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NAME: Natalia Awisha

HR: 303

1-20-16

Post-Seminar:
Students will respond to the following questions and then volunteers will share their
responses with the whole class while we debrief the seminar.
1. In his speech at the March on Washington, Martin Luther King pontificated
on the hopes he had for the nation beyond 1963. In what ways has or hasnt the
nation acted on his hopes? In your response it is crucial that you make
connections to current race/religious relations in the US. Cite evidence to support
your claim(s).
We celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and his monumental effect on equality,
peace, and civility in America. Martin Luther Kings Speech I Have A Dream made an impact,
but not a big one. In his time, when he lived he made a change, but nowadays we still have
racial profiling, racism, and segregation. He made a change by standing up and giving a
powerful speech. He really meant all his words. It was very truthful and wholehearted. He made
an impact during his time, but throughout the years things changed and people started making
comments, stereotypes and many other things.
Dr. King was very strong and brave. He was given seven minutes and they let him stay
on the stage and continue talking because of how powerful and persuasive his speech was. He
based everything off facts like when he talked about how the Constitution and the Declaration of
Independence stated that all men are supposedly equal but they didn't show that. Everyone
would love if Dr. Kings dream became a reality. Not only could they be openly friends with
others, but also form relationships with people of ethnicities other than our own. Having many
opinions available for one to use whenever or however they wish wasnt always the problem.
Nor was a white person sharing the water fountain or bathroom with a colored person. Now,
we can be friends, coworkers, and classmates with anyone.
We still have segregation today not by physically putting up signs or making laws and
rules, but it all comes from people and how they think about a race. They start to talk and it
spreads. Martin Luther King Jr. said, little black boys and black girls will be able to join with little
white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. This dream did come true but with the race
being a big issue with some things wont change. King's dream will not become reality until
everyone is considered equal to one another. It would be easy to say that our country does not
treat all people equally. Never before in history have people been judged by the content of their
character more than by the color of their skin. Our president is living proof of that. Our society is
much more blind to factors such as race and gender than it was only decades ago.
Today, individuals have the freedom to get to where they want to be based on their own
quality. Racism still lurks in our cities and towns. It's easy to say that his dream will never
become reality because segregation will always exist, no matter where you go, no matter how
far you go. Some may argue that the civil rights movement ended in the 1980s, but they're
wrong. It's happening again now.

NAME: Natalia Awisha


HR: 303

1-20-16

Martin Luther King Jr. longed for a day when all people would "not be judged by the color
of their skin, but by the content of their character" and while equality is possible, there are still
many obstacles to overcome. For the most part, times have changed for the better. Schools and
businesses are not allowed to segregate or discriminate against their students and employees
based on race. People still are covertly judged by their race, and some must work harder than
others in order to be represented. One politician said that he has to "run twice as fast in order to
be considered half as good" simply because he is African-American. Not everyone has
privileged access to education, safety or health care, and racial biases and stereotypes still
quietly spread throughout our society and culture. In order for King's dream to come true, we
need to put his words into practice judge people not by their appearances but by their actions.