festival:
Vivid Projects presents the culmination of a two year collaboration between
six leading biomedical scientists and six animation artists (pages 14, 38 and
46); Professor Jane Raymond, School of Psychology, leads an interactive gallery
session at The Barber Institute revealing what happens to your brain when you
look at art (page 34); University of Birmingham particle physicists work with
contemporary dancers on an exciting new project; and Permission Taken, an
exhibition by artist Antonio Roberts, brings together digital technology, ‘copyleft’
and the university’s own collections (pages 11, 42 and 46).
Once again, we encourage you to fuel your interests, exercise your curiosity,
and navigate your way through the festival programme with verve.
Thank you for joining us.

–3–

welcome

ON MEMORY:
Recital and
Conversation
Joseph Houston – piano
Michael Zev Gordon – composer

ConceRts

Tuesday 15 March, 17.00 – 19.00
Bramall Music Building,
Dome Room, 3rd Floor R12
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit:
on-memory.eventbrite.co.uk
Professor of Composition, Michael Zev
Gordon, explores the festival theme
with award winning pianist Joseph
Houston.
The evening includes a discussion
between the composer and pianist
exploring the relationship between
memory and music, followed by a
performance of On Memory, a 40-minute
work for piano.

BARBER EVENING
CONCERT
Callum Smart – violin
Richard Uttley – piano
Wednesday 16 March, 19.30
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts,
Concert Hall R14
 £18 / £15 / £12 Barber Friends / £5
students. Please visit barber.org.uk
to book online or call the Barber on
0121 414 7333
Callum Smart attracted public attention at
the age of thirteen after winning the strings
category final of BBC Young Musician 2010 and
in the same year, the top European prize in
the Menuhin Competition in Oslo. He has since
appeared at festivals, in concert and with major
orchestras across Europe, and released his first
recording in 2014. He is joined by acclaimed
pianist, Richard Uttley. Richard has given
concerts in the Barber Lunchtime Series and
makes his debut in the evening series with this
concert.
Mozart: Sonata in B flat, K378
Poulenc: Sonata, FP 119
Bach: Chaconne from Partita No. 2 in D minor,
BWV 1004
Strauss, R: Violin Sonata in E flat, Op. 18

–5–

Concerts

Beer: Dark Matter
Thursday 17 March, 19.30
Birmingham Open Media
1 Dudley Street, B5 4EG
 Free

Concerts

In collaboration with the Art@CMS project at
CERN in Switzerland, the Birmingham Ensemble
for Electroacoustic Research (BEER) presents this
performance involving the sonification of data
streams from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s
largest and most complex particle accelerator.
Experimental data containing clues towards
possible 'new physics' becomes the raw material for
improvised music and visualisations programmed in
real time by the ensemble with the aim of creating
a result that is beautiful, and both musically and
scientifically meaningful.
As part of this event Nomad, BOM’s cutting edge
restaurant partner, will offer an innovative physicsinspired menu. (Further details will be made available
at foodbynomad.com)

–6–

BarbeR Lunchtime
Concert
Friday 18 March, 13.10 – 14.00
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
Concert Hall R14
 Free
Students from Chetham’s School of Music
give their annual concert in the Barber
Institute. One of the UKs most respected
music school, Chetham’s support future
generations of musicians and composers.
Come along to spot a star of the future!

MUSIC SOCIETY:
CHAMBER CHOIRS &
BRASS BAND
Friday 18 March, 19.30
Bramall Music Building,
Elgar Concert Hall R12
 £10 / £8 / £3 students. Available on
the door or online at shop.bham.ac.uk
The Music Society’s two chamber choirs and
brass band present an evening of popular
compositions and arrangements, with
feature soloists.

–7–

Concerts

OrcHestral
Bramall Music Building,
Elgar Concert Hall R12
 Individual concert tickets
£10/ £8/ £3 students
 Weekend tickets
£16/ £12/ £5 students
Available on the door
or online at shop.bham.ac.uk
The Music Society orchestras and their
conductor Daniele Rosina present a
weekend of concerts in the Bramall Music
Building. The concerts feature popular
orchestral works alongside soloists and
the world premiere performance of
postgraduate composer Oliver Frost’s
new orchestral work, drawn onward.

Saturday 19 March, 19.30

Music Society:
Symphony
Orchestra
Daniele Rosina – conductor
Lucy Haggerwood-Bullen – violin*
Mascagni: intermezzo from Cavalleria
Rusticana
Puccini: intermezzo from Suor Angelica
Bizet: selection from Carmen
Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 61
* Winner of the Music Society's annual Solo
Competition

Sunday 20 March, 15.00

Music Society:
Philharmonic
Orchestra
Daniele Rosina – conductor
Richard Jenkinson – cello

Weekender

Philharmonic Orchestra performs Maurice
Ravel’s 1922 orchestration of Mussorgsky’s
popular suite Pictures at an Exhibition. Based
on the paintings of Viktor Hartmann, the
orchestral suite is a triumph of colour and
texture, evoking scenes of great Russian
architecture and folklore. The idea of colour
is further explored in two short antiphonal
fanfares for brass, Signals from Heaven, by
Japanese composers Toru Takemitsu, and
in Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings. In
addition, cellist Richard Jenkinson (CBSO
principal cellist and Dante Quartet), joins
the Orchestra for a captivating performance
of Barber’s Cello Concerto.
Takemitsu: Signals from Heaven
Barber: Adagio for Strings
Barber: Cello Concerto
Oliver Frost: drawn onward (world premiere)
Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

PERMISSION TAKEN
Monday 14 – Friday 18 March
9.00 – 17.00
Exhibition continues to 30 May
Bramall Music Building, Ground and
First Floor Foyer R12

This exhibition displays work by Antonio
Roberts created during his 2014–15 artist
residency at the University of Birmingham.
Roberts focused on issues surrounding
copyright, permission culture and art; issues
which become ever more pertinent as
online communities become more prolific
and harder to police.
Whilst his practice focuses on digitally
reusing and remixing archive material,
Roberts will also use his work to encourage
audiences to engage in a dialogue over
these issues. Copy Bomb sculptures
positioned across campus will allow users
to participate in an ‘exquisite corpse’ game
where data and images are remixed, raising
questions over issues of ownership and
intellectual property.

Exhibitions

Presented by Research and Cultural
Collections

&

RELATED EVENTS

Events

• A workshop inspired by the
Exquisite Corpse surrealist
storytelling technique. See
page 46 for further details
• An event introducing copyleft
concepts and how these could be
applied practically. See page 42
for further details

Image courtesy of Antonio Roberts

 All exhibitions and events are free

– 11 –

exhibitions & events

EMPIRES OF EMPTINESS AND
SAHARA & THE STEPPE
A photographic and historical journey in
North Africa and Central Asia
Monday 14 – Friday 18 March, 9.00 – 18.00
Exhibition continues to 15 May
Aston Webb, Rotunda Gallery (First Floor) R6

RELATED EVENTS

PICNIC IN THE DESERT
Thursday 17 March, 12.30 – 13.20
Aston Webb, Rotunda Gallery
(First Floor) R6
 Free, booking essential.
To book your place, please visit
picnic-in-the-desert.eventbrite.co.uk

How do empires expand into deserts?
Despite their apparently limited value
and significant logistical difficulties,
the conquest of desert has often mobilised sizeable resources from some of
the world’s most notable empires.
Presenting the results of the
Birmingham-led research project
Outposts of Conquest, this exhibition
displays the history and present-day
state of one of the most symbolically
charged expressions of imperial
control in desert environments: the
Russian fortifications in the Central
Asian steppe and the vast network
of French forts built in an attempt
to control the Sahara desert. The
comparison shows how these two

Section Title

– 12 –

Christian colonial powers sought to
control Muslim and predominantly
nomad populations.
The indoor exhibition is
complemented by an outdoor
gallery, Sahara & the Steppe, which
contextualises the geographical and
human environment where these
fortresses were built. The vanity of
these imperial fortresses, guarding
these vast spaces of wind, sand and
stars, appears even more clearly, and
the stories behind these sentinels of
the void, even more mysterious.
Presented by Department of Modern
Languages in partnership with
Research and Cultural Collections.

Join the Empires of Emptiness academic
curator, Dr Berny Sèbe (Senior Lecturer
in colonial and post-colonial studies) in
conversation with Dr Benedetta Rossi
(Lecturer in African Studies) as they discuss
desert life, nomadism and imperial control
in the Sahara.
Bring your packed lunch and join us for
a dialogue combining history, anthropology
and photography to better understand
one of the most extreme environments on
Earth, and how it has shaped human beings
over centuries.
• A screening of Akounak Tedalat Taha

Tazoughai, a Tuareg language remake
of Prince’s Purple Rain set in Niger.
See page 29 for details.

– 13 –

Section Title
© Photo Alain Sèbe/www.alainsebeimages.com

FROM COLLECTING
CURIOSITIES TO
CELEBRATING
DIVERSITY
Monday 14 March, 17.30 – 18.15
Wednesday 16 March, 13.15 – 14.00
Medical School, Foyer B1

SILENT SIGNAL
Exhibition at University of Birmingham:
Monday 14 – Friday 18 March
9.00 – 17.00
Exhibition continues to 22 April
Biosciences Building R27
Exhibition at Vivid Projects:
Friday 18 March, 18.00–20.00
Saturday 19 March, 12.00–17.00
Exhibition continues to 23 April
Open Thurs – Sat 12.00 – 17.00
Vivid Projects, 16 Minerva Works
158 Fazeley Street, Digbeth, B5 5RS

Silent Signal is a group exhibition bringing
together six artists with six leading
biomedical scientists to explore genetics,
cell biology, immunology and epidemiology
through animation.
Each work is the result of an artist
closely collaborating with a scientist over a
period of two years to produce an artistic
response to their scientific research.
Sited between Vivid Projects and
University of Birmingham, the works raise
questions about what our genetic code is,
how our immune system functions, how
disease is spread, and what the future
applications and impact of the research
into these areas might be for us all.

RELATED EVENTS

Silent Signal is devised and produced
by Animate Projects, and is supported
by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award and
the Garfield Weston Foundation, and
presented in Birmingham by Vivid Projects.

• Join Vivid Projects for an enlightening afternoon of discussion and
demonstration with three of the
artist-scientist partnerships.
See page 38 for more details.
• An interactive workshop with Genetic
Moo, the artists behind Battle of the
Blister. Bring your own props and
be prepared to dance yourself into
a bacterial frenzy! See page 46 for
more details.

exhibitions & events

Join Dr June Jones, College Lead on
Diversity and Head of the Repatriation
Programme, and Professor Jonathan
Reinarz, Professor of the History of
Medicine, for a tour of the current Medical
School exhibition which highlights the
amazing achievements of UoB alumni.
Learn more about the work of
Professor Arthur Thomson and Professor
Thomas Adeoye Lambo, each strategic in
developing Nigerian health care, the work
of Dr Arshya Vahabzadeh in developing
google glasses for children with autism,
and the first female President of the Royal
College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
Dame Hilda Lloyd. Amongst our famous
alumni, there are also hidden treasures,
such as the student known as ‘Llandudno’
– a refugee from war-torn Vietnam who
applied to continue his medical education
at Birmingham.
The exhibition also celebrates Maori
and Salinan Native American repatriations
undertaken over the last four years
by University of Birmingham, the only
UK institution to proactively contact
indigenous groups to offer to return
skulls held as part of its ancient anatomy
collection.
Presented by the History of Medicine
Unit in partnership with the Institute of
Clinical Sciences.

Birmingham Metro Extension, Track Instalment by
Mohammad Reza Zolfaghari, Doctoral Researcher, Civil
Engineering, University of Birmingham

– 14 –

 All exhibitions and events are free

IMAGES OF RESEARCH
Monday 14 – Friday 18 March
9.00 – 18.00
Staff House, Foyer R24
How do you sum up your life as a
postgraduate researcher in a single image?
That’s the challenge that we have set
our postgraduate researchers from the
University of Birmingham.
Researchers from across disciplines
have shared their stories with us and
the resulting images, which capture the
exciting projects our postgraduates are
working on, will be on display throughout
Arts & Science Festival.
Presented by University Graduate School
– 15 –

exhibitions & events

My route

#nicklin unseen
Monday 14 – Sunday 20 March
Open all day
Exhibition continues to 31 March
Outdoor area in front of Costa,
University Centre R23

This outdoor photographic exhibition
examines the work of Birmingham
photographer, Phyllis Nicklin, and
catalogues the wide-ranging changes
that have shaped the city.
Phyllis Nicklin was a lecturer in the
Department of Extramural Studies at the
University of Birmingham during the 1950s
and 1960s. During her time in post, she
took thousands of photographs from
across the city, which have remained in
the University archive.
David Oram, creator of social media
phenomenon Brumpic – an online platform
that shares photos capturing Birmingham
throughout its rich history – has now
brought these photos back to life. The
photographs capture the city in a state of
transition, as old gives way to the modern.
Presented by Colmore Business District
and Brumpic with support from Heritage
Lottery Fund, University of Birmingham
and JMP Consultants Ltd.

Wednesday 16 – Friday 18 March
9.00 – 18.00
Exhibition continues to 27 March
(open Mon-Fri)
Muirhead Tower, Atrium R21
Sampad South Asian Arts presents content
from their recent community heritage
project My Route, a project which captured,
shared and preserved the vibrant and
culturally rich heritage of Birmingham’s
Stratford Road (and surrounding areas).
Over the last 60 years this road has
welcomed many new residents from across
the globe, whose lives and experiences have
created diverse and colorful tales. The
exhibition, which combines photographs
and audio, paints a picture of what it is like
to live and work on Stratford Road, giving
insight into the rich social history of the area.
My Route was supported by the National
Lottery through the Heritage Lottery
Fund. The exhibition at University of
Birmingham is presented in partnership
with Arts & Science Festival.

RELATED EVENTS
• A panel discussion and screening
which further unpick the exhibition.
See page 39 for details.

– 16 –

– 17 –

exhibitions & events

SKIN ATLASES:
MAPPING DISEASES
OF THE SKIN
Monday 14 – Friday 18 March
09.00 – 18.00
Exhibition continues to 18 April
Muirhead Tower, Atrium R21
Skin atlases are among the most visually
compelling medical publications. They
date from the emergence of nineteenthcentury specialist skin hospitals in Europe.
This exhibition curated by Professor
Jonathan Reinarz, Director of the History
of Medicine Unit, of ground breaking texts
by pioneering physicians in the field of
dermatology, from the Cadbury Research
Library, traces the development of this
medical speciality over the nineteenth
century. Featuring images from works by
Robert Willan, Jean-Louis Alibert, Thomas
Bateman, Pierre Rayer and Henry Radcliffe
Crocker, among others.
Presented by Cadbury Research Library
in partnership with the History of
Medicine Unit
RELATED EVENTS
• Curator’s talk charting the emergence of
skin atlases, illustrated with works from
the Cadbruy Research Library collections.
See page 40 for details.

Field Mushroom, cyanotype.
Photographer: Anne Parouty, 2015

IMAGINING
MUSHROOMS II
Monday 14 – Sunday 20 March
Mon–Fri 10.00 – 16.00
& Sat–Sun 11.00 – 16.00
Exhibition continues to 28 March
Courtyard Gallery, Winterbourne House
& Garden G12
Featuring:
Anne Parouty – photographer
Ming de Nasty – photographer
Daria Kwiatkowska – composer
Lukas Large – mycologist
An exhibition exploring the mapping
and naming of mushrooms in and near
Winterbourne from the days of old magic
through to the scientific revolution.
Presented by Winterbourne House
& Garden

exhibitions & events

– 18 –

 All exhibitions and events are free

CHANCE, ORDER, CHANGE:
ABSTRACT PAINTINGS 1939 – 1989
Monday 14 – Sunday 20 March
Mon–Fri, 10.00 – 17.00
& Sat–Sun, 11.00 – 17.00
Exhibition continues to 8 May
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts R14

RELATED EVENTS
• Find out about the effects of artworks on
our brain with Jane Raymond, Professor of
Visual Cognition. See page 34 for details.

Josef Albers, Bridget Riley, Victor Pasmore,
Ad Reinhardt and Sean Scully: some of
the most influential abstract artists of
the 20th century feature in this exciting
exhibition, which forms the centrepiece
of the spring programme. Coming to the
Barber from an important private collection
and never seen together before in public,
these 12 paintings and mixed-media works
by leading artists span 50 key years in
the development of modern art. They
offer a rare opportunity to enjoy cuttingedge abstract art in a gallery generally
associated with Old Masters, Impressionists
and more representational masterpieces.
Presented by the Barber Institute of
Fine Arts

© Bridget Riley 2016. All rights reserved,
courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

– 19 –

exhibitions & events

ABSCONDITI VISCUS
Thursday 17 March, 18.00 – 20.00
Birmingham City University,
School of Art, Margaret Street, B3 3BX

Join sound artist Justin Wiggan for the
launch of Absconditi Viscus, a series of
phonic excavations from Birmingham City
University School of Art’s archives during
the period 1914 to 1918.
Following a series of public workshops,
Wiggan presents five sound pieces which
have been embedded into the fabric of
the building at Margaret Street and are
accessible only through QR codes. Visitors
are invited to use their smart phones to
access the sound files which will enable
them to engage with the phonic residue
left within the fabric of the School of Art
building on Margaret Street after those four
years of political and social turbulence.
Absconditi Viscus is an ongoing project
which considers the notion of historical
phonic information that is lost but
continues to permeate and affect physical
and psychological space, leaving a legacy
for subsequent generations.
Presented by Justin Wiggan in partnership
with Birmingham City University and
Voices of War and Peace.

MEMORIES OF NOW: RESPONSES TO THE JANET
MENDELSOHN ARCHIVE
Friday 18 – Sunday 20 March
Launch Fri, 18.00 – 20.00
Tues–Sat, 10.00 – 17.00
& Sun, 10.00 – 16.00

Exhibition continues to 3 April
The Old Print Works, Long Gallery, 506
Moseley Road, Balsall Heath, B12 9AH

Working with local residents, Some Cities
photographers Andrew Jackson and
Dan Burwood present an exhibition of
photography produced in response to
images of 1960s Balsall Heath by Janet
Mendelsohn.
Mendelsohn’s archive of photography
was rediscovered as part of CCCS50, a
recent University of Birmingham research
project by Matthew Hilton and Kieran
Connell, which re-examined the significance
of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural
Studies and communicated its pioneering
work to a wider audience.

Take in a range of real stories as part
of the opening weekend, which includes
the exhibition launch on Friday 18 March,
18.00 – 20.00 and an artist/participant talk
on Saturday 19 March, 14.00. A number of
Mendelsohn’s original prints can be seen in
Ikon’s exhibition, Varna Road (27 January —
3 April).
Presented by Some Cities in partnership
with University of Birmingham

Balsall Heath 2015. Credit: Dan Burwood

– 21 –

exhibitions & events

Performances

THE NEUTRINO
PASSOIRE

THE GOOD SISTERS
by Michel Tremblay
Adaptation by Noël Greig
Directed by Gareth Nicholls and
Philip Holyman of Little Earthquake.

Sunday 20 March, 16.30 – 17.30
Bramall Music Building, The Dome R12
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
neutrino-passoire.eventbrite.co.uk

Thursday 17 – Saturday 19 March
19.30 & 14.00 matinee on Sat 19 March
George Cadbury Hall,
998 Bristol Road, B29 6LU
 £8 / £6. Advance online booking
recommended at shop.bham.ac.uk
When Germaine wins a million Green Shield
stamps, she goes giddy with plans to cash
them in and transform her tatty flat into
the poshest pad in the block. She can’t do
anything until the stamps are stuck into
their books — so she gets the girls round
for a “lick ‘n’ stick party”.
These feisty and formidable women
would do anything for a share of the jackpot
to help them escape the drudgery of their
daily lives. A single stamp is pilfered and
soon, whole books are being stuffed into
handbags and hidden inside hair-dos. As
resentment bubbles up and tempers flare,
the night turns into a rowdy and raucous
disaster, with cat-fights across the kitchen
table and dark secrets coming to light.
Section Title

– 22 –

The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics was
awarded for the “discovery of neutrino
oscillations”, recognising key contributions
to experiments which demonstrated that
neutrinos – the elusive particles in the
Universe – change identities. This discovery
changed our understanding of the
innermost workings of matter!
The peculiar behaviour of the omnipresent neutrino, which passes through
normal matter, the earth and our bodies,
rarely interacting with them, is the inspiration for a new collaboration between
University of Birmingham particle physicists
and contemporary dancers Mairi Pardalaki
and Fanny Travaglino.
The dancers will use the image of
a colander (‘passoire’ in French) as a
metaphor for the human body, through
which neutrinos pass without realisation or
memory of the event itself.

– 23 –

Presented by the Particle Physics Group
performances

Timetable
Monday 14 March

Tuesday 15 March

Event

Category

Venue

Time

Price

Page

Tricked by Memory

Talk

Learning Centre, UG06

12.15–13.45

Free

34

Matron Lloyd and the University's
War Effort

Talk

Muirhead, CRL Seminar Room 13.00–13.50

Free

34

From Collecting Curiosities to
Celebrating Diversity

Event

Medical School, Foyer

17.30–18.15

Free

15

Art That Tickles the Brain

Talk

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

17.30–19.30

Free

35

Blister Cinema Workshop

Workshop

ERI, Digital Hub

10.00–13.00

Free

46

Imprinting Memories

Workshop

Winterbourne House & Garden 12.00–14.00

£5

Nuffield, G22

12.30–13.15

Free

35

Why What I Study Matters

Talk

Aston Webb, WG5

12.30–14.00

Free

36

The Road to Midnight Mushrooms

Talk

Muirhead, CRL Seminar Room

13.00–13.50

Free

37

Distortions of the Mind: Magritte
and Redon

Talk

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

13.15–13.45

Free

36

Death Café

Workshop

Arts, Senior Common Room

14.00–16.00

Free

45

Silent Signal Salon

Talk

ERI, Digital Hub

14.00–17.00

Free

38

On Memory

Concert

Bramall, Dome

17.00–19.00

Free

5

Exquisite Corpse Workshop

Workshop

Muirhead, Seminar Room 122

18.00–20.00

Free

46

MA Film & Television + One Minute
Movie Competition

Screening

Muirhead, G15

18.30–20.30

Free

28

Price

Page

10.30, 12.00,
13.30 & 15.00

Free

48

Celts: Search for Civilisation

Talk

Arts, LR5

12.00–12.50

Free

43

Race, Prostitution and
Cultural Studies

Talk

Muirhead, CRL Seminar Room 13.00–13.50

Free

43

Barber Lunchtime Concert

Concert

Barber, Concert Hall

13.10–14.00

To Liv(e)

Screening

mac birmingham, B12 9QH

14:00

Memories of a Child Pageant
Superstar

Performance St Francis Hall,
Main Worship Space

18.30–19.30

Chamber Choirs & Brass Band

Concert

Bramall, Concert Hall

19:30

Tall Tales and Unreliable Narrators

Workshop

Barber

Digbeth Canal Workshop

Workshop

Grand Union, B5 5RS

Orchestral Weekender

Concert

Bramall, Concert Hall

19.30

Sorceress of the New Piano

Screening

mac birmingham, B12 9QH

20.00–22.30

Orchestral Weekender

Concert

Bramall, Concert Hall

15:00

The Neutrino Passoire

Performance Bramall, Dome

Free

7

£7.50/
£5.50

32

Free

26

£10/£8/
£3

7

13.30–16.00

£6/£4

49

16:00–18:00

Free

50

£10/£8/
£3

9

£7.50/
£5.50

32

£10/£8/
£3

9

Free

23

16.30–17.30

Events oveR Multiple days
Venue

Time

Price

Page

Bramall

9.00–17.00

Free

11

Silent Signal

Exhibition

Biosciences

9.00–17.00

Free

14

28

Empires of Emptiness and
Sahara & The Steppe

Exhibition

Aston Webb, Rotunda

9.00–18.00

Free

12

Free

47

Images of Research

Exhibition

Staff House, Foyer

9.00–18.00

Free

15

Free

39

Exhibition

Muirhead, Atrium

9.00–18.00

Free

18

£7.50 /
£5.50

29

Skin Atlases:
Mapping Diseases of the Skin
#Nicklin Unseen

Exhibition

Outdoor, University Centre

Open all day

Free

16

£18/£15/
£12

5

Imagining Mushrooms II

Exhibition

Winterbourne,
Courtyard Gallery

Free

18

Free

13

Mon–Fri:
10.00–16.00
Sat–Sun:
11.00–16.00

£5

39

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Mon–Fri:
10.00–17.00
Sat–Sun:
11.00–17.00

Free

19

40

Chance, Order, Change: Abstract
Paintings 1939–1989

Exhibition

Free

Wed 16 to Fri 18 March

My Route

Exhibition

Murihead, Atrium

9.00–18.00

Free

17

Thurs 17 to Sat 19 March

The Good Sisters

Performance George Cadbury Hall

19:30

£8/£6

23

Exhibition

Vivid Projects, B5 5RS

Fri:
18.00–20.00
Sat:
12.00–17.00

Free

14

Exhibition

The Old Print Works, B12 9AH

Fri:
18.00–20.00
Sat:
10.00–17.00
Sun:
10.00–16.00

Free

21

39

Free

15

Sugar Cane Alley

Screening

mac birmingham, B12 9QH

16.00–18.15

£7.50 /
£5.50

Why Remember?

Workshop

Muirhead, Seminar Room 113

17.00–18.00

My Route

Talk

Muirhead, G15

17.00–19.00

Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai

Screening

mac birmingham, B12 9QH

18.30–19.45

Barber Evening Concert

Concert

Barber, Concert Hall

19:30

Picnic in the Desert

Event

Aston Webb, Rotunda

12.30–13.20

William Withering's Forgotten Fungi

Talk

Winterbourne House & Garden 12.30–13.30

Skin Atlases:
Mapping Diseases of the Skin

Talk

Muirhead, CRL Seminar Room

13:00–13:50

Living the Heritage of Conflict

Talk

ERI, Digital Hub

17:00–19:00

Free

40
41

Free

Mon 14 to Fri 18 March

Mon 14 to Sun 20 March

Copyleft

Talk

Arts, LR2

18.00–20.00

Free

42

Absconditi Viscus

Event

BCU School of Art, B3 3BX

18.00–20.00

Free

20

Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask Screening

The Drum, B6 4UU

19.00–21.30

Free

30

BEER: Dark Matters

Concert

BOM, B5 4EG

19:30

Free

6

Datong: The Great Society

Screening

mac birmingham, B12 9QH

20.00–22.30

£7.50/
£5.50

32

– 24 –

Time

ERI, G53

Exhibition

Free

13.15–14.00

18.00–19.30

Venue

Workshop

Category

13:00–14:00

Medical School, Foyer

Ikon Gallery, B1 2HS

Category

Life Echo

Permission Taken

Arts, LR1

Event

Talk

Sunday 20 March

Event

Event

Talk

From Collecting Curiosities to
Celebrating Diversity

The Legacy of Guano

Saturday 19 March

45

Mindfulness: Remembering to Forget Talk

Wednesday 16 March Writing Competition

Thursday 17 March

Friday 18 March

Fri 18 to Sat 19 March

Silent Signal
Fri 18 to Sun 20 March

Memories of Now

– 25 –

MEMORIES OF A CHILD
PAGEANT SUPERSTAR
Friday 18 March, 18.30 – 19.30
St Francis Hall, Multi Faith Chaplaincy,
Main Worship Space O2
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
child-superstar.eventbrite.co.uk

Memories of a Child Pageant Superstar
brings together a series of plays written
for Arts & Science Festival that explore
childhood memories.
Featuring four monologues, the plays
centre upon the industry of child beauty
pageants, a growing and controversial
industry said to be worth millions. What
is the appeal of these curious and divisive
events? Are they a symptom of a society
that puts too much focus on physical
appearance and celebrity? Are they the
result of pushy parents and spoilt pre-teen
divas? Or could there something more
sinister about this growing trend?
Join four individuals as they reflect on
incidents which have changed their lives
forever. They look at memories and the rewriting of memories after traumatic events
and in the process explores themes of
gender, sexuality, parenting and childhood,
to ask: ‘can you really trust your own
memories?’

ScReeningS

Presented by MRes Playwriting Studies in
collaboration with MRes Directing.
performances

– 26 –

– 27 –

Section Title

MA FILM & TELEVISION
SHOWCASE and
ONE MINUTE MOVIE
COMPETITION
Tuesday 15 March, 18.30 – 20.30
Muirhead Tower,
Lecture Theatre G15 R21
 Free, booking recommended.
Book online at one-minute-movie-2016.
eventbrite.co.uk
Join MA Film and Television for a showcase
of documentary films and guided editing
projects by the most recent cohort of
MA in Film and Television: Research and
Production students.
This is followed by a shortlist of films
submitted to the Department of Film and
Creative Writing’s second ‘One Minute
Movie’ competition. This year’s entrants
responded to the festival theme memory
and forgetting and the competition winner
will be announced on the night!
Presented by MA Film and Television and
B:Film: The Birmingham Centre for Film
Studies

sugar cane alley

AKOUNAK TEDALAT TAHA TAZOUGHAI

[dir. Euzhan Palcy, 1983, 106 mins]

[dir. Christopher Kirkley, 2015, 75 mins]

Wednesday 16 March, 16.00 – 18.15
mac Birmingham, Cannon Hill Park,
Birmingham, B12 9QH
 £7.50 / £5.50. Book online at
macbirmingham.co.uk/event/blackshack-alley-q-a
Sugar Cane Alley is a French Caribbean film
based on the semi-autobiographical novel
La Rue Cases-Nègres (1950) by Joseph Zobel.
The narrative centres on his childhood on a
plantation, the sacrifices his family made in
order to secure his education and the ways
in which racial inequality and prejudice
pervaded the colonial school system. Palcy’s
cinematic adaptation of the book won
many awards and much critical acclaim but
remains less well-known in this country.
PhD student Antonia Wimbush will
introduce the film, contextualising both
the novel and the film in terms of cultural
output from the Francophone Caribbean.
Dr Louise Hardwick, an expert on Zobel, will
host a Q&A session following the screening,
sharing insights from her recent research
trips to Martinique for an AHRC-funded
project on Zobel.
This screening is presented by Dr Claire
Peters as part of a project sponsored by the
AHRC’s Cultural Engagement Fund, which
supports valuable collaboration between
universities and cultural organisations. Dr
Peters will share some of the fascinating
research currently taking place at the
University of Birmingham’s Modern
Languages Department through screenings
of Francophone films at regional
organisations including mac Birmingham
and The Drum.

Wednesday 16 March, 18.30 – 19.45
mac Birmingham, Cannon Hill Park,
Birmingham, B12 9QH
 £7.50 / £5.50. Book online at
macbirmingham.co.uk/event/akounaktedalat-taha-tazoughai

A revolutionary story of guitars, motorcycles, cellphones – and the music of a new
generation. Don’t miss this Tuareg language
remake of Prince’s Purple Rain.
The film is set in Agadez, the Nigerien
city ‘where guitars are king’ and stars the
Tuareg ‘desert blues’ guitarist Mdou Moctar
in Prince’s title role. Adopting the original’s
structure, the story follows a motorcycle
riding, purple robed musician trying to
make a name for himself whilst battling
local rivals, his conservative father and
eventually, his own ego.
The Tuareg are a semi-nomadic Berber
group in North Africa, and their language
(tamashek) has no word for the colour
purple. The title therefore translates
literally to ‘rain the colour of blue with a
little red in it’.
Presented by the Department of Modern
Languages in partnership with Research &
Cultural Collections and mac birmingham.

Presented by the Department of Modern
Languages in partnership with Research &
Cultural Collections and mac birmingham.

Screenings

– 28 –

– 29 –

Screenings

FRANTZ FANON:
BLACK SKIN, WHITE
MASK
[dir: Isaac Julien, 1996, 70 mins]

Thursday 17 March, 19.00 – 21.30
The Drum, 144 Potters Lane, Aston,
Birmingham, B6 4UU
 Free, booking recommended. Please
call The Drum on 0121 333 2444 to
reserve your place.

Interviews, reconstructions and archive
footage tell the story of the life and work of
the highly influential anti-colonialist writer
Frantz Fanon, author of Black Skin, White
Mask which examines the psychological
effects of colonialism and racism on
the colonised and 'The Wretched of the
Earth', a passionate call to revolution. The
film also traces his professional life as a
psychiatric doctor in Algeria during its war
of independence with France.
‘The impetus for the film project was
to restore to academic and artistic
discourses a recognition of both the
originality and contradictory nature
of this major thinker. It was initially
conceived as a reflection on the revival
of interest in Fanon's ideas in black
visual and performance arts. The black
arts movement in Britain and North
America had sought a more substantial
basis for reflection on the black body
and its representations. In development,
the film's mandate became broader
to include other aspects of Fanon's
influence and legacy.'
– Isaac Julien
The screening is presented in partnership
with The New Centre for Contemporary
Cultural Studies (NCCCS) at The Drum and
will be followed by a discussion offering
a unique chance to re-engage with crucial
questions about race and identity. NCCCS
aims to create an open and inclusive
space for debate, discussion and political
engagement within and between the
various communities of Birmingham.
It embraces the ethos of Stuart Hall’s
directorship of the original Centre for
Contemporary Cultural Studies at the
University of Birmingham and seeks to
analyse the problems facing Birmingham’s
communities by forging a working
relationship with those very citizens.
Presented by Dr Claire Peters, Department
of Modern Languages, in partnership with
The Drum as part of a project sponsored
by the AHRC’s Cultural Engagement Fund,
which supports valuable collaboration
between universities and cultural
organisations.

Screenings

– 30 –

THE CINEMA OF
EVANS CHAN:
ART, HISTORY
AND IDENTITY
mac Birmingham, Cannon Hill Park,
Birmingham, B12 9QH
 £7.50 / £5.50. Online bookings should
be made at macbirmingham.co.uk.
You can also book by telephone on
0121 446 3232 from 9am – 9.45pm.

Datong: The Great Society (2011)
Screening Thursday 17 March

“With his poetic sensibility, penetrating
observations, and formal originality, Evans
Chan has emerged as the true intellectual
auteur with a unique vision of history in
contemporary Chinese cinema,” wrote renowned Taiwanese critic/producer Peggy
Chiao. For Gina Marchetti (Postmodern
Culture), Evans Chan’s work conjures up
the vision of a diasporic intellectual, who
traverses “nations, cultures, languages…
pointing to a new type of cultural sphere
that moves through and beyond Greater
China.”
Raised in Macao and Hong Kong
and now based in New York, Chan has
presented, in both fiction and documentary
features over more than two decades, an
alternative exploration of key moments in
Hong Kong and global Chinese culture —
from his most recent critical hit, Datong:
The Great Society, a thought-provoking
re-examination of the official narratives of
the 1911 Revolution, to his directorial debut
To Liv(e) in which he explores the plight of
Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong, and
finally an exploration of artistic crossover
and global Chinese identity in the exquisite
musical performance of Margaret Leng Tan
in Sorceress of the New Piano.
We are delighted to announce that
Evans Chan will be present to introduce all
three screenings and participate in postscreening discussions led by guest hosts.
Presented by Department of History, in
partnership with mac birmingham with
support from the China Institute and
Cultural Engagement at University of
Birmingham.

To Liv(e) (1992)
Screening Friday 18 March

– 31 –

Screenings

Thursday 17 March, 20.00 – 22.30

DATONG:
THE GREAT SOCIETY
[2011, 118 mins]
In Cantonese, Mandarin, English and
French with Chinese and English
subtitles
Hailed as a masterpiece, Datong: The Great
Society focuses on modern China's first
major utopian philosopher and earliest
constitutional reformer, Kang Youwei
(Liu Kai-chi) and his pioneering feminist
daughter Kang Tongbi (Lindzay Chan).
Kang and his daughter fled into exile
for sixteen years following the Qing
government’s bloody crackdown on the
political reform he initiated in 1898. Framed
around their Swedish soujourn (1904–1908),
Evans Chan’s docu-drama recounts Kang’s
epic struggle to modernise China and his
dream of Datong – the Chinese utopia.
Evans Chan will introduce the film and
Dr Shirley Ye of the Department of History
at University of Birmingham will host a
post-screening discussion.

Friday 18 March, 14.00

TO LIV(E)
[1992, 107 mins]
Cantonese and English with Chinese
and English subtitles

Talks &

Long considered an underground classic,
Evan Chan’s widely acclaimed directorial
debut is inspired by Norwegian actress,
Liv Ullmann’s, visit to Hong Kong in 1990,
where she decried the forced deportation
of Vietnamese refugees.
Following the life of protagonist Rubie,
and capturing the bohemian fringe of the
Hong Kong arts scene, Chan examines love,
family, the fate of Hong Kong, and the
culture clash between East and West with
depth and assurance.
Evans Chan will introduce the film
and Hermann Aubié, PhD Candidate in
the Centre for East Asian Studies at the
University of Turku, Finland, will host a
discussion after the film.

Saturday 19 March, 20.00 – 22.30

SORCERESS OF THE NEW PIANO
– THE ARTISTRY OF MARGARET LENG TAN
[2004, 90 mins]
In English with Chinese subtitles

Screenings

Ten years in the making, Chan's documentary celebrates the trans-cultural
career of Singapore-born, New York-based
pianist Margaret Leng Tan. Hailed by
The New Yorker as "the diva of avantgarde pianism", Tan was the world's first
professional toy pianist and has been a
preeminent performer of John Cage’s
music for the last three decades.
Chan's “exemplary documentary” (Time
Out Film Guide) makes avant-garde music
— that of George Crumb, Philip Glass, Tan
Dun, Somei Satoh, and others — engaging
and exciting.
Evans Chan will introduce the film and
Dr Richard Langley of the Department of
Film at University of Birmingham, will host
a post-screening discussion.
– 32 –

lectures
– 33 –

Section Title

ART THAT TICKLES
THE BRAIN
Monday 14 March, 17.30 – 19.30
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts R14
 Free, booking essential.
To book your place, please contact:
0121 414 2261 or email
education@barber.org.uk
Ever wondered what really happens to
your brain when you look at art? Join Jane
Raymond, Professor of Visual Cognition
at the University of Birmingham’s School
of Psychology for this interactive gallery
session to find out!
Explore the abstract works in the
Barber’s current exhibition Chance, Order,
Change in a totally different way. Find out
about the effects of such artworks on our
brain, visual cognition and perception and
the psychology of art in this illustrated talk.

TRICKED BY MEMORY

Presented by The Barber Institute of Fine
Arts in partnership with the School of
Psychology

Monday 14 March, 12.15 – 13.45
Learning Centre, Lecture Room UG06
R28
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
tricked-by-memory.eventbrite.co.uk
Professor Lisa Bortolotti chairs three
talks from researchers based in the
Philosophy Department at the University of
Birmingham exploring the effects of biased,
distorted and false memories. The session
will be followed with an opportunity for
audience questions.
Presentations include:
– Sometimes I Get Lucky and Forget –
Depression, Memory and Negative Bias
by Magdalena Antrobus.
– Distorting the Past to Serve Our
Present Needs by Dr Anneli Jefferson.
– How False Memory Can (and Cannot)
Improve Our Perception of the World
by Dr Kathy Puddifoot.
Presented by Department of Philosophy
with sponsorship from project PERFECT –
perfectperfect.eu
talks & lectures

MATRON LLOYD AND
THE UNIVERSITY’S
WAR EFFORT
Monday 14 March, 13.00 – 13.50
Muirhead Tower, Cadbury Research
Library, Seminar Room R21
 Free, booking essential. To book
your place, please call 0121 414 5839 or
email special-collections@bham.ac.uk
Lecture by Susan Worrall, Director of
Special Collections, on the life and work of
Kathleen Grace Lloyd (1877–1976). Lloyd
was Matron of the 1st Southern General
Hospital and was based in the buildings on
the University's Edgbaston campus during
the First World War.
A small exhibition of Matron Lloyd's
memorabilia and photographs from the
Cadbury Research Library will be on display in
the Main Library 11 January – 20 March 2016.

– 34 –

MINDFULNESS:
REMEMBERING TO
FORGET
Tuesday 15 March, 12.30 – 13.15
Nuffield, Seminar Room G22 R9
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
remembering-to-forget.eventbrite.
co.uk
The idea of mindfulness has never been so
popular in the UK. Ever more frequently,
we are informed of the impressive
benefits of “being mindful”, from improved
relaxation and concentration to greater
creativity and physical health. Popular
accounts of mindfulness, however, are
often short on detail concerning how this
hallowed state is to be attained. Defining
mindfulness simply as a “present-centred”
and “non-judgemental” form of awareness
lacks instructiveness and brushes over
some of the more deliberative and
conceptual activities that mindfulness has
traditionally been associated with.
Recent scholarly work has come to
emphasise the rich historical connotations
of the term, problematising simplistic
definitions. It has likewise stressed that
an appreciation of this history can help
us in the actual practice of mindfulness,
that is to say, how we might cultivate it. In
this talk, Philosophy postgraduate Michael
Roberts, outlines how these considerations
highlight the importance of memory and
active forgetting in practice and suggest
that we might best conceive mindfulness
practice as a procedure of "remembering to
forget” what is unhelpful to us.
Presented by Department of Philosophy,
Theology & Religion.

– 35 –

talks & lectures

WHY WHAT I STUDY
MATTERS:

THE ROAD
TO MIDNIGHT
MUSHROOMS

POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS SHARE
INSIGHTS INTO THE STUDY OF THE
ARTS, HUMANITIES & LAW

Tuesday 15 March, 13.00 – 13.50
Muirhead Tower, Cadbury Research
Library, Seminar Room R21
 Free, booking required.
To book your place, please visit
midnight-mushrooms.eventbrite.co.uk

Tuesday 15 March, 12.30 – 14.00
Aston Webb Building, Lecture Theatre
WG5, Block A R4
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please email
calengagement@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Shakespeare and his contemporaries saw
mushrumps as gateways to magic, or as vile
and lowly things. But times are changing
and the way is led by those at the forefront
of scientific revolution; mushrumps become
mushrooms.
Join Martin Killeen, Senior Librarian at
the Cadbury Research Library, and artist
Anne Parouty, as they trace the early
development of the scientific method as it
came to be applied to fungi, through the
works of Frances Bacon, Erasmus Darwin,
John Gerard and William Withering. This
talk will examine the impact on successive
editions of Shakespeare as the language of
poetry bends to the times.
This talk accompanies the exhibition
Imagining Mushrooms II at the Coach House
at Winterbourne House and Garden
14–28 March.

How does research in Arts, Humanities
and Law subjects link to the world beyond
the university? Find out by hearing from
a cross-section of the College of Arts
and Law’s postgraduate students, who
will share their research and its wider
implications with you.
Presented by College of Arts and Law

DISTORTIONS OF THE
MIND: MAGRITTE AND
REDON

Presented by Cadbury Research Library
and Winterbourne House and Garden

Tuesday 15 March, 13.15 – 13.45
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts,
meet in the foyer R14
 Free
This lunchtime gallery talk looks
at Surrealism, Symbolism and Post
Impressionism in four paintings, exploring
the theme of memory, invention and
imagination and the way that artists
engage their own memories, and those of
people looking at the works.

talks & lectures

Works of James Gillray, from the original plates.
London: Bohn, 1830

– 36 –

– 37 –

talks & lectures

SILENT SIGNAL Salon

WRITING
COMPETITION
– PANEL DEBATE AND
AWARD CEREMONY

MY ROUTE
– PANEL DISCUSSION

Tuesday 15 March, 14.00 – 17.00
European Research Institute, Digital
Humanities Hub (Ground Floor) G3
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
silent-signal-salon.eventbrite.co.uk
Silent Signal partners six artists working
with animation together with six leading
biomedical scientists, to create experimental
animated artworks exploring new ways of
thinking about the human body.
Join Vivid Projects for an enlightening
afternoon of discussion and demonstration
with three of the artist-scientist partnerships. The collaborators will share their
development processes and insight into
how the production of the artworks
addressed the complexity of the science.
Participants: Ellie Land and Dr Peter
Oliver – Sleepless; Samantha Moore and Dr
Serge Mostowy – Loop; Eric Schockmel and
Dr Megan MacLeod – Immunecraft.
The Silent Signal project is produced
by Animate Projects, supported by a
Wellcome Trust Large Arts Award and
the Garfield Weston Foundation, and
presented in Birmingham by Vivid Projects
18 March – 23 April 2016, see page 14
for more details.

Wednesday 16 March, 17.00 – 19.00
Muirhead Tower,
Lecture Room G15 R21
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
my-route-panel.eventbrite.co.uk

Wednesday 16 March, 13.00 – 14.00
Arts Building, Lecture Room 1 R16
 Free, booking recommended. Free,
booking recommended. To book your
place, please email
calengagement@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Sampad South Asian Arts presents an
evening exploring Stratford Road’s
history using elements of its Heritage
Lottery Funded project My Route. The
event includes a screening of a short
documentary produced by Iconic Productions, followed by an informal panel
discussion with artist photographer Vanley
Burke; Curator Tas Bashir; and the My Route
project team.

Join a lively debate based on the topic
of the University of Birmingham’s
Undergraduate Writing Competitions 2016:
‘How important is your memory in your
approach to your studies and what creative
strategies do you employ to improve it?’
This event will also provide a chance
to celebrate the winners of this year’s
Undergraduate and Postgraduate Taught
Writing Competitions.

My Route was supported by the National
Lottery through the Heritage Lottery
Fund. This event is presented by Sampad
South Asian Arts in partnership with
University of Birmingham.

Presented by College of Arts and Law

WILLIAM WITHERING’S
FORGOTTEN FUNGI
Thursday 17 March, 12.30 – 13.30
Winterbourne House and Garden G12
 £5 (including mushroom soup and a
roll), booking recommended. To book
your place, please call 0121 414 3003 or
email enquiries@winterbourne.org.uk
William Withering, Lunar Society member
and resident of Edgbaston Hall, is well
known for his work on digitalis, but his
work with fungi is largely forgotten.
Anne Parouty (artist) and Lukas Large
(mycologist) explore how arts and science
came together in the ground breaking
illustrated edition of his work that never
quite made it to the press.
Presented by Winterbourne House and
Garden

talks & lectures

– 38 –

Fy Agarics still flourish at Winterbourne as they did
in Withering and Aylesford's day. Photographer: Anne
Parouty, 2015

– 39 –

talks & lectures

SKIN ATLASES:
MAPPING DISEASES
OF THE SKIN
Thursday 17 March, 13.00 – 13.50
Muirhead Tower, Cadbury Research
Library, Chamberlain Seminar Room
R21
 Free, booking essential. To book
your place, please call 0121 414 5839 or
email special-collections@bham.ac.uk
Join Professor Jonathan Reinarz, Director
of the History of Medicine Unit, for this
lecture tracing the development of the
classification of skin diseases, as depicted
in the visually compelling skin atlases of the
nineteenth century.
This talk is supported by visual
material from the Cadbury Research Library
collections and accompanies the exhibition
Skin Atlases: Mapping Diseases of the Skin in
Muirhead Tower Foyer until 18 April 2016.
Presented by Cadbury Research Library

LIVING THE
HERITAGE OF
CONFLICT: MEMORY,
IDENTITY AND
MEMORIALISATION
Thursday 17 March, 17.00 – 19.00
European Research Institute, Digital
Humanities Hub (Ground Floor) G3
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
heritage-of-conflict.eventbrite.co.uk
War memorial research to date has almost
exclusively focused on the creation and
use of monuments by those with living
memories of the events and individuals
commemorated.
Dr Emma Login leads a panel discussion
exploring the reframing of remembrance
and memorialisation for citizens of a
modern, innovative, twenty-first century
global community.
The session will explore the topic
from multiple perspectives to include
historic and contemporary conflicts, and
will bring together conflict academics with
professionals from cultural and heritage
organisations. The Digital Humanities Hub
will also have images of memorials and
conflict on their touch tables and screens
which the audiences can engage with prior
to the discussion.
Presented by Dr Emma Login in
partnership with Digital Humanities Hub.

Psoriosis gyrata from Delineations of Cutaneous Diseases,
Thomas Bateman, 1828. Cadbury Research Library

talks & lectures

Opposite: Dinh Q. Lê. Chincha Norte Island. Production
shot of The Colony (2016). Photo courtesy of the artist.

– 40 –

THE LEGACY OF GUANO

with DR.FRANK UEKOTTER, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM
Thursday 17 March, 18.00 – 19.30
Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham, B1 2HS
 Free, booking essential. Visit www.ikon-gallery.org to book online
or call Ikon on 0121 248 0708
Dr Frank Uekotter, Reader in Environmental
Humanities, University of Birmingham,
provides the historical context for the
current Ikon exhibition of video work by
acclaimed Vietnamese artist Dinh Q. Lê.
The talk gives an insight into Lê’s newly
commissioned work, The Colony, which is
loosely based on 19th century depictions
of a cluster of islands off the west coast of
Peru, rich in guano, a powerful fertilizer.
Exploring the drama of absurdity, greed
and human suffering, all for the brown gold
of bird excrement, Lê’s narratives touch on
aspects of the islands’ history such as the
nineteenth century imperial wars between
Spain and its former colonies Peru and

Chile, and the US Guano Act of 1856 that
authorised over one hundred claims for
uninhabited islands, reefs and atolls in the
Pacific and Atlantic.
For more information about Ikon’s
exhibition by Dinh Q. Lê, The Colony,
(27 January – 3 April 2016) visit
www.ikon-gallery.org

– 41 –

Presented by Ikon in partnership with
University of Birmingham.

talks & lectures

RACE, PROSTITUTION
AND CULTURAL
STUDIES:
THE POST-WAR INNER
CITY THROUGH JANET
MENDELSOHN’S
“SOCIAL EYE”
Friday 18 March, 13.00 – 13.50
Muirhead Tower, Cadbury Research
Library, Chamberlain Seminar Room,
Lower Ground Floor R21
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
race-prostitution-cultural-studies.
eventbrite.co.uk

COPYLEFT WORKSHOP
Thursday 17 March, 18.00 – 20.00
Arts Building, Lecture Room 2 R16
 Free, booking essential.
To book your place, please visit
copyleft.eventbrite.co.uk
Antonio Roberts introduces concepts
behind his exhibition Permission Taken and
shares his knowledge of copyright gained
through undertaking the Havard Law School
CopyrightX course. This session encourages
participants to think critically about how
Copyleft concepts could be applied to their
own practice or area.
Presented by Antonio Roberts in
partnership with Research and Cultural
Collections as part of Permission Taken,
see page 11 for more details.

talks & lectures

– 42 –

Dr Kieran Connell, Queen’s University
Belfast, provides the historical context for
an exhibition of photographs by American
academic and documentary filmmaker Janet
Mendelsohn, currently on display at Ikon
Gallery, Birmingham.
The talk gives an insight into a unique
archival discovery of 100 prints, 3,000
negatives and interviews now housed at
the University of Birmingham’s Cadbury
Research Library. Most of Mendelsohn’s
photographs were taken in Balsall Heath,
an area of Birmingham once infamous
as one of the country’s largest ‘red light’
districts as well as the home to increasing
numbers of immigrants from the Caribbean
and South-Asia. The talk explores what
Mendelsohn’s archive tells us both about
the innovative nature of cultural studies in
this period and the everyday experiences
of those who lived in of inner-city areas like
Balsall Heath in the late-1960s.
For more information about Ikon’s
exhibition by Janet Mendelsohn Varna
Road (27 January — 3 April 2016) visit
ikon-gallery.org
Presented by Special Collections: Cadbury
Research Library in partnership with Ikon

CELTS: SEARCH FOR A
CIVILISATION
Friday 18 March, 12.00 – 12.50
Arts Building, Lecture Room 5 R16
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
celts.eventbrite.co.uk
Professor Alice Roberts takes us on a
journey across Europe, sharing with us
revelations about the origin of the Celts,
how they lived and thrived, and their
enduring modern legacy.
This is the story of a multicultural
civilisation, linked by a common language.
It’s the story of how ideas travelled in
prehistory: how technology and art spread
across a continent. The Mediterranean
civilisations may grab our attention, but
it’s from the Atlantic shores of prehistoric
Europe that a truly epic story unfolds.

– 43 –

talks & lectures

IMPRINTING MEMORIES

DEATH CAFE

Tuesday 15 March, 12.00 – 14.00
Winterbourne House and Garden G12
 £5, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
the Winterbourne Shop, or call
0121 414 3003

Tuesday 15 March, 14.00 – 16.00
Arts Building
Senior Common Room R16
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
uob-death-cafe.eventbrite.co.uk

Join letter press artist Becky Howson as
she explores the role that printing has
played in cultural memory. This short
workshop will introduce participants to the
historic collections held at Winterbourne
and some of the basic processes involved in
letterpress printing.
Becky combines academic research
with her own practice which draws from
various print methodologies. She creates
work inspired by collections, curiosities,
archives, type, printed ephemera.

Death Café is a world-wide social franchise
which invites people, often strangers, to
gather to eat cake, drink tea, and discuss
death.
There’ll be no agenda, objectives
or themes – simply a group-directed
discussion with a view to increasing
awareness of death in order to help people
make the most of their (finite) lives. The
group is convened for discussion rather
than grief support or counselling. For more
information, visit deathcafe.com

Presented by Winterbourne House and
Garden

Presented by the School of Philosophy,
Theology and Religion

Workshops
– 45 –

workshops

WHY REMEMBER?
Wednesday 16 March, 17.00 – 18.00
Muirhead Tower,
Seminar Room 113 R21
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
why-remember.eventbrite.co.uk
Why remember? Why are 100 years
significant? How would you remember?
These questions were posed as part of a
research network and educational campaign
linked to the now iconic installation of
ceramic poppies at the Tower of London,
Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red.
Join Dr Joanne Sayner, Department of
Modern Languages, for this participatory
workshop in which you will have a chance
to reflect on your own answers to these
questions, to respond to an animated film
about the First World War made by pupils
at the Grey Coat Hospital in London, and to
discuss your reactions to the installation at
the Tower.

BLISTER CINEMA
WORKSHOP WITH
GENETIC MOO
Tuesday 15 March, 10.00 – 13.00 (drop-in)
European Research Institute, Digital
Humanities Hub (Ground Floor) G3
 Free
Genetic Moo is a UK based art group
who make interactive installations. The
artists present a free, interactive, drop-in
workshop for Arts & Science Festival to
coincide with an exhibition of their new
work Battle of the Blister as part of Silent
Signal – a group show exploring the science
of genetics, cell biology, immunology and
epidemiology.
The artists will demo their interactive
app Multiple, which they used to make their
film Battle of the Blister, and which you can
use to generate your own multi-coloured
animations. They’ll explain the science
behind the project and give you a glimpse
of the coding techniques they used. Bring
your own props and be prepared to dance
yourself into a bacterial frenzy!
Presented by Vivid Projects in partnership
with University of Birmingham as part of
Silent Signal, see page 14 for more details.

Presented by the Department of Modern
Languages

Exquisite Corpse
Workshop
Tuesday 15 March, 18.00 – 20.00
Muirhead Tower, Seminar Room 122,
First Floor R21
 Free, booking essential.
To book your place, please visit
exquisite-corpse.eventbrite.co.uk
Antonio Roberts leads a workshop
inspired by the Exquisite Corpse surrealist
storytelling technique. Participants are
invited to co-create an artwork re-mixing
archive images and other materials.
Following the workshop there’ll be
a discussion questioning authorship and
ownership of the collaboratively created
artworks.
Presented by Antonio Roberts in
partnership with Research and Cultural
Collections as part of Permission Taken,
see page 11 for more details.

workshops

– 46 –

– 47 –

workshops

TALL TALES AND UNRELIABLE NARRATORS
– WRITING WORKSHOP
Saturday 19 March, 13.30 – 16.00
The Barber Institute of Fine Arts R14
 £6 / £4 for UoB staff and students,
booking essential. To book your place,
please contact: 0121 414 2261 or email
education@barber.org.uk

Be inspired by the Barber collection and
respond to the festival theme of memory
and forgetting in this creative writing
workshop.
Explore ways in which we can take
our own and others’ memories, some of
them recorded in works in the collection,
and turn them into stories and poems…
sometimes with a complete disregard for
the truth.
Presented by The Barber Institute
of Fine Arts

LIFE ECHO – the world’s first phonic
memory harvest class
Friday 18 March
10.30 / 12.00 / 13.30 / 15.00
European Research Institute,
Seminar Room G53 G3
 Free, booking essential.
To book your place, please visit
life-echo-workshop.eventbrite.co.uk

workshops

What’s the soundtrack to your life? The first
song you bought? Your wedding dance?
What about the everyday sounds that
score your memories? The hum of the
radio, the tap of a wooden spoon against
an enamel bowl, or the sound of spokey
dokeys as they slid up and down your
bicycle wheel spokes…
Join sound artist and UoB Honorary
Research Fellow Justin Wiggan for a special
workshop as part of ongoing project Life
Echo, an art based enquiry into sound and
memory. Participants will be led through
a series of activities designed to trigger
and structure their own phonic memory
content. The resulting sounds will form part
of a ‘Phonic Memory Garden’ proposed for
2017, a public space in which visitors can
listen to each other’s audio memories.
For more information, visit life-echo.com

– 48 –

– 49 –

workshops

d

igbeth

How to
find us

Art & science

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DIGBETH CANAL
WORKSHOP

via grand union

Typhoo
basin

Saturday 19 March, 16.00 – 18.00
Grand Union Gallery, 19 Minerva
Works, 158 Fazeley Street, Digbeth,
Birmingham, B5 5RS
 Free, booking recommended.
To book your place, please visit
digbeth-canal.eventbrite.co.uk
Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton are
award winning interdisciplinary visual
artists, facilitators, and community
organisers from Calgary, Canada.
Throughout the last seven years they have
developed a collaborative practice that
operates in both a gallery and in more
public spaces and arenas.
For Arts & Science Festival, the artists
invite you to walk and talk with them
along Digbeth’s canal. The walk leaves from
Grand Union Gallery, where they will be in
residence throughout February and March
undertaking intense research about the
canals & waterways that are so prominent
in Birmingham’s history.
Presented by Grand Union in partnership
with Cultural Engagement

workshops

The University of Birmingham is located in
south-west Birmingham, approximately 3
miles from the city centre. For maps and
information about getting to the University
please visit www.about.bham.ac.uk/maps
By train
Local trains operated by London Midlands
run from Birmingham New Street to
University Station. Check train times at
londonmidland.com
Parking
Pay and Display
North East Car Park,
52 Pritchatts Road
Satnav: B15 2SA
Blue Badge holders
Parking is available on campus
beyond the security barriers.

Contact


Coming Soon
The University of Birmingham is home to a
diverse cultural offer which includes public
museums, galleries, archives, collections,
libraries and cultural venues.
For details all University of Birmingham
events, please visit birmingham.ac.uk/events
or pick up a copy of our What’s On Guide.

– 50 –

artsandscience@contacts.bham.ac.uk
birmingham.ac.uk/artsandsciencefestival
facebook.com/CultureUoB
twitter.com/CultureUoB

Cultural Engagement
University of Birmingham
32 Pritchatt’s Road
Edgbaston, B15 2TT

Credits
Arts & Science Festival is conceived and
developed by the Cultural Engagement
team at the University of Birmingham.
We would like to thank all involved in the
planning, promotion and delivery of festival
events. Special thanks to Laura Milner, Ian
Grosvenor, Clare Mullett, Anna Young, Nadia
Awal, Sue Franklin, Jo Sweet, Jen Ridding,
and Andy Tootell.
We would also like to thank our festival
partners: Birmingham Open Media,
Brumpic, The Drum, Grand Union, Ikon, mac
Birmingham, Sampad, Some Cities, Vivid
Projects, Voices of War and Peace.
Design: An Endless Supply

– 52 –

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 facebook.com/CultureUoB
 twitter.com/CultureUoB

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Medical School
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G12 Winterbourne House
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R4
Aston Webb – Block A
R6
Aston Webb –
Great Hall
Nuffield
R9
R12 Bramall Music
Building
R14 Barber Institute of
Fine Arts
R16 Arts Building
R21 Muirhead Tower
R23 University Centre
R24 Staff House
R27 Bioscience Building
R28 Learning Centre

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