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QuasiMado

THE
EARRY HARRfS
WORKSHOP VfDEO

Copyrigbt 0 1994, 1998 by Bop City ProdllC!ioos loe., P.O. Box 21016, 6GT7 Meadowvale Town Cenen:,
Mississauga OnL LSN 6A2, Cunada Our intemet addtess is: www.bopcity.com.
Howatd Rccs' email addtCSS is; howardrees@jazzworkshops.com.
Second printing by Bop Ciy Productions lnc. 1998
All righlS reserved. Mlldc in Canacla. No pan of ths book may be rcproduccd in any form without
pcnni.~siOtl rrom thc puhli~cr.

Barry Harris and Howard Rees, Toronto 1991

...

are many Joved ones, mentors, collcagucs and friends to


whom I am indcbted for their kindness, patiencc and llnowledge
in helping me with this project. in particular:
my parents, for teaching me to follow m y dreams;
my bruther Philip, for his ongoi ng support and vas t
computer skills;
my senseis Rarry Harris and Ted Jungblut, for showing me
thc path;
friends J anc Bunnett and T.arry Cramer, for thcir suppurt and
good advice; Brian Kau, for his hclp with transcriptions and
cditing; Larry Lewis, for his hc.l> with guitar transcriptions;
Jane Low-Uccr, for cover dcsign; D.D. Jackson, for computer
help; Jannifer Smith-Rubcuzahl, for her help with proofrcading
and cditiug.
The music and text were set and laid out by David Nicho!
(4 16-921 -4963) on the Maciutosh computer using NoteWritcr
and QuaJ k.XPress.
'111CIC

I dedicate this book to the lcgacy of Charlie Parker and to thc


musicians aJld teachers everywhcrc who ha ve carried on the tradition of this bcautiful music.

Jn the autumn of 1979, aftcr having spcnt the previous twelve months
getting myself togethcr psychologically, financially and musically, I
moved to New York to realize a dream- to study with Uarry Harris.
Jt 's difficult to describe the atmospherc of lhe studio 1 walked
into for my first class-t.he electricity of 25 or 30 people f()(;u scd on
Rarry seatcd at the piano. Poring over cvcry note and cvcry word, each
uf us would cr.mc for a view of thc keyboard knowing lhat what was
going on was very special allll powerful. As itturned out it was car
training night. The tune was "Body and Soul." The scene changed
every couple of minutes when Barry would choose someone random1y,
point, and motion to them t.o siL ncxt to him. "Okay," he would say rto
his consenting but nervous subject], "now yuu play it in this kcy."
lt's not difficult, in fact it's easy, to think of stories lhat show the
love and rcspect llarry has for his students. In 1979 the fec for his
class-which startcd with piano and guitar players at5 p.m., added
singers at 8 p.m., and hom players at 11 p.m.- was $3. Nothing would
upset Barry more t.han to find out that someone missed class beca use
they didn't have t11e money, so he was direct when he would say, "You
lcnow you're supposed to come anyway."
Uack lhen Barry would go to great lengths to comrnunicate to
his students the passion and intimacy of the music. On one occasion, I
watched Barry work with a sightless student. Seated next to him at lhe
keyboard, Barry had thc student place bis hands on top of hls own and
thcn played. Today, t11c cssence of Ba.rry's instruction remains
unchanged. He sharcs his musical gcnius wirh heart and soul.
Now, smne fifteen years aftcr my frrst e lass with Barry, J a m in
the process of fulfilling anoLher goal-to docurnent his intemationally
acclaimed teachings. It is my hope rhat the scnsc of joy, exciremcrll and
purpose that Barry generuusly bestows upon cach srudent that comes ro
hirn is transmitted Lhrough rhis video to you.
The human cvolurionary thread spirals upward, and J am con-

vinced that as pcople continue to search for more meaningful cxpcriences in life and place a highcr value on tapping into their own creative powers, the music that developed in Ncw York in the 1940s and
50s wll be widely regarded with amazemcnt and ucasured for ils
beauty and frcsh sound.
We are fortunate to have Barry Harris as spokesperson for this
lcgacy. 1reless in dedicating his energies and talcnLS to the ongoing
devclopmcnt of the music, he has long been recognizcd as one of its
major proponents and grcatcst comrnunicators. Simply put-he is "the
keeper of the flame."
rinally, 1 would like to mention, to thc crcdit of everyone
involved in documenting this extraordinary performance-the production crew whose intuilion and abilities harmoni:r.ed to capture the
cssence ofthese sessions, the musicians who beautifully mirror
Barry's ideas, and Jim MacDonald for his support horn out of his
love for this music-that the entire recording took place without any
rehearsal.
Ilere is in fact arare opportunity to ga.in an inside view of a
truc master at work.
Howard Rccs
February, 1994

TI1is work is an attcmpt to perpetuatc the music. i bclieve that along


with ideas comes the responsibility of sharing them. While not always
correct, it is important to pass on one's knowledge.
My greatest desirc is for peoplc to ha ve the opportuniry to expcricnce the beautifullegacy that jazz. is huilt un. I'm particular! y interest
ed in having more young pcople tumt:.d on to this music. Historically it
has becn almost impossible to cou nt on media support. Today we find
oursclvcs in a siluation wh ere we ha ve people who haven't even heard
thc music, and yct they already have a negative mage about il. This
must change.
Bcbop represents thc furthest extension of music. il takes place
in thc moment, there is no tuming back. and no re-grouping. There is
also no room for faking. Although relatively young, this music has
airead y riscn toa very high leve! dueto thc gcnius of such pcople as
Charlic Parker, Tht:lonious Monk, Di:t.z.y Gillespie and Bud Powell.
'l11cre are no shortcuts to the leaming process. lt isn't possible for
someone to go out, buy a hom, and get a gig the next day. Technical
mastery of one's instrument is the start.ing point, and from there, with a
lot of hard work, one might reach the height of moving the music forward. In addition, all instrumentalists and vocalists should know something about the keyboard, about chord and sea le relaLionships, and
about how to use the scales as a basis for improvisation. To this end, a
total commiuncnt is required of every player-commitment to study,
discipline, patience and also to yourself. Thesc are the keys to frcedom,
exprcssion and self-knowledge.
This is a vital music. Jts history is both very rich and beautiful. lt
is importan! for new pcople coming along to lea m about a.nd carry on
those traditions. As a teacher, it's irnportant to start teaching from
where we camefrom- not from where we're ~11. Hopefully then Lhc stutlent will grow to wht:re thc teacher is, and add a little mure.
I would like to cxpress my thanks to Howard Rt:t:s whose hard
work ensured that this projec t woultl become a reality.

TAEI.E Of CONTENTS

......
/~

\J/1)fQ CA~E ONE

C~ 1: Tkg~

Foreword

Scale practice or " the ABC's"

2
2

Explanatory Notes
The 1/arris lla/f-Step Practice Model
The Dominan! 7th Scale Half-Step Rules
le Major Se ale Half-Step Rules
Thc Minor Scale llalf-Step Rules
Chromatic scalc breakdown chart
The dimnishcd chord and its 4 related dominan! 7ths
The 'Dimnishcd Scalc'
Related dominant 7th scales =chord movcmenL~
The minor7 flat5 chord
The '5-4-3-2' Phrases
'5-4-3-2' on thc major scale
'5-4-3-2' on thc dominan! 7th scaJc.
'5-4 3-2 ' on the minor sr.ale

8
8
14

16
18
18

20
20

24
24
24

26
26

C~2:A~
Foreword
"Back Home in Indiana" by Mac0 ona1d-Hanlcy
Sea le outlinc of (Back Hume in)"lndiana"
Seale outline of 'the Blues' in C
A typical 'fllues' progression
Applicaton uf scale ideas to 'the Blues'
The 'Related Viminished Chord'

29
30

'Rhythm Changes'
Scale outline of 'Rhythm Changes'
The 'Important Minor'
Application of scale ideas to 'Rhythm Changes'

36

"Anthropology" by Charlie Parker


"Cherokee" by Ray Noble
Scalc outline of the "Cherokee" bridge
Applicaton of scale ideas to the "Cherokec" bridge
" 1low Hgh Thc Moon" by Murgan l.ewis
Scale outline of "How Hgh 'D1c Moon"
Tlle 'Minor 6 Diminished Seale'
Scale practice on the G minor 6 diminishcd scale
AppUcation of scale ideas to "How Hgh Tbe Moon"

Forcwurd
The C6 Diminhed S cale
The C6 dimini~hed ~cale with chord voicings for piano
The C6 diminishc:d sea le wirh chord voicings fur guirar

31
32

32
34
34

36

3X
38
44
45
46

46

48
49
50

50
52

59
60
60
60

TI1c e6 diminished scale in si ngle notes


Guitar fingering for thc C6 diminished sea le
The C6 dminishcd scalc in comrary rnotion

The C Minnr 6 Diminished Scale

Thc minor 6 diminished scale perfonned up and down


Chords found oo the minor 6 dirninished sea le
" Alone Togf;',ther" hy f)ietz-Schwartz
"Body and Soul" by Green

'The Tritone's Minor'


Re-thinking the m7 and thc m71>5 chords
Movng Am7 on the C6 diminishcd scale
Moving a voicing through the major scalc
Moving a voicing through the C6 diminished scale
The 6 dminished scale contains two dominant 7th chords
Ending a tune with movements on thc 6 dirninished scale
Extcnding Lhe previous idea through 4 kcys
Using the C6 diminshed sea le on 11-V-I in G major
Usi ng the minor 6 dinnlshed se ale on TT-V-I in G

60

60
60
60
60

62
62

62
62
62
62
64
64

66
66
66
68
68

Bascd on " Django" hy John Lewis


Based on "Ifl Should Lose You" by Robin-Raingcr
Based on "In Your Own Sweet Way" by n ave Brubcck

68
70
72
72

'Majar- minar- mi11or/6'

72

Applied to " Stella by Starlight" by Young-Washington


Applied to "Likc Someone In Love" by van Hcuscn-Burke
Applied to " I Remcmber You" by Schertzinger-Mcrcer
Applied to "Stella by Starlight" wth guitar voicings
Thc 4 related dominant. 7ths used as V7 substitutions

74
74
74
74

Foreworcl

79

'Borrowed Notes'

76

"SLraight, No Chnser" by Thelonious Monk


Walking bass p;Hterns emphasizing the upbeat
The whole rhytJun scction demonstrating Lhc prcvious rhyth ms
Rhythrn lghlighting the '2+' and tJ1c '4+'
Rhythm highlighting the '1+' and the '4+'
Using longer valucd tied nores in the walking bass line

80

82
82
82
82
82

C~S: V~
Foreword
"You Must Believe Tn Spring" by Michcl Legrand
Thc E diminished chord wilh applications t.o " Y.M.B. in S."
Wurm-up exercises
Application of thc wann-ups ro "Y.M.B. in S."
Use of thc related dimin ished chord in thc 1st 4 bars of"Y.M.B. in S."
"Billie's Bounce" by Charlie Parkcr

85
86
RR
88
92
92
94

102
102

THE EASfCS
Probably the most frequently asked question by le music student is:
"What should 1 spend my valuable practice time on?" In lis section
a systematic, step by step approach 10 answering this qucstion is
outlined.
Technique might best be thoughl of as a mcans to an en d.
That is 10 say, strong technique is a prerequisite for jazz improvisation; but, for 1hc purposes of praccing, teehnique must always have
a musical cootext. To get the poiot across Barry says, "practice your
playing- nol your practicing."
To be consistent in providing musical contexts, make the
rchearsaJ time as real as possible. A lot of practice time is spent
alone, so it is essential lo re-create Lhe rhyLhm section for yourself as
you play. Hear the drums, the bass and 1c chord changes. Practice
in tempo, and envision how the rhyLhrn section would accompany
yo u.
As Barry states in bis opening remarks in Lhe video, everyLhing comes from scales, which requires that Lhey be practiced in a
variety of ways. With thls in rnind, "The Basics" contains transcriptions of the musical examples covered in the corresponding section
of the video. The transcriptions appear in sequence as they are introduced in the video. Additiooal explanations and further examples
have been includcd where necessary-all of whlch will hopefully
guide you on the road 10 discovery and beyond.
Note:
1) Examples are in the key of C concert unless otherwise notated.
2) Where Lherc is no key signature, apply Lhe accideotaJs as 1cy
occur.
3) In sorne examplcs enharrnonic equivalent~ may not be shown.

(!~1
Sea le Practice or the "ABe's"
Explanatory Notes

1-1) The referencc that Barry malees to em7- F7, and why it would
have been impossible for Bird to have played that as a horn player, is
bccause Crn7 is the chord found on the 5th of the f7 scale (the 'important minor'), a.nd for that reason, only the F7 scale is rcquired for soloing over both of the chord changes (see Fig.2-8).
1-2)'Up and down' refers toa scale playcd from its tonic up to its 7th
degree (either domina.nt or major 7th), and then straight back down.
This produces a 2 bar phrase.
1-3) The C dominant 7th scale up a.nd down.
1-4) The e major sea le up a.nd down.
1-5) Scale practice on the e dominant 7th scale.
a) The scale perfonncd in 3rds.
b) Same as previous figure, starting a half-step below the 1st note of
each 3rd.
e) The scale performed in triads.
d) Sarne as previous figure, starting a half-step below the 1st note of
each triad.
e) 4 note chords performed on each degree of the scale.

Fig. 1-3

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Fig. l-4

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43

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1) Same as previous figure, starting a haJf-sLcp below Lhe 1st note of


cach chord.

g) The three important arpeggios on thc dominant 7th seale are found
on thc !Oitic, the 5th and the 7Lh. Illustrated in its entirety is the arpeggio on the tonic (e). Practice lhe arpeggios on the 5th and 7th (Gm and
Bb, shown in root position) the sarne way.
1-6) Pivoting
Pivoting is a muJti-purpose technique that is an importarlt tool for all
instruments. It is cspcciaJly useful for hom/string players and vocaJisL~
enabling them to pcrform a melodic line of any length and/or rangc
while remaining within the boundaries of thcir instruments. Notice that
the acccntual structure of Lhe line changes where thc pi vol creates new
highest and lowest notes, whicb natur.Uly feel rhythmically stronger
wilhin the melodic line.
a) Pivoting with thc chords on the e major scaJe.
b) Pivoting with thc e major scaJe. (Not shown on video.)
e) Pivoting wilh the dominant 7th scalc as shown in Fig.l-6b. (Not
shown on video.)

1-7a) Major arpeggos are perfonned down chromatically from the


highest note on the alto. Here, the hlghest note is the tonc.
b) Next, the highest note s the 3rd of the arpeggo.
e) Final! y, the highest note is the 5th of the arpeggo.

1-8) This figure demonstrates dimnished chords performcd chromatically in an altemating descending/ascending pattern.
] -9) In this figure, inversions of lhe e augmented arpcggio are performed.
1-10) "Chi-Chi" by Charlie Parker makes use of a 1st inversion
arpeggio.

Fig. l-7a

Fig. 1-9

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1-11) Rhythm exercise perfonned on thc dominan! 7th sea le; (8-6b7-6-5-4-3-2- 1). Practice this on the major sea le as weU.
1-12) The Harrls Half-Step Practice Model
Half-steps typify the language of Lhc bcbop player. With this in mind,
Barry developed the half-step pra.ctice model to teach the art of playing rhytJunicaUy. In their basic role, they appear as notes added 10 the
descending form of the scale. 1rough various applications, (shown
below), the half-steps becomc an endless source from which to generate improvisational ideas. Thc dominant 7th sea le, the majar and the
minar scales cach have their own set of 'rules' for adding half-stcps.
a) Thc Dominant 7th Scale Half-Step Rules
St11rting Note
1 (octave)
2
2

# of Added Half-Steos

1 (8-7)

o
2 (2-8;8-7)
1 (8-7)
3 (3-2;2-8;8-7)

EndOn
tonic

.
.

.."

3
4

"

4
5
5

2 (2-8;8-7)
1 (8-7)
3 (3-2;2-8;8-7)

"

6
6
7
7

o
2 (2-8;8-7)
1 (8-7)
3 (3-2;2-8;8-7)

"
"

.
.
..

3rd

(!~1
Note:
Thesc rules are applied to scales descending from at Jeast the
octave (i.e., starting on t11e 2nd is acn1ally starting on the 9th).
1) The starting notes of the sea! e are grouped by odd and even numbers.
2) The octave is called 1 in t11is case as it takes the rules of the odd
numbcred group.
3) In Chaptcrs 1 and 2, added half-steps where applied to the illustrated
examples have been circled.
b) Vocalized scale ideas on the C dominalll 7th scale.
e) The 'Miscel/aneou.r Rule': start on a note, go up Lo any note, and
(whcn descending), fo!low a rule for thc starting note. (If t11e half-step
falls on the bcat, put it at the bottom of the phrase.)
d) When starting a phrase with 8th note trip/ets, use a ru le for thc middlc note of the triplcc
e) When starting a phrase witlt a 3rd, follow a rule for thc next note
iliat falls on the beat; i.e., tonic-3rd-2nd follow a rule for the 2nd.

f) When starting with a triad, follow a rule for the top note of the triad;
i.e., C-E-G top note s the 5th so use 1 or 3 half-steps.

10

11

(]~1
g) For 4 note chords, follow a rule for the bollo m note (the root) of
each chord. Note that the exceplion to Lhls rule is the chord on the
tonic.
The reason for this is that both the top and bouom notes of the
chord are from the ' odd' number group, 1 and 7 (as opposed to the
other chords that have notes from opposite groups on their Lop and bottom). Therefore, use a rule for the 1st scale tone below the top note of
tbe chord; i.e., C-E-0-Bb-A. 'A,' being the 6th of the seale, would
require either Oor 2 added half-steps.
h) For starting a semi-tone below the root of a chord on the sea! e,

beginning on the '&' after '1,' follow a rule for the top note of the
chord. n1ere are no exceptions here. Note, however, that the chord on
the tonlc requires the half-step(s) to be played at tbe bottom of the scale
(i.e., bctween the root and the flat 7; or between the 3-2; 2-1; 1-b7).
i &j) These 2 figures show the application of the prevlous e.x ample
over a common tumback. The chord on the 4th degree of C7 up, down
the scale with 3 half-steps to lhe 3rd, then up the related diminished
chord of C7, resolving to lhe 5th ofF major; while the rhythm scction
plays 1-VI-II-V in Lhe key ofF.

12

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1
13

(!~1
k) Any note as a half-step. The object here is to make the line fccl right
rhythmically.

1-13) The Major Scale Half-Step Rules (not shown on video)


There is also a system for adding extra half-steps to both the major and
the minor scales. As with the dominant 7th scale, the sarne two divisions of notes are made-even numbered and odd. There are two rules
for each group with the exception of starting from the octave (1) where
there is only one rule.
TI1e frrst rule for descending from the 1-3-5 and major7 is: 1
addcd half-step between the 6-5.
The second rule applying to tltc 3-5 and major7 is: 3 added halfsteps between the 3-2; 2-1; 6-5. Another way to practice this second
rule is by placing the half-steps between the 3-2; rnajor7-6; 6-5.
111e frrst rule for escending from the 2-4-6 is: no added halfsteps. Play straight down the scale from the various starting notes.
The second rule for the 2-4-6 is: 2 addcd half-steps which can
come between the 2-1; 6-5 or between the rnajor7-6; 6-5. (Practice both
sets.)

14

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1-14) The Minor Scalc Half-Step Rul es (not shown on video)


Thc minor scale that the half-steps are addcd to is the melodic minor in
ascending form- tonic - 2- b3 - 4- 5 - 6 - major7.
1l1e addcd half-steps for this scale fall in the same places as do
Lbe half-steps for the major se ale. The onc cxccption to this is where
the major scale rules add a b3rd. Bccause this note is aiready present in
the melcx:lic minor scale, any other note may be used in iLS place.
Noticc that this m ay al so be achieved by using intcrval jumps and by
rcpeating the same note twice.

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1- 15) Chromatic scale breakdown chart


1 chromatic scale

..,
2 whole tone scales

..,
3 dmnshed chords

..,
4 (keys or) donnant 7th chords related to each drninished chord

a) The diminished chord and its 4 related dominant 7ths


Dy taking a diminished chord and lowering each of its notes, one ata
time, 4 related dorninant 7l chords are formed. Because these 4 domi nant 7ths share the same diminished chord, ccrtain harmonic relationships between them are also implied. (See Fig.l-17.)
The rule of thumb for finding a related diminished chord is to
build ita major 3rd above 1e dominant note. If you are looking for the
related diminished chord to a dominan! 7th chord, just go up a major
3rd from the root of the dominant 7th chord (i.e~, in the key ofF, C is
the dominant note, E is a major 3rd above the dominant note and the
root of the related diminished chord).
1) C#-E-G-Bb becomes C-E-G-Bb (C7)
2) C#-E-G-Db becomes C# (Db)-Eb-G-Bb (Eb7)
3) C#-E-G-Bb becomes C#-E-F#-Bh (F#7)
4) C#-E-G-Bb beeomcs C#-E-G-A (A7)
b) Extending a dominant 7th sea le phrase with the related diminished
chord ofC7.
1~

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11

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1-16) The 'Diminished Scale'


The 4 notes of a dimioished chord, plus the roots of the 4 related dominant 7th chords, combine to form a scale- i.e.,
The e diminished chord = e-Eb-Gb-A.
The roots of the 4 related dominant 7ths are b-d-f-ab.
When these 8 notes are combincd, thcy form t11c 'diminisbcd scalc'e - d - Eb - f - Gb - ab - A - b
(or; b-e- d- Eb- f- Gb- ab-A)

1-17) Related dominant 7th scaJes = chord movements


As mcntioned earlier, certain implications arisc from stating tbat 4 keys
or dominant 7th chords are related to one another through sharing the
same diminished chord. It is useful to practice the 4 related dominant
7ths (as scales) 'into eachother.'
Tis chart demonstrates how, by practicing the related dominant
7th scales 'into eachother,' key chord movements can be practiced at
the same time. Here the four scales (C7; A7; Eb7; Gb7) that share the
e# diminished chord are illustrated. (Not shown on video.)
SeA LES
1) e7-A7
2) e7-Eb7 (tritone of A7)

3) C7-Gb7 (tri tone of e7)

20

ei-JORD MOVEMENTS

Em7b5-A7 (bot11 outline


Em7b5-A7 1Im7b5-V7 in D min)
Also:Gm7-Bbm7 (IIm7-IVm7 in F maj)
Gm7-C7 (Ilm7-V7 in F maj)

Fig. l -16

r ~J

; ~4 ~ J

e diminish<XI chord

Roou or lhe Relaled Dominan 71h chords

21

C~1
1) A7-Gb7 (F#7)
2) A7-C7
3) A7-Eb7
1) Eb7-C7
2) Eb7-Gb7
3) Eb7-A7
1) Gb7-Eb7
2) Gb7-A7
3) Gb7-C7

C#m7b5-F#7
C#m7b5-F#7
Also:Em7-Gm7
Em7-A7
Gm7b5-C7
Gm7b5-C7
Alsu: Bbm7-Dbm7
Bbm7-Eb7
Bbm7b5-Eb7
Bbm7b5-Eb7
Alsu:C#m7-Em7
Dbm7-Gb7

This is the entire chart for the C# diminished chord. Do a similar chart
for the other 2 diminished chords (i.e., C and D), then the same chord
movements will be outlined in alll2 keys.
1-18) Practice the C7 scale up and down followcd by the Eb7 scale up
anddown.
a) Prnctice the C7 scale followed by (or nto) an Eb7 scale to outline a
bar each of Gm7(11m7}-C7 and Bbm7(1Vm7)-Eb7, illuslrating the 1st
two mensures of "When Sonny Gets Blue."
b) Shown here is anoll1er cxample of the C7 scale into the Eb7 scale
outlining, in thi s case, Em7b5-A7. TI1is cxample descends the C7 scale
from the 2nd degrec, adding 2 half-steps and continuing down thc scale
to the 5th of C7 which beco mes the 3rd of Eb7. 3 half-steps are added
fonning a chromatic line from the 3rd of Eb7 down to its b7th. (Not
shown on video.)

22

Fig. 1-18
llm7 (Gm7)

1Vm7 (B~m7)

*EJj j JJ Jd J Jj j j JdJ ] dd J~J J 3 J J JJ


1

Fig. 1-18a
Om7

PI

C7sm4

B~ m7

El7

Fmaj7

Gm7 (A~dim)

jl\lm/

Am7

D7

11

Fig.l-18b
Em7~S

A7

*n=r-9? w~n J( f(@d ~,-H


1

23

J-19) Shown here are 3 examples ofthe C7 scale run into the Gb7
(F#7) scale, outlining Gm7-C7.
a) The 1st examplc descends from the tonic to the b7 of C7 with 1
added half-step. The b7 becomes the 3nl of Gb7, and the line continues
down t.he Gb7 scale to the 4th, again adding a half-step bctween the
tonic and b7 of Gb7, rcsolving to the 5th ofF major.
b) The 2nd example on Gm7-C7, uses a parallel pattem of 8-2-#2-3 on
cach of the two dominant 7th sea les.
e) Thc last example dcscends the C7 scale from the octave, with 1
added half-step to the flat 7, 1cn down the arpcggio of the flat 7 (Bb).
The same idea is then applicd to the Gb7 scale, finally resolving to the
5th ofF major.

1-20) The minor7 flat5 chord


The following illustration shows a C7 scale with the Em7b5 chord
located on its 3rd degrce. 'Ibis is a key point. When soloing over the
Em7b5 chord, choose the C7 sea/e because the chord is found on the

scak.
a) Playing the C7 scale up and down to its flat 2, or 10 the 3rd of A7,
ouines Em7b5-A7 (one bar apiece).
1-21) The '5-4-3-2' Phrases
As Barry states, these phrascs are handy to help "get out oftrouble."
Use them to end and 10 begin lines.

24

a) '5-4-3-2' on the major scale


Notice that not only is it possible to play all 4 phrases 'into eachother,'
but it is also possible to make up various combinations-i.c., '5' into
'4'; '5' into '3'; '5' nto '2,' etc. (See Fig.2-3.)

Fig. 1-1 9a

Gm?

Fmaj7

C7

f4u @*d:D~tt; Ld ~.W'4' t


Fig. l-19b
Om7

C7

~" {jp J ~ibw '


11

Fig. 1-20

~11

Em1~5

..- [!J

11

"

Flg. l-20a

Emns

'"

A?

ftuo J auJ Jdf?:zm=mv' *

"

Fig. 1-2Ia

uz"

~~~~ Ia'nm;

1
"S--4-3-2..

* 1

iJP~r'WJ';1 a,J;

* 1
zs

b) Scalc practice ending with 1c '5' phrase.

1-22) '5-4-3-2' on the dominant 7tb scale (not shown on video)


In applying thc phrases to the dominant 7th scale, tbe '5,' '4' and '2'
can be borrowed directly from thc major scale phrases. In Lhis figure,
we show the '3' phrase, an a1temate '2' phrase, and then thc '5-4-3-2'
run together.
1-23) '5-4-3-2' on the minor scale (not shown on video)

26

Fi. l-21b

J 1 J J J 3j1 [}=' t
~ji B U ;fJ

1;

)- -

2"1

APPLfCA1fON5
In Lhe previous chapter we covered many of Lhe basic
tcehniques (or ABC's as Barry refers to Lhem) Lhat
should make their way into any practice-rime repertoire. In Lhis section, these tcclmiques are applied to
solo building over severa! well-known song forms.

Consider three steps:

l. Choose the correct scale(s) to outline Lhe chord


progression (song). Practice the scale(s) thoroughly.
Not only will this sourui the harmony, given that the
chords come from the various scales, but it will also
illuminate any darkened cerner in the tune, shedding
light on 'how to solo.'
2. Make-up as many different phrases as possible
based on tbe scale(s) outlning the harmony. Pr.tetice
them in all keys, and at cballcnging tempos.
3. Find differenttunes that make use of the chord
progression that you are working on, and try out the
phrases in cach of them.

C~2

INDIANA

2-1)

r&q 'J

Fmaj7

JJ

~~ J!p!;J

~~

B~ma7

Pf

ly

J.""

D7

'

J 1_,t j.
MJ

Dm7

tJ

Jttj.

""'"""

EmfS

A7

Dm

1J J J Jd l_"__j~J
Pmj7

07

Om7

t~fokF-9- -:tr
30

C7

~=

Em-fS

Dm

J_

( Fldim

F7

j_
07

C7

-Jt J.

~J
'1

Am7

Fmuj7

J r=ll p

r r

:tJ

Gm7

A7

nt.=
1

07

Cm?

07

Em7s

J.

l'!

Fmaj7

E~?

~J

cJ

Fmaj7

~~ tu

C7

n~m7

~
~

'1

Om7

jffi_ J_j
F

-r~
Om7

C7

G7

07

11 . . z

MacDonald-Hanley

a:=P1
07

Fl J
A7

J J
A~diJn

1 -

Gm7

};>-

J J
C7)

2-2) Scale outline of (8ack Homc in) " Indiana"

ttt ;rikfgl@n~;~n 111Atru 1ae>Wl


tJj fl n.n 1iJ l H 1il .U l3f V, 1tJ iil gM
~ $J ; J,, i.-J51 m~.a~p ' n JP r:HJ mDMJ a
~ .a u e ttr u >, E 111 n n~n 1r3 3J,. J
mu u 1tan-;,* 1pn a-er 1uu J, A
1

WJ+f.n~n 1:3 Rp, s 1;J P~ , 1~n amp;L!

~ ;J nm~, wfHHa;-d ;l m~, 1rn:!n u ru

cr n,; , ~~n unJ' 1;a

JO

au1 liJa J!-


31

2-3) Scale outline of 'the Blues' in e


*The e Major 7 scale played into an A7 scale. This outlines Lhe following 2 bar chord progression: emaj7-A7 or Em7-A7; and also 2 bcats
each ofemaj7-F7-Em7-A7.
a) A typical 'Biues' progression

Fig.2-3

ff-1nn FJ &), 'nm 01~~, 1

n _

7.

1 Tmat7

IV'

(pr1

Jlmal' t VIm'

1 llfi7 )

JIDW

A~

VIi

y1

>>

2-4) Application of scale ideas lo 'the Blues'


The following examples run thc e major scale into !he A dominant 7tll
scale, making use ofthc '5-4-3-2' phrases (seeFig.l-18a). Hcrc, !he
musicians illust:r.lle bars 7 and 8 of 'the 8/ues.'
a) '5-4' down to the 3rd of A7.
b) '5-3' down to the 3rd of A7.
e) '5-2' to the 3rd of A7.

d) '5' down to the 3rd of A7.


e) e major from the 5th degrce to !he 5th degree, then down to !he 3rd
of 1\7.
f) Descending
the 3rd of /\7.

e major from the major7th to the 5th, then '5' down to

2-5) The 'Relatcd Diminisbed Chord'


The related climinished cbord is built from a major 3rd abo ve tbe dominant note. Por instance, in !he kcy of D the dominant note is A and a
tbird above is C#.
a) In the following example, which outlines bars 7 and 8 of 'the Blues'
(in the key of e), noticc how the related diminishcd of 1\7 is u sed to
extend tbe phrase.

Fig. 2-4
a) "S .. . ..4 ..

~=rng]1 1 J vJ i P#fr' ~
b) " 5"- "'3"

C) "5" .. 2"

~11 TJ JJ fj }Sf!J yap' t fJ .s 1JJ1 1 J}ij Jtjfj)iJ


11

t-~1 11 n I]JJ cr p y
1)

~ID

miJJ1 EtJ#l , -

Fig. 2-S

~~o
a)

CmaJ7

Bm7

11

11

..

1tf-F:
F7

1 'J>nn n fJ Jo p'*

"

11

A7

~~' g4"J11 D 1J 3:= p JPI J S

3S

C~2
2-6) 'RIIythm Changes' (refers to thc chords based on " I Got Rhythm")
2-7) Sea le oumne of 'Rhythm Changes' (pcrformed here in the kcy of
Bb)_ This is a 32 bar song fonn with 4 eight bar scctions: A-A-B(ridgc)-A.
To cnd the tune, the last A section is the 1st six bars with the 2nd ending;
to repeat the tune, the lastA secrion is the 1st six bars with the 1st ending.

f!
1
41-1=Jmaj7

v'lm 7

.1 1l

~~--.

t mw

IJ:m'l'

-,n -,:

llf(!lm

~#I:votm

pilmaJ7

\11

t@lf n!W
y.

""I

11

';11

or..?

tmaF

y.

(!~2
2-8) Tbe ' lmportant Minor'
' Importan! minar' is the term given to the chord found on thc 5th
degree of a donnant 7th scale (5 of 5).
*13arry is saying here that blllm7 (C#m7) is the ' important
minor ' of the bV17 chord (F#7) in tltekey of Bb. Similarly, he points
out that thc llm7 chord, or Cm?, is the chord found on thc 5th of F7.
This phrase bcgins with the chord on the 3rd of Bb major.
a) This phrase and the previous cxample both illusttate bars 3 and 4
of 'Rhythm.'
b) This is an example of combin.ing the sea les of thc 5111 and 6th bars
of 'Rhythm.'
2-9) Application of scale ideas to 'Rhythm Changes'
The next 12 figures (2-9a-1) are various illustrations on the 'Rhythm'
bridge.
a) Up and down each dominant 7th scale ending with the '4' phrase.
b) Up and down eacb dominant 7th scale ending with the '5' phase.
e) Down cach. dominant 7th scalc from the b7tll to tllc 5th, tllen adding
the '5-4-3' phrases.

Fig. 2-8

lllm7

bJllm7

' ITm7

titey-3 di J.a g td @--= ??ll


a)

.-J~

Ft'' MJ cl$!Ii3 ;p uam

11
11

C)

1~1

ip f9J JIBJ jJJ

C~ 2
d) DominanL 7th scales down and up t.o the 4Lh dcgree, then adding
the 4' pllfase.
e) Arpeggios bascd on the triad found on the 1st dcgree of each of thc
dominan! 7th scales.

f) The arpeggio bascd on the tonic of each scale up, Lhcn descending
thc scale fTom the b7th to the 3rd.
g & h) Variations on Fig.2-9f.
i) Up each dominant 7th se ale from the 3rd to the b7th, back down Lo
the 3rd degrcc, then up the chord on the 3rd dcgree of the scale.

d)i3
~11 SaO ;J 11A J ~Jffr' 1 FE!g :D kEJ t!r vUd

-Jn ' n JtJ ; ,ntr E!fH r~ ,m;Jr;;a


.anA!Jr' - 'a cffJ u''H
J

r~ fJ P.IJ~9 ~1

~tJrPJJS=JV'*
~

'

cJ if-EJ 04iJtt~

- _,

lgdCTCF~ -

n n~lffl, , , -_ kb tJtrttr ,)'* -

11

e~z
j) Descending cach scale from the b7th to thc 3rd, then adding the 5th
and the 2nd degree of each scale.
k) Improvisation bascd on the lst 5 bars of the bridge.
1) Each dominant 7th scale followed by its lritone 7th scale.
2-1 O) Sea!e outline of 'Rhythm'- see Fig.2-7 for the 'A' sections; use
Fig.2-9k for the bridge.
a) Here, Lhe same scalc outline is performed. The scales on tl1c ' A' sections begin on thc '&' after beat 4.
2- 11) Improvisation based on the 1st 5 bars of the 'Rhythm' bridge.

42

e~z

ANTHROPOLOGY

2-t2)

Charl~

[X]

~ r2 t

a~

a 0 er cr

Ff$ @tn

P7

111 7

F1

Cm7

lt l

Cm7

Om7

"

07

al

p E: ;

1,

v r A ~F
1

,Tp""r

Gm7

~ r1 0 tp

n~

Ddim

l'arur

Edim

tf1 fh

- r ,n :-=1ti E! cJ ,J, ve: er, vu '-EJ u*


a

[ID

P7

Cm7

Cm7

D1

Bl

F1

07

,..

F@* fr rt r 'ar ru t t5"1rt! E!fffer' * , fhr


~

Cl

rf?L%; t
[A]

~u

rj 7

Cm7

Om7

l>dim

~ :n~r

u, ptr trtf[J' r n,. , :PII


t ; pe; r vu0 u r ., s ,

, J! 1 C!

uu E8 D

al

vi

E 17

ntr

"

F1

F7

al

-r-

1'i

Edim

.....

Gm7

Cm7

Cm7

F1

al

F7

,tPa ,ac:,~u ~ au -H

CHEROKEE

2-13)

(!]

~~~~;

RayNob/t

B~

F-t7

EJ= j [o
;.t.

Tf1

Fm7

lo

1"

,]

~7

cJm7

Bmaj7

;;'.

"

G7

On7

J j

si

F7

!l-o

lo

l 2 Cm7

lt

1o

~ J

;1'.

C9

A~7

"

El

.....

di

1
~

Dm7

E9

Amaj7

;;'.

~~aag pr 1ilp ~J .Jj}t~ :lfc#@J F I~:Jj 1


Am7

e <J J

Om7

I,W ...

C7

1J.ijJ
P+7

h+

1]

C9
"
o
l
1J
z..

B1 7

Fm7

1o
;',

!k

"

J J

Cm7

lo

F7

F+7

1~ ',.. 11

A~7

"

El

On7

;.'.

si
1

1
~

"
2J

C4iuZ
2-14) Scale outline ofthe "Chcrokce" bridge
2-15) Application of sea le ideas to the "Cherokee" bridge
a) Scales performed down and up.
h) Scales perfonned in 3rds.
e) Scales performed from the tonic to the 5th; 3rd to the 7th.

d) Seales performed from the tonic to tite 5tJt; 3rd to tJte 7th;
5th to tlte 7th.

ltl

HOW IITGH THE MOON

2- 16)

Ff
S

tJ ~

E1maj7

j
1

Am71s

~LJ J J

1w
Rm7

~j7

Ir

Omaj7

f11 J

Q,n7

E7

Lf

~~t;:E
Am7

F lf n

;..'.

>

~11naJ1
J ~
I.~ J

LJI Omaj7

D7

omaJ7

J J J 1J J 1:0 J W

~M

Am7

D7

F I~'J J M
C7

'f ~ ~J J

aJ
s

FIF

D7

Omaj7

J J J ;g..

IJ

1r J:J u- J

'817

Am71

:.-'.

Om7

tMdd t~..

i J:r ~m7

if.l

jJ j d
Cm

l=f
n1 1

1 ~o=---

D7

.n n

C7

J J j 1&5
Fm7

;.1.

~j7 j

:.-'.

Morgan Lewis

Cm7

1t

J ,u-~J%1
F7

hf

(Am7

lp!!

F
1)7)

2-17) Senle outline of " How lligh Tbe Moon"


Fig. 2-17

~-mnutr'Ouia 'nnn~m, n: JJ>'em

~-nm 00 ,JiJFt ~~3 mms1Jana,., H


~rD m=ttf11 b8f Etf SBJftl DtD ~! f(J tr )-, t:::=J

~ n trlEJ

unp, *

.r:~1t1 n E]+m.n J'''

~fnPFJ LJ1tr kOU lil 113 D &D FB J' *

~ JJPu u 1JJ fn, * ~34~ iJ ~~o IJ ag dgtJ' *


1

rtcmaup'lEfttrn1:!, ,n nu~ , , ;J mp
~ nnuh I ;J,;an ~, ~ nnuh I;J,a=.Spt

2- 18) The 'Minor 6 Diminished Scale'


This scale is formcd by combining a minor 6 chord wilh its related
diminished chord. The diminished chord is built from a major 3rd
above Lhe dominant note of lhe scale.
2-19) Scale practicc on thc G minor 6 diminished scale
a) The scalc pcrformed up and down.
b) The scale performed as broken note chords.
e) The scale performcd as arpcggios with inversions.
2-20) Figures 2-20a-n show various phrases based on lhe G minor 6
dimilshed scale (bars 11 & 12).

so

.~ . '~' d
t

j
""'
'
""'
'
J ~bt
a
~

related 1'# dinnished chord

Fig. 2-19
a)

~lid 1 ~h (~rtll E1r E'F g ~U 1-J=' 1-

,,r r m{ r~r!r ltfepiJ JO

~~~~) er rJ egfl rbrJ=to:; 1blter lEO 1


Fig. 2-20
a)

b)

9 ~,* 1
~-~~ ao~r
d)

.- 3 ~

e)

tf-C r P, 1 gWff__gj 411


e)

-:::.:;;::;

~ 1 ' J! W ~ , * lbS) oo r k~UA::&=e-v , .t- 1

l~igJ@# cJI ~ '* - ii>[J&8n;1 tJ 1fiJ lJ


h)

i)

j)

,,~3 ~ 'dj l JJ n~EfFli:>J

nv c:f 1~ ' *

1
S1

Application of scale ideas to "How Higb The Moon"


2-21) Figures 2-2la-f show various phrases ba~ed on the G major scale
(bars 1 & 2;17 & 18).

2-22) Figures 2-22a-f show various phrascs based on thc


scale (bars 3 & 4; 19 & 20).

sz

e dominant 7th

m)

~-11 Jj1

n)

'"'

k 11 ~ ,; t)t=J11 ~)'

Fig. 2-21

~it

b)

n nu'muu ,, fo OP, -~
11

~i D J>" 1!\ :P J1 n PJJ.} n

~&(j ;~, e] 0

gr f.l t 4

Fig. 2-22

~) ~nn~nt9-J nY*
:J

h)
11

.-3.,

~u Lvl rfflr:!&Wu 1J 3''

e)

...

mw J.;b~'JJidl

~]) u~u J JN=il rfflC!P EP!uJ-n ',


f)

11

2-23) Thc F major scale performcd up and down (bars 5 & 6; 21 & 22).

2-24) Thc Bb dominant 7th scalc peonned up and down (bars 7 & 8;
23 &24).

2-25) This figure oullines bars 9 & 10 (also 25 & 26). Here lhe Eb
major scale is played up; followed by the F dominant 7th scale played
down to lhc 3rd degree of the D dominant 7th scale.

Fg. 2-23

u u mn ; ,cu

r-~u--.EJ m

Fig. 2-24

~ llcrg aJJtffl 1m iJt=Jl, * 1


Fig. 2-2S
ll~m'\)7

*11~;; JS~u ~,

cm7~ S

02,

1&[) iJ mJ
11

SS

(!~2
2-26a-b) Perfonned hcrc are furthcr cxamples illustrating bars 9 & 10.

2-27) This figure shows an improvisation built on bars 9-13.

Fig. 2-26
a)
,_, ...

b)

'1 v ;~~na p' 1 11 ,

,_,...

e)

,_3 ...

J;@ (f ~ , 11 ,PJ ~ 1S .1Jo'1 -A


e)

d)

.;JW}?, S _JiJ .f~J"

Fg. 2-27

,_

~~~' Jd Jd fO lcHfiJ ~JO


@

J J1

JP J5=' - --=

~~ ~J J J J_Ji d -

11

HO\IAELE QHOR7)5
QuasiMado

PIANO~ QliiTAR
Thls chapteris inspiring notonly:from my

perspectlve as a pianist,butalso from a philosophical perspectlve that chords and cbording


(lilee other th1ngs in lifc) can be thought of as
Ouid and havlng potenti al for constant lnteractioiL We are requlred, then, to consider where
each cbord origirwes, and lo examine how !he
chords are related one to eacbother.
'The misconceptlon that chords are fixed
polnts in thc tune, bound by vertical hannonic
movement, may be !he culprit behind thc tcndency to play thc same two or three voiciitgs
over and over for thc same change. Introduccd
hcre ls a 'scalefor chordlt~g; anda melhod of
assigning vinually any chord to one of two
scalcs-th<! major 6 diminisMd and th<! mlnor 6
tlminished. Through tite various ways in
which pracllcing chords on tiu::ir respective
scalcs is dcmonstrat.cd, sce how misconccption~ about hannoruc rigidity disperse.

1b illustrate lhis point furthcr, lhink of a


right-handed piano volcing for an Aro7 chord
(from bottom note 10 IOp) llke D-C-E-G
against A in the len hand. Actually this voicing can be found in tilc repertolre of most jazz
pianists; however, not many plnyers would
considcr lncorporating a D. an F oran Ab inlo
that spoci tic cbordal structurc.
Qarification of how Ain7 (going 10 D7 in
lhe lc.ey of G) is actually C6 follows; and, that
B. D. F, and Ab-helng part of tite C6 dimlnished scal~H~re all perfeclly acceptablc (not 10
mention intcresting) note choices for tite Am7
chord.
Barry masterfully dcmonstrates lhe conccp! and appliation of movablc chords later in
!he scgment within tite contcxt of severa!
tunes.
(Tr.lll.SCriptions of rubato passages are
meant 10 illustr.tte thc harmony and 1o approximatc the rhythmic shapc of the tune.)

Notes for guilllr players:


1) Thc opcn strings on lhc cuitar are numbered (frum lowcst string 10 highe~1) in !he following manner; 6 5-4- 3- 2- l. Thcse numbcrs will appear circled.

2) In guitar notation, lhcre are often two oumbcrs beside a note. TIJC circled numbcr (as it is
explained abovc) indicates !he string !he note is found on. The undrelcd number lndlcates !he futgcr
nf lhe lefi hand thatthe note is played wilh. 'o' indicates an open string.
3) 1e capltalletter C followed by a Roman numeral indicatcs a bar on a particular fret For examplc. CV indicates a bar on thc fifth fret.

Thc C6 Dimi.nishcd Scale


3- la) This figure shows the e6 diminished scale in chords with voicings for the piano and for the guit.ar (T'ig.3-1b).
3-2a) Here; the e6 dirninished scale is shown in single notes. Fig.3-2b
gives the guitar fingering.
This scale is actually comprised of all 3 diminished chords. The
and A belong to one dimin.isbcd, the E and G to a second, and the B
diminishcd chord provides the other four notes of the scale.

3-3) These two illustrations show the e6 diminished sea le performed in


contrary motion: a) in single notes, a.nd b) in chords.

The e Minor 6 Diminishcd Scalc

3-4) The minor 6 diminished sea le performed up and down. (To practice this scale as a 2 bar phrase, play it up and down to the major 6th
degree, omitting the major7th and thc octave. Not shown on video.)

60

Fg. 3-2a

1
<D-0

<D)--

Fg. 3-Ja

Fig. 3-3b
l-.1

Fig. 3-4

~ 1 J ilt"fd ~~lijA 1B

w J 3~FJ 1:t> '

3-5) Chords found on thc C minor 6 diminished scale are illustrated


here: a) C minor triad on the lst degree; b) the D minor triad on the 2nd
degree; e) 2nd inversion Ab major triad on the b3rd degree; d) 2nd
inversion Ab minor triad also on the b3rd dcgrcc; e) thc F minor triad
on the 4th degree; f) the F major triad al so on the 4th degree.
3-6) "AloncTogcther" starts with its fustchord, Cm, being voced with
thc b6tl1, a diminished note from tlle scale ( the Ab), tllen resolving back
to the 6th degree (A). In the third bar a Cm6 chord movement is shown
on the C minor 6 diminished scale resolving to Dm7b5.
3-7) This figure illustrates tlte movement of an Ebm7 chord on the Gb6
diminished seale, resolving to Ab7. lt. is performed in the context of
"Body and Soul."
The movement o ver the Ab7 chord to gel to the Dbmaj7 makes
use of the A minor 6 diminshed scale, the altered scale for the Ab7
chord, al so referred toas 'the tritone's minor.' (This term comes from
the 'importan/ minor,' see Fig.2-ll, and is being used here to refer to the
chord on 1e 5th degree of the lritone of Ab-Am.)
3-8) Re-thinking the m7 and the m7b5 chords
Every minor 7 chord is an inversion of a major 6th chord, and every
rninor7 flaL'i chord is an inversion of a rninor 6tl1 chord. This figure
shows Am7b5 on the rnajor 6th degree of the Crn6 dirninished scale.
Notice that it is al so simply an inversion of thc Cm6 chord. (On 1c C6
dminished scale, the chord on the major 6th degree appears as Am7.)
3-9a) Moving Am7 on lhe C6 dminished scale
In this figure, an Am7 chord is performed ascending the C6 diminished
scale. Each note moves to the next note on the scale. Fig.3-9b voices
the same example on the guitar.

62

Fig. 3-5a

b)

-o

~-

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1'"1:

'

f)

e)
1

l.J

-.J

"ALONE TOOETHER"

~Q ~t.J. ~ 1

Fig 3-7

11

"BODY & SOUL"

;..('). 6

--;

,-,

d)

rrw

Fig. 3-6

1,11

e)

. -l

~~

Ji..-

po (;l-6
- - _,

...

- .-.fl-

pO

'
-t:.---1,~ Ffl =~~

1-1>,.

- 1!

A~7

al6

D~maj7

'

Fig. 3-8

Fig. 3-9a

Fig. 3-9b

~Id

fe~),

crv

k~ ij~ ~
f@z f@z r0z

CV

~ ~
Q:h

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'

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~"
1

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11

~3

3-lOa) Moving a voicing through the C major scalc


Here, chords are played up a C major scale. Fig.3-10b illustr.Jtes voicings
for the gui t.ar.

3-lla) Moving a voicing through thc C6 diminished scale


The same initial cbord as in the previous figure is now pcrformed on the
C6 diminishcd scale, with guitarfingerings shown in Fig.3-11 b.

Remember to nwve each note to the next note of the sea/e.

Fig. 3-IOa

nnnnnnn
Fig. 310b

Fig. 3-lla

~-

l'l;

,.n . ~n. -~.n.

.n n n
1

Fig. 3-llb

~11

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~ ~jJ ~ ..Q

nn-;~n~n

Clli

~v,_,

f7 rrfPFf

cv_I.O

eA eME ip
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3- 12) The 6 diminshed sea le contains two dominant 7t.h chords


Illustrated in lhi s figure s a key difference between lhe major scale and
the major 6 diminished scale. As Barry mentions, notice that the major
6 dimilshed scale contains the dominant 7th chord belonging to tbe
key, (in this case G7), as weU as the dominant 7th chord belonging to
the relative minor of the k.ey (E7).
3-13) Ending a tune with movements on the 6 diminishcd scale
a) Voiced for t.he guitar, ths figure shows an ending for a tune developed by playing up the 1st four chords of the C6 diminished scale and
rcsolving IVm-bVll7 (implied by the 'E' moving to 'D,' tbe 3rd of
Bb7) lO lrrtaj6.
b) Another illustration of us.n g a 'chords on the scale movement' lo
create an ending. This exan1ple is performed by Barry.
3-14) This figure exlcnds the cxamplc shown in Figs.3-13a&b, develo ping the idea into a four key exercisc.

Fig. 3 12

t-~

11

Fig. 3-13a

~~~r

5!)

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Fig. 3-1 3b

. nn_n _
r

Fig. 3-1 4
.-1

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. r-.

..n n

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1.,

.r-.

n
1

... 1"1

~~]";1

n
r

~"'JJ-

tTJ
b
o o

3-15) Using the C6 diminished scalc on 11-V-1 in G major


a&b) TI1esc two figures illustrare the movemcnt of an Am7 chord (C6)
on Lhc CG diminished scale within thc context of a IIm7-V7-Tmaj progression in the key of G.
e) Here, a variation of the previous examplc is written in guitar nota-

tion.
3-16) Using tbe C minor 6 diminisbcd scale on ll-V-1 in G
a&b) Two cxamples showing Am7b5 (Cm6) moving on the C rninor 6
diminished scale within the context of a Ilm7b5-V7-I progression, first
in the key of G major, then G minor. (Fig.3- 16c illustrates a tllird example for the guitar.)
3-17) ' Borrowcd Notes'
This example demonstrJ.tes the samc chord progression as the previous
figure; however, it incorporales 'borrowed' diminisbed notes. The 'C'
and ' Eb' are notes of the F# dirninished chord-the related dirnnished
to D7. Borrowcd diminished notes are circ/ed in Figures 3-17,3-18,
3-19, and 3-22.

Fig. 3-15b

Fig. 3-15a

r--

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....

tt

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Ftg. 3- 16a

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Fig. 3-15c

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ptg, 3.. 16b

171

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Fig. 3-17
1

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=-tj

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r -;:l

1':\

/fif
-

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U'

3-18a&b) The following two examples illustratc diminished notes


(circled), borrowed from B diminished on the Cm6 chord.
e) Perfonned by Barry, this example takes chords up the C6 dirninished
scale beginning with a voicing that includes a dim.inished note with thc
C6 chord,-altcrnating..with a dirninished chord using a note of C6.
(Fig.3-18d illustrates a 2nd similar example, not shown on the video.)
3-l9a) Based on "Django" by John Lewis

70

Fig. 3-18a

b)

'''

Fig. 3 18c

11

Fg. 3-18d

Fig. 3 19a "DJANGO" (last 8 bars)

Am

r--r

.. ~
Do(j

rl

~m

r r

Al'\

IJ\

Um
V

. (~pJ'
1

~~)
Bm7
-

tt :.~
(ti7)

#
Am

1
)

3-19b) Rased on "If 1 Should Lose You" by Robin-Rainger


3-19c) Based on "In Your Own Sweet Way" by Davc Rrubeck
'Major-minor-minor/6'

3-20) This figure shows the progression from major to minor to minor
with the 6th degree in Lhe bass(Bb major-G minor-Gm/E).

Fig. 3-19b "IF T SHOULD LOS!!. YOU"


Gm7
Am7\5 0 7

Om7

,--1-

011

~i t J f' ~ IRh; ;J I:J &!) r~c~ lct@c.lt@)


Fm7
1

b~~r~

a7

Plrulj7

, J. @ 1J J R J

Gm7

ltMJ

11

Fig. 3-19c "lN YOUR OWN SWBBT WAY"


Am~s

f4 ~ 1 UW
Alm7

1>7

o-]19

0m

Om6

<@f4

(JI maj7

'maj7

Cm7

..
-01;

...

l>f

al6

Fmaj7

1# cff'r ey-1f-3Uf
Cm715

~, ~~vr <ttf 'r ~&: J-EuP


Fig. 3-20

F7\9

a>ma7+l1

,fi[JJu. ~ru

3-21 a) The previous progression based on bars 24-25 of " Stclla by


Starlight" by Young-Washington. llle chord movements are I majorID7-relative minor-bVldim-Imaj/5-nnor/6.
b) Here, the harmonic.concept of the previous figure is applied Lo a
. progression-based on-the .fust 4 bars of"Like Someone In Lovc" by
van Heusen-Burke.
e) Again, the hannony of Fig.3-21a is applied to changes based on the
fust 2 bars of "I Remembcr Yo u" by Schertzinger-Mercer.
d) The movemcnts on the 24th-25th bars of "Stclla by Starlight" written for guitar.

Fig. 3-2 la "S'T'ELLA BY STARLTGIIT''

@)
~-

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B~

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lE Cm ' !~~'!~
A
NT

Gm

Em'-J

w r

Fig. 3-21b "LIKB SOMEONE IN LOVE"

.:

11*

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1

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r r------r

r r

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Fig. 3-21c "1 REMEMBER YOlf'


1

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IS

3-22) Tbe 4 rclated dominant 7ths used us V7 substit.utions


In thc following two figures, (3-22a written for guitar and 3-22b for
piano), we have illustrations of how related dominant 7th chords may
be used to substitute 'for eachother' when the V7 chord moves back to
the l. Refer to Figs.l-15, l -15a, and 1-17 for explanation of how to find
thc dominan! 7thchordsrelated to a.given diminished cbord; and also
for examples of how to practice!hose.relatcd dominant 7th seales 'into
eachother' to outline key chord movements. In the following examples,
07 going to G major is outlined. TI1e diminished that 07 comes from is
F# (F#-A-C-Eb). Given that F7, Ab7, and 87 are also relatcd to F#
diminished, they make very interesting voicings when played against D
in the bass. In addition, notice how diminished chord tones (circled)
can be incorporated into the progression.

Fig. 3-2211

Fig. 3-22b

Gmaj7
Al ?

r--, ,-.....,

B7
1

r::

.--3--,

-]{d i

'- _./

Gmaj7

'{..,

'Y

'Y

'<

!---"

-hJ

1HE RHYTHH 5EC1tON


lt occurs to me lhat if one were seeking a model
for-the perfect.social order it would not be necessary to look beyond the jazz rhylhm section.
Considera socicty based on the fulfillment of
its members' needs. Each person would be
secure and confident about his or her unique role
in life and in the ability to express ideas. People
would think well of, support and creatively challengc not only lhemselves, but others. Add to
this everyonc proudly assuming a role in the
devclopment and flourishing of the wholc, while
continuing to build a strong, focuscd individual
center. Par from being perceived as a threat, cach
diffcrent voice would be welcomed wilh full
attention and consideration.
Anything sbort of this in lhe rhythm secton
causes imbalance, confusion, and beats Jo drop!
ln the corresponding video segment Barry
puts thc rhythm section through key rhyt.hmic
a.nd listening cxercises designed tu achieve the
kind of 'harmony' described abovc.

4-1) "Straight, No Chascr" by Thelonious Monk.

STRAIGHT, NO CHASER

Fig. 4- 1
F7

B~7

~~~ J 1: ftjJ lJ JjJ 11iJ Jd_J.


;;".

~&J u ; ]

c:1

~::ti#J ;

JlJ d

;;".

B~7

1'

.n J fl

4)

Fmaj7

J,J J J_tJJ u

( Dm7

J f.l

t:t

Cm7

tJ.

c:l)

'<4)1

4-2a-d) Walking bass pattcms emphasiz.ing the importance of the


upbeat. Note how Fig.4-2d ma.kcs the '1' disappear by phrasing over
the bar line .

4-3) The above pattems can be practiced in various combinations and


pcrformed simultaneously throughout,therhythm section.
a) This example combines the '2+' and the '4+.'
b) Here, the ' 1+' is combined with the '4+.'
4-4a-d) Tis next series of figures extends the previous idea by rnaking
use of longer tied note.~ in the walk:ing bass line.

Fig. 4-2ll

Fig. 4-2b

~ 1 J J J .1 .J "

.m

Fig. 4-2c

.1 .1

1r=J J

.1

.o

Pig. 4-2d

~11 ,} J

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Fig. 4-3a

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Fig. 4-3b

$=:::0 ,) .o .o ],)

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1$11 bJ .1 ,) 1 .1 .l .! .J 1 .E J J J 1 J
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~hl J J J~3

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11

VOQALf2fNG
Here, the voice is cast into the role of
both storyteller and melodic/rhythmic
instrument. To achieve success in the
areas of story and rhythm, it is essential for the singer to develop a sense
of time and phrasing independent of
what the rhytlun section lays down.
Tt is also vital for the vocalist, as it
is for any instrumentalist in this
music, to develop technical (scalar
and rhythrnical) skills in order tomaster the art of improvisation-to then be
free to explore nuanee, possibility, and
depth. With this in mind, severa! key
exercises and elcments of thcory are
demonstrated such as the use of the
relatcd diminished chord. (The relat.ed
diminished chord has been dealt with
in more detail earlier in this book. See
figures 1- 15a-b and 1-16.)

5-1) "You Must Bclicve ln Spring" by Micbcl Legrand.

YOU MUST BELIEVE IN SPRING


J\m

Whm ~ ly

M iclf<:l Lrgrand
A7

Rm7

mud OWI Uf Y'- min~l,

(Ull.nat cbW the

Cl~.l)

Dmr(l

J!J&\

Bm

.,... it

a~n

J..

,_.,.. wm re ap - pc-r;

CII(I'J)

Bm7

Ul'

llt('ml.

(.)7 (~'})

Oon'I\';IJ

1~

in.g

A(l. ril'a mel1.

1 'jll J

Yoa nu be-Bew: Ea &ow- oS


1117~

waiU lite Ida&

ot

Cm

G?ffl/C

...

A m 1\';1)

M.ty.

Su

In

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wotld

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oTi!"JJ

9'17

F m7

@J J J

""" k '

Elmo7

cr

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f)c ~iq t'OK

cr(I'J)

0t UMa w.t come llld &U.

5-2) The E diminished chord with applications to "Y. M. B. in S."


a-d) Demonstratcd in the following four figures are examples of the Jast
2 bars of "Y.M.B. in S.," incorporating notes of the diminished chord.
Exarnples arenotatedin the keys ofF and e minor. C7 (in the key ofF
rninor) usesthe-E-diminishedchord; while G7 (in the key of e minor)
uses the B dirninished chord.

Warm-up exercises
5-3) The D dirninished chord.
a) Here, a pattern based on chrornatically descending dirninished
chords is illustr.tted. Playing up the fust chord and down the second.
b) An Ab rnajor arpeggio.
e) An Ab minor arpeggio.

Fig. 5 2

1~1

~J

j J J

3 J

Fig.S-2a

'~ 1J d d J-3

J J 3~J

J
-~

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11

Fig. 5-2b

1'112Eld2J J j j J tJ :
Fig. S-2c

I~H J d d

J =J

~ ~ E j

( )~ ~

r
~

Fig. 52d

Fig. S-3

e F>r

~[ Jdid 3
~1 J J.ffl

11

..

r..

11

rr
" e

I r1

11

d) An Ab augmented arpeggio (the 5th degrce is ra sed a half-step from


the major).
5-4a) The Ab majar scale perfonncd up.
b) The Ab major scale performed down.

5-Sa) The Ab whole tone scale (a six note scale built on whole-steps
above the root).
b) 1l1c Ab whole tone scale perfonned up in 3rds.
e) The Ab whole tone scale performed down in 3rds.

5-6a) An Ab diminished arpeggio.


b) An Ab diminished chord.

Fig. 5-3d

$ =w a (~nJ 1 3 J iJ
Fig. 5-4a

~ll s

W J d=d J J

'

Pig. 5-4b

~ ) GfQJ

a g, ,

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l$&s iJ J J J tU tP tH
f'ig. 5-5b

~VJs oFJ

ro l:fiJaJ ~=---n

Fig. S-Se

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Fig. S-6a

~1~
Fig. 5-6b

~"i]

J f d J J J73
J J d jJJ
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tA l

AppUcation of the warm-ups to "Y.M.B. in S."

5-7a) An illustration of the lnst 2 bars of "Y.M.B. in S.," making use of


the related diminshed chord. (Perfonned in the key ofF minor.)
b) An illustration of the last 2 bars of "Y.M.B. in S.," first making use
of the related diminished chord (ascending), then descending the G
augmented arpeggio. (Perfonned in the key of minor.)

Use of tbe related diminished cbord


5-8a) Barry demonstrates the use of the related diminished chord over
the first 4 bars of "Y.M.B. in S." Fig.5-8b gves a second resolution
pont after the diminished chord in the first 2 bars. (Performcd in le
key ofF minor.)
5-9) More exnmples using le related dimini shed chord are shown here.
(Performed by Cara in the kcy ofF minor.)
5 -l O) This figure illustrates the same 4 bars as abo ve. (Examples are
perfonned by Denzil in the key of minor.)

12

flig. 5-7a

~~-~~J. d d JFer(~)r ~rJ

11

Fig. 5-7b

L'll

J JdJ fFj#ilJ aJO]

Fig. 5-8a

,,,, ' J aJ&J3+1-f.J=~ ~J


Fig. 5-8b

r..

ijo

11

::

In:~ t JdJJ
"' ;;; E(llr t
>J F

11

Bll...LIE'S BOUNCE

Fig.S-11
F

IW* ' J ~~ ~J

14

B~7

Bdim

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Clrarlk Parku

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A) Albums recorded aq leacic< (orina solo pmno seuing)


Rrcakin' lt Up
At The J a.zz Worlc:shop
Preminado
Lisien To llany ltlrris...Solo Piano

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BuU'sEyc
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Plays Tadd Damcron
UvelnTokyo
Plays Bany ltlrris

Xanadu 113

l30(Xanadu FDC 5155)


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177

Tokyo: 1976

The Binl of Red and Gold


Foc Thc Moment
Live al Maybeclc Recital Hall
Solo
llany HarrLq In Spain
Conlimutlion (with Kenny Barron)

213
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Se.pember CO 5111 (Delgium)
NUBA (CD) 7754 2 (Spain)
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CANNONBALL ADDERLilY Tllem Diny Blues
Don'! Look Rack
DAVID All.YN

CHARLIEBYRD
VONALD BYRD

Blues Sonala

ALCOHN

Play ll Now
Al Cohn ~ Ametica

ByrdJozz

NoProblem

SONNYCRISS
RONNIE CUBER
CHARLES OAVIS
KUNNY I.X>RHAM
ARTFARMER/
DONALDBYRO
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'IDRRY GlBBS

Rivcrside 322 {L:lndmark 13l}


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138
179
Xanadu 105 (FOC 5163 Frunce)

Sa!Ury Moming
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Rcflcctions
Bebop Rcvlsiled,
Vol.5

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HOWARO McGEE
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Gcuin' Around
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Picture of Heath
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Tite Bock S1.0ps Here
BotlomsUp
Allstars
Body and Soul
Come Along Witb Me
Jay Hawk Tal k
CeUoAgain
Clumgcs & Things
The Magnificent
ThadJooes
Magnificcnt Tllltd
Iones, Vol. 3
Repetition
Feelin' and Dealin'
West Coast Dlues
1nto Sometlllng
Eastem Sound~
Many Faces of
Yusef Lateef
BackHome
J87.zbrot1Jcrs

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Criss Cross CD 1046
Jazzland 920 (Jap.Victor 23660)
New Jazz 8272 (OJC 700)
Prcstigc 7319 (OJC 612)

1)

CHARLES McPHERSON

BILLY MlTCHI.!.LL
HANKMOBLEY

JAMESMOODY
FRANK MORGAN
LEEMORGAN

Bcbop Revisill:dl
Con Alma!
TI1c Quintct/Livcl
Mcl'herson's Mood
U ve lnTo kyo
Charles McPherson
The Colossus of

Prostige 7359 (OJC 710)


7427
7480 (OJC 1804)
7743
Xanadu 131
Mainstream 329

Dctroit
Mobley' s Mcssage
Jazz Messsge Vol.2
Sualgbt. No Filter
Thc Thmarouod
Doo't Loolc Away Now
You Must Believe

X..nadu 158
Prestige 7061 ('2A063)
Savoy 12092 (CD 0158)
Bluc Note 84435
B1ue Note 4186 (CD 84186)
Prestige 761.5

rn Spring
TakeTwelve
Thc Sidewinder

Antilles (CD) 314 512 S10


Ja:a.land 980 (OJC 310)
B1ueNote 4157 (CD 84157)
F!Wl Sound (CD) 1024

Wc Remcmbu You
SAMNOTO

DAVEPIKE
SONNYRED

EnU11nce!
ActOne
11's Tune For
Davc Pike
Broe>.ing
ThcMode

lmages
REDRODNEY

Bird Uves!
HomeFree

FRANK ROSOUNO

Swing...Not Spring

ER1C SCHNEIDER
SONNYST1TT

Eric's Alley
Bumin'
Tunc-Up!

(4 tunes)

Constcllation
Twelve
Mellow
Play&Gene Ammons
Bluc.s for Dulce
Sonny's Back
In Style
Moonlightln Vermo nt

Xanoou 103
127
Riversidc 360
Ja.z.zland 32

59
74

Muse 5371 (CD5371)


MR 5135
Savoy 12062(CD 0 188)

Gatcmouth 1005
Argo 661
Cobb1estone 9013(Muse CD 5334)
9021 (Muse CD 5323)
Muse 5006 (JapaneseCrown CD4520)

Muse5067
5091

5129
5204
5228
Denon CD 7046

C) Various ArlisL

ANNlVBRSARY
TIIE BASIE-ITES
l REMEMBER BEBOP
11m PIANO PLA YfiRS
RIVERSIDE REUNION
BAND
WANGARATIAJAZZ
XANADU AT MONTREUX

(Trio: Sall PcanuiS)


How High The Moon
(Trio: 4 Monk tunes)

Xanadu 201
Jubilcc 5004
Columbia C2 35381

(Trio: a Barry Harris


original- Confusion)

Xanadu171

Mostly MonJe
Vol.l
Vol.2
Vol.3
Vol.4

MileSU>ne MCD-9216-2
Subaru (CD) SJOOI
(Auslnllia)
Xanadu 163

- Compilcd by nM MacDONALD

164
165

The following quotations ha ve been gathercd ovcr the years from lecturcs
and personal conven;ations with Barry Harris.

l. (On jazz having advanced since Charlie Parlcer)


"You can wear your trousers backwards, but that won 't neccssarily put you
any further ahen.d."
2. (On tlte use of too many 'blue' notes)
"1e old folks would say, ''The person who curses a lot has the fcwest
words at their command.' "
3. (On tite importance of focused practicing)
"Practice your playing-not your practicing; make the pmctice time as real
for yourself as possible."
"Monk would praclicc playing a tune for hours, and so when he went 10
the ;ig he was ready."
4. (On rhythm)
'"I'hink about it- you 'd mther hear a cat play rhythmic and wrong, than
non-rhythmic and right, cause thcy'rc going to be wrong anyway."
5. (On volume)
"Play at your norm [volume levelj. Know what your nom1 is so that you
play the most relaxed. lf you play a little louder than that, theo you 've
broughl in sorne teosion, and tension won ' t allow you to really do it.
Thc loud that you really want is thc loud that comes from surety- positiveness- thnt's when you hear people really starting to speak out."
6. (On vibrato)
" How dislinctive and easily recognizablc thc tenor players were, onc from
the other, bccause of their vihrato."
"Your vihrato is likc your soul. Hom players nowadays aren't prncticing
their vihrnto and tltat's why you can't tell thern apart."

100

7. (On the effect Charlic Parker hod on other musicion~)


"He made people play 'over their heads.' "
"1 heard Bird with some of the worst cats you could imagine. He carne to
Detroit once with [a band led by] Emperor Nero--and on top of thatEmperor Nero playcd alto. The funny pan of it is that I had never heard
Emperor Nero play so good in my life as he did with Bird."
8. (On performing with Lester Young)
"The way that he would count in a tune wos such a knockout-all he'd do
is shrug bis shoulder- Iike that-and that would be the tempo."
9. (On the hipness of Euro-Classical masters)
"If Bach and Chopin and them were around today, they wouldn 't be playing other people's music, they'd be down in the comer joint jarnming."
10. (On perceiving thc whole. Philosophy, anda typicnl ~tart to another session of the Barry HluTis 1azz Workshop)
"One thing that modero (wo)man is particular! y good al is naming everything ...Thcrc are petrus, a stem, !caves, the starnen, sccnt, color and all too
often what becomes obscured is that whnt we are Iooking at is a flower."

101

Barry Doyle Ilarris, born in Detroit Michigan on December


15, 1929, is self-proclaimed as thc world's oldestjazz teachcr.
He began playing the piano at age 4 and claims to ha ve
always known that Lhat was what he was destined to do. By
the time he reached bis teens he had developed his own theo.r ies of.jazz, and soon became sought out for bis knowledge by
local pcers and established, visiting jazz musicians alike.
Indeed, tbe Harris family borne might well be regarded as tbe
first school of jazz. While Barry's reputation is legendary, his
modesty is also front and center. When asked about hispassion for teacliing, Barry typically rcplies tbat it is fucled by bis
own 'selfish' motives, hoping "that someone will come along
and show me the way." ' 'That," he states, half-jokingly, " is
when class is over."

Howard Rces, born in Toronto Canada on Fcbruary 2 1, 1954,


began studying with Barry Harris in 1979. In 1984 he founded
the Howard Rees Jazz Workshop in Toronto, which, in its
tenth year, is a leading CanadiaJl school dedicated exclusive! y
to the study of bebop.
In addition, Howard maintains a busy schedule as guest
clitcian and peormer on both the piano and the double bass.
He is currently working on a book detailing Barry Harris' harmonic concept as it applies to the piano.

102