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SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

Lesson Plan Template


TOPIC
Name
Subject
Grade Level
Date/Duration
Big Ideas
Essential
Questions

PA/Common
Core/Standards

DETAILS
CK
Cassie Szmyd
ELA- Math
2
45-60 minutes (1 or 2 class periods)
Numbers can be classified, ordered, and stated in different
ways.
How are relationships represented mathematically?
How can mathematics support effective communication?
How can recognizing repetition or regularity assist in solving
problems more efficiently?
How is mathematics used to quantify, compare, represent,
and model numbers?
What does it mean to estimate or analyze numerical
quantities?
What makes a tool and/or strategy appropriate for a given
task?
How is mathematics used to quantify, compare,
represent, and model numbers?
CC.2.1.2.B.1 Use place value concepts to represent amounts
of tens and ones and to compare three digit numbers.
CC.2.1.2.B.2 Use place value concepts to read, write, and skip
count to 1,000.

Objectives
Bloom's
Taxonomy
Webb's Depth of
Knowledge
(DOK)
Formative &
Summative
Assessment
Evidence

Students will use the symbols <, >, or = to compare three


digit numbers and different objects with 90% accuracy.

Regular Education Students:


Observe students as they complete the Ordering and
Comparing Numbers Worksheet (M-2-1-3_Ordering and
Comparing Numbers Worksheet and KEY.docx).
Observe student responses during Instructional
Procedures.
Question the students to check for understanding.
For ELLs:
Reading-read math problems with buddy, share
answers in partners
Writing- write down correct answers, exit slips,
sentence frames, dialogue journal
Speaking- listen for correct pronunciation of numbers
and words, provide positive and negative feedback,
have student talk to and collaborate with peer buddy
Listening- student will listen to all directions and listen

to the prompts given; I will provide examples for


student
Family- mom and dads most and least favorite thing in
dialogue journal
Culture- say some words/numbers in their native
language
Senses: touch, smell, hearing, seeing, tasting

Use of technology
Literacy (English and Native Language)

ISTE Standards
for Students
Framework for
21st Century
Learning
Accommodation
s, Modifications

ELL Students:
Use iPad to record student completing activity
Use iPad to record student saying and comparing
numbers (both in English and native language)
Use iPad for educational mathematics games dealing
with <, >, =
Graphic Visuals

SUPERVISING
TEACHERS
SIGNATURE

Seton Hill University Lesson Plan Template Step-by-Step


Procedures
RATIONALE for
the Learning
Plan
Introduction

CK
Activating Prior Knowledge
Ask students about certain objects in the classroomwhat they like more and what they like less.
I will point to the objects and ELL will have visual cue
cards with the name of the object in both English and
native language.
Hook/Lead-In/Anticipatory Set
Begin the lesson by having students choral count as follows:
Start at 132 and count forward by 10s. Have
students stop at 232. (132, 142, 152, 162, 172, 182,
192, 202, 212, 222, 232)
Start at 385 and count forward by 5s. Have
students stop at 445. (385, 390, 395, 400, 405, 410,

Explicit
Instructions

Lesson
Procedure
Must include
adaptations &

415, 420, 425, 430, 435, 440, 445)


Start at 570 and count forward by 100s. Have
students stop at 1,070. (570, 670, 870, 970, 1070)
Start at 842 and count backward by 100s. Have
students stop at 42. (842, 742, 642, 542, 442, 342, 242,
142, 42)
Start at 745 and count backward by 5s. Have
students stop at 690. (745, 740, 735, 730, 725, 720,
715, 710, 705, 700, 695, 690)
Start at 360 and count backward by 10s. Have
students stop at 280. (360, 350, 340, 330, 320, 310,
300, 290, 280)
ELL student will state the numbers and have assistance
from peer buddy. Visual cards with numbers on them
counting by 1s, 5s, 10s, and 100s both in English and
native language. The visual cards will be used all
throughout the lesson.
Big Idea Statement
Students will read the big idea statement that is written
on the board aloud as I point to each word.
ELL will already have these written down in dialogue
journal and will read them to their peer buddy.
Essential Questions Statement
Students will listen as teacher recites the essential
questions. Questions that arise will be answered.
ELL will already have these written down in dialogue
journal and will read them to their peer buddy.
Objective Statement
Students will listen and follow along as the teacher
reviews the three (3) mathematical symbols that are
going to be taught (<, >, =). The activity that will be
completed in class will be modeled for the students
(Order Up M-2-1-3_Game Board.pdf) before moving onto
the lesson.
ELL will have a sheet with the new vocabulary words and
meanings (both in English and in native language), along
with their peer buddy to assist them.
Transition
Have students quietly return to their seats and put
everything away and off their desks to get ready to
learn.
Key Vocabulary
Equal To: The same value as
Greater Than: Bigger or more
Less Than: Smaller or less
PreAssessment of Students
Students will complete the practice problems on the
board in their seats while the teacher models them with
big cut outs of the symbols on the board (<, >, =). The

accommodation
s for students
with special
needs

problems will consist of small numbers and different


objects.
ELL student will receive sheet that has simple numbers
and objects in both English and native language to
complete.
Modeling of the Concept
Guiding the Practice
How many of you can count to 1,000? If you count to
1,000, what is the biggest number that you count?
(1,000) Write this on the right side of the board. What is the
smallest number? (1) Write this on the left side of the
board. Pick a number between 1 and 1,000. Call on a
student and write the students number in the middle of the
board.
Pick a number that is smaller. Call on a student and
write this students number between 1 and the student-choice
number written in the middle of the board. Pick a number
that is larger. Call on a student and write this students
number between the student-choice number written in the
middle of the board and 1,000.
ELL student will complete at seat on large sheet of paper.
You are going to be playing a game in pairs. The
purpose of the game will be to build the largest
number that you can.
On the board draw three horizontal lines. __________
__________ __________
I am going to draw three number tiles from a jar. After
I draw each number, you will decide where to put the
number (line 1, line 2, or line 3). Once a number is
written down, it cannot be erased.
Draw one tile from the set of tiles. Show students the tile.
What line should this number go on? Write their
response on the board, return the tile to the jar, and draw
another tile. Show students the tile. What line should this
number go on? Write their response on the board, return
the tile to the jar, and draw another tile. Show students the
final tile and write the number on the remaining line. Ask a
volunteer to read the number. Is this the largest number
we could have possibly made? Write on the board the
largest number students could have made and circle it.
What is the smallest number you could have made?
Write students response on the board.
ELL will work with peer buddy even though it was as a class;
communicate and collaborate effectively
Then say, I am going to write some symbols on the
board. Write >, <, and =. Point to > and say, This symbol
stands for greater than. Write 127 > 120 on the board
and say, One hundred twenty-seven is greater than
one hundred twenty. Point to the < symbol and say, This
symbol stands for less than. Write 451 < 845 and say,

Four hundred fifty-one is less than eight hundred


forty-five. Point to the = symbol and say, This symbol
stands for equal to or the same as. Write 53 = 53 and
say, Fifty-three equals fifty-three. Fifty-three is the
same as fifty-three. Point out that the greater-than and
less-than symbols resemble an open mouth. Ask students,
Would you rather have 20 cookies or 80 cookies? (80)
Write 20 < 80, emphasizing that the symbol looks like a mouth
eating the greater number. Ask, Would you rather have 17
donuts or 2 donuts? (17) Write 17 > 2, emphasizing that
the symbol looks like a mouth eating the greater number.
Have students take out whiteboards and ask them which
symbols belong in the following examples:

235
352
(<)

768
712
(>)

165
165
(=)

545
554
(<)

213
123
(>)
When reading the numbers above, the teacher will use fingers
to show the correct amount. Each student will write problem
on whiteboard and then add their answer to the board.
Students will hold it up for teacher to see. Then some
students will chorally read the examples with the correct
symbols inserted.
Here, ELL will participate and follow along with peer buddy and
visual number cards. Teacher will repeat the numbers in ELL
native language after showing the correct amount with
fingers. If ELL is having trouble, he or she can stop and watch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6Efzu2slaI to help them
gain a great understanding of the symbols again.
Have students put away clean and put away their white
boards. Give each student a copy of the Ordering and
Comparing Numbers Worksheet (M-2-1-3_Ordering and
Comparing Numbers Worksheet and KEY.docx). As students fill
out the worksheet, move around the room observing and
asking clarifying questions to evaluate which students
understand ordering and comparing numbers and which need
additional exploration.
After ELL student has completed half of the worksheet with the
assistance of his or her peer buddy and the visual number cue
cards, he or she will write in dialogue journal about 2 objects
that his or her mom likes and doesn't like and about 2 objects
that his or her dad likes and doesn't like. This activity will be
modeled for the student.
Providing the Independent Practice
White board activity
Students complete the worksheet independently.
ELL student will complete the worksheet like stated
above, but after will write in journal like stated above.
Transition

Students will bring worksheet to my desk to be checked


for correctness.
Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Special
Needs
See in orange within the document
Evaluation of
Formal Evaluation
the
The worksheet at the end of the lesson
Learning/Master Informal Evaluation
y of the
The activity at the beginning of class
Concept
Observe and correct students
Closure
Summary & Review of the Learning
Once all the worksheets are turned in, bring class up
front. Review by completing the same activity as in the
beginning, but instead of numbers, use different objects
and words. Find out what the students like and don't like
by using the 3 symbols (<, >, =). Also, make sure the
students have an understanding of the math vocabulary.
Homework/Assignments
Exit slip- random 3 digit numbers will be given to the
students and they have to write which symbol belongs in
the missing space.
ELL will take the rest of the worksheet home to complete
and share dialogue journal with parents.
Reading
Number tiles 19 (36 sets)
Materials
Jar (one jar for each set of number tiles)
Technology
Whiteboard
Equipment
Whiteboard marker
Supplies
Whiteboard eraser
Ordering and Comparing Numbers Worksheet (M-2-13_Ordering and Comparing Numbers Worksheet and
KEY.docx)
Place-value number cubes (hundreds, tens, ones) for
each partnership
Pencil
Teacher

Self-reflection