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Sample Lesson Plan 1

Think about

What do I want students to learn and

Lesson Objectives:

Objective: TSWBAT model the multiplication and division rules for


finding equivalent fractions.
TSWBAT rename fractions in simplest form.

be able to do?

What content knowledge and/or skills do I

want students to acquire, demonstrate, or


refine?
What assessment(s) will be used before
instruction to measure the level of
student mastery of each objective?
How will the objectives be shared with
students?
Why are the objectives for todays
lesson important?
How does this lesson align with curriculum
standards and school initiatives?
How does todays lesson connect with
previous and subsequent lessons?
What resources and materials will be
needed for this lesson?

Think about

Will students be able to complete the warmup independently?

How will the warm up provide scaffolding for


the lesson?

How will feedback from the warm up inform


instruction?

Will there be accountability for completion?


How will correct answers be shared?

Grade 6 Everyday Mathematics: Unit 4

Prior knowledge: The students will need to be able to find common factors and
greatest common factors. Students will need to know basic multiplication/division
facts.
Students will learn to compare fractions in subsequent lessons.
Materials: PowerPoint, SmartBoard, white boards/markers (1/student), warm-up, 4
pieces of colored paper, crayon.

Warm Up/ Drill:

Students will list the factors of 12, 15, 48, 27, 9, and 36. This will activate prior
knowledge that students will need for todays lesson.

Students will answer the following question in the format of a BCR.

Zoe and Ryan are both having birthday parties. Zoe cuts her cake into 24 pieces.
Her guests eat half of the cake. Ryan cuts her cake into 18 pieces. Her guests eat
half of the cake. If both of the cakes were the same size, which guests ate more?
Explain your answer.
Students will discuss their answer with the 2 people sitting next to them. I will then
call on students to share what they discussed. (Common Misconception: Some
people will think that Zoes guests ate more because they ate more pieces of cake.)
Other students will know that they ate the same amount since they both ate half of the
cake.
Warm-Up Extension: I will give each group two colored pieces of paper to represent
the two cakes and a crayon for shading. In a group, they will need to prove whether or
not equal amounts of both cakes were consumed.

Think about

Will there be accountability for completion?


How will correct answers be shared?
How will questions be answered?

Homework Check:

Students did not have homework over the weekend because they took a test the end of
last week.

Think about

Motivation and Connection:

How will I teach the lesson?


What will spark student interest in the

lesson?
What connections can be made between
this lesson and real-world applications?
What connections can be made across
curricula?

Think about
What previously learned concepts will
connect to this lesson?

How will the new concept(s) be introduced?


What strategies will encourage active

Instructional Activity/Activities:

learning?

What technology, hands-on activities, and

manipulatives could enhance student


understanding?
How can reading and writing be
incorporated?
What research-based strategies could
extend and refine student understanding?
How will activities connect to one another?

What strategies and methodologies will

convey content and skill objectives to all


students?
What are the pivotal points of the lesson at
which assessments are essential?
How will student understanding be
monitored?

Real World Connection: Equivalent fractions may be used in cooking. For example, if
you need cup of sugar but only have a cup measuring cup you will need to find
an equivalent fraction to measure the sugar. (See PowerPoint slide 6)
Students will be engaged through white board activities, Think-Pair-Share, a short
video, and class discussion (guided by questions in PowerPoint). Additional questions
may be asked as necessary to enhance learning and clarify misconceptions.

After the discussion of the warm-up the students will begin to explore equivalent
fractions through an opening activity. (Detailed instructions included in attached
PowerPoint slides) Each student will fold a paper in thirds and shade two of the
thirds. They will write a fraction for the shaded portion in their notebook. They will
then fold the paper in fourths the other direction. They will record the fraction that
describes the new shaded portion in their notebook. This concrete representation will
help students understand equivalent fractions.
This procedure will be repeated folding a second piece of paper in fourths. Three of
the fourths will be shaded. Students will draw a representation of this activity in their
notebook. Students will then fold the paper in half the other direction. Now 6/8 of the
paper is shaded. Students will draw a picture to represent this in their notebook. The
students will fold the paper in half again the same direction. The now have 12/16
shaded. Students will draw a picture to represent this in their notebook. By seeing
both a concrete and representational model of equivalent fractions, students should be
ready to move to the abstract.
Students will take notes on vocabulary and important concepts guided by a
PowerPoint presentation. (See attached slides) Topics include finding equivalent
fractions using the multiplication and division rules, finding the greatest common
factor, writing fractions in simplest form, and finding a missing number in the
numerator or denominator. Practice problems and formative assessment will be
included throughout. Questions are included in PowerPoint. Additional questions will
be added to enhance student learning.

A video link is included in the PowerPoint presentation. This gives students another
look at understanding/finding equivalent fractions. Students will record two things
they learned or heard reiterated about equivalent fractions from the video.
White board formative assessment- Students will demonstrate finding equivalent
fractions using multiplication and division, simplifying fractions, and finding a
missing number in the numerator or denominator. They will record the answer to
various problems in these categories on a white board and hold up their board so that I
can check for correct answers. I will provide additional examples for reinforcement of
skills if necessary.
Formative Assessment Reflection: I will note students who answer question
incorrectly on my seating chart so that I can provide further instruction to these
students.
Areas of difficulty: Students may struggle with the concept that fractions can be
equivalent even though the numbers are different. They may assume the fraction that
has larger numbers is larger. The concrete and representational models used at the
beginning of this lesson should alleviate this misconception.
Independent practice: Students will complete math journal page 124-125
independently. I will circulate around the room giving students individual instruction
or work with a small group of students at the back table depending on the students
needs.
Closure:

Think about
How will I know if students learned

Exit Slip: Students will write two equivalent fractions and the simplest form of 12/30.
They will turn this in on their way out. I will use this to assess students understanding
of equivalent fractions.

what I wanted them to learn?

What assessments will be used after

instruction to ascertain the level of


student mastery of each objective?
How will the results of this assessment
impact subsequent lessons?
How will I ensure that all students have
learned?
What will I do to accommodate students who
are struggling and students who have
mastered the lessons objectives and are
poised for additional challenge?

Think about

How does the assignment connect to the


lesson?

Are directions clear?


Will students be able to complete the

Homework (if applicable):

Study Link 4-1

assignment independently? If not, how


will you differentiate?

Think about

What went well?


What should be changed?

Reflection:

Name____________________________________

Warm Up
1: List the factors of the following numbers. (Remember factors are all of the numbers that can be multiplied to equal the given
number.)
a. 12
b. 15
c. 48
d. 27
e. 9
f. 36
2: BCR:
Zoe and Ryan are both having birthday parties. Zoe cuts her cake into 24 pieces. Her guests eat half of the cake. Ryan cuts her cake
into 18 pieces. Her guests eat half of the cake. If both of the cakes were the same size, whose guests ate more? Explain your answer.

Vocabulary
Equivalent Fractions- Two ___________________ that name the ________________ amount.
Ex. ___________________________________
Simplest Form- The _______________________ and denominator have no _______________factors.
Ex. 24/60 = 2/5
___________________________- A factor of each of two or more counting _______________.
Ex. _______ is a common factor of 8 and 12.

Greatest Common Factor (GCF)- The _____________ factor that two or more counting numbers have in _______________
Ex. The common factors of 24 and 36 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12, and their GCF is ___________.

Multiplication Rule
To find an ____________________ fraction, multiply the numerator and denominator of the ______________ fraction by the
same (nonzero) number

*
*

Ex.

Ex.

Division Rule
To find an equivalent fraction, _____________ the _______________________ and denominator of the original fraction by the
same (nonzero) number
Ex.

Ex.

.
=

10
15

Sample Lesson Plan 2


Think about

What do I want students to learn

Lesson Objectives:

Objective: TSWBAT interpret and draw graphs that correspond to given


situations.

and be able to do?

What content knowledge and/or

skills do I want students to


acquire, demonstrate, or refine?
What assessment(s) will be used
before
instruction to
measure the level of student
mastery of each objective?
How will the objectives be shared
with
students?
Why are the objectives for
todays lesson important?
How does this lesson align with
curriculum
standards and
school initiatives?
How does todays lesson connect
with previous and subsequent
lessons?
What resources and materials will be
needed for this lesson?

Think about
Will students be able to complete the
warm-up independently?

How will the warm up provide


scaffolding for the lesson?

How will feedback from the warm up


inform instruction?

Will there be accountability for


completion?

How will correct answers be shared?

Grade 6 Everyday Mathematics: Unit 2

Prior knowledge: Students will need to have prior knowledge of the x and y-axis and
basic knowledge of how to interpret a graph. Students will also need prior knowledge from
the previous lesson on how to create a graph from a table in order to match graphs and tables
for the readiness activity.
Materials: PowerPoint, SmartBoard, white boards/markers (1/student), warm-up, exit
ticket, math journal, readiness matching activity, guided notes

Warm Up/ Drill:

Warm Up Extension: Next to each graph on p.115, fill in a word to complete the sentence
As time passes, the speed of the car _______
Misconception: Students may hold the misconception that a change in the graph shows the car
traveling up or down hill. We will take time to address this misconception and take notice of the
x and y-axis labels.
Think about

Will there be accountability for


completion?

How will correct answers be shared?


How will questions be answered?

Homework Check:

Composite area practice. We will review this homework in the second half of class.

Think about

Motivation and Connection:

How will I teach the lesson?


What will spark student interest in

the lesson?
What connections can be made
between this lesson and realworld applications?
What connections can be made
across
curricula?

Think about

What previously learned concepts


will connect to this lesson?

How will the new concept(s) be


introduced?

What strategies will encourage


active learning?

What technology, hands-on


activities, and manipulatives
could enhance student
understanding?
How can reading and writing be
incorporated?
What research-based strategies
could extend and refine student
understanding?
How will activities connect to one
another?
What strategies and methodologies
will convey content and skill
objectives to all students?
What are the pivotal points of the

Readiness Activity: Students will use their prior knowledge to match a real world situation
to a line graph and table.
Initially students will place the graph and table on the chart with the story but not glue.
Students will have a chance to fix their answer at the end of class. Then we will go over the
final answer and the students will glue the matched sets into their interactive notebooks. The
extra graph and table will be glued in the back and the students will create their own story to
match it.

Instructional Activity/Activities:
Vocabulary: (Students will record on guided notes)
Time Graph- a graph representing a story that takes place over time. The units on the
horizontal axis are time units.
Students will label parts on a time vs. speed graph (acceleration, constant speed, etc.). the
teacher will ask the students what they think each part of the graph represents before
revealing the words for their notes.
Identifying parts of a time Graph:
The teacher will show students several time graphs and ask students questions such as
How far has the object traveled after 3 seconds? Students will respond using all-pupil
response strategies.
Students will be asked to match a story to a time graph and will respond using all-pupil
response.
Constructing a Time Graph:
I will present the students with the following time story. Satya runs water into his bathtub.
He steps into the tub, sits down, and begins to bathe. The water in the tub begins to cool,

lesson at which assessments are


essential?
How will student understanding be
monitored?

so he drains some water and add more hot water. Satya finishes bathing, gets out of the
tub, and drains the water. We will work as a class to create a time graph that illustrates the
time story including as many details as possible. (Students will glue their guided notes into
their interactive notebook.)
Students will open their math journal to page 115. We will work together to create a second
time graph for the following story, A woman walks up one side of a hill at a steady pace
and runs down the other side. She then continues walking at a steady pace.
Interpreting a Time Graph:
Students will turn to math journal p. 116. The class will work together to begin creating a
story for the first half of the following graph. The students will complete the second half
independently. Once they have finished, students will share their story with the class.

Independent Practice:
Students will complete question 2 on math journal page 116 independently.

We will go over the answer as a class.


An additional independent practice will be available for the second half of class.
White board formative assessment:
Students will turn to math journal page 117. The students will complete the question one at a
time and will write the letter of the graph that matches each situation on their white board.
Formative Assessment Reflection: The teacher will record the number of students that
answers each question correctly and use this information to assess whether students need
any additional practice or re-teaching.
Areas of difficulty: Understanding the units may be an area of difficulty. For example,
students may confuse speed with elevation.
Think about

Closure:

How will I know if students


learned what I wanted them to

Exit Slip: Called to a crime, Batman sped away from the Bat Cave. Realizing the Bat Car

learn?

was out of gas, he stopped at the Royal Farms to fill up. After leaving Royal Farms, still
driving further away from his home, the Bat Car alarm warned of Robins motorcycles flat
tire, so Batman immediately made a U-Turn and went back towards the Bat Cave to pick up
Robin, who hadnt gotten very far from the Cave when the tire went flat. Once they fixed the
tire, the men got back on the road to the crime scene. Batman and Robin had just passed the
Royal Farms Batman had gotten gas at earlier when Alfred the butler called to say there was
a false alarm, so they drove back home to the Bat Cave. Create a time graph to show
Batmans distance from the Bat Cave.

What assessments will be used after

instruction to ascertain the level


of student mastery of each
objective?
How will the results of this
assessment impact subsequent
lessons?
How will I ensure that all
students have learned?
What will I do to accommodate
students who are struggling and
students who have mastered the
lessons objectives and are poised
for additional challenge?

Think about
How does the assignment connect to
the

lesson?

Are directions clear?


Will students be able to complete the

Homework (if applicable):

SL 3-9

assignment independently? If not,


how will you differentiate?

Think about
What went well?
What should be changed?

Reflection:

Sample Lesson Plan 3

Think about
What do I want students to learn and be
able to do?
What content knowledge and/or skills do I
want students to acquire, demonstrate, or
refine?
What assessment(s) will be used before
instruction to measure the level of
student mastery of each objective?
How will the objectives be shared with
students?

Grade 6 Pre-Algebra: Unit 11

Lesson Objectives:

Time
:

Students will distinguish between statistical questions and those that are not
statistical.
Students will distinguish between categorical data and numerical data.

Common Core State Standards:

6.SP.1-5
http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Content/6/SP

Why are the objectives for todays lesson


important?
How does this lesson align with curriculum
standards and school initiatives?
How does todays lesson connect with
previous and subsequent lessons?
What resources and materials will be needed
for this lesson?

Think about
Will students be able to complete the warmup independently?
How will the warm up provide scaffolding for
the lesson?
How will feedback from the warm up inform
instruction?
Will there be accountability for completion?
How will correct answers be shared?

Warm Up/ Drill:


Students will be given a hand-out with the following scenario:
Jerome, a 6th grader at Roosevelt Middle School, is a huge baseball fan. He loves to
collect baseball cards. He has cards of current players and of players from past baseball
seasons. With his teachers permission, Jerome brought his baseball card collection to
school. Each card has a picture of a current or past major league baseball player, along
with information about the player. When he placed his cards out for the other students to
see, they asked Jerome all sorts of questions about his cards. Some asked:
How many cards does Jerome have altogether?
What is the typical cost of a card in Jeromes collection?
Where did Jerome get the cards?

Time
:

Students will answer the following questions:


Which of these questions do you think might be statistical questions?
What do you think is meant by statistical question?
Students do not have a definition or understanding of what a statistical question is at this
point. We will discuss what they think a statistical question is before learning the formal
definition.
A statistical question is one that can be answered with data and for which it is
anticipated that the data (information) collected to answer the question will vary.
The second and third questions are statistical questions because the answer for each card
in the collection could vary. The 1st question, How many cards do you have in your
collection? is not a statistical question because we do not anticipate any variability in the
data collected to answer this question. There is only one data value and no variability.
Students will correct their warm up question, cut it out, and glue it in their interactive
notebook.
Convey the main idea that a question is statistical if it can be answered with data that
varies. Point out to the students the concept of variability in the data means that not all
data values have the same value. The question, How old am I? is not a statistical
question because it is not answered by collecting data that vary. The question, How old
are the students in my school? is a statistical question because when you collect data on
the ages of students at the school, the ages will vary not all students are the same age.
Think about

Homework Check:

Time
:

Motivation and Connection:

Time
:

Will there be accountability for completion?


How will correct answers be shared?
How will questions be answered?

Think about
How will I teach the lesson?
What will spark student interest in the lesson?
What connections can be made between this
lesson and real-world applications?
What connections can be made across
curricula?

Students will cut out a vocabulary flipbook for this lesson. They will record the definition
of a statistical question.
The students will be given a list of the following questions:
a. Who is my favorite movie star?
No, not answered by collecting data that vary.
b. What are the favorite colors of 6th graders in my school?

Yes, colors will vary.


c. How many years have students in my schools band played an instrument?
Yes, number of years will vary.
d. What is the favorite subject of 6th graders at my school?
Yes, subjects will vary.
e. How many brothers and sisters does my best friend have?
No, not answered by collecting data that vary.
They will cut out each question and sort them into 2 piles: statistical questions and not
statistical questions. They will glue the statistical questions into their flipbook. The nonstatistical questions will be glued into their notebook as non-examples.
Think about
What previously learned concepts will connect
to this lesson?

Instructional Activity/Activities:
Display the following statement to students.

How will the new concept(s) be introduced?


What strategies will encourage active
learning?
What technology, hands-on activities, and
manipulatives could enhance student
understanding?
How can reading and writing be incorporated?
What research-based strategies could extend
and refine student understanding?
How will activities connect to one another?
What strategies and methodologies will
convey content and skill objectives to all
students?

We use two types of data to answer statistical questions: quantitative data and categorical
data. If we recorded the age of baseball cards, we would have quantitative data. Each
value in a quantitative data set is a number and it makes sense to find the mean of those
numbers (average age of the 25 baseball cards). If we recorded the team of the featured
player for baseball cards, you would have categorical data. Although you still have
data values, the data values are not numbers. They would be team names, which you can
think of as categories. It does not make sense to find the mean or average of team names.
After the students have read they will record the definition of quantitative and categorical
data in their flipbook. I will then pose the following questions:

What are the pivotal points of the lesson at


which assessments are essential?
How will student understanding be monitored?

What are other examples of categorical data? Eye color, the month in which you
were born, and the number that may be used to identify your classroom are
examples of categorical data. Be sure to clarify that categorical data can be
numbers but it doesnt make sense to find the mean of these numbers.
What are other examples of quantitative data? Height, number of pets, and
minutes to get to school are all examples of quantitative data.

Students will now cut out the data sets listed below. They will sort the data into
categorical and quantitative data.
Identify each of the following data sets as categorical (C) or quantitative (Q).
a. Heights of 6th graders Q

Time
:

b. Favorite flavor of ice cream for each of 6th graders C


c. Hours of sleep on a school night for 6th graders Q
d. Type of beverage drank at lunch for each of 6th graders C
e. Eye color for each of 6th graders C
Follow up with these questions:
For each of the following statistical questions, students asked Jerome to identify whether
the data are quantitative or categorical. Explain your answer, and list four possible data
values.
a. How old are the cards in the collection?
Quantitative, as I anticipate data will be a set of numbers for which I can find the mean.
Possible data values: years, years, years, years
b. How much did the cards in the collection cost?
Quantitative, as I anticipate data will be a set of numbers for which I can find the mean.
Possible data values: $ ., $ ., $ ., $ .
c. Where did you get the cards?
Categorical, as I anticipate the data represents the name of a place.
Possible data values: a store, a garage sale, from my brother, from a friend
d. What are the jersey numbers for each of the baseball players?
Categorical, it does not make sense to take an average of the data collected.
Think about
How will I know if students learned what
I wanted them to learn?
What assessments will be used after
instruction to ascertain the level of
student mastery of each objective?
How will the results of this assessment impact
subsequent lessons?
How will I ensure that all students have
learned?
What will I do to accommodate students who
are struggling and students who have
mastered the lessons objectives and are
poised for additional challenge?

Closure:
Students should individually answer the following questions.
1. Indicate whether each of the following two questions is a statistical question. Explain
why or why not.
a. How much does Susans dog weigh? Not a statistical question, there is no variation
in the data. Susans dog will have one weight.
b. How much do the dogs belonging to students at our school weigh? It is a statistical
question, the weight of dogs will vary.
2. If you collected data on the weights of dogs, would the data be quantitative or
categorical? Explain how you know it is quantitative or categorical. It will be quantitative

Time
:

because the data will be numbers and it makes sense to find the mean or average of these
numbers.
Bonus (Preview for tomorrows lesson)
What type of graphical displays would be best to use for categorical data? Circle Graphs
or Bar Graphs
Think about
How does the assignment connect to the
lesson?

Homework (if applicable):


Data Insert Day 1 HW Worksheet

Are directions clear?


Will students be able to complete the
assignment independently? If not, how
will you differentiate?

Think about
What potential barriers exist that would
interfere with student learning?
What UDL solutions can be included in the
lesson to prevent these barriers?

The HW asks students to collect data from 10 people. If there are a few minutes at the
end of class, you may want to let them collect some of that data in class. If a student
objects to being able to collect data from 10 people then tell them to make up the data.
The HW also asks students to make a bar graph and find the median of a set of numbers.
These are review skills from prior grade levels. They should not be taught in class.
Individual remediation can be provided for the few students (if any) that may need help.
Notes:

Time
:

Name _________________________

Warm Up
Jerome, a 6th grader at Roosevelt Middle School, is a huge baseball fan. He loves to collect baseball cards. He has cards of current players and of players from
past baseball seasons. With his teachers permission, Jerome brought his baseball card collection to school. Each card has a picture of a current or past major
league baseball player, along with information about the player. When he placed his cards out for the other students to see, they asked Jerome all sorts of
questions about his cards. Some asked:

1. How many cards does Jerome have altogether?


2. What is the typical cost of a card in Jeromes collection?
3. Where did Jerome get the cards?
Complete the following:
1. Circle the question(s) above you think might be statistical questions?
2. What do you think is meant by statistical question?

Quantitative vs Categorical
For each of the following statistical questions, students asked Jerome to identify whether the data are quantitative or
categorical. Explain your answer, and list four possible data values.
a. How old are the cards in the collection?

b. How much did the cards in the collection cost?

c. Where did you get the cards?

d. What are the jersey numbers for each of the baseball players?

Name __________________________________

Closure
1. Indicate whether each of the following two questions is a statistical question. Explain why or why not.
a. How much does Susans dog weigh?

b. How much do the dogs belonging to students at our school weigh?

2. If you collected data on the weights of dogs, would the data be quantitative or categorical? Explain how you know it is
quantitative or categorical.

Flipbook