You are on page 1of 23

HYSYS Dynamics

Why Dynamic Modeling and how
does it work?
Wim Van Wassenhove
Aspentech

© 2010 Aspen Technology, Inc. All rights reserved

Why dynamic simulation?
 A properly operating plant = Increased benefits
 Some of the common plant problems



Start-ups taking too long
Too much off-spec product
Capacity limited because of operability problems
Violating environmental law can be very expensive

© 2010 Aspen Technology, Inc. All rights reserved

|

2

Inc.Why dynamic simulation?  Overdesign of security equipment to ensure safety  Energy efficient plants are usually less stable  Finding out the problems late is expensive  Tuning operation directly on the plant is – Less effective or VERY expensive – Potentially dangerous and source of more problems © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 3 .

Inc.Throughout the plant lifecycle  Process design  Hazop type studies  Pre start-up preparations  Process modifications  Analyse / Troubleshoot operability problems © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 4 .

All rights reserved | 5 .What does HYSYS Dynamics offer?  Seamless transition from Steady State to Dynamic  Versatile solver. integrator and flash  Rich choice between simple and detailed modeling  A comprehensive library of operations  Event scheduler  Dynamics extensibility © 2010 Aspen Technology. Inc.

Completely integrated with HYSYS Steady State  Same program  Same GUI  Same Thermodynamic models Dynamic mode  All input data are shared Steady State  Steady State results can be used as initialisation for dynamic simulation © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 6 . Inc.

All rights reserved | 7 .Interactive Environment © 2010 Aspen Technology. Inc.

integrator and flash  Layered integration approach – Pressure flow solver uses implicit Euler integration  Flash efficiencies for real vessel behaviour  Real nozzle behaviour  Forward and backward flow © 2010 Aspen Technology. Inc. All rights reserved | 8 .Solver.

All rights reserved | 9 . Inc.Rich choice between simple and detailed modeling options  A linear valve with instant action – or  An equal percentage valve with – – – – an actuator with linear rate an actuator with a defined fail mode a holdup An offset to simulate leaking © 2010 Aspen Technology.

All rights reserved | 10 .Rich choice between simple and detailed modeling options  A vessel with only the volume given – or  A vessel with – – – – – – Height and width Vessel elevation defined Nozzle positions defined Heat losses defined Entrainment modeling Level taps © 2010 Aspen Technology. Inc.

All rights reserved | 11 . Inc.A comprehensive library of operations  Vessels  Piping  Reactors  Heat transfer  Distillation columns  Rotating equipment  Logical operations © 2010 Aspen Technology.

Or. delay. Lead. … Anti-surge Controller Spreadsheet for custom calculations © 2010 Aspen Technology. counter. All rights reserved On/Off Controller | 12 . Integrator. sine wave. … Split Range Controller Ratio Controller PID Controller and Feedforward Generic MPC Controller DMCplus Controller Cause&Effect Matrix Override Selector Transfer Function: Lag. latch. 2nd order. Inc. ramp.Control features in HYSYS Dynamics Boolean Gates: And.

Inc. All rights reserved | 13 .Spreadsheet © 2010 Aspen Technology.

Inc. All rights reserved | 14 .Event scheduler  Timed and logical execution of commands  Applicable to – Shut-down logic – Batch recipes – Repeating scenarios © 2010 Aspen Technology.

User Models  Two Options: – Modules developed in a programming language via ActiveX technology – Modules developed in Aspen Custom Modeler © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 15 . Inc.

Inc.Dynamics extensibility  If the model library does not supply the model  Programmable in any OLE-compliant language  Ready built blocks can be used  Legacy code can be integrated  Shares the same interface as the HYSYS models  Can use HYSYS properties © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 16 .

Inc.OLE client and server User created unit operation © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 17 .

How to transition from Steady State to Dynamics © 2010 Aspen Technology. Inc. All rights reserved .

Transition from Steady State to Dynamics Five Steps to Get There  Add missing Equipment  Size all Equipment  Set the Pressure Flow Specifications  Add Process Control  Set up visualisation and possibly scenarios © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 19 . Inc.

Inc. All rights reserved | 20 . why add block valves? © 2010 Aspen Technology.Add Missing Equipment  A Steady State Model is like a PFD  A Dynamic Model is like a P&ID  Number one missing items are valves  Keep in mind the purpose of the model – If no shutdown modelling is required.

valve dynamics may be essential © 2010 Aspen Technology. but only use if no data – Valve Sizing – Pump Curve Generation – Vessel sizing  Level of detail required in sizing depends on model purpose – No need to add level taps unless level measurement is key – For very fast processes. All rights reserved | 21 .Equipment Sizing  Sizing info is almost always on the Rating or Dynamics Tabs  Use actual information as much as possible  HYSYS can estimate some data. Inc.

All rights reserved | 22 . it is more realistic) Resistance calculation (for valves) Conductance Calculation (for process equipment) © 2010 Aspen Technology.Pressure Flow Specs  Pressure-flow specifications and relationships  Material Streams – – – – Pressure specification Flow specification Select one of the two Usually only on boundary streams  Equipment – – – – Fixed Pressure drop (Rarely used) Pressure/Flow equation (prefererd. Inc.

Add Process Control  A model can run without controllers – But can your process run without them?  Usually essential to keep the process operating – Liquid levels are usually the first ones to control  Enter controllers as on the P&ID  Make sure you have sensor ranges (= PV Range)  Make sure you have the controller tunings © 2010 Aspen Technology. All rights reserved | 23 . Inc.