6 Annotated Bibliographies­ Formative Assessment in Mathemathics 

 
 
Heritage M., Kim J., Vendlinkski T., Herman J. (2009). From Evidence to Action a 
Seamless process in formative assessment?​
 ​
Educational Measurement: Issues 
and Practice​
. Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 24–31 
 
This article touched on how most teachers, after formative assessment has been 
given, do not know what the “next steps” are in instruction. I like how this article 
speaks of a “learning domain.” This domain involves the instructional steps 
leading up to an outcome, the outcome itself, and subsequent steps after the 
outcome has been met. I this this is a clear indication of how a teacher can view 
formative assessment. When the assessment is not understood, steps to 
reaching the outcome must be taught. When the assessment is understood, 
subsequent steps must be taught that may lead to the subsequent outcome or 
enrichment of the previous outcome. This article also emphasizes the use of a 
professional learning community and how they can help with coming up with 
subsequent steps of instruction that have been shown to increase student 
achievement, after a formative assessment is given.  
 
 
 
 
Hernandez­martinez et al.. (2011). Mathematics coursework as facilitator of formative 
assessment, student­centred activity and understanding. ​
Research in 
Mathematics Education​
, 13(2), 197­212. 
 
This article backed up why formative assessment is key in mathematics 
instruction. It was shown that many of the students achievement had improved 
after formative assessment was given and the teacher was then able to tailor her 
instruction to each students needs. The students were shown to have a greater 
understanding of the concepts being taught, motivation increased, the teacher 
differentiated her instruction in accordance to the students needs, and finally the 
assessment strategies implemented met the needs of all of the students. 
Formative assessment was shown to be a springboard for overall best teaching 
practises in the classroom.  
 
 

Hyunju, L, Feldman, A & Beatty, A.D. (2012). Factors that Affect Science and 
Mathematics Teachers’ Initial Implementation of Technology­Enhanced 
Formative Assessment Using a Classroom Response System. ​
Journal of 
Science Education and Technology​
, 21(5), 523­539. 
 
This article discusses formative assessment in both math and science that is 
implemented via technology called Technology Enhanced Formative Assessment 
(TEFA). TEFAs merits were determined through two extrinsic and three intrinsic 
variables. From reading this article I have solidified my thoughts in that 
technology has a place in the classroom when it opens doors to possibilities 
children are unable to access in a normal classroom, but, that being said, 
formative assessment is something that does not require technology in order to 
implement. I realize that a lot of teachers are trying to find almost “shortcuts” in 
how to implement formative assessment but I think that a good teacher does not 
require reliance on technology in order to do their job. Formative assessment is 
not a chore, it is a requirement in best practise and the research has stated this 
over and over again. I would not rely on technology in my classroom for the 
implementation of formative assessment.  
 
 
Mcintosh, M. .E. (1997). Formative assessment in mathematics. ​
Clearing House​
, 71(2), 
71. 
 
This article was ahead of its time in that it discussed measures in the classroom 
that should have been implemented much sooner that 2008. The idea that 
formative assessment should have a “seamlessness from assessment to 
instruction” really hit home with me. Formative assessment does not have to be a 
sit down test. It can be something as passive as observations made in the 
classroom while centres are being used. This article also just talks of the basics 
of formative assessment, its true meaning which is to form or shape a teacher’s 
instruction. I felt like this article did not sugar coat the necessity of formative 
assessment for better teaching and it was very practical in its delivery of 
information.  
 
 
Phelan et al.. (2011). Differential Improvement in Student Understanding of 
Mathematical Principles Following Formative Assessment Intervention. Journal of 
Educational Research, 104(5), 330­339. 
 

I enjoyed this article because it solidified the need for collaboration in amongst 
education professionals. When the teachers met in professional learning 
communities the achievement of the students improved. This has been 
hypothesized in my professional learning community class with Ray Williams but 
I had yet to read the research that solidifies these statements. When teachers 
come together to share best practise and what has worked well for them, this 
knowledge improves the collective group. According to the theory of “collective 
intelligence” the collaboration of minds can result in a greater intelligence than 
that of just a single person.  
 
Ruthven, K. (1994). Better judgement: Rethinking assessment in mathematics 
education. ​
Educational Studies in Mathematics​
, 27(4), 433­450. 
 
This article almost shows the research steps taken prior to the area of formative 
assessment has been created. The researchers are trying to find a style of 
testing that improves student achievement. I enjoyed in the conclusion how it 
spoke of assessment as becoming “not useful but habitual.” This comment lends 
itself to thoughts of teachers who basically go through the same format of 
teaching every year, those teachers who do not tailor their instruction 
whatsoever, but have a premeditated idea of what they will be doing every day 
regardless of the students needs. Those types of teachers are being brought to 
attention in this article and basically stating that their teaching practises simply 
are not working. I am grateful that education has come so far and that we as 
teachers are trained to now seek out “best practice” through formative 
assessment, and professional learning communities. 
 
References: 
 
Heritage M., Kim J., Vendlinkski T., Herman J. (2009). From Evidence to Action a 
Seamless process in formative assessment?​
 ​
Educational Measurement: Issues and 
Practice​
. Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 24–31 
 
Hernandez­martinez et al.. (2011). Mathematics coursework as facilitator of formative 
assessment, student­centred activity and understanding. ​
Research in Mathematics 
Education​
, 13(2), 197­212. 
 
Hyunju, L, Feldman, A & Beatty, A.D. (2012). Factors that Affect Science and 
Mathematics Teachers’ Initial Implementation of Technology­Enhanced Formative 

Assessment Using a Classroom Response System. ​
Journal of Science Education and 
Technology​
, 21(5), 523­539. 
 
Mcintosh, M. .E. (1997). Formative assessment in mathematics. ​
Clearing House​
, 71(2), 
71. 
 
Phelan et al.. (2011). Differential Improvement in Student Understanding of 
Mathematical Principles Following Formative Assessment Intervention. Journal of 
Educational Research, 104(5), 330­339. 
 
Ruthven, K. (1994). Better judgement: Rethinking assessment in mathematics 
education. ​
Educational Studies in Mathematics​
, 27(4), 433­450.