You are on page 1of 7

Classroom Floor Plan

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Classroom Floor Plan 
Erin Sink 
ECE315 
Instructor Catherine Norwood 
February 6, 2015 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Classroom Floor Plan

 
Introduction 
Children are born with the ability to learn language.  Across the entire world, this is the 
truth.  “There is no single environment in which children learn language” (Piper, 2012).  While 
this is true and they will eventually learn to communicate with language in even the most dire of 
circumstances, we can certainly enrich the environment and provide opportunities to learn and 
practice language skills. 
 
Screen Shot of Floor Plan 

 
 
 

 
Classroom Floor Plan

 
Explanation of Floor Plan 
I was having technical difficulties with the program repeatedly frozen, so I was unable to 
put labels on the actual floor plan.  I will instead explain it here.  The upper left corner 
constitutes the Library center.  to the right of it is the teacher desk with storage behind it.  The 
upper right corner is the science center.  In the middle of the room we have student tables to 
work on whole group activities, and off to the right center a circle rug for morning meetings. 
The bottom left corner is the art center, next to that is the dramatic play area, and in the bottom 
right corner we have the block center.  The four areas I  
will focus on explaining with regards to language acquisition are the library center, the science 
center, the art center, and the block center. 
Library Center 
My library center is on a large, carpeted area in one corner of the room.  One wall has 
bookshelves filled with books pertaining to whatever theme the children are currently learning 
about.  The second wall has a puppet theatre with a chest full of puppets that include people and 
animals that can be commonly found in stories.  Bordering the other two sides of the carpet are 
child sized couch and chairs.  This area will promote language development between the children 
because the furniture provides a homelike setting encouraging them to be comfortable and 
relaxed.  They can sit and socialize as they would with their own family at home.  The books and 
puppets provide encouragement for the children to reenact stories that they have heard.  They can 

work together to come up with puppet shows, and communicate with their peers by retelling 
stories. 
 
Classroom Floor Plan

 
Science Center 
My science center has two rectangular tables, and two shelves of easily accessible 
supplies.  The tables are a good size to promote working together among multiple students.  The 
shelves will contain objects such as oversized magnifiers and magnets, scent jars, prisms, and 
other manipulatives.  There will be multiple of each item so that children can have parallel 
investigations going on, or work together to investigate objects.  This will encourage interaction 
and exploration of science vocabulary. 
Art Center 
The art center consists of three easels, a large kidney table, and two easily accessible 
shelves filled with art supplies.  The easels will always have large paper on them, and the 
materials in the trays will vary from different types and textures of paints, to chalks and other 
items.  The easels are side by side so children can watch and comment on others’ work.  The 
large kidney table provides room for the children to work together on a small group project such 
as a collage.  The shelves will give the children access to explore different types of art materials. 
There will be a large sheet of butcher paper set in the middle of the kidney table each day. 
Children will be able to use the days supplies to create their own section on the paper to 
ultimately come up with a class painting, drawing, or collage. 

Block Center 
The block center will consist of a flat carpet...easy to balance blocks on, but to give some 
cushion to muffle the sound of building collapses!  It will have two large shelves of different 
types of blocks and building supplies.  Block centers are vital to any preschool classroom 
because in this center  
 
Classroom Floor Plan

 
“children improve their motor skills, practice problem solving, and learn to work with their 
classmates” (​
www.kaplanco.com​
, 2016).  There will be room for up to six children to play in this 
center at a time.  Along with the traditional wood blocks and oversized legos, other building 
materials will be regularly introduced to spark creativity and cooperation among the children. 
One example would be large cardboard boxes, along with heavy duty markers.  These things will 
excite the children and encourage them to work together.  There will also be a tub of paper and 
pencils to draw and share “blueprints”. 
Teacher Involvement/Assessment 
The role of the teacher will be to circulate among the children in the centers throughout 
the day.  He or she will facilitate the opening of discussions, asking children about what they are 
doing, and modelling inviting others to join them.  Daily observations will be made to see if the 
activities and set up of the centers are encouraging the children to work together and 
communicate. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Classroom Floor Plan 

 
Resources 
Piper, T. (2012). Making Meaning, Making Sense : Children’s early language. San Diego, CA : 
Bridgepoint Education. 
 
Science Center. (2015). Retrieved from ​
http://www.prekinders.com/science­center 
 

Setting Up Your Preschool Learning Centers (2016). Retrieved from 
http://www.kaplanco.com/ii/preschool­learning­centers