You are on page 1of 16

Sentence Complements

 Sentence Complements complete the
meaning begun by the subject and the verb
 Sentence Complements can be any one of
the following: Direct Objects, Indirect
Objects, Predicate Nouns (also called
Predicate Nominatives), or Predicate
Adjectives

How can you figure out
which sentence complement
is being used?

 Sentence Complements are
determined by the verb

 Action verbs take certain types of
sentence complements
 Linking verbs take other types of
sentence complements

Complements for Action
Verbs

Action Verbs will have:
Direct objects
AND
Indirect objects

Example:
Mrs. Thomas gave
the class the test.
Direct object: the test
Indirect object: the class

DIRECT OBJECTS

Direct Objects follow an action verb, and they receive
the action of the verb
1. Direct Objects answer who or what after an action
verb
2. In the example, Mrs. Thomas gave the class the test,
who or what did Mrs. Thomas give? The test. So,
the test is the direct object in that sentence.

INDIRECT OBJECTS
 Indirect Objects follow an action verb, and tell to
whom or for whom the action was done.
1. Indirect Objects come before the direct object
in the sentence.
2. In order to have an Indirect Object, there must
be a direct object.
3. In the example, Mrs. Thomas gave the class the
test, to whom or for whom did Mrs. Thomas
give the test? The class. So, the class is the
indirect object in that sentence.

HINT: There is a test that
can be used for indirect
objects!
Since Indirect Objects answer to whom
or for whom an action was done,
they can be changed into prepositional phrases and
moved to the end of the sentence.
Mrs. Thomas gave the class the
test.

OR
Mrs. Thomas gave the test to the
class.

JUST REMEMBER!!!!
1. Action Verbs Can Use Both Direct and Indirect
Objects
2. Direct Objects Can Be Used Without Indirect
Objects
3. Indirect Objects Cannot Be Used Without a
Direct Object
4. Indirect Objects Always Appear Before the
Direct Object

Complements for Linking
Verbs

Linking Verbs will
have:

Predicate Nouns
OR
Predicate Adjectives

Notice that you can
only have one or the
other. You can not
have both in the
same sentence.

PREDICATE NOUN
 Predicate Nouns
rename the subject
 They will most often
follow a form of the
verb “to be” or “to
become”
 Example:
 Mr. King is our
teacher.

HINT: There is a test that
can be used for predicate
nouns!
Since Predicate nouns rename the subject,
they can be interchanged with the subject and the
sentence will still say the same thing.

Our teacher is Mr. King. OR
Mr. King is our teacher

PREDICATE ADJECTIVE
 Predicate Adjectives
describe the subject
 They will follow any
linking verb
 Be careful of sensory
linking verbs
 Example:
Mr. Bud grew angry
while driving.

Don’t Forget!
1. Predicate Nouns can also be called Predicate
Nominatives.
2. Predicate Nouns and Predicate Adjectives
follow Linking Verbs only.
3. Predicate Nouns and Predicate Adjectives
cannot be used together in the same sentence.

IMPORTANT:
One Final Reminder!
No Verb MUST HAVE
a Sentence Complement!
Some Verbs Express Complete Ideas on Their Own!

To Conclude:
Sentences have subjects,
verbs, and complements
 Action verbs
will have:
Direct objects
Indirect objects

 Linking verbs will
have:
Predicate Nouns
Predicate Adjectives

Look at the handout,
page 33, 1-10. Identify
the verb. Underline it
twice, and label it as AV
or LV.

Look at the handout, page
33, 1-10. Identify the
complements.
 If your verb is an
Action verb:

 If your verb is a Linking
verb:

Direct objects

Predicate Nouns(noun)

(what?/who?)

Predicate Adjectives
(adjective)

Indirect objects
(to whom/for
whom?– before)