You are on page 1of 6

USED TO, BE USED TO, GET USED

TO

2) After be/get used. He is used to it. We say: Frank is used to living alone (not: Frank is used to live) . not a part of the infinitive. to drive). He is used to living alone. We say: She is used to driving on the left 3) When we say ‘I am used to something’. we cannot use the infinitive (to do. It is not strange for him. He doesn’t mind this because he has lived alone for 15 years.1) I’M USED TO SOMETHING: it is not new or strange for me * Frank lives alone. to is a preposition.

. but these days I usually go by bike. You can use this only for the past.Do not confuse I AM USED TO DOING and I USED TO DO I am used to (doing) something = it isn’t strange or new for me I am used to the weather in this country I used to do something = I did it regularly in the past but no longer do it. not for the present. The structure is ‘I used to do’ (not I am used to do) I used to drive to work every day.

Negative: I didn’t never use to drink Question: (What) did you use to smoke? Would: there is no difference between the form of would when it refers to the past and its form as a modal verb. Meaning: Used to / would as an alternative to the past simple in describing habits and repeated actions.Form: Used + infinitive Affirmative: They used to live…. .

e. i.Used to is only used to describe extended past tenses. i.e. We used to live in the town centre There used to be three cinemas in the High Street We can use would (as well as used to) to describe repeated states which are temporary and related to a particular context. She would usually be hungry when she got home from school .

● ● ACTIONS TEMPORARY / REPEATED ACTIONS ● ● PERMANENT STATES USED TO ● WOULD OK ● OK ● OK ● OK ● OK ● .