The Most
Comprehensive
 
 
Financial Guide For
Women
 
 
 

Anand Vijayakumar
A Woman is always the Heart & Soul of the Family and her 
contribution  to  the  family  is  Second  to  None.  This  Book  is 
My Attempt to help her Become Financially Independent 
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog
 
 

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

Foreword
Have you ever seen your mother or your friends’ mother pull out a hundred rupee note or a fifty rupee 
note from inside a Jar of Cereals when you need money in a hurry and dad isn’t around? For people in 
our  generation,  the  Woman  was  almost  always  a  “Home  Maker”  and  did  not  earn.  But,  when  the 
month‐end comes closer, the lady of the house almost always has more money at her disposal and even 
sometimes  bails  out  the  husband.  Just  imagine  this;  our  mothers  never  had  any  formal  financial 
education  or  training.  They  learnt  things  the  hard  way  and  saved  money  from  whatever  was  given  to 
them to run the house by their husbands. Even with the limited resources they had, they managed to 
enroll  themselves  into  chit‐fund  schemes  or  into  Gold‐Saving  schemes  and  helped  contribute  towards 
the family’s Savings.  
What if they had an opportunity to learn about Investing and Financial Discipline? Our Moms would’ve 
been able to save a lot more than what they used to…  
As  you  might  already  know,  I  am  a  blogger  and  write  a  lot  about  financial  topics.  However,  my  lovely 
wife is my total opposite. She doesn’t even track her own bank account through online banking. Most 
Women would fall into the same category as my wife. It is not as if they cannot do it. A woman who can 
work in an office and grow in her career can very easily start planning her finances as well. In most cases 
they don’t get into Investments or Finance because their father or husband or son does it for them.  
So,  if  you  want  to  understand  what  your  father  or  husband  is  doing,  it’s  pretty  easy.  It  is  not  that 
complicated and you can easily understand it.  
This book is my attempt to help women understand the basics of the financial markets, Investments, Life 
Insurance and everything else about money.   
 
Hope you find it useful.  
 
 
 
 
Best Regards, 
Anand 
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 1

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
 
 
 
 

This book is dedicated to my wife Dharini who has had the Patience to Put Up
with me spending countless hours in front of the laptop.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 2

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
 
Copyright  ©  2014  Anand’s  Blog.  All  Rights  Reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  may  be  reproduced, 
stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted,  in  any  form  or  in  any  means  –  by  electronic,  mechanical, 
photocopying, recording or otherwise – without the explicit prior written permission of the Author.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The Author is an Independent Blogger and Financial Advisor. Use of the information contained in
this book is at one’s own risk. This is not an offer to sell or solicitation to buy any investment products. All stock market
investments carry an inherent risk of loss and the author will not be liable for any losses incurred out of the investment(s)
made by the reader. Information contained herein does not constitute a personal recommendation or take into account the
particular investment objectives, financial situation or needs of individual investors. All content and information provided in
this book is on an “As Is” basis by the Author. Information in this book is believed to be reliable but the Author does not
warrant its completeness or accuracy and expressly disclaims all warranties and conditions of any kind, whether express or
implied. The author may hold investments in any of the products discussed here however the author has NO Vested Interest
in recommending any of the products outlined in this book. The Performance of the products quoted in this book may or may
not be sustained in future. All rate of returns used in calculation’s are for indicative purposes only and do not guarantee
future results. The actual returns your portfolio will gain will be based on multiple factors like your investment choice, market
performance etc.

 
 
 
 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 3

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

Table of Contents
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 8 
Before We Begin ........................................................................................................................................... 9 
1.1: Banking Services .................................................................................................................................. 11 
1.1.1: What is a Bank? ............................................................................................................................. 11 
1.1.2: Who Regulates the Banking System in India? ............................................................................... 11 
1.1.3: How does a bank Work? ............................................................................................................... 12 
1.1.4: Why Banking Systems Work? ....................................................................................................... 14 
1.1.5: What Happens if a Bank Fails? ...................................................................................................... 14 
1.1.6: What Services Do Banks Provide?................................................................................................. 15 
1.1.7: A Bank Cheque .............................................................................................................................. 16 
1.1.8: Demand Drafts .............................................................................................................................. 22 
1.2: The Debt Markets ................................................................................................................................ 23 
1.2.1: Fixed Deposits ............................................................................................................................... 23 
1.2.2: Bonds ............................................................................................................................................ 24 
1.2.3: Risks Involved in Investing in Bonds ............................................................................................. 25 
1.2.4: Debentures ................................................................................................................................... 27 
1.3: The Equity or Stock Markets ................................................................................................................ 29 
1.3.1: What is an Equity Share? .............................................................................................................. 29 
1.3.2: How Does a Company Issue Shares? ............................................................................................ 29 
1.3.3: The Secondary Market .................................................................................................................. 35 
1.3.4: The Stock Exchanges of India ........................................................................................................ 35 
1.3.5: Market Trends –Bears and Bulls ................................................................................................... 37 
1.3.6: Securities and Exchanges Board of India – SEBI ........................................................................... 38 
1.3.7: Choosing a Good Stock for Investment? ....................................................................................... 39 
1.3.8: How to Trade and Invest in Equity Markets ................................................................................. 42 
1.3.9: Exchange Traded Funds ................................................................................................................ 44 
1.4: The Mutual Funds Market ................................................................................................................... 46 
1.4.1: What is a Mutual Fund? ................................................................................................................ 46 
1.4.2: What Do I do with the Money you Invested? ............................................................................... 46 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 4

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
1.4.3: Do Mutual Funds Have Any Fee or Charges? ................................................................................ 47 
1.4.4: The Association of Mutual Funds in India – AMFI ........................................................................ 48 
1.4.5: Types of Mutual Funds .................................................................................................................. 49 
1.4.6: Choosing a Good Mutual Fund – For Your Portfolio ..................................................................... 52 
1.4.7: Mutual Fund Myths ....................................................................................................................... 55 
1.4.8: What is the Best Way to Invest in Mutual Funds? ........................................................................ 57 
1.4.9: How to Invest – Buy/Sell Mutual Funds ........................................................................................ 59 
1.5: The Derivatives Market ........................................................................................................................ 60 
1.5.1: What are Derivatives? ................................................................................................................... 60 
1.5.2: A Real Life Example for Derivatives .............................................................................................. 60 
1.5.3: Purpose of Derivatives .................................................................................................................. 61 
1.5.4: Types of Derivatives ...................................................................................................................... 61 
1.5.5: Participants in a Derivative Market .............................................................................................. 62 
1.5.6: Derivative Categories .................................................................................................................... 64 
1.5.7: How to Trade in the Derivatives Market? ..................................................................................... 75 
1.5.8: The Commodity Futures Market ................................................................................................... 76 
2.1: Credit Cards .......................................................................................................................................... 80 
2.1.1: What is a Credit Card? .................................................................................................................. 80 
2.1.2: How a Credit Card Works .............................................................................................................. 81 
2.1.3: Online Purchases ........................................................................................................................... 82 
2.1.4: So, How Does the Bank Make Money? ......................................................................................... 82 
2.1.5: Things to Check – Before you Sign up for a Credit Card ............................................................... 83 
2.1.6: Things You Should Know About Your Credit Card ........................................................................ 84 
2.1.7: Zero % Interest Schemes are Not Really 0% ................................................................................. 85 
2.1.8: Credit/Debit Card – Safety Instructions ........................................................................................ 86 
2.2: Life Insurance ....................................................................................................................................... 89 
2.2.1: So, what is Life Insurance? ............................................................................................................ 89 
2.2.2: How Life Insurance Works ............................................................................................................ 89 
2.2.3: How Insurance Companies Work .................................................................................................. 90 
2.2.4: Insurance Regulatory and Development Agency – IRDA .............................................................. 92 
2.2.5: Types of Life Insurance Policies .................................................................................................... 94 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 5

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
2.2.6: How Much Insurance Do I Need? ................................................................................................. 95 
2.2.7: Insurance as an Investment – A BIG NO ....................................................................................... 95 
2.2.8: Do You Have Medical/Health Insurance? ..................................................................................... 99 
2.2.9: What to Do If you have an Insurance Related Grievance? ......................................................... 100 
2.3: Unit Linked Insurance Plans – ULIPs .................................................................................................. 102 
2.3.1: What are ULIP’s? ......................................................................................................................... 102 
2.3.2: How do ULIPs work? ................................................................................................................... 102 
2.3.3: So, Why Do People Like ULIPs So Much? .................................................................................... 103 
2.3.4: What are the Fee & Charges Associated with ULIP Investments? .............................................. 104 
2.3.5: Things Most People DO NOT Know About ULIPs ........................................................................ 105 
2.3.6: A REAL LIFE EXAMPLE: ................................................................................................................ 107 
2.3.7: Am I Totally Against ULIPS? ........................................................................................................ 108 
2.3.8: Things To Do – Before You Purchase a ULIP Plan ....................................................................... 109 
2.3.9: What To‐Do with your Existing ULIP Investments? .................................................................... 110 
3.1: Investment Portfolio .......................................................................................................................... 114 
3.1.1: Why do we need a Portfolio? ..................................................................................................... 114 
3.1.2: Investing In Gold ......................................................................................................................... 118 
4.1 Retirement Planning ........................................................................................................................... 124 
4.1.1: Why Plan for Retirement? .......................................................................................................... 125 
4.1.2: How much money will I need? .................................................................................................... 126 
4.1.3: Where will the money come from? ............................................................................................ 129 
4.1.4: Building the Retirement Corpus ................................................................................................. 133 
4.1.5: Employee Provident Fund and Employee Pension Scheme ....................................................... 134 
4.1.6: Withdrawal of EPF ...................................................................................................................... 139 
4.1.7: Transfer of EPF ............................................................................................................................ 140 
4.1.8: How Much Pension Will We Get Through EPS? .......................................................................... 142 
4.1.9: Gratuity Benefits ......................................................................................................................... 144 
4.1.10: SuperAnnuation Benefits .......................................................................................................... 146 
5.1: Planning Your Children’s Future ........................................................................................................ 150 
5.1.1: Why Plan for our Kids Future? .................................................................................................... 150 
5.1.2: How to Calculate the Future Money Requirement? ................................................................... 151 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 6

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
5.1.3: So, How to Accumulate the money? .......................................................................................... 151 
5.1.4: So, What Next? ........................................................................................................................... 152 
5.1.5: A TIP for the Parent Who is Extremely Busy: .............................................................................. 153 
6.1: Buying a House ................................................................................................................................... 155 
6.1.1: Things to do before buying a home: ........................................................................................... 155 
6.1.2: Ideas for the Smart Home Buyer ................................................................................................ 155 
6.1.3: Documents you will Need – To Avail a Home Loan .................................................................... 157 
6.1.4: Home Loan – Part Repayment .................................................................................................... 157 
7.1: Money Tips – For Today’s Women .................................................................................................... 161 
7.1.1: Tip No. 1: Overcome the Gender Barrier .................................................................................... 161 
7.1.2: Tip No. 2: Save Up for a Contingency Fund ................................................................................ 161 
7.1.3: Tip No. 3: Get yourself Insured Sufficiently ................................................................................ 163 
7.1.4: Tip No. 4: Always Prepare a Budget and Try to Stick to It .......................................................... 163 
7.1.5: Tip No. 5: Always Set Saving Targets and Try to Achieve Them ................................................. 164 
7.1.6: Tip No. 6: Control Your Urge to Splurge ..................................................................................... 164 
7.1.7: Tip No. 7: Don’t Ignore Your Family’s Finances .......................................................................... 164 
7.1.8: Tip No. 8: Know Your Husbands Financial Status........................................................................ 164 
7.1.9: Tip No. 9: Don’t Let Fear Stop You .............................................................................................. 165 
7.1.10: Tip No. 10: Learn From Your Mistakes ...................................................................................... 165 
7.2: Investment – Do’s and Don’ts ............................................................................................................ 166 
7.2.1: The Do’s: ..................................................................................................................................... 166 
7.2.2: The Don’ts: .................................................................................................................................. 166 
7.2.3: When and What to Buy ............................................................................................................... 167 
7.2.4: Some General Guidelines ............................................................................................................ 167 
7.3: Tracking your Portfolio Performance ................................................................................................. 168 
7.3.1: Tracking your Portfolio – The Manual Route .............................................................................. 169 
7.3.2: Tracking your Portfolio – The Finance Websites Route .............................................................. 169 
 
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 7

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

Introduction
 
Our society and culture places an immense emphasis on the Man of the house to be the breadwinner of 
the family. In the past couple of decades, more and more women have started working & earning and 
the % of women who can survive on their own; is going up every day. Though a lot of women work and 
earn, not many of them are fully aware of Investment Concepts, Retirement Planning and many other 
finance related topics.  
In  fact,  one  of  the  leading  investment  firms  in  the  world  had  conducted  a  survey  among  working 
women. You will be shocked with the findings…  
 90%  of  working  women  do  not  handle  their  own  finances  and  let  their  Spouses  handle  their 
investments  
 Many Women just let their money stay idle in their bank accounts  
 More than 50% of working women do not have any Retirement Plan 
 More than 80% of retired women do not have any pension income 
If  you  conduct  a  similar  study  among  working  men,  the  results  will  be  starkly  different.  Why  so  much 
difference?  
Is it because Women are any less competent when it comes to investment and finance?  
 
 
 
Some of the most successful institutions across the globe have been managed by Women. In fact, even 
in the Mutual Funds world, some of the top performing Equity Mutual Funds are managed by Women 
and they have been able to meet or beat the returns generated by their peer funds managed by Men. 
So, ability is definitely not the problem here. I asked this question on the WHY part to my wife and her 
answer amazed me…  

Before Marriage my Dad handled my finances and After Marriage you are doing it. So, when a 
Man I fully trust and love is doing it, why should I bother? 

 
 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 8

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Before We Begin
 
So, you have purchased this book and paid a decent amount of money to get it. If you went through the 
preview copy of this book or if you just reviewed the “Table of Contents” you would’ve been surprised 
that this book does not cover two main topics:  
a. Income Taxes  
b. A Retirement Portfolio  
If you did not notice  this  and you just  realized  that  this book  does not  cover  Income Taxes or how to 
build a Retirement Portfolio don’t worry. I would never shortchange my loyal readers. I had published an 
e‐book last year titled “Your Complete Guide to Indian Income Tax and Retiring as a Crorepati”. As you 
have  paid  a  significant  amount  of  money  in  purchasing  this  book,  I  am  going  to  give  you  that  book  – 
ABSOLUTELY FREE!!!  
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 9

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 10

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

1.1: Banking Services
 
A Bank Account is something that all of us have. Right from our childhood we are taught to save money 
in our little Piggy Banks and as we grow up, we move on to Savings Bank Accounts where we keep our 
money. So, how does a bank work and is the role of the bank?  

Banks are the Financial Intermediaries of the Economy. Their Main aim is to facilitate the flow of 
money from those that have it in surplus (By Accepting Deposits) to those that need it (By Giving 
out Loans). Without Banks, our Economy would just come to a stand‐still… 

 

1.1.1: What is a Bank?
 
According to the Official Definition ‐ A bank is an institution that deals in money and its substitutes and 
provides other financial services to its Customers. Banks accept deposits and make loans and derive a 
profit from the difference in the interest rates paid and charged, respectively. 
 

1.1.2: Who Regulates the Banking System in India?
 
The Reserve Bank of India or RBI is the “Central Bank” of India and is the Governing Body that supervises 
all banking services in our country. The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) is India's central banking institution, 
which  controls the monetary policy of the Indian rupee. It was established on 1 April 1935 during the 
British  Raj  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Reserve  Bank  of  India  Act,  1934.  Following  India's 
independence  in  1947,  the  RBI  was  nationalized  in  the  year  1949.  The  Reserve  Bank  Governor  is  the 
person  who  is  at  the  helm  of  the  RBI.  Though  the  Finance  Minister  has  the  power  to  influence  the 
decisions of the RBI, the RBI is an autonomous body and has the power to take decisions on its own.  
 
1.1.2.1: Functions of the RBI
 
The following are the key functions of the RBI: 
 Develop the Banking System in India  
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 11

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 






Issue Currency Notes in India 
Serve as the Monetary Authority of the Country 
Regulator and Supervisor of the Financial Industry in the Country 
Manage Forex Requirements & Set Forex Regulations  
Grant Loans to other Banks that operate in India  
Set Policy Rates and Reserve Ratios for Banks  
Etc… 

The  list  is  actually  very  long.  To  put  it  simply,  any  bank  that  serves  customers  in  India  would  have  to 
obtain  approvals  from  the  RBI  before  they  start  the  same  and  they  have  to  follow  every  rule  and 
regulation that is set by them.  
 

1.1.3: How does a bank Work?
 
Banks are critical to our economy. The primary function of banks is to put their account holders' money 
to use by lending it out to others who can then use it to buy homes, businesses, send kids to college... 
When  you  deposit  your  money  in  the  bank,  your  money  goes  into  a  big  pool  of  money  along  with 
everyone else's, and your account is credited with the amount of your deposit. When you write checks 
or  make  withdrawals,  that  amount  is  deducted  from  your  account  balance.  Interest  you  earn  on  your 
balance is also added to your account. 

 
Banks  create  money  in  the  economy  by  making  loans.  The  amount  of  money  that  banks  can  lend  is 
directly affected by the reserve requirement set by the RBI. This amount can be held either in cash on 
hand or in the bank's reserve account with the RBI. To see how this affects the economy, think about it 
like this. When a bank gets a deposit of Rs. 100, assuming a reserve requirement of 10 percent, the bank 
can then lend out Rs. 90. That 90 goes back into the economy, purchasing goods or services, and usually 
ends up deposited in another bank. That bank can then lend out Rs. 81 of that Rs. 90 deposit, and that 
Rs.  81  goes  into  the  economy  to  purchase  goods  or  services  and  ultimately  is  deposited  into  another 
bank that proceeds to lend out a percentage of it. In this way, money grows and flows throughout the 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 12

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
community in a much greater amount than physically exists. That Rs. 100 makes a much larger ripple in 
the economy than you may realize!  

 
Let us say, your dad just retired and got his final settlement from his employer. He has 25 lakhs with him 
right now but doesn’t want to spend it. He consults a financial advisor who considering his age and risk 
appetite  suggests  that  he  invest  the  money  in  a  Bank  Fixed  Deposit.  Now,  the  bank  has  25  lakhs  as  a 
deposit  and  they  need  to  do  something  with  it  so  that  they  can  afford  to  pay  your  dad  the  Interest 
Amount. For ex: If the Rate of Interest is 9% then the bank has to give your dad Rs. 2,25,000/‐ as Interest 
at the end of 1 year when his deposit matures.  
On the other hand, let’s say I am planning to buy a Honda City Car which costs approx. 10 lakhs. I have 
around 3 lakhs in my savings account as cash but need 7 more lakhs to finish my purchase. So, I take a 
Car  Loan.  The  average  rate  of  interest  that  banks  charge  is  around  11%  and  they  also  charge  a  small 
processing fee on the loan. So, if I borrow 7 lakhs I will end up paying around 8.5 lakhs at the end of the 
loan tenure. If the bank manages to attract some more customers like me, it will disburse more loans 
and they will collect an interest from all of us. They will use this interest to pay deposit customers like 
your dad.  
Of course, the balance remaining amount is their income…  
 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 13

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

1.1.4: Why Banking Systems Work?
 
Banking is all about trust. We trust that the bank will keep our money for us when we go to get it. We 
trust that it will honor the cheques we write to pay our bills. The thing that's hard to grasp is the fact 
that while people are putting money into the bank every day, the bank is lending that same money and 
more  to  other  people  every  day.  Banks  consistently  extend  more  credit  than  they  have  cash.  That's  a 
little scary; but if you go to the bank and demand your money, you'll always get it. However, if everyone 
goes to the bank at the same time and demands their money, there might be problem.  
A Bank does not have the right to demand a full‐settlement on its loans from customers anytime they 
want but the Customer has the right to demand his deposit any time he wants.  

A Bank Run is a situation where all the customers of a “Bank” visit its branch to withdraw their 
money. As I just explained, Banks will keep a % of the money you deposit to meet the “Reserve 
Requirements” set by the RBI and lend out the remaining. So, if everyone visits the bank one fine 
day and asks for their money, there is a good chance that the bank may not have enough money 
to pay all its customers. In fact, this is how many small “Banks” and financial institutions across 
the world collapsed a few years ago during the Economic Crisis. They did not close because they 
did not have enough money. They had money but it was all lent out to other customers which they 
couldn’t ask for… 

 

1.1.5: What Happens if a Bank Fails?
 
In  the  event  of  a  bank  failure,  your  money  is  protected  (to  a  certain  extent)  as  long  as  the  bank  is 
insured  by  the  RBI.  RBI  has  a  Deposit  Insurance  Scheme  which  is  mandatory  for  all  banks  in  India  to 
enroll with. Each depositor in a bank is insured up to a maximum of Rs.1,00,000/‐ (Rupees One Lakh) for 
both principal and interest amount held by him with the bank. In case of a Default, the RBI will give you 
one lakh as a bare minimum and then work towards helping to claim as much of your deposit as possible 
by selling the bank’s assets.  
A  point  to  note  here  is  that,  even  if  you  have  multiple  deposits  with  the  bank,  the  total  maximum 
guarantee  is  one  lakh  only.  However,  if  you  have  deposits  with  multiple  banks,  your  deposits  will  be 
insured for up to 1 lakh in each individual bank with which you have an account.  

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 14

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

1.1.6: What Services Do Banks Provide?
 
As  I  mentioned  towards  the  beginning  of  this  book,  Banks  are  the  Financial  Intermediaries  of  the 
Economy and provide a wide variety of services to its customers.  

 
The Key Services Include:  
a. Savings Accounts  – These are the basic bank accounts where you can park your surplus 
funds  for  saving.  The  money  is  totally  liquid  and  you  can  withdraw  it  any  time  you  want. 
Banks give you 4% interest on your savings. Some private banks offer interests of up to 6% 
on  your  Savings  Account  Balance.  There  are  certain  limitations  on  the  number  of 
transactions that you can do in a month/year but these limits are very high and sufficient for 
regular customers like you and me.   
b. Checking or Current   Accounts   –  These  are  accounts  for  businessmen  and  traders. 
The money in this account is totally liquid and you can withdraw it any time you want. These 
accounts do not have any limitations on the number of transactions because businessmen 
need to do hundreds of transactions each month and regular savings account wouldn’t suit 
them. Because of the high volume of transactions and liquidity requirements, banks usually 
do not offer any interest to such accounts.  
c. Fixed Deposits – These are special deposit accounts wherein the customer (You) specify 
the quantum of time that you feel you won’t be needing the money. As you are depositing 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 15

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

d.

e.

f.

g.

h.

i.

your money for a longer duration, the bank offers you a much higher rate of interest. For a 1 
year deposit, banks offer interests of around 8 to 10% depending on the bank.  
Recurring Deposit – Not everyone will have a lot of surplus that they can open Fixed 
Deposits  with.  So,  in  order  to  help  out  such  customers  save  money,  banks  offer  Recurring 
Deposits or RD’s. An RD is nothing but a simple deposit account where you save a specific 
amount of money each month for a pre‐specified/pre‐planned duration. As the RD will be 
open  for  a  longer  duration  and  you  won’t  withdraw  the  funds  quickly,  banks  offer  much 
higher interest rates. Banks offer an average of around 8% interest for RD’s.  
Loans –  Not  everyone  will  have  investible  surplus.  There  may  be  times  when  you  need 
money but you don’t  have it – for ex:  when you want to  buy a  house. You  won’t possibly 
have 20 or 30 lakhs lying around for you to buy the house. So, you take a loan from a Bank. 
The Bank will grant you a loan based on your income and eligibility and you will repay the 
money  as  monthly  instalments.  Banks  offer  different  loans  like  Home  Loan,  Automobile 
Loan, Personal Loan, Mortgage Loan, Gold Loan etc.  
Insurance Advisory Services –  Banks  also  provide  Insurance  Advisory  services 
wherein  they  sell  Insurance  Products  to  its  customers.  Most  Bank  Branches  will  have 
authorized and trained individuals who can advise customers on the Insurance Products that 
the bank is currently selling.  
Investment Advisory Services – Banks also provide Investment Advisory Services to 
its  customers  wherein  they  sell  Investment  Products  like  Mutual  Funds,  ULIPs,  and  Gold 
Bars.  Just  like  Insurance  Advisors,  most  bank  branches  will  also  have  qualified  individuals 
who can offer advice on Investment Products that the bank is currently selling.  
Safety Deposit Lockers – Just like we have lockers in our cupboard or cabinet, Banks 
too provide Lockers which we can rent out. By paying a small fee, you can rent out a safety 
deposit locker from the bank and keep your valuables inside. The locker is usually housed in 
a “Safe Room” that is heavily armored and guarded at all times.  
Cheques & Demand Drafts – Cheques and Demand Drafts are monetary instruments 
that can  be considered at  par with Cash. If I need to pay you some money I  can issue the 
payment  in  cash  or  as  a  cheque  or  demand  draft.  When  you  deposit  the  cheque  or  draft 
with your bank, you will get the money that I am supposed to give you. The next section will 
explain in greater detail about how these instruments work.  
 

1.1.7: A Bank Cheque
 
A  cheque  is  a  negotiable  instrument  that  can  be  issued  by  one  person  to  pay  money  to  another 
person/entity. The person to whom the cheque is issued is entitled to receive the sum mentioned in the 
cheque (provided the account has sufficient balance) from the bank where the cheque issuer holds his 
account.  A  Sample  Image  of  an  HDFC  Bank  Cheque  that  I  picked  from  the  Internet  can  help  you 
understand how a real cheque would look.  

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 16

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

 
 
1.1.7.1: Who can issue Cheques?
 
Anyone  who  holds  a  valid  bank  account  can  issue  a  cheque  to  make  payment  to  anyone  or  any 
organization.  
 
1.1.7.2: How a Cheque Works
 
Let’s say I owe you Rs. 10,000/‐ and give you a cheque drawn on my bank account (ICICI). Let us see the 
sequence of events 
1.
2.
3.
4.

I hand over the cheque worth Rs. 10,000/‐ drawn on ICICI Bank to you 
You take it to your bank (let’s say HDFC) and deposit it into your bank account 
HDFC Processes the cheque and sends a request to ICICI for payment 
If I have enough funds in my account, ICICI will process the payment and release the funds to 
HDFC Bank 
5. HDFC Bank processes the payment and credits the funds into your bank account 

The above is a simple illustration of how this whole Cheque Collection & Clearing mechanism works. If 
you  had  an  ICICI  Bank  account  too,  this  whole  process  would  be  much  faster  because,  step  3  is  not 
required at all. The bank will just check if you have enough funds in your account and if so, move the 
money into the payee's bank account right away 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 17

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

 
 
1.1.7.3: Cheque Clearing & Collection Timelines
 
With  the  use  of  latest  technology,  most  banks  issue  “Cheques  that  are  Payable  at  Par  –  In  all  their 
Branches” which has significantly shortened the Cheque Clearing Timelines. Once upon a time, a cheque 
issued  from  an  different  city  could  take  up  to  7  days  and  from  a  village  could  take  up  to  14  days. 
However, these days almost all cheques get cleared within 3 to 5 Business Days.  
 
1.1.7.4: What happens if your Account Doesn’t have Sufficient Balance?
 
As per the example I just used, I have given you a cheque for Rs. 10,000/‐. Let’s say my bank account 
does not have sufficient money to pay for this Cheque, the Cheque will BOUNCE. You WILL NOT get any 
money.  
Issuing such cheques is an offense. Not only will your bank charge you penalties and fees for issuing such 
cheques, the person who got the cheque can file a police complaint against you and you may be jailed 
for  the  same.  So,  we  must  always  make  sure  that  our  account  has  sufficient  funds  before  we  issue 
cheques.  
 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 18

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
1.1.7.5: Cheque Clearing & Collection Fees
 
If  you  are  using  an  “At  Par”  cheque,  your  bank  CANNOT  and  SHOULD  NOT  be  charging  you  any  fee. 
Anyways,  in  case  of  the  remote  possibility  that  you  actually  got  a  cheque  from  a  bank  in  a  different 
city/town (from where you reside) which isn’t an At Par Cheque, your bank may charge you a small fee.  
RBI has set guidelines on these charges and they are:  
 Up to and including Rs.5000 – Rs.25 per instrument + service tax 
 Above  Rs.5000  and  Up  to  and  including  Rs.  10,000  –  not  exceeding  Rs.  50  per  instrument+ 
service tax 
 Above Rs. 10,000 and up to and including Rs. 1, 00,000 – not exceeding Rs. 100 per instrument + 
service tax 
 Rs.1, 00,001 and above – left to the banks to decide.  
You need to check your banks outstation cheque collection policy & fees document to find out the fee. 
However, RBI has recently asked Banks in a recent circular to reconsider their charges & Reduce them. 
There is not much clarity on how much banks will reduce these fees but they will be reducing it soon. 
No additional charges such as courier charges, out of pocket expenses, etc., should be levied. 
So, if you used an outstation cheque and were charged a fee that is more than the amounts above, you 
have the right to question your bank. 
 
1.1.7.6: Important things to note while writing a cheque
 
A Cheque is a Powerful Monetary Instrument and if we are careless, we may end up in trouble. There 
are a number of important things that we must keep in mind while writing a cheque. They are:  
 Remember to Cross the Cheque ‐ Crossing a cheque means putting two parallel lines on the 
left  hand  top  corner  of  the  cheque.  This  means  that,  the  cheque  is  an  Account  Payee  cheque 
which means it can only be deposited into another account and cannot be exchanged for cash 
over the counter. This serves two purposes – you can keep a track of who encashed your cheque 
and also ensure that even if the cheque is lost, it cannot be misused by anyone. The person to 
whom the cheque was paid will be recorded.  
 Write the Name of the person to whom the cheque is to be paid – In Full.  It  is  very 
important to state the cheque payee’s name in full without missing any part of the name in the 
“pay to line” The name entered here should match the name under which the person holds a 
valid bank account. If there is any mismatch or spelling mistake the cheque will not be paid.  
 Write the amount to be paid both in numbers and words. It is advisable to write both the 
number value as well as value in words in the cheque. Also care must be taken to ensure that 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 19

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

there  are  no  leading  or  trailing  blank  spaces  while  entering  these  values  which  might  cause 
tampering of the cheque and modification of the cheque value 
Write the cheque date Correctly ‐ Do not issue cheques that do not have a cheque issue date. 
This  is  to  ensure  that  your  cheque  isn’t  “Valid  Indefinitely”.  Cheques  in  India  are  valid  for  a 
period  of  3  months  from  the  date  of  Issue.  Let’s  say  I  give  you  a  cheque  on  1st  January,  the 
cheque is valid until 31st March. Starting 1st April, the cheque is useless and even if you deposit 
the cheque in your bank, the cheque will not be honored and you WILL NOT get any money.  
Sign the cheque at the bottom right hand corner with the exact signature that is
registered with the bank records. If there is even a slight mismatch between the signature in 
the bank records and that in the cheque the bank will not release the payment.  
Don’t Overwrite or Make Edits in the Cheque ‐ There should be NO EDITS or OVERWRITINGS 
in the Cheque. If any are present, the cheque would be considered invalid and will not be paid 
out.  
NEVER Issue Blank Cheques  ‐  DO  NOT  issue  cheques  to  anyone  that  does  not  contain  a 
cheque  value.  If  you  do  so,  if  the  other  person  fills  in  some  random  big  amount,  you  will  be 
liable to pay the amount even if you don’t owe them that much money.  

In the Odd Chance that a cheque that you issued is lost you need to immediately visit the bank or 
call up their customer care and request them to “Stop Payment” on the cheque. Once you do so, 
even if the cheque is picked up by some stranger who tries to cash it, the bank will not pay the 
money. Remember ‐ It is our responsibility to keep the cheques safe. If you lose it and someone 
encashes it, the bank will be liable to make the payment and you will end up losing MONEY.  

 
1.1.7.7: Cheque Truncation System
 
The RBI has come up with a new standard for using cheques called “Cheque Truncation System” or “CTS 
2010” which all banks have to follow. As per RBI, only those cheques that are CTS compliant can be used 
as legal monetary instruments beginning 2013.  
 
1.1.7.7.1: How is it different from the previous standard?
 
Earlier,  all  cheques  were  sent  directly  (In  physical  mode)  to  the  other  bank  for  clearance.  This  means 
that,  if  you  have  an  ICICI  Account  and  I  give  you  a  cheque  from  HDFC  Bank,  ICICI  Bank  will  send  the 
cheque you deposited to HDFC Bank to confirm that the cheque is valid and then receive the payment 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 20

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
on your behalf and credit it into your account. This is the reason why other bank cheques take at least 2‐
3 days to get credited into your bank account.  
Starting  2013,  banks  will  just  send  a  digital  (scanned)  version  of  the  cheque  to  the  other  bank  and 
technically the clearance can happen very fast (even on the same day).  
This essentially means three very important benefits:  
 Easier Processing for both banks 
 No physical transfer of cheques – so lesser delays 
 Quicker receipt of funds – For Customers 
From the customer’s point of view, we don’t care what the bank does to get my funds. All we care about 
is how fast will we get my money and this CTS 2010 standard can help banks clear funds much faster 
than before. 
 
1.1.7.7.2: What are the Features of CTS Compliant Cheques?
 
A CTS Complaint Cheque would look like below:  

 
The following are some features of cheques that will be CTS compliant:  
 They will have the wordings “Please sign above this line” at the bottom right hand side corner  
 They will have a watermark with words “CTS INDIA” which can be seen against a light 
 An invisible bank logo will be placed with an Ultra Violet Ink which can be seen only under UV 
Scanners 
 It will not allow any changes/alterations to the cheque. If there is any mistake or correction, the 
cheque will become invalid 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 21

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
 “Payable at par at all branches of XXXX Bank in India” text will be printed at the bottom of the 
cheque 
 The Bank’s IFSC and MICR Code will be present in the cheque 
 Signatures will have to be made using a dark ink so that your signatures can be scanned properly 
All these features would ensure uniformity across cheques issued by various banks as well as help banks 
scrutinize cheques properly, which in turn is expected to act as a deterrent against cheque frauds. Below 
is a Sample of how these new CTS 2010 cheques must look like as per the RBI: 
 

1.1.8: Demand Drafts
 
A  Demand  Draft  or  DD  (as  it  is  frequently  called)  is  very  similar  to  a  cheque  but  has  a  few  minor 
differences.  Firstly  only  “Banks”  can  issue  DD’s.  Any  customer  who  needs  a  DD  has  to  visit  the  bank 
branch, fill up a form and request for the DD. The Bank will require an upfront payment to be made and 
only  then  the  Draft  will  be  issued.  So,  a  DD  is  almost  equivalent  to  Cash.  Most  people  will  prefer  to 
receive DD’s in place of Cheques because, the DD will not bounce. The bank would’ve already received 
money  from  you  and  hence  the  DD  will  definitely  get  paid.  Apart  from  this  difference,  the  clearance 
process works exactly the same way as Cheques.  
 
1.1.8.1: Will a Demand Draft Bounce?
 
Theoretically – Yes, but Practically NO. Just like cheques it is possible to “Cancel” a DD however, in order 
to do so, you will be asked to submit/surrender the original DD. In case of loss or theft of the DD when 
the customer wants to cancel his/her DD the bank will usually ask for a Police Complaint to facilitate the 
cancellation of the DD. So, if someone gives you a DD, they can’t sneak back to the bank and cancel it 
without your knowledge. This is exactly the reason why all educational institutions ask us to attach a DD 
for the Application Fee rather than asking us to send Cheques.  
Just remember that, even if they somehow manage to do it and the DD you got Bounces, it is ILLEGAL 
and you can file a police complaint against that person.  
 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 22

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 

1.2: The Debt Markets
 
The Term Debt Markets is a broad based term that refers to instruments which are very similar to “Fixed 
Deposits.  The  three  main  types  of  Instruments  that  fall  under  this  category  are  “Fixed  Deposits”, 
“Bonds” and “Debentures” 
 

1.2.1: Fixed Deposits
 
A Fixed Deposit is arguable the most common and most‐widely used Debt Product in India. I am pretty 
sure you already know what a FD is, am I right?  
Anyways,  a  Fixed  Deposit  is  nothing  but  an  agreement  between  a  “Bank”  and  its  “Customer”.  The 
Customer deposits a “Fixed Sum of Money for a Fixed Duration of time at a Fixed Rate of Interest” hence 
the term “Fixed Deposit”. Based on the duration of your deposit, the rate of interest you earn will vary. 
At  the  end  of  the  deposit  duration,  the  bank  will  return  your  money  along  with  the  “Interest”  you 
earned by keeping the deposit with the bank.  

 
These days, FD’s that offer Monthly, Quarterly, Half‐Yearly Interest Payment options too wherein you 
will get the Interest paid out as per your selection and the Principal will be returned to us at Maturity.  
Choosing a FD is straight‐forward. If you select a “Good” bank that is going to return the amount you 
invested,  there  is  absolutely  “NO  RISK”  for  you  as  an  investor  here.  By  doing  some  research  and 
selecting  the  bank  that  offers  the  best  FD  product,  you  will  only  earn  extra  income  out  of  your 
© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 23

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
investments. So, if you don’t have the time or the means to inquire with multiple banks, just open an FD 
with the bank where you maintain your account. Some banks offer a much higher rate of interest than 
others. So, If you are going to deposit 10 Lakhs in an FD, a bank offering 8% rate of interest will give you 
Rs. 80,000/‐ at the end of the year whereas the bank offering 9% will give you Rs. 90,000/‐ 
 

1.2.2: Bonds
 
A  Bond  is  nothing  but  an  arrangement  between  an  Investor(s)  and  a  Borrower  wherein  the  Borrower 
gets money from one or more Investors, uses it for his business purposes and then repays the amount 
along  with  an  Interest.  Bonds  are  used  by  companies,  municipalities,  states  and  even  governments  to 
finance  a  variety  of  projects  and  activities.  The  rate  of  interest  offered  on  the  Bond  depends  on  the 
creditworthiness  of  the  borrower.  The  borrower  either  makes  periodic  interest  payments  or  pays  the 
interest at maturity. At the end of the deposit duration the initial deposit (plus interest) is returned back 
to the Investor.  

 
Bonds  are  usually  backed  by  some  sort  of  collateral  that  the  borrower  has  to  place  with  the  central 
governing  bodies.  Bonds  usually  offer  a  slightly  higher  rate  of  interest  in  comparison  to  “Bank  FD’s” 

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 24

The Most Comprehensive Financial Guide For Women
 
because people have, for generations trusted Bank FD’s and to make them consider other fixed return 
investments, the rate of returns has to be slightly higher.  
Private Companies usually have to offer higher interest rates than government bond issues because they 
need  to  motivate  borrowers  to  invest  in  them  even  though  government  issues  are  safer.  Another 
important  point  to  note  here  is  that,  in  official  Bond  Terminology  the  Interest  Component  is  called 
“Coupon”. If someone says, this bond yields a 8% coupon, it means that the bond earns a rate of interest 
of 8%.  
 

1.2.3: Risks Involved in Investing in Bonds
 
Bonds are one of the most preferred investment instruments for the risk averse investor who wants a 
decent return on investment (ROI) and capital preservation at the same time. Bonds are debt obligations 
which  pay  out  a  fixed  interest  on  the  invested  sum  and  pay  back  the  whole  invested  principal  at 
maturity. Unfortunately, Bonds are not so straight forward as they might sound. There are many risks 
involved in investing in Bonds. These risks can cause losses to the investor’s bond portfolio and defeat 
the whole purpose of capital preservation.  
Some of the risks involved in investing in Bonds are:  
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Interest Rate Risk 
Re‐investment Risk 
Call Risk 
Default Risk &  
Inflation Risk 

 
1.2.3.1: Interest Rate Risk
 
This is the most or well known risk in the bond market. This refers to the risk that bond prices will fall as 
the  interest  rates  in  the  market  rise.  Bond  prices  are  inversely  proportional  to  the  prevailing  interest 
rates in the market. By buying a bond, the bondholder has committed to receiving a fixed rate of return 
for a fixed period. If the market interest rate rises from the date of the bond's purchase, the bond's price 
will  fall  accordingly.  The  bond  will  then  be  trading  at  a  discount  to  reflect  the  lower  return  that  an 
investor will make on the bond. The investor would end up suffering losses if he wishes to liquidate his 
holdings at that point of time. Market interest rates are a function of several factors such as the demand 
for, and supply of, money in the economy, the inflation rate, the stage that the business cycle is in as 
well as the government's monetary and fiscal policies.  

© 2014 Anand’s Blog. All Rights Reserved.
 

Page 25