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Marisa Casciano

UDL Lesson Plan


SPE 270
This lesson is for Pre-Kindergarten
I will be teaching Literature
Common Core Standards:
1. With prompting and support, actively engage in-group reading activities with purpose
and understanding.
2. With prompting and support, retell detail(s) in a text.
Josephson Institute Standard:
1. SE3.5. Effective Communication
Students demonstrate the ability to: 1) Send, receive, and correctly interpret information,
ideas, thoughts, desires, and needs by both verbal and nonverbal communication.
International Society for Technology in Education
2. Design and develop digital age learning experiences and assessments
a. Design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and
resources to promote student learning and creativity.
Smart Objectives:
1. Given the text If You Give A Mouse A Cookie, the student will follow along as the
teacher points to each word in the story, answer leading questions from the teacher, and
engage with his or her classmates about their understanding of the story with 100%
accuracy, by the end of the weeks lesson.
2. Given questions about what the student liked, disliked, and learned in the book If You
Give A Mouse A Cookie, the student will communicate specific details in the text
100% accuracy, by the end of the weeks lesson.
3. Given the text If You Give A Mouse A Cookie, the student will effectively
communicate his or her ideas, thoughts, and interpretation of the story to his or her
classmates 100% of the time, by the end of the weeks lesson.
WHY do students need to learn this lesson?
Today we are going to read the story If You Give A Mouse A Cookie
Written by Laura Numeroff. We are going to study this book so we can
learn what we like about the story, what we dont like about the story,
and be able to retell the story in our own way to our friends and family!
Does that sound like fun?
Materials Needed:
A big-share book of If You Give A Mouse A Cookie

Small Copies of the book If You Give A Mouse A Cookie for


everyone to hold.
Mouse ears, a mouse nose, and a mouse-tail.
Markers to write on the board
Markers and paper for the children to write or draw on
An I-pad, Mac computer, or SMART board

Anticipatory Set:
I am going to engage my students by dressing up as a mouse for my
class with mouse ears, a tail, and a nose. I will make the students
guess what I am! I think this is a fun way to keep childrens interest in
the story. After they guess what I am, I will make a KWL on the board
and ask what things they know about mice and if they have ever seen
a mouse in real life before. After we start talking about mice, I will grab
my big-shared book to read to my class on the carpet. I will ask the
kids to follow along with my finger as I point to each word in the story.
After we are done, I will ask the class questions about the story and if
they had learned anything new. That way we can add more facts to our
KWL on the board.
Multiple Means of Engagement:
I will first read to the students in a big group. I will ask questions about
the story and what they have learned. After that, I will let the students
get into smaller groups, or work on their own with their small copies of
If You Give A Mouse A Cookie. I will ask the groups or individuals to
write down new things they have learned, draw pictures of things they
learned, liked, or disliked, or use an I-pad, SMART board, or Mac
computer to draw on Google drawings. I think this is a good way to not
single anyone out, but get my class to learn in a way they feel
comfortable.
Multiple Means of Representation:
I think the information of the text is presented in multiple ways. I
dressed up as a mouse. I wrote facts about mice on the board. I read
the book to them. I asked them questions in a big group. I let the
children take their small copies of the book and look it over more
closely. I let them choose if they want to be in a group or if they would
like to work alone.
Multiple Means of Assessment:

I let the children pick if they wanted to draw pictures of what they
liked, disliked, or learned on paper, use an Ipad, Mac computer, or
SMART board to draw using technology, or write small sentences of
what they liked, disliked, or learned.
Sequence:
1. Dress up as a mouse for the students to look at.
2. Make them guess what animal you are.
3. Create a KWL on the board to see what they know about mice, about
the story, and if they have ever seen mice. Help them predict what
might happen in the story.
4. Sit on the reading carpet, grab the big shared book called If You
Give A Mouse A Cookie and read to the children.
5. As the kids to make predictions and ask questions frequently
throughout the book.
6. At the end of the book, ask them what they liked about the book, what
they disliked, and what they have learned from the book.
7. After the group discussion, tell the students to either get in small
groups or work by themselves (whatever they prefer).
8. Hand out small copies of If You Give A Mouse A Cookie to each group
or individual.
9. Tell the group or individuals to either write a sentence on what they
liked, disliked, or learned from the book OR to draw a picture of what
they liked, disliked or learned from the book on paper or using
technology such as Ipad, Mac computer, or SMART board.
10.
Look over the childrens work to make sure that everyone
understands the book, and that they are able to retell some parts of
the story in their own words.
11.
If children would like to share what they wrote or draw, let them
share at the end of the lesson. Make sure everyone has something on
their paper OR that they are able to explain what they learned in the
text to you.