You are on page 1of 15

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

                                         Case Study: Acute Myeloid Leukemia
                                                        Nicole Mischler
                                                       Argosy University

1

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

2

Introduction

For about two weeks, I was fortunate enough to partake in the total body
irradiation of a patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia.  The patient whom I 
was able to do this study on was Narcella Gonzalaz.  During Narcella’s two­week
journey with our radiation therapy department I was able to observe and participate in the
simulation and treatment to treat and condition her hematopoietic system for her bone
marrow transplant. From my experience with Narcella’s journey, I will present a case study,
from consult to follow up, as well as provide further information of acute myeloid
leukemia.

Consultation

     On the morning of Oct. 14, 2015 Narcella headed over to the radiation oncology
facility from her primary hospital next door. By 9:30 a.m. I was pleased to be acquainted
with a 22­year­old female who seemed very familiar with her leukemia. Soon after arrival
the oncology nurse conducted an assessment. Narcella’s vitals signs yielded a tympanic
temperature of 98.5 degrees Fahrenheit, a blood pressure of 111/63, a heart rate of 92
beats per minute, 17 respirations per minute and she was not experiencing any level of
pain.
     Narcella just recently graduated college and currently lives with her parents.

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

3

Although she just recently began occasionally smoking cigarettes within the past year,
she’s never smoked them before. Her grandmother had breast cancer and also had an
uncle diagnosed with brain cancer. In October 2003 Narcella was diagnosed with acute
myeloid leukemia. After a round of chemotherapy and a matched­sibling bone marrow
transplant, she’s been healthy since then.
      In late August of 2015 Narcella was involved in a motor vehicle accident and
suffered trauma and bruising. A complete blood count was performed on her since she
also experienced pharyngitis. The test yielded 2.3 trillion/L WBCs, 8.3 grams/dL of
hemoglobin and 140,000 mcL. A repeat count was performed along with a bone marrow
exam. The results portrayed a circumstance of 75% myeloblasts and a condition of
pancytopenia.
      Subsequent of a motor vehicle accident, Narcella was able to discover that she was
suffering from easy bruising, acute pharyngitis, with peripheral blasts cells on her blood
smear. With a bone marrow aspirate, it was confirmed that her AML has relapsed. Based
on the French­American­British (FAB) classification system of AML, her Leukemia is
classified as an M2 subtype which entails acute myeloblastic leukemia with maturation.
Soon after, an unrelated bone marrow donor was identified for Narcella.

Simulation

After her consultation she preceded to the radiation oncology department for the
simulation of her total body irradiation. The first step required her to lay supine on the

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

4

TBI table on two vacfix bags. A whole body mold was then built up and encompassed
around her for immobilization and reproducibility. Once her positioning was satisfactory,
body thicknesses measurement were obtained throughout different points of her body.
These measurements were then used to create tissue compensators to even out
transmission across the beam based on her varying body thicknesses. Narcella was then
strapped into the vacfixes and table with seatbelts. The table was tilted in a manner where
her body faced towards the gantry head, which allowed the beam to be en face with Narcella
and the divergence to capture her entire body. At this point she was suspended almost
horizontally on our TBI Table. A contour of her body was traced on a template by the
dosimetrist, based on her silhouette, using the field light of the gantry. This body contour
serves as a guide during treatment planning so the dosimetrist can reference placement of
tissue compensators as well as lung blocks. 
 After about an hour of simulation the positioning preparation for the anterior to posterior 
positioning was complete. She was then placed laying prone on another set of vacfixes and 
simulation was performed in a similar course as the anterior to posterior position. Simulation 
was fulfilled within two hours. Finally, a CT scan of her thorax was obtained to determine 
lung depth for her lung blocks. A culmination of all the measurements composed her treatment 
plan, lung blocks and two sets of tissue compensators for Narcella.
      Two days later on Oct. 16 Narcella returned to the radiation oncology department.
We situated the patient into her body molds and arranged for the anterior­posterior field.
A beam spoiler was placed between Narcella and the beam. The lung blocks were placed on
the beam spoiler and x­ray films were taken to determine correct placement of the lung

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

5

blocks. Following about six attempts of lung block placement and imaging, the blocks
were accurately shielding the lung and film approval was granted from the physician. We
then accomplished the similar process for her posterior to anterior field and the blocks
were marked on her chest. Narcella was ready for treatment.

Daily Treatment

Prior to Luigi’s initial visit to radiation oncology, she completed a round of chemotherapy.
The induction chemo comprised a protocol of clofarabine and Ara­C, which occurred on Oct. 
10 through Oct. 18.  In terms of her TBI, her plan entailed two AP and PA fields, with 40 cm 
x 40 cm field sized, gantry angles of 259 degrees, at 60 MU’s with the whole field 
encompassing her whole body.  Each field required a bi­daily approach, treatment in the 
morning and in the afternoon at 6­hour intervals.
On treatment day, Oct. 21st, Narcella underwent total body irradiation at 8 a.m. two fractions
from  AP and two fractions from PA were delivered.  She then returned at 2 p.m. for two 
more fractions from AP and PA for a total of 165 cGy.  This continued on for the next 3 days
at the same exact times, totaling a cumulative dose of 1320 cGy, at eight fractions of 165 cGy 
per day, with a photon energy of 6 MeV.
Upon completion of her TBI, Narcella’s nausea was more persistent which was improved with 
Aloxi, an anti emetic.  Increased fatigue also set in furthermore with fevers and chills.  
Besides the nausea, Narcella tolerated her total body irradiation well.
The following Sunday, soon after her TBI, Narcella underwent a round of Cytonxan and Anti­

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

6

thymocyte Globulin (ATG).  This treats the system for the cancer, aplastic anemia, and 
conditions her system for prevention of graft versus host disease.  Finally, her bone marrow
transplant from a matched­unrelated donor was intitialized on the Thursday after.

Follow­up

Regardless of a well­prepared hemopoietic system, it is not always an assurance a that patient’s 
body will elude rejection of the new stem cells.  According to Narcella’s status in early December, 
she has been suffering from acute grade II graft versus host disease.  Pathologic findings insist 
the newly transplanted donor cells have caused organ rejection in the stomach, UGI and colon, 
which have been managed the by steroids, Tacrolimus and Cellcept.  She has also been enduring 
an altered mental status and short­term memory loss leading to episodes of anxiety, that have 
improved recently.  Narcotics have been easing chronic pain.  As of Dec 16 Narcella’s blood counts
remain consistently exceptional and no new lesions exist.

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer that originates in the blood and bone marrow.  It is the most 
common form of acute leukemia in adults.  When the bone marrow routinely produces stem 
cells for blood, it may be myeloid or lymphoid stem cells.  Which are initially immature and
become mature and healthy with time.  Incident of AML halts the maturing process of the stem 
cells and instead they form into immature myeloblasts or myeloid blasts.  These abnormal cells 

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

7

infiltrate the bone marrow, blood, spleen and liver. (National Cancer Institie, 2014)

Etiology and epidemiology

In general, males are at a greater risk for the disease.  Other AML risk factors include blood 
and genetic disorders.  Blood disorders such as chronic myeloproliferative disorder and 
myelodyspastic syndrome can develop AML.  Problems caused by these conditions include
low blood cell counts and irregular cells circulation in the bone marrow and blood.  These 
disorders may eventually advance into AML. (American Cancer Society, 2014)  Genetic 
disorders that may contribute to AML include ataxia, neurofibromatosis, Schwachman syndrome, 
Down Syndrome, and severe congenital neutropenia.  These are just a select few but the majority 
of genetic instances do not have a concrete relation to AML although individuals with immediate 
family members that have been diagnosed with AML are at a greater risk, especially if that family 
member is an identical twin that is younger than 1 year old.  (American Cancer Society, 2014)
Certain cancer treatments also escalate the possibility of AML, chemotherapy and radiotherapy
regimens to be specific.  Alkylating and platinum agents are the two focus chemotherapeutic 
agents, especially 8 years subsequent to treatment.  Radiation exposure to a fetus is approached 
with caution as it can stimulate a risk.  Although the known extent of the risk from radiation is 
faint, it is not taken lightly in the profession, especially if the exposure to the fetus is within the
first months of growth.  Japanese atomic bomb survivors were also burdened with a greater risk, 
since the event produced a high­dose radiation exposure.  This peaked at 6 to 8 years after the 
exposure (American Cancer Society, 2014).

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

8

Smoking is the only confirmed induced carcinogenic risk factor for AML.  Many times tobacco 
is associated with cancers of the larynx, mouth, throat, and lungs but the cancer causing agents 
in tobacco are captivated by the lungs and transported via the blood stream thus directly affecting 
the blood.  Another chemical that poses as a risk of AML is benzene which is a solvent utilized 
in rubber, oil refineries, shoes manufacturing, glues, cleaning products and detergents just to name
a few.  Exposure to formaldehyde may also influent AML. (American Cancer society, 2014)

Diagnostics

Upon consultation with a doctor, questions will be asked pertaining to links to these chemicals. 
Exposure to any of these chemicals may be found in the medical history and physical exam the 
doctor will perform.  Attention to the eyes, mouth, spleen, liver, lymph nodes and nervous 
system is fundamental for the examinations as these areas of the body may unveil symptoms
triggered by abnormal blood cells.  Symptoms such as anemia, infections, bruising or bleeding
will call for further blood counts to establish a diagnosis of leukemia. ( American 
Cancer Society, 2013)
The complete blood counts examine the differentials in the number of different types of white 
blood cells.  Peripheral blood smears are also performed.  This test focuses on the volume of 
cells circulation in the blood as well as their appearance.  AML patients contain myeloblasts 
and lack red blood cells and platelets.
Following the blood work, bone marrow samples are obtained.  Most samples are harvested 

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

9

from the posterior pelvic bone, which involve two types of samples, a biopsy, and an aspiration.
Both are accomplished simultaneously.  Doctors require, both blood counts and bone marrow
results to reassure a diagnosis.
Additional lab work that helps aid the diagnoses of AML is comprised of Spinal fluid samples, 
cytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics, Fluorescent in situ 
hybridization (FiSH) and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR).  If AML is suspected to infiltrate
the CNS system a lumbar puncture or spinal tap is done to check for the spread of the disease 
and chemotherapy agents are inserted if need be.  This may also prevent spread into the brain. 
Cytochemistry is attained with chemical dyes that microscopically reveal leukemic cells.  
Antibodies are exposed to the cells during flow cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry, 
which fasten to certain leukemia cells.  This test distinguishes between different AML cells, 
a process called immunophenotyping.  Studying DNA strains is useful for cytogenetics.  AML 
displays certain changes in the chromosomes and cytogenetic tests may factor in an AML 
diagnose, depending on the chromosome variations.  In addition to cytogenesis, fluorescent 
in situ hybridization or FISH incorporate fluorescent dyes that adhere to genes exposing 
changes in the chromosomes.  This can pick up deviations cytogenetics cannot detect.
Since leukemia does not produce perceptible tumors, imaging studies are not utilized for 
diagnosing AML.  Instead, imaging is employed to confirm infections and further complications
initiated by AML. ( American Cancer Society, 2013).  X­ray images are suited for finding
infections in the lungs and CT scans can show enlarged lymph nodes and organs such as the 
spleen.  CT imaging may be executed in combination with contrast or PET imaging.  
Ultrasounds can also verify enlarged organs.

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

10

Pathology

Although these imaging studies may contribute a lot to the diagnoses, it does not suffice 
AML without the hematopoietic results.  As previously stated the development of the disease
is initiated with myeloid stem cells.  The final product of these stem cells may either mature 
into oxygen­carrying red blood cells, infection fighting white blood cells, or blood clotting 
platelets.  Due to the leukemic nature the stem cells transition into immature white blood 
cell termed myeloblasts.  Myeloblasts are irregular and do not mature into a healthy WBC
due to chromosomal translocations and genetic defects.  Construction of regular white 
blood cells ill decline: quick proliferation of the myeloblasts will occur along with a reduced
capacity of apoptosis.  Overpopulation of myeloblasts overcomes the mature red blood cells, 
white blood cells, and platelets resulting in infections, anemia, and abnormal bleeding. 
(Seiter K, 2014)

Treatment Options

After a diagnosis is formulated treatment needs to be initiated as soon as possible.  The 
intent of radiotherapy for treating AML is to destroy the bone marrow and the leukemic 
cells prior to a bone marrow transplant by method of total body irradiation.  After the TBI, 
the new donor stem cells or the patient’s own blood that was previously harvested 
(autologous transplant), is administered to the blood stream in hopes that the stem cells will

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

11

regenerate healthy new blood.  Total body irradiation regimes are administered twice a day
for 3 to 4 days or the radiation can be delivered as a single dose.  Each treatment is 
accomplished by administering the radiation to one side of the body for 10 to 15 minutes.  
The opposite side of the body is treated in the same manner (Cancer Research UK, 2014)  
IF the disease has spread to the CNS system, further radiotherapy treatment is administered
for whole brain and spinal cord.
Treatment for the disease depends on what type of AML the patient has.  Bone marrow 
transplants are used in conjunction with high doses of chemotherapy but radiation is not 
always certain.  It is possible the patient may undergo all three treatment modalities or if 
the patient is not a candidate for high does chemotherapy, lower endurable doses of chemo 
and radiation is given with a mini transplant. (WebMD, 2013)
The whole routine of treating AML consists of two portions, induction therapy and
consolidation therapy.  Induction therapy entails killing as many AML cells as achievable. 
Regaining normal blood counts and diminishing the signs of the disease.  The main purpose 
of induction therapy is to accomplish remission.  Consolidation therapy involves further 
chemotherapy treatment and perhaps a bone marrow transplant.  This section finds and 
clears the hidden AML blood cells that cannot be detected by typical blood work. 
(Web MD, 2013)

Analysis

Our team of radiation therapists, dosimetrists, oncology nurses and physicians all agree 

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

12

with the fact that total body irradiation is an appropriate treatment method prior to bone 
marrow transplants of leukemic patients.  We are all worried when we are acquainted 
with our immunosuppressed pediatric patients since our procedure further subdues their
immune system.  We believe total body irradiation is necessary to allow for a smooth 
stem cell transplant.  The cancer center that Luigi received treatment is known for their
total body irradiation, especially their pediatric physician who has built a reliable 
pediatric oncology reputation through their collaboration with the Children’s hospital 
next doors.
The approach of radiation therapy in collaboration with chemotherapy and ATG played
a role for preparing Narcella’s immune system for bone marrow transplant.  The pediatric
physician prescribed the radiation to manage the hematopoietic system by destroying
the abnormal white blood cells and affected bone marrow in unison with chemotherapy. 
Narcella’s intravenous administration of ATG operated as a bio therapeutic tactic to attack
the T­lymphocytes and improve blood counts in an attempt to prepare her for a smoother 
reaction the transplant.
After two rounds of chemotherapy and total body irradiation, Narcella’s body tolerated the
burden well.  Although graft versus host disease and immunosuppression instigated a few
bumps in the road, Narcella’s condition seems to be steadily improving.  A relapse is definitely
not an ideal outcome for acute myeloid patients, but in Narcella’s case, a fighting drive is all she 
needs.

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

References
American Cancer Society. (2013, July 24). How is acute myeloid leukemia
     diagnosed? Retrieved from
     http://www.cancer.org/cancer/leukemia­
     acutemyeloidaml/detailedguide/leukemia­acute­myeloid­myelogenous­
     diagnosed

American Cancer Society. (2014, July 2). Leukemia­­Acute Myeloid
     (Myelogenous). Retrieved from

13

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

14

     http://www.cancer.org/cancer/leukemia­
     acutemyeloidaml/detailedguide/leukemia­acute­myeloid­myelogenous­
     risk­factors

Cancer Research UK. (2014, May 16). Radiotherapy for acute myeloid
     leukaemia. Retrieved from
     http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about­
     cancer/type/aml/treatment/radiotherapy­for­acute­myeloid­leukaemia

National Cancer Institute. (2014, November 11). Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia
     Treatment (PDQ®) ­ National Cancer Institute. Retrieved from
     http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/adultAML/Patient/pag
     e114

Seiter, K. (2014, August 15). Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

 

Retrieved from 

     http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/197802­overview#a0104

CASE STUDY: ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

15