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Annotated Bibliography

By: Sam Freiberg

Primary:
Albert Einstein and ... 1922. Emaze Presentations. Web. 23 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Albert Einstein scientist page. It helped me
understand what Albert Einstein looked like when he accepted his Nobel Prize. It is primary
because the person that took it was at the ceremony when the photo was took.
Allied Powers Leaders. 1935. About.com Education. Web. 20 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Impact of the Atomic Bomb page. It helped me
understand who the Allied leaders were in The Second World War, and what they all looked like.
It is primary because the person that took the photo was at the conference in Potsdam, along
with the leaders.
Atomic Blast. 1946. Albuquerque. Chemistry Explained. Web. 2 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a photo on my What was the Manhattan Project page. It helped
me understand what the actual explosion looked, and how destructive even the smallest bomb
could be. It is primary because the photo was taken at the headquarters in Albuquerque, and
the person who took it was there.
Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima. 1945. Hiroshima. The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and
Nagasaki: 70 Years Later. Web. 24 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Historical Context page. It helped me understand
the destructive power of the bomb as well as what the least destructive bomb looked like and
helps me understand how much more destruction would happen if the most destructive bomb
was ever used in war. It is primary the person who took the photo was on the plane that dropped
the bomb.
Cold War Air Defense Relied on Widespread Dispersal of Nuclear Weapons, Documents
Show. 1960. George Washington University, Trenton. Cold War Air Defense Relied on
Widespread Dispersal of Nuclear Weapons, Documents Show. Web. 04 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Historical Context page. It helped me understand
what the U.S.s missiles looked like in the Second World War, as well as where the experiments
took place and how the government stored the missiles. It is primary because the person that
took the photo was actually there.
Einstein, Albert. "Manhattan Project Letter." Letter to Franklin Roosevelt. 2 Aug. 1939.
MS. New York, New York.
I used this source as a Scribd on my Albert Einstein scientist page. It helped me
understand how Albert Einstein helped out with the start of the project as well as what his
motivations were for why he helped out the project. It is primary because it was written by Albert
Einstein himself.

Enrico Fermi. Atomic Heritage Foundation, Chicago. Atomic Heritage Foundation. Web.
23 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Enrico Fermi scientist page. It helped me
understand what he looked like when he worked on the project as well as what the lab looked
like and how he was in a work environment. It is primary because the person that took the photo
was actually in his laboratory.
Fermi, Enrico. "To Fermi with Love." Interview. Atomic Heritage. Soundcloud, 11 Feb.
2015. Web.
I used this source as a sound clip/interview on my Enrico Fermi scientist page. It helped
me understand how Enrico Fermi handled an interview and allowed me to hear his thought
about working on the project. It is primary because Enrico Fermi was there and he was the one
being interviewed.
Haake, Paul. "Troubling Specter of Nuclear Power." New York Times [New York] 9 July
1978: CN16. Print. 2 Jan. 2016.
I used this as a newspaper article on my Nuclear Medicine and Energy page. It helped
me understand what the public's perception of nuclear power was at first, and how the media
perceived it. It is primary because the person that wrote the article was alive at the time of the
first use nuclear power.
J. Robert Oppenheimer. Chicago. Atomic Heritage Foundation. Web. 11 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Robert Oppenheimer page. It helped me understand
what he looked like in his lab and what his lab looked like. It is primary because the person that
took the photo was there.
"J. Robert Oppenheimer's Interview." Interview by Stephanie Groueff.SoundCloud.
Atomic Heritage, Web. 11 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a sound interview on my Robert Oppenheimer page. It helped me
understand how he handled an interview and what his thoughts were on the Manhattan Project.
It is primary because the interview was done when the Manhattan Project and Robert
Oppenheimer was the person being interviewed.
Manhattan Project | United States History. 1945. Alamogordo. Encyclopedia Britannica
Online. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a photo on my home page. It helped me understand the power of
the atomic bomb and what the first explosions actually looked like. It is primary because the
person that took the photo was actually there when the bomb exploded.
Power for U.S. From Russias Old Nuclear Weapons. New York Times, Moscow. The New
York Times. By Andrew E. Kramer. Web. 04 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my impact of the Atomic Bomb. It helped me
understand what Russias nuclear weapon program was like and allowed me to get a
perspective view of the worlds nuclear landscape at the time. It is primary because the person
that took the photo was there.
Proposal. 1940. Albuquerque. Manhattan Project. Web. 2 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a photo on my home page. It helped me understand how Albert
Einstein helped benefit the project and how the project got started. It is primary because the
person that took the photo was there.

Setting It Straight: Race and Racism, Minority Groups. Albuquerque. Race and Racism,
Minority Groups. Web. 06 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my What was the Manhattan Project? page. It helped
me understand what the first nuclear explosions looked like and how, they were compared to
now, so much smaller in explosion power, and lethality. It is primary because the person that
took the photo was actually there when the bomb was detonated.
The Decision to Drop the Bomb. 1945. Potsdam. Ushistory.org. Web. 13 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Impact of the Atomic Bomb page. It helped me
understand who the Allied Powers leaders were in the Second World War as well as who had
the power to give the order to drop the bomb. It is primary because the person that took the
photo was actually there.
The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. 1945. Mushroom Cloud Rising Over
Nagasaki, Nagasaki. Nagasaki. Web. 04 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my What was the Manhattan Project? page. It helped
me understand what the first nuclear explosions looked like and how, they were compared to
now, so much smaller in explosion power, and lethality. It is primary because the person that
took the photo was actually there when the bomb was detonated.
The Manhattan Project. Manhattan Project Voices. Web. 29 Oct. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my Home page. It helped me understand who worked
on the project as well as if they had any females that were high ranking or any minorities that
were high ranking. It is primary because the people in the photo worked on the project and the
person that took the photo was actually there.
"Tracing Disease to It's Source." Hutchinson News (7 Aug. 1983): 1B.Newspaper Archive
Academic Library Edition. Newspaper Archive. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a newspaper article on my Nuclear Medicine and Energy page. It
helped
me understand what people thought of Nuclear Medicine at first and how
Medicine was being used when it was first invented. It is primary because the person that wrote
the article was at the facility and was alive when Nuclear Medicine was first being used.
Trinity Crater. 1945. Alamogordo. Trinity Crater. Web. 13 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a photo on my What was the Manhattan Project? page. It helped
me understand what the first nuclear explosions looked like and how, they were compared to
now, so much smaller in explosion power, and lethality. It is primary because the person that
took the photo was actually there when the bomb was detonated.

Secondary:
"Access Newspaper Archive Institutional Version | Unauthorised User."Access
Newspaper Archive Institutional Version | Unauthorised User. Newspaper Archive, Web.
13 Jan. 2016.
I used this source to get all of my newspaper articles on my website. It helped me
understand how to get good primary sources and look for important information in newspaper

articles. It is secondary because it is a website and the creators of the website werent there
when all of these newspapers were published.
Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2016. Web. 19 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a website to gather information on most of my scientists. It helped
me understand how to shorten information into a reasonable amount, and how to present only
important details in a persons life. It is secondary because it is a website and it wasnt created
by the people that are on the website.
"Enrico Fermi." Atomic Heritage Foundation. Atomic Heritage, Web. 23 Dec. 2015.
I used this source to gain information to put on my Enrico Fermi scientist page. It helped
me understand what working on the project was like for Enrico and how he helped as well as
what his family life was like and where he grew up. It is secondary because this is a website
about him and it was not created by Enrico himself.
"How Albert Einstein Helped Blackmail President Roosevelt Over Manhattan Project
Funding." Space. Purch, 2015. Web. 18 Dec. 2015.
I used this source to research my Albert Einstein page. It helped me understand how
Albert Einstein helped with the Manhattan Project, and what his relationship was like with the
president at the time. It is secondary because it is a website not made by Albert Einstein about
him.
"Manhattan Project." Manhattan Project. Department of Energy, Web. 6 Oct. 2014, 29 Oct.
2015.
I used this source to research my What was the Manhattan Project? page. It helped me
understand what the Manhattan Project did and where it was as well as the destructive power of
the bombs. It is secondary because it is a website created about the Manhattan Project and
wasnt created by the people that worked on the project themselves.
"Manhattan Project." Project of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Media Temple, 1998.
Web. 23 Oct. 2015.
I used this source as a way to gain information and knowledge for my What was the
Manhattan Project page and my scientists pages. It helped me understand what the process
was like from researching the project to actually creating the atomic bomb. It is secondary
because the people that made the website didnt work on the project themselves.
"Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery." Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery.
Web. 06 Nov. 2015.
I used this source as a way to gain information on multiple pages of my website. It
helped me understand what the process to create the Manhattan Project was like and how
difficult it was to create a nuclear weapon, something that have never been done before. It is
secondary because the people that made the website didnt work on the Manhattan Project
themselves.
Noguchi, Jamie. "Cold War Air Defense Relied on Widespread Dispersal of Nuclear
Weapons, Documents Show." Cold War Air Defense Relied on Widespread Dispersal of
Nuclear Weapons, Documents Show. National Security Archive, 1995. Web. 04 Dec. 2015.
I used this source as a way to gain information for my New Warfare page. It helped me
understand how many nuclear weapons were circulating throughout the cold war and how
destructive nuclear weapons can be. It is secondary because the people that made the website
didnt create nuclear weapons themselves.

"Nuclear Arsenals." ICAN. ICAN, Web. 13 Jan. 2016.


I used this source as a way to gain information of the destructiveness of atomic bombs.
It helped me understand what the most destructive nuclear bomb was and was a good visual for
me to understand just how big this explosion is. It is secondary because the people that made
the website did not work on the atomic bombs themselves.
"Soundclound." Soundcloud. Soundcloud, Web. 9 Feb. 2016.
I used this source to get the interviews from the scientists off of. It helped me understand
why preserving these interviews are important and how the scientists handled interviews about
the sensitive topic The Manhattan Project. It is secondary because although the interviews are
primary the website that they are on is not.
"The Manhattan Project." AMNH. American Museum of Natural History, Web. 17 Dec.
2015.
I used this source to gain information about where the Manhattan Project was in America
and what the American people thought about it after they found out. It helped me understand
what the publics perception of the Manhattan Project was. It is secondary because the people
that made the website didnt work on the Manhattan Project.
"The Manhattan Project." Manhattan Project Voices. Atomic Heritage Foundation, Los
Alamos Historical Society, Web. 29 Oct. 2015.
I used to gain information about the scientists that worked on the project and what
qualifications they needed to have to be able to work on the project. It helped me understand
how much education these scientists had as well as what they knew about nuclear energy
weaponry and medicine. It is secondary because the people that made the website didnt work
on the Manhattan Project.
The New York Times. The New York Times Company, 19 Jan. 2016. Web. 19 Jan. 2016.
I used this source to gather information and newspaper articles about the Manhattan
Project. It helped me understand what the project was portrayed like by the media. It is
secondary because it is a website not created by the Manhattan project scientists but by New
York Times journalists.
Ushistory.org. "51f. The Manhattan Project." The Manhattan Project. U.S. History Online
Textbook, Web. 23 Oct. 2015.
I used this source as a way to gain information about The Manhattan Project. It helped
me understand why the Manhattan Project was created and gave me insight into the Germans
nuclear program in comparison to Americas. It is secondary because the people that made the
website didnt also work on the Manhattan Project.
"World Nuclear Association." History of Nuclear Energy. US Nuclear Association, Web.
13 Jan. 2016.
I used this source as a way to find out the history of Nuclear Energy and weaponry. It
helped me understand what the U.S. and the world knew about nuclear energy and weaponry
before the Manhattan Project. It is secondary because the people that made the website didnt
also work on the Manhattan Project.