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TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis User's Manual

TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis User's Manual

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TEMS™ Investigation 9.

0 Route Analysis
User’s Manual

This manual is provided by Ericsson AB without any kind of warranty. Improvements and changes in this description due to typographical errors or inaccuracies in current information, or improvements to programs and/or equipment may be made by Ericsson AB at any time without notice. These changes will, however, be incorporated into new editions of this manual. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, stored in a retrieval system, nor translated into any human or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyrighted owner, Ericsson AB. TEMS is a trademark owned by Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson. All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders. © Ericsson AB 2008. All rights reserved. Publication number: LZT 108 9853 R1B

Contents

Contents

1. Introduction

1

1.1. Fundamentals of TEMS Investigation 9.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2. What’s New in TEMS Investigation 9.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3. What’s in This Manual (and What’s Not) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.4. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

2. Using Route Analysis: The Basics

6

2.1. Recommended Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.2. Installing TEMS Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.3. Starting TEMS Investigation Route Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.4. Loading Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.5. Presenting and Analyzing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.6. RAN Tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.7. The Converter Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

3. User Interface

9

3.1. Projects and Workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.1.1. Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.1.2. Workspace and Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.2. The Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.2.1. Project Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3.2.2. Info Elements Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3.2.3. Menu Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.2.4. Worksheets Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.3. The Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.4. The Main Window Toolbars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.4.1. Main Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.4.2. RAN Tuning Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.4.3. Replay Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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3.4.4. Utils Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.5. The Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.6. Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4. Configuration of General Properties

17
18 18 18 18 19 19 19 20 21 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 25 25 27 27 27 27 28 28 28 28 29

4.1. General Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.1. Information Element Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1.2. Reload Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2. Error Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3. User-defined Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1. Composing a User-defined Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1.1. Adding an Information Element Criterion to the Event Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1.2. Adding a Predefined Event to the Event Expression 4.3.1.3. Adding a Layer 3 Message to the Event Expression 4.3.1.4. Basic Syntax Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1.5. Advanced Syntax Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.2. Debugging the Event Expression. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.3. Example of User-defined Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4. User-defined Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.1. Composing a User-defined Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5. Map Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.1. Information Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.1.1. Case I: Presentation by Color Only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.1.2. Case II: Presentation by Color, Size, and Symbol . . 4.5.2. Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.3. Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.3.1. Area Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.3.2. Time Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.3.3. Distance Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5.4. Datum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6. Presentation Attributes of Information Elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6.1. Editing the Marker Colors for Information Elements . . . . . . 4.6.2. Editing the Marker Sizes and Symbols for Information Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5. Loading Data into Route Analysis

30

5.1. Loading Map Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 5.2. Loading Cell Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

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5.3. Loading Logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 5.3.1. Loading Logfiles into the Data Selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 5.3.2. Loading Logfiles with the Open Logfile Command. . . . . . . . 32 5.4. Loading Logfiles from Other Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.5. Clearing the Logfile Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

6. Presentation: Basics

35

6.1. The Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.2. Types of Presentation Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.3. Configuration of Presentation Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.4. Window Updating and Synchronization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 6.5. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

7. Map Windows

37

7.1. Loading Map Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 7.2. Presenting Logfiles in a Map Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 7.3. The “Generic” Map Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 7.3.1. Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 7.3.2. Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 7.3.3. Spider Cursor: Identification of Serving Cell/Active Set and Neighbors (UMTS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 7.3.4. Information Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 7.3.4.1. Notes on Information Element Plotting and Updating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 7.3.5. Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 7.3.6. Pinpoint Markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 7.3.7. Further Notes on the Legend Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 7.3.8. The Info Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 7.4. The “Generic” Map Presentation: Statistical Binning. . . . . . . . . . . . 45 7.4.1. Combining Different Types of Statistical Binning; Binning vs. Route Plotting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 7.4.2. Properties of Statistical Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 7.4.3. Examples of Statistical Binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 7.5. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 7.6. Slave Map Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 7.7. Exporting the Map View to Google Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 7.8. Map Context Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 7.9. Map Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

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7.10. Map Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 7.11. Map Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 7.12. Copying Map Window Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

8. Multi-logfile Analysis

54
54 55 57 57 57 58 58 60 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 69 70 70

8.1. Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2. Call Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3. Handover Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4. GPRS Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5. Map-based Tasks: General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6. Pilot Coverage Analysis (WCDMA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6.1. Functions of the Combo Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6.2. Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6.3. Threshold Settings for Coverage Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.7. Pilot Pollution Analysis (WCDMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.7.1. Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8. Missing Neighbor Analysis (WCDMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8.1. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.9. Benchmarking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.9.1. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.10. GSM Filter (GSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.10.1. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.11. User-defined Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9. The Data Selector

71

9.1. Copying Window Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 9.2. Printing Window Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

10. The Line Chart

72
72 73 74 74 75 75 75 75

10.1. Organization of the Line Chart Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.2. Contents of the Line Chart Panes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3. Zooming the Line Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4. Changing Line Chart Contents and Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4.1. Editing General Line Chart Window Properties . . . . . . . . . 10.4.2. Adding and Deleting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4.3. Rearranging Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4.4. Editing a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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10.4.5. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 10.4.6. CPICH Scan Line Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

11. The Bar Chart

79

11.1. Contents of the Bar Chart Panes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 11.2. Changing Bar Chart Contents and Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 11.2.1. Editing General Bar Chart Window Properties . . . . . . . . . . 80 11.2.2. Adding and Deleting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 11.2.3. Rearranging Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 11.2.4. Editing a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 11.2.5. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

12. Status Windows

84

12.1. Changing the Configuration of Status Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 12.1.1. Managing Status Window Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 12.1.2. Changing Status Window Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 12.1.3. Changing IE Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 12.1.4. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

13. Message Windows

88

13.1. Changing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

14. Replaying a Logfile

89

14.1. The Replay Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

15. Searching a Logfile 16. RAN Tuning (UMTS)

90 91

16.1. General Remarks on RAN Tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 16.1.1. RAN Tuning WCDMA: WCDMA vs. GSM Data . . . . . . . . . 91 16.1.2. Incomplete Calls and Data Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 16.1.3. Scanner Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 16.2. Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

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16.3. RAN Tuning WCDMA Report Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 16.3.1. Opening or Creating a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 16.3.2. Adding Logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 16.3.3. General Report Settings Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 16.3.4. UE Report Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 16.3.5. Cell File Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 16.3.6. Statistics Thresholds Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 16.3.7. Frequency Selection Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 16.3.8. Report Template Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 16.3.8.1. Selecting and Modifying Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 16.3.8.2. Working with Report Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 16.3.9. Output Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 16.4. RAN Tuning GSM Report Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 16.4.1. Opening or Creating a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 16.4.2. Adding Logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 16.4.3. General Report Settings Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 16.4.4. UE Report Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 16.4.5. Cell File Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 16.4.6. Statistics Thresholds Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 16.4.7. Operator Selection Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 16.4.8. Report Template Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 16.4.9. Output Options Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 16.5. Generating Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 16.5.1. Generating Output in Batch Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 16.5.2. Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 16.6. Notes on Microsoft Word Bookmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

17. The Converter Tool

112
112 113 113 113 114 115 116 117 117 118 118

17.1. Launching the Converter Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2. Merging Uplink AQM Data into Logfiles (UMTS) . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2.1. Retrieving Uplink AQM Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2.2. Preparing and Performing a Merge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2.3. Performing a Merge from the Command Prompt . . . . . . . 17.3. Converting TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV Cell Files to XML Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.4. Processing TEMS Investigation Logfiles with Python Scripts . . . 17.4.1. Running Python Scripts from the Command Prompt . . . . 17.5. Exporting TEMS Investigation Logfiles in MDM Format . . . . . . . 17.6. Further Functionality in the Converter Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.6.1. Editing Conversion Setups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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17.6.2. Removing Files from the Converter Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 17.6.3. Aborting a Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 17.6.4. Checking the Outcome of a Conversion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

18. Support Contact Information Appendix A. Keyboard Shortcuts Appendix B. File Types in TEMS Investigation Route Analysis Appendix C. Format of CEL File (UMTS)

119 120

121 122

C.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 C.2. File Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 C.3. Column Headers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 C.4. Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 C.4.1. General Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 C.4.2. GSM-specific Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 C.4.3. WCDMA-specific Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 C.5. Comment Lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 C.6. Neighbor Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 C.7. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Appendix D. Format of XML Cell File

129

D.1. Scope of XML Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 D.2. Relation to CEL Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 D.3. Relation to TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV Format . . . . . . . . . . 129 D.4. Schemas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 D.5. General Remarks on Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 D.6. TEMS-specific Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 D.6.1. String_OperatingBand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 D.6.1.1. GSM Bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 D.6.1.2. WCDMA Bands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 D.6.1.3. CDMA Bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 D.6.1.4. Wi-Fi Bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

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D.7. Structure of Cell File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.1. Diagram Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.2. Overall File Structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.3. GSM Cell Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.4. WCDMA Cell Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.5. CDMA Cell Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.6. EV-DO Cell Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.7. Wi-Fi Access Point Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.8. Site Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9. Container Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.1. ANTENNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.2. BSIC (GSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.3. CDMA_CHANNEL_INFO (CDMA, EV-DO) . . . . . . D.7.9.4. CGI (GSM, WCDMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.5. CHANNEL_INFO (GSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.6. INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.7. NEIGHBOR_LIST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.8. POSITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.9. REPEATER_LIST (CDMA, EV-DO) . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.9.10. TEMS_INTERNAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.10. “Atomic” Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.7.11. Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.8. Example of Complete XML File: UMTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.9. Example of Complete XML File: CDMA/EV-DO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . D.10. Note on Processing in TEMS Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

135 135 136 137 139 140 141 142 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 148 148 152 154

Appendix E. Cell Identification

155
155 155 155 156 156

E.1. Cell Identification in GSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E.1.1. Serving Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E.1.2. Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E.2. Cell Identification in WCDMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E.3. Cell Identification in CDMA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Index

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Chapter 1. Introduction

1.

Introduction

Thank you for choosing TEMS Investigation 9.0 – the leading air-interface test tool for wireless networks. TEMS Investigation represents Ericsson’s continuing commitment to Making Wireless Better. To get the most out of TEMS Investigation, please take the time to read this user manual in order to gain an in-depth understanding of the product features. We at Ericsson are confident that TEMS Investigation will satisfy all your measurement needs and that it will become an indispensable tool in your daily work.

1.1.

Fundamentals of TEMS Investigation 9.0

See the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 1.1.

1.2.

What’s New in TEMS Investigation 9.0

See the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 1.2.

1.3.

What’s in This Manual (and What’s Not)

This book covers TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis, giving a comprehensive account of all functions in the Route Analysis application. A separate User’s Manual is provided for TEMS Investigation 9.0 Data Collection. A further volume, Information Elements and Events, provides full details on all IEs and events found in the two applications. Besides these reference manuals, a Getting Started Manual is provided which covers all preliminaries. Much of what is said there concerns preparations for data collection and is thus not relevant for Route Analysis. However, the following parts of the Getting Started Manual do apply to Route Analysis as well:

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• • • • •

Chapter 2: Product Packaging Chapter 5: Installing TEMS Investigation Chapter 7: Licensing Chapter 11: Cell Data and Maps Chapter 12: Configuring the PC for Python Script Processing

Readme File, Release Note Some technical issues not addressed in this manual are dealt with in the file Readme.rtf in the TEMS Investigation installation directory. The same information is reproduced in the Release Note issued with the current release. FAQ Many questions regarding TEMS Investigation are answered in the FAQ sections found on the Web at www.ericsson.com/tems under the link “Tech support”. Technical Support If you have a question about TEMS Investigation which is not answered in any of the manuals nor in any of the other sources mentioned above, please contact technical support. Contact information is given on the Web at www.ericsson.com/tems under the link “Contact TEMS”. TEMS On-line Subscription Service To sign up for the TEMS on-line subscription service, please go to www.ericsson.com/tems and click the link “TEMS Subscription Service”. This free service includes e-mail notification of TEMS product launches, version upgrades and patches, as well as the on-line newsletter TEMS News.

1.4.

Definitions

This section explains a number of central concepts in TEMS Investigation Route Analysis which are frequently referred to in this user manual. Cluster A cluster is an arbitrary set of cells, belonging to one or several base stations, in a cellular network. A cluster is defined by a cluster file. (The concept serves

2

Chapter 1. Introduction

exclusively as a convenient means of grouping cells and does not have any deeper significance.) Current Logfile This is the logfile that is currently “selected” in the application. It is written in boldface in the Navigator. The current logfile is the one that is • • • replayed from the Replay toolbar (see chapter 14, page 89) searched by the Find function (see chapter 15, page 90) presented in all presentation windows except the Data Selector and the Map (where multiple logfiles can be presented).

Event An event is a signal generated by the TEMS Investigation software in order to indicate that something worthy of note has occurred, either in the cellular network or in connected equipment. A number of events are predefined; all of these are found in Information Elements and Events, chapter 7. Besides the predefined events, you can define events of your own. User-defined events are specified by logical expressions which trigger the event when they evaluate to true. These expressions can contain predefined events, Layer 3 messages, and conditions involving information elements. Information Element Information elements are pieces of numeric or text-format data that are presentable in the TEMS Investigation user interface. All information elements handled by TEMS Investigation Route Analysis are found in Information Elements and Events, chapter 4. Information Element Group A group of information elements containing similar data. The groups are defined in the general properties. Example: The information element group “RxLev dBm” comprises all elements that present RxLev in dBm (as opposed to GSM RxLev units). Not all information elements belong to a group. Information Element, Argument of Many information elements contain an array or a matrix of values rather than a single value. To select a value, one or several arguments are used.

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For instance, the GSM information element Neighbor RxLev contains the signal strengths of all neighboring channels (there may be up to 32). To present the signal strength of a particular neighbor channel, you must specify an argument in the form of a neighbor index between 1 and 32. The “Sc” elements containing WCDMA scan data have two arguments: one representing a UMTS frequency, and one representing a scrambling code. Complete details on the arguments of information elements are given in Information Elements and Events, chapter 4. Information Element, Attribute of Some information elements have attributes that determine some aspect of their content. For example, the WCDMA “Sc” elements, which contain CPICH scan data, have a set of attributes that determine the sorting order of the scrambling codes. Complete details on the attributes of information elements are given in Information Elements and Events, chapter 4. Note that these attributes have nothing to do with the presentation attributes (color, size, symbol) defined for information elements in the general properties. Message The term “message” in this user manual generally denotes an air interface message described in the wireless technology specifications, most often a Layer 3 message. A “message window”, however (see chapter 13), may list either air interface messages, or mode or error reports produced by a phone, or messages from various protocols, or events. Similarly, in the “Find” dialog (see chapter 15), a “message” may be an air interface message or a phone mode report. Mode Report A mode report is a status or measurement report generated by a phone. Phone The term “phone” covers both GSM phones, UMTS (WCDMA/GSM) user equipments (UEs), and CDMA phones. When a subset is meant, a suitable qualifier is prefixed, and/or a more precise term is used (“GSM phone”, “Sony Ericsson GSM phone”, “Nokia UE”, “Kyocera CDMA phone”, etc.).

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Chapter 1. Introduction

Some user terminals supported by TEMS Investigation are in fact data cards rather than phones. The word “terminal” is therefore sometimes used instead of “phone”, without any difference in meaning from the point of view of TEMS Investigation. Project See section 3.1.1. Properties: Default Properties This is the Default Properties part of the dialog accessed from Edit → Properties. These properties are always applied when a new project, workspace, or presentation window is opened. Later on the project, workspace, or window can be modified. Properties: General Properties This means the whole of the dialog accessed from Edit → Properties (both default properties and properties of the current project and workspace). Scanner The term “scanner” denotes a device dedicated to scanning, for example a PCTel scanner. Phones with scanning capabilities are not referred to as scanners. Task Route Analysis is capable of performing a number of predefined analyses of logfile data, such as “Call Analysis” and “Pilot Pollution Analysis”. Each of these is referred to as a task. The result of the analysis is presented in the Data Selector for some tasks and in a Map window for others. You can also define your own tasks. For these, the result of the analysis is always shown in the Data Selector. Workspace See section 3.1.2.

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2.

Using Route Analysis: The Basics

Route Analysis is a post-processing tool for data collected with TEMS Investigation Data Collection, or with TEMS Automatic or TEMS DriveTester. Most of the functionality of Route Analysis is designed for on-screen analysis of one or several logfiles. The Data Selector and the Map are specifically intended for analyzing multiple logfiles. The remaining presentation windows, on the other hand, always present one logfile at a time. RAN Tuning is a reporting tool for UMTS data: packet-switched data, circuitswitched data, and voice. The Converter tool is used to merge uplink AQM data into logfiles (among other things).

2.1.

Recommended Skills

Since TEMS Investigation Route Analysis is a Windows application, familiarity with Windows is useful. To obtain a genuine understanding of the presented information, you need a working knowledge of the wireless technologies concerned.

2.2.

Installing TEMS Investigation

See chapters 3 and 5 in the Getting Started Manual.

2.3.

Starting TEMS Investigation Route Analysis

Once installed, the Route Analysis application can be launched from the Start menu. • Choose Start → Programs → Ericsson → TEMS Products → TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis.

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Chapter 2. Using Route Analysis: The Basics

Alternatively, Route Analysis can be started from within the Data Collection application (from the main window toolbar or from the Logfile menu). See the Data Collection User’s Manual, sections 3.3.6 and 3.5.

2.4.

Loading Data

Cell data can be loaded in XML or CEL format. Note: It is necessary to load your cell files first of all. See section 5.2. Map files need to be provided in MapInfo GeoSet or TAB format. See section 5.3. After loading cell and map files, you are ready to start working with logfiles. Logfiles can be opened in two ways in Route Analysis: • From the Data Selector. This method should be used when you are working with multiple logfiles and want to sift through all of them in search of interesting properties. For example, if you are interested in spotting dropped and blocked calls, you search the logfile set for call events. By using the Open Logfile command. This command simply opens one or more logfiles, without doing anything in particular with them. This method is more akin to the way of working in Data Collection, where you open a single logfile and study it.

Section 5.3 covers the mechanics of these procedures.

2.5.
• • • •

Presenting and Analyzing Data

How to configure and use the presentation windows is explained in chapters 6–7. Everything about multiple-logfile analysis is covered in chapter 8. Logfile replay is gone through in chapter 14. Logfile search is gone through in chapter 15.

2.6.

RAN Tuning

The RAN Tuning report tool is launched by clicking the Start RAN Tuning button in the main window (see section 3.4).

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How to work with RAN Tuning is covered in chapter 16.

2.7.

The Converter Tool

The Converter tool is launched by clicking the Start Converter button in the main window (see section 3.4). What the Converter tool is used for is covered in chapter 17, page 112.

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Chapter 3. User Interface

3.

User Interface

This chapter describes the basics of the Route Analysis user interface.

3.1.

Projects and Workspaces

When working with Route Analysis, you are always using a project and a workspace. The present section explains these concepts. Note that the project and the workspace are independent of one another: you can switch to a different workspace while keeping the current project open, and vice versa.

3.1.1.

Project

The project defines what data you are working with: what cell files, map files, and logfiles you have loaded. All project data is collected on the Project tab of the Navigator. One project is active at a time. Since a project is a repository for data, you will probably want to stay within the same project as long as you are working with files that belong together. When you switch to studying a different set of data, you may want to close the current project and open a new one. When you start Route Analysis for the first time, a default project is opened. This also happens if you have never saved a project. After you have saved a project for the first time, the project last saved will be opened each time you start the application. To start the application without loading any existing project, go to the Application subdirectory and give the following command: investigationRA.exe -newproj You inspect the contents of the current project from the Navigator. To manage the current project and switch projects, you use the File menu (File → Project):

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• •

Add: From here you can add files to the current project. This can also be handled from the Navigator. See chapter 5 on loading data. New Project: Creates a new project, which will adopt the default properties set in the application (see chapter 4). The previously current project is closed. Open Project: Opens a previously saved project. Close Project: Closes the current project. Save Project: Saves the current project (file extension .trp). Save Project As: Save the current project under a new name.

• • • •

3.1.2.

Workspace and Worksheets

The workspace defines the presentation of data: what presentation windows are open and how they are configured. One workspace is active at a time. When you start Route Analysis for the first time, a default workspace is opened. This also happens if you have never saved a workspace. After you have saved a workspace for the first time, the workspace last saved will be opened each time you start the application. To start the application without loading any existing workspace, go to the Application subdirectory and give the following command: investigationRA.exe -newwksp The workspace contains a number of worksheets, each of which you can configure for a different aspect of the presentation. To manage workspaces, you use the File menu (File → Workspace): • New Workspace: Creates a new workspace, which will adopt the default properties set in the application (see chapter 4). The previous workspace is closed. Open Workspace: Opens a previously saved workspace. Save Workspace: Saves the current workspace (file extension .trw).

• •

3.2.

The Navigator

The Navigator pane is found on the left in the application window. It has the following tabs:

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Chapter 3. User Interface

• • • •

one that gives an overview of your current project (Project tab: section 3.1) one that lists information elements (Info Elements tab) one that lists presentation window types (Menu tab) one that provides an overview of the worksheets and their contents (Worksheets tab)

You can hide the Navigator by clicking the cross button or deselecting it in the View menu.

3.2.1.

Project Tab

This tab gives an overview of the contents of the current project: cell files, map files, and logfiles.

The current logfile (see section 1.4) appears in boldface in the list. The logfile icon is also tagged with a “c”. To make a different file the current logfile, double-click it in the Navigator. Any logfiles that contain error events are tagged with a red dot. Which events to regard as error events is user-configurable and is set in the general properties; see section 4.2. Contained within each logfile is a tree structure that shows what devices (MS designations and make/model) have been used in the recording and what events they have reported:

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3.2.2.

Info Elements Tab

This tab lists all information elements that are presentable in Route Analysis. See Information Elements and Events, chapter 4 for a complete listing. Information elements are by default arranged in a hierarchical structure: cellular technology GPRS and EGPRS elements GPRS/EGPRS measurements information element value type presentation settings value range Alternatively, it is possible to list all elements in straightforward alphabetical order for each cellular technology (as is done in Data Collection). To do this in the current project, right-click on the Info Elements tab and choose “Classic”. How to change this setting in the default properties is explained in section 4.1. Certain elements have one or more of the following: (one or several) units, attributes, and arguments. Regarding the last two, see section 1.4. All of this

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Chapter 3. User Interface

is displayed in the Navigator in the following manner (the purpose of the attributes in this case is to provide multiple sorting orders for arrays):

You can add an information element to a status or Map window by dragging it from the Navigator and dropping it in the window. Regarding adding of elements to Map windows, see also section 7.3.4. If the element is an array and has an argument, you will get one component of the element at a time, starting with the lowest argument value.1 Among units and attributes, the first option listed will be chosen. If the element can be presented in more than one unit, you can drag the item representing the desired unit instead of the element itself. The element will then be presented in the chosen unit.

You can always change these settings later in the Properties dialog of the presentation window.

1. If the element has more than one argument, the last argument will be stepped. To adjust arguments, open the Properties dialog for the presentation window (see chapters 7 and 10–13).

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3.2.3.

Menu Tab

This tab lists all types of presentation window that are available in the application. Double-clicking an item on this tab opens a window of the corresponding type. You can also drag a window from the Navigator to a worksheet. The whole tab is mirrored in the Presentation menu. See Information Elements and Events, chapter 8 for descriptions of the contents of individual presentation windows. How the windows work and how they can be configured is covered in the present document: see chapters 7–13.

3.2.4.

Worksheets Tab

This tab gives an overview of the worksheets (whose names are currently not user-editable) and their contents. Windows can be moved between worksheets by drag-and-drop on the Worksheets tab.

3.3.
File Menu

The Menu Bar

From this menu you manage projects and workspaces: see section 3.1. The menu also holds standard print and exit commands. Edit Menu The Find commands are used to search logfiles. See chapter 15, page 90. The General Properties command opens a dialog where you can customize many aspects of the contents and appearance of presentations. See chapter 4. View Menu From this menu you can hide and show the main window toolbars, the status bar, and the Navigator. Presentation Menu This menu is used to open presentation windows and templates, as well as the RAN Tuning tool. It has the same function as the Menu tab of the Navigator.

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Chapter 3. User Interface

Window Menu This menu is a standard window manager. Help Menu This menu gives access to the online help, which contains the same information as this manual, and to the “about” page.

3.4.
3.4.1.

The Main Window Toolbars
Main Toolbar

New Project: Creates a new project. Open Project: Opens a saved project. Save Project: Saves a project. Copy: Copies selected rows in a message window. Print: Prints a focused Map window. About: Displays information about the Route Analysis application. Clear Logfile Cache: Removes references to old cell data that is no longer used in the application. See section 5.5 for more details.

3.4.2.

RAN Tuning Toolbar

Start RAN Tuning: Launches the RAN Tuning application. See chapter 16, page 91.

3.4.3.

Replay Toolbar

See section 14.1, page 89.

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3.4.4.

Utils Toolbar

Start Converter: Launches the Converter tool. See chapter 17, page 112.

3.5.
• •

The Status Bar

The status bar at the bottom of the main window displays the following: Section 1: Number of logfiles loaded; loading time Section 2: Name of current logfile

3.6.

Keyboard Shortcuts

A number of central operations in TEMS Investigation Route Analysis can also be performed from the keyboard. A list of keyboard shortcuts is found in appendix A, page 120.

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

4.

Configuration of General Properties

Route Analysis has a “master” configuration dialog which governs many aspects of the presentation. It is accessed by clicking the Edit menu and choosing General Properties. Default Properties The default properties should be your normal, “business-as-usual” application settings. When you open a new project, it will inherit all default properties that relate to projects. When you open a new workspace, it will inherit all default properties that relate to workspaces. Note that when you change the default properties, the changes do not affect the current project or workspace. The default properties can be reset by removing the file InvestigationRA.default from the directory ...\[My] Documents\TEMS Product Files\TEMS Investigation 9.0\Settings. Current Project Under Current Project, you can configure settings that will apply only to the project you are currently working with. For example, when studying a particular set of data, you might want to construct some special user-defined events that you will not be interested in generating all the time. Similar considerations may apply to user-defined tasks. When you open a new project, it does not acquire the properties defined here but only the default properties (as explained above). Current Workspace Under Current Workspace, you configure settings that will apply only to the current workspace (presentation attributes for information elements).

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4.1.
4.1.1.

General Properties
Information Element Presentation

If you check the box “Classic mode (no groups)”, information elements will not be arranged hierarchically as described in Information Elements and Events, chapter 3, but listed alphabetically under each of the top-level groupings (including the cellular technologies). This applies to the Navigator as well as to all dialogs where information elements are selected. Intermediate categories (such as “GPRS/EGPRS” under GSM) are removed in this presentation mode. For the current project, you can toggle between the two presentation modes in the Navigator itself: see section 3.2.2.

4.1.2.

Reload Settings

If you check the box “Always reload project at changes (if needed)”, the project is automatically reloaded as soon as you make any changes under Current Project or under Default Properties → Error Events. In the process, any modified user-defined events are regenerated according to their new definitions. If you uncheck this box, you will be asked on modifying any of the abovementioned settings whether you want to reload the current logfile, reload the whole current project, or not reload anything.

4.2.

Error Events

You can customize which events to regard as error events. Logfiles with at least one error event are marked with a red dot in the Navigator (see section 3.2.1) and in the Data Selector (see section 5.3.1). User-defined events, too, can be classified as error events; but they must have been previously defined (before opening the general properties this time around) to appear in this dialog. • To include an event in the error event set, select it in the Available Events box and click the “>” button. The event is then copied into the Selected Events box. To remove an event from the error event set, select it in the Selected Events box and click the “<” button.

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

To remove all events from the error event set, click the “<<” button.

By default events signifying errors or failures, such as Dropped Call and Handover Failure, are classified as error events.

4.3.

User-defined Events

User-defined events in Route Analysis are boolean expressions which can be composed of the following building blocks: • • • information element criteria checks for predefined events checks for Layer 3 messages.

Each such building block is a boolean value.

4.3.1.
• •

Composing a User-defined Event

First decide whether the event should be part of the default properties or belong to the current project (or both). In the General Properties dialog, under the relevant root item in the tree, click the User-defined Events item. (Define the event in both places if desired.) Click the Add button. Enter a name for the event in the Name field.

• •

4.3.1.1.

Adding an Information Element Criterion to the Event Expression

To add an information element criterion to the event expression, type the string ie{ . The first time you click in the Definition box, this string appears automatically. A popup appears to the right of the curly brace, inviting you to select an information element. The top-level IE categories (“GSM”, etc.) appear at the top of the list; the IE list beneath the categories contains all elements that exist in only one category. Type the first few characters of an element to jump to the elements that begin with these characters. • When you double-click a category, the popup is updated to show all elements belonging to that category.

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• •

When you double-click an element, it is added to the IE string (and the category is supplied automatically). If the element can be expressed in more than one unit, another popup will appear for selecting a unit. Otherwise, the unit is added to the IE string automatically. If the element has attributes, yet another popup will appear for selecting an attribute. If the element has one or several arguments, the lowest argument value(s) will be selected automatically and displayed in square brackets.

• •

The complete information element string might look as follows (“Worst” is an attribute):

To change the argument, just edit the string in the Definition box. Now, to complete the IE criterion, the IE string must be compared to a constant value. To achieve this, simply type the relational operator and the constant. See the example in section 4.3.3 below.

4.3.1.2.

Adding a Predefined Event to the Event Expression

To check for the occurrence of an event, type event{ . A popup appears listing event categories, “Common” containing events that are common to all cellular technologies. • • Double-click a category and the popup will be updated to show all events belonging to that category. Double-click the desired event to add it to the event string.

You can check for several events at the same time by entering multiple event strings and joining them with OR (written || ). The resulting expression will evaluate to true if at least one of the events is generated on account of the latest Layer 3 message received.

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4.3.1.3.

Adding a Layer 3 Message to the Event Expression

To check for the occurrence of a Layer 3 message, type msg{ . A popup appears listing message categories. They are the same as those appearing in the message windows under Properties → Messages tab → Layer 3 Messages. • • Double-click a category and the popup will be updated to show all messages belonging to that category. Double-click the desired message to add it to the event string.

You can check for several messages at the same time by entering multiple message strings and joining them with OR (written || ). The resulting expression will evaluate to true if one of the messages is the one received.

4.3.1.4.
• • • •

Basic Syntax Rules

The event expression as a whole must adhere to the following syntax rules: Allowed logical operators are && for AND, || for OR, and ! for NOT. Allowed relational operators are >, >=, <, <=, ==. Round brackets ( ) can be used as delimiters for the purpose of nesting. Line breaks can be inserted anywhere between tokens in the expression but are never mandatory.

See the example in section 4.3.3 below.

4.3.1.5.

Advanced Syntax Options

The following combinations of operators and building blocks deserve comment: event1 && (ie1 < thr) This evaluates to true if and when event1 is generated and ie1 is less than thr at that time. event1 && event2 [&& ...] This evaluates to true if and when all the enumerated events are generated on account of the same message. The criterion is not satisfied if the events are triggered by different messages, no matter how close in time. msg1 && (ie1 < thr)

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This evaluates to true if and when msg1 is received and ie1 is less than thr at that time. msg1 && event1 This evaluates to true if and when msg1 is received and event1 is generated on account of msg1. msg1 && !event1 This evaluates to true if and when msg1 is received without event1 being generated as a result. (A simple condition !event1 or !msg1, on the other hand, will be ignored and will not trigger anything, since such a condition would be satisfied almost all the time and generate a vast number of events.)

4.3.2.

Debugging the Event Expression

You can check that the syntax of the event expression is correct by clicking the Check Syntax button. The Output box should display the message “Syntax OK!”. If there is at least one syntax error, the first error will be highlighted in red in the Definition box and explained in the Output box.

4.3.3.

Example of User-defined Event

There are many possible causes of poor C/I values. Two common ones are co-channel and adjacent channel interference. In certain circumstances, however, the main problem is not interference from other callers, but the fact that the signal is overwhelmed by assorted random disturbances – i.e. what is usually called “noise”. This means thermal noise generated within the circuits of the phone as well as external background noise from a plethora of sources, including other man-made signals so faint that they merely add up to a quasirandom disturbance. The following event gives a rough indication that the poor C/I is probably due to a noise problem: the poor C/I coincides with a very low signal strength. 1. Name the event “Noise Indication” (or whatever you like). 2. Type the string ie{ . Double-click GSM, and scroll down to find the C/I information element. Double-click this element. 3. In the new popup that appears, double-click Worst. The Definition field should now read: ie{GSM,C/I,dB,Worst}[0] 4. Complete the line by typing < 10 . Press Enter (optional). 5. Type && . Press Enter (optional).

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

6. Type ie{ again. Double-click GSM, and scroll down to find the RxLev Sub element. Double-click this element. 7. In the new popup that appears, double-click “dBm”. 8. Complete the line by typing < -99 . 9. The event expression should now look as follows:

10. Click OK to finish. The user-defined event is now ready to be used in the Map and in the other presentation windows. The icon for user-defined events is always a bell.

4.4.

User-defined Tasks

User-defined tasks are similar to predefined tasks such as Call Analysis, which consist in computing statistics on a subset of events and displaying these statistics in the Data Selector. How the Call Analysis task works is gone through in section 8.2, page 55. For a user-defined task you select the subset of events yourself. Both predefined and user-defined events can be selected.

4.4.1.
• •

Composing a User-defined Task

First decide whether the task should be part of the default properties or belong to the current project (or both). In the General Properties dialog, under the relevant root item in the tree, click the User-defined Tasks item. (Define the task in both places if desired.) Click the Add button. Enter a name for the task in the Name field.

• •

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Move the desired events from the Available Events box to the Selected Events box. To add a single event to those selected, select it in the tree structure and click the “>” button. To add all events, click the “>>” button. To remove a single event, select it under Selected Events and click the “<” button. To remove all events, click the “<<” button. Note that user-defined events can also be selected.

4.5.
4.5.1.

Map Properties
Information Elements

Here you decide what information elements to show by default in Map windows. You can modify these settings for an individual Map window in its own Properties dialog, which looks just like the one gone through here. • To use an element in the map presentation, select it in the Available IEs box and click the “>” button. The element is then copied into the Added IEs box. To remove an element from the set that can figure in the presentation, select it in the Added IEs box and click the “<” button. To remove all elements from the presentation, click the “<<” button.

• •

Selecting the added element brings up a number of settings relating to it in the Properties box on the right:

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

4.5.1.1.

Case I: Presentation by Color Only

If you want to present information elements by color only, not making use of the size and shape of route markers, the settings are very simple. Just make sure that Color Valid is set to Yes for all elements, and that Size IE and Symbol IE are both set to None.

4.5.1.2.

Case II: Presentation by Color, Size, and Symbol

Each element in the Added IEs box defines a route marker that can present up to three information elements by varying its color, size, and shape (“Symbol”). The element itself will be represented by the color of the marker. The meanings of the marker size and marker symbol are defined by selecting other elements in the Size IE and Symbol IE fields. These elements must themselves have been added in the Added IEs box in order to be selectable. It is possible to refrain from defining the size and symbol attributes by setting Size IE and Symbol IE to “None” (as was done in section 4.5.1.1). We may illustrate the configuration in a matrix. Here is an example, where IE1, ..., IE6 are the elements in the Added IE box: Marker No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Color IE1 IE2 IE3 IE4 IE5 IE6 Size IE4 IE6 None None None None Symbol IE5 None None None None None Color Valid Yes Yes Yes No No No

Since we have added six elements, six route markers are defined automatically. However, we do not wish to present IE4–IE6 by color, so we set Color Valid to No for these elements (markers). Markers 4–6 will thus not be drawn. The reason we have included IE4–IE6 is that we want to express them as the size and symbol of marker 1 and the size of marker 2, respectively. For reasons of performance optimization, the maximum number of IEs that can be added to the Added IEs box is 20.

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The whole list of properties of added IEs is as follows: • Value Visible: This is a flag that governs whether the marker as a whole should be shown or not. It does not affect the configuration of the marker contents described above. The flag has the same function as the corresponding checkbox on the Legend tab of a Map window (although that checkbox applies only in that window). Value Type: This setting has two functions. The default is Mean. – Route plotting: Not infrequently, a route marker on the map (one GPS position) will represent several air interface messages. In such situations, you can choose whether to display the mean of all values, the best value, the worst value, or the most commonly occurring value. The above applies to ordinary routes as well as to time and distance binning plots (see section 7.4, page 45). The choice “Most Common” is intended for IEs with discrete values, such as SCs. Compare section 7.3.4.1, “Notes on Information Element Plotting and Updating”, on page 43. Area binning: The Value Type setting also determines how to compute the value that will be displayed in each bin by the area binning function (see section 7.4, page 45). The range of options is the same as for route plotting. The Value Type setting has further implications for the Benchmarking task: see section 8.9, page 68.

Offset: This parameter governs how far the route marker will be offset from its true coordinates. A positive value means “offset to the right”, and a negative value means “offset to the left” (from the drive tester’s point of view). IE Attribute: Attribute of the information element (e.g. sorting order of channels). This field appears only where applicable. IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: Arguments of the information element (e.g. channel index, SC index, [U]ARFCN index). These fields appear only where applicable. Color Valid: See the above discussion. In other words, if Color Valid is set to No, the marker defined by this IE will never be drawn. The point of offering this option is to let the user add IEs that are presented only as size or symbol attributes. (Any IE that is to play a part in the presentation must be put in the Added IEs box.) Size IE, Symbol IE: These fields define the meanings of the marker size and shape. See the above discussion.

• •

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

4.5.2.

Events

Here you decide what events to show by default in Map windows. You can modify these settings for an individual Map window in its own Properties dialog, which looks just like the one described here. • To include an event in the map presentation, select it in the Available Events box and click the “>” button. The event is then copied into the Selected Events box. To include all events in the map presentation, click the “>>” button. To remove an event from the set that can figure in the presentation, select it in the Selected Events box and click the “<” button. To remove all events from the presentation, click the “<<” button.

• • •

4.5.3.

Binning

Here you set properties of the statistical binning (see section 7.4, page 45).

4.5.3.1.
• • •

Area Binning

Area Bin Size, X: Longitudinal bin size in meters. Area Bin Size, Y: Latitudinal bin size in meters. Projection Type: – UTM: The bin size is fixed at X × Y meters, as defined above. Bin boundaries will not be parallel with meridians anywhere except on the reference meridians that run through the centers of UTM zones. If the map is drawn in a projection other than UTM, the bins will look more or less distorted. The larger the distance from a UTM zone center, the greater the distortion. Lat/Lon: Bin boundaries are fixed along meridians. Consequently, the longitudinal size X (or width) of the bin varies with the location; its area is equal to X × Y meters only at zero degrees latitude. The larger the distance from the equator, the narrower the width of the bin.

4.5.3.2.

Time Binning

Binning Time: The interval at which statistics are computed along the route, given in seconds.

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4.5.3.3.

Distance Binning

Binning Distance: The interval at which statistics are computed along the route, given in meters.

4.5.4.

Datum

Cell files: Enter the datum of the cell files you are using. Click Edit to select the correct datum.

4.6.

Presentation Attributes of Information Elements

Numeric information elements have the following presentation attributes which determine the graphical presentation of the element as a function of its numeric value: • • • Color: Range of colors used to encode the IE value (in a variety of presentation windows). Size: Range of plot marker sizes encoding the IE value in Map windows. Symbol: Range of plot marker shapes (symbols) encoding the IE value in Map windows.

For elements organized into a group (see section 1.4), attributes can be edited only at the group level and not for each individual element separately. This arrangement is designed to save you a lot of work, since rather than having to change every element containing (say) RxLev, you make the desired change for all RxLev elements in a single action. An element not belonging to a group, however, has its own unique attributes. Such elements are found under “Single IEs” immediately beneath each toplevel IE category (“GSM”, etc.).

4.6.1.

Editing the Marker Colors for Information Elements

Select the information element group to edit in the left-hand box.

A default set of color ranges is already provided. If you want to edit this set, do as follows: • To add a color range, click Add. Optionally, you can first select an existing range to have the new range inserted next to it. Range endpoints are

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Chapter 4. Configuration of General Properties

suggested and old ranges are adjusted automatically, but naturally you can set the endpoints any way you like (as long as they are within the value range of the information element). • • To delete a color range, select it and click Delete. Adjacent ranges are adjusted automatically to fill the gap. To edit an endpoint of a range, double-click the relevant field, enter the desired new value, and press Enter. Press Esc or click somewhere outside the field to cancel the action. Click Auto Setup to generate a set of color ranges automatically. Note that these will often be different from the default color ranges:

• • •

Set the number of intervals. Choose colors for the extremes of the value range (From Color and To Color). Check the Via Color box if you want to use a specific color in the middle of the range. If you do not check the Via Color box, the intermediate color is chosen by the application based on the “From” and “To” colors.

When you click OK, a color range is created automatically with evenly sized intervals and suitable intermediate colors.

4.6.2.

Editing the Marker Sizes and Symbols for Information Elements

The ranges of map plot marker sizes and symbols are edited in the same way as color ranges. See section 4.6.1 above. In the automatic setup of symbols, you choose a starting symbol.

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5.

Loading Data into Route Analysis

This chapter describes how to load map, cell, and logfile data into Route Analysis. It is wise to load files precisely in that order. If you load a cell file after you have already loaded logfiles, some additional steps are needed to ensure data consistency; see section 5.5.

5.1.

Loading Map Files

It is assumed in Route Analysis that you already have map files in TAB or GeoSet format. If not, you can construct a GeoSet as described in the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 23.3. There is no way to access the GeoSet Manager from within Route Analysis, but you can run it by executing the following file: C:\Program Files\Common Files\MapInfo Shared\MapX Common\GeosetManager40.exe. Note that it is perfectly possible to plot data in a Map window without having any map files loaded in it. • To load a map file, right-click the Map Files item in the Navigator and choose Add from the context menu, then browse for the desired TAB or GST file.

5.2.

Loading Cell Files

You can load cell files of the following formats: Plain-text, TEMS Investigation specific format (*.cel). The current version of this format allows mixing of both GSM and WCDMA cells in one file. See appendix C, page 122. Plain-text XML file (*.xml), whose format is common to TEMS Investigation and several other TEMS products. See appendix D, page 129.

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Chapter 5. Loading Data into Route Analysis

CDMA cell files in TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV format can be converted to XML format using the Converter tool. See section 17.3, page 115. Several cell files can be loaded and displayed in the application at the same time. If multiple files of the same type (CEL or XML) are loaded, the information in all files is correlated in the presentation. However, if you load both CEL and XML files, no attempt is made to correlate CEL and XML cell information; rather, cell information is presented separately from each type of file. It is necessary to add the cell files to the project first of all (before you add any logfiles). Compare section 5.5. • To load a cell file, right-click the Cell Files item in the Navigator and choose Add from the context menu, then browse for the desired file.

5.3.

Loading Logfiles

There are two ways to load logfiles in Route Analysis: using the Data Selector and using the Open Logfile command.

5.3.1.

Loading Logfiles into the Data Selector

This method should be used when you are working with multiple logfiles and want to sift through all of them in search of interesting properties. For example, if you are interested in spotting dropped and blocked calls, you search the logfile set for call events. To load logfiles using the Data Selector, do as follows: • • • Double-click Data Selector in the Navigator or press F9 to open a Data Selector window. Right-click in the Data Selector window and choose Add Logfiles. In the file dialog, select the desired logfiles, and click Open.

You can also drag logfiles from the Navigator (i.e. files that you have previously added to the project, see section 5.3.2) to the Data Selector. Either way, the logfiles you have chosen to load are listed in the Data Selector. As in the Navigator, logfiles with at least one error event are marked with a red dot. Which events to regard as error events is user-configurable and is set in the general properties; see section 4.2. An analysis task (by default, Handover Analysis) is performed immediately on the logfiles you loaded, events being counted and displayed in the event

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columns. A sum line appears at the bottom of the Data Selector showing the total number of occurrences of each event. Regarding tasks, see chapter 8.

The logfiles you load in the Data Selector are not automatically added to the project. However, you can add a logfile listed in the Data Selector to the project by double-clicking it. The file will then appear in the Navigator also. To load multiple logfiles from the Data Selector into the project, select the files in the Data Selector, right-click the selection, and choose Load Selected Logfiles in Project. To remove logfiles from the Data Selector, select the files, right-click, and choose Remove Selected Logfiles from the context menu.

5.3.2.

Loading Logfiles with the Open Logfile Command

This command simply opens one or more logfiles and adds them to the project. The Data Selector is not involved. This method is more similar to the way of working in Data Collection. • • Double-click Open Logfile in the Navigator, or press F10. In the file dialog, select the desired logfiles, and click Open.

The selected logfiles are now added to the project and listed on the Project tab of the Navigator. At any time, the logfile last added to the project will be the current logfile (bolded). See section 1.4 for the definition of current logfile.

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Contained within each logfile is a tree structure that shows what devices (MS designations and make/model) have been used in the recording and what events they have reported. See section 3.2.1. The events are divided into error events and normal events. Which events to regard as error events is user-configurable and is set in the general properties; see section 4.2. Within each category, events are listed in the order they occurred. To remove a logfile from the Navigator, right-click it and choose Close. To remove multiple logfiles, select them and press Delete on your keyboard.

5.4.

Loading Logfiles from Other Sources

TEMS Investigation Route Analysis can read logfiles from the following TEMS products: • • • • • • • • TEMS Investigation 9.0, 8.x, 7.x, 6.x TEMS Investigation GSM 5.x, 4.x, 3.x (except data recorded with SH888 or CF668 scanners) TEMS Investigation EDGE 1.x TEMS Investigation WCDMA 3.x, 2.x TEMS DriveTester GSM–TDMA 1.x (GSM logfiles) TEMS Pocket 6.0, 5.x TEMS Automatic 7.0, 6.x (any MTU and HTU logfiles) TEMS Automatic 5.x (any MTU logfiles)

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• • • • •

TEMS Automatic 4.x (MTU logfiles recorded with GSM-only MTUs) TEMS Automatic 3.x, 2.5 EFEM logfiles from Motorola phones MDM files logfiles from Anritsu ML8720 scanners (i.e. files logged by the scanner itself).

Route Analysis can also read

5.5.

Clearing the Logfile Cache

As was said in the introduction of this chapter, cell files should be loaded prior to logfiles. If you want to load new cell data with logfiles already present in the project, you must perform the following steps to remove references to the old cell data from the logfile cache and generate correct references to the new cell data: • Remove the logfiles from the project as described in section 5.3. Click the Clear Logfile Cache button on the main window toolbar. • Load the logfiles again as described in section 5.3.

The same applies if you open a new project and want to use a different cell file than in the previous project. First load the cell file, then click the Clear Logfile Cache button before loading any logfiles into the new project. (If you are not using a cell file at all in the new project, it is not necessary to clear the logfile cache.)

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Chapter 6. Presentation: Basics

6.

Presentation: Basics

This chapter goes through some basic facts of data presentation in Route Analysis.

6.1.

The Data

The presentation windows are used to present information elements, events, and messages. For an overview of information element categories, see Information Elements and Events, chapter 2. Full details follow in chapters 3, 4, and 5. Regarding events, see Information Elements and Events, chapter 7. Message windows (chapter 13) display air interface messages as well as mode reports and error reports produced by connected devices.

6.2.

Types of Presentation Window

The following presentation windows (besides the Data Selector) are available in TEMS Investigation Route Analysis: • • • • • Map windows: chapter 7, page 37 line charts: chapter 10, page 72 bar charts: chapter 11, page 79 status windows, presenting information elements in tabular form: chapter 12, page 84 message windows, listing messages and events: chapter 13, page 88

6.3.

Configuration of Presentation Windows

A large number of preconfigured windows are built into Route Analysis. See the overview in Information Elements and Events, chapter 8. These windows

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are designed to exhibit the crucial data with maximum clarity and thus facilitate many frequently recurring analysis tasks. You can easily change the contents and appearance of any presentation window by altering the window’s properties. They are accessed by rightclicking in the window and choosing Properties from the context menu. Some aspects of the presentation are determined by the general properties of the application. How to set these is the subject of chapter 4.

6.4.

Window Updating and Synchronization

A fundamental distinction can be made between “snapshot” windows, showing the situation at one instant in time (status windows and bar charts) “history” windows, exhibiting the entire logfile (maps, line charts, and message windows)

and •

All windows are synchronized. When you select a point in time in a history window, other history windows highlight the same time instant, whereas the snapshot windows are updated to show the data that was current at this time.

6.5.

Changing Devices

This handy function is found in all presentation windows: To keep the window configuration intact but present everything from a different device, right-click the title bar of the window and choose the desired device from the context menu.

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Chapter 7. Map Windows

7.

Map Windows

A Map window is used to display a map of your testing area and present logfiles graphically on it. Information elements, events, and cells are shown along the route in symbolic form. Numeric values are shown in tooltips. The Map window is the most important, powerful, and versatile presentation window in Route Analysis. High-level information on large logfile sets can be extracted by statistical binning; at the same time, single routes can be analyzed in minute detail.

7.1.

Loading Map Files

See section 5.1, page 30.

7.2.

Presenting Logfiles in a Map Window

Map windows can present data from multiple logfiles. By default all MS and DC devices in each logfile are included in the presentation. Logfiles can be loaded in a Map window • • by drag-and-drop from the Navigator by right-clicking logfiles in the Data Selector and choosing View in Map.

The logfiles currently loaded in a Map window are listed on the Logfiles tab in the right-hand pane of the window. If you uncheck the checkbox next to a logfile on this tab, the file is excluded from the map presentation (affects both routes and statistical binning, including all tasks). However, the logfile remains loaded in the Map window. Check the box to include the logfile in the map presentation again. To remove a logfile permanently from a Map window, select it on the Logfiles tab and press Delete on your keyboard.

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7.3.

The “Generic” Map Presentation

The Map window is capable of several forms of presentation. On one hand, it is configured for a basic presentation (called “Generic”). On the other hand, it can also display the output from various specialized computation tasks alongside (or on top of) the basic presentation. The description of the specialized tasks is deferred until chapter 8; here, we will discuss the basic presentation, referred to as “Generic” in the map toolbar combo box. When you open a new Map window, the Generic presentation is derived from the default properties (see chapter 4). The contents of the Generic presentation appears from the Legend tab found in the right-hand pane of the Map window. The contents of the Generic presentation always remain selectable on the Legend tab, even if you choose a different task in the task combo box. Indeed, all items in the Generic presentation are by default selected, so that they will always be shown unless you turn them off. Consequently, the Generic presentation is the place to put “standard” data that you want to show most of the time.

7.3.1.

Route

The route is traced by a black dotted line (“Trail” on the Legend tab), labeled at regular intervals with blue arrows that indicate the direction of travel. Information element route markers, where drawn, will be plotted on top of the trail and hide it.

Trail only

Trail and route markers

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Chapter 7. Map Windows

7.3.2.

Cells

The presentation of cells is largely predefined. Cell sectors are drawn with correct orientations, spaced apart slightly. Route Analysis does not display neighbor relations between cells as part of the standard cell presentation. Neighbor relations are however indicated for a selected route marker by means of the spider cursor: see section 7.3.3. GSM Cells The colors used to draw GSM cells are predefined. GSM cells are always labeled with their names, regardless of zoom. If you zoom in enough on a cell, the text label becomes more detailed:

Zoomed out WCDMA Cells

Close-up

The coloring of WCDMA cells follows that of scrambling codes, which is set in the General Properties (see section 4.6, “Presentation Attributes of Information Elements”). WCDMA cells are always labeled with cell name and SC index, regardless of zoom. If you zoom in enough on a cell, the text label becomes more detailed:

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Zoomed out

Close-up

CDMA Cells The colors used to draw CDMA cells are predefined. CDMA cells are always labeled with their names, regardless of zoom. If you zoom in enough on a cell, the text label will show cell name, band, RF channel, and PN offset. Wi-Fi Access Points Wi-Fi access points defined in an XML cell file are presented in the same way as cells, using predefined colors. Wi-Fi access points are labeled with their names.

7.3.3.

Spider Cursor: Identification of Serving Cell/ Active Set and Neighbors (UMTS)

The appearance of this presentation is predefined, including the color scheme. Note that you must click the Selection tool button on the Map window toolbar to be able to select cells.

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Chapter 7. Map Windows

Presentation With Cell File If a cell file with matching information is loaded in the application, the spider cursor will display as follows: • A blue line is drawn from the selected route marker to the serving cell (GSM) or Wi-Fi access point (GAN) or to each member of the active set (WCDMA). A magenta-colored line is drawn from the route marker to each neighbor (according to the neighbor definitions in the cell file). Names of cells/access points are printed along the connecting lines.

• •

Presentation Without Cell File If no matching cell data is loaded in the application, a poor man’s version of the spider cursor is displayed based on what can be gleaned from the logfile. The “spider” in this case is drawn symbolically around the selected route marker:

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For GSM and GAN, a long blue line at twelve o’clock represents the serving cell or access point. For WCDMA, a blue line is drawn to each active set member (only one in the above WCDMA example). All shorter, magenta-colored lines represent neighbors (including the hidden one representing SC 68 in the screenshot above). For WCDMA, both detected and monitored neighbors are displayed. CGI parameters are printed as text labels insofar as they can be identified. In the absence of such data, channel parameters are given instead (GSM: ARFCN/BSIC; WCDMA: SC/UARFCN), as in the screenshot above.

7.3.4.

Information Elements

A Map window receives the information element configuration for its Generic presentation from the general properties (see chapter 4). Each route marker defined there, encoding up to three information elements, appears on the Legend tab where it can be selected or deselected. The route markers are sorted according to their plot offsets. The simplest way to add further information elements is by drag-and-drop from the Navigator to the Legend tab. The first element you drop on the Legend tab will determine the color of a new route marker. The size and symbol attributes of this marker will initially be unassigned; you can drop further elements directly onto these attributes to assign them. (To set arguments and attributes, you need to access the Properties dialog; compare next paragraph.) Alternatively, to change the information element configuration, you can rightclick in the Map window, choose Properties, and click the IE tab. This

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Chapter 7. Map Windows

command opens a dialog identical to General Properties → Default Properties → Map → Information Elements; the settings made in the Map window will override the general properties, but only for that particular window. All details of the dialog are gone through in section 4.5.1. When you have changed the information element configuration, you may be prompted to reload the logfiles in order for the presentation to update. The reason this is not always done automatically is that the updating may take some time if a large amount of logfile data is loaded, and/or the changes made to the configuration necessitate extensive reloading of data. When this is the case, it should be possible to postpone updating the window.

7.3.4.1.
• •

Notes on Information Element Plotting and Updating

Here is a summary of the factors that affect plotting and updating of IEs: Interpolation. Map positions specified by pinpointing are linearly interpolated. Frequency of measurements. A new IE marker is plotted only if a message with fresh data has been delivered by the measurement device. Markers are therefore plotted more sparsely in idle mode than in dedicated mode. Note also that certain information elements are not updated regularly at all but only on special occasions (for example, when the phone switches to a different RAB). Map zoom. The plotting density on the map is dependent on the current zoom of the Map window. When you zoom in, more markers are filled in to show the route in more detail; when you zoom out, markers are drawn more sparsely. Specifically, a new IE marker is drawn next to the previous one if the centers of the two markers will be more than 5 pixels apart on the screen.

7.3.5.

Events

A Map window receives the event configuration for its Generic presentation from the general properties (see chapter 4). Each event included there appears on the Legend tab under the item “Events”, where it can be selected or deselected. To change the event configuration for this particular Map window, you can right-click in the window, choose Properties, and click the Events tab. This command opens a dialog identical to General Properties → Default Properties → Map → Events; the settings made in the Map window will

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override the general properties, but only for that window. All details of the dialog are gone through in section 4.5.1.

7.3.6.

Pinpoint Markers

If a logfile has been positioned manually by pinpointing (see the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 7.1.4), the waypoints are stored in the logfile as filemarks with the information “Pinpoint”, and they will be plotted as black diamonds in a Route Analysis Map window. The presentation of the waypoints cannot be customized.

7.3.7.

Further Notes on the Legend Tab

At the top of the Legend tab is a combo box where you can select which items to show on the tab. You may find it convenient to hide the ranges of information elements (“All, No Ranges”). When you right-click an information element on the Legend tab, a context menu appears with the choices Show Worst, Show Mean, Show Most Common, and Show Best. This refers to the presentation of multiple air interface messages plotted at the same GPS position; see the general properties, section 4.5.1 (“Value Type”). You can delete a route marker (IE triplet) by selecting it and pressing the Delete key on the keyboard. Note that the entire marker disappears, not just the IE selected. The other items on the Legend tab cannot be deleted in this way.

7.3.8.

The Info Tab

The Info tab shows information on a map object that you have selected: a route marker, an event icon, or a cell. The Cell section of the Info tab also shows the serving cell and neighbor cells associated with a route marker, as identified graphically on the map by means of the spider cursor (see section 7.3.3). What is said of cells here applies equally to Wi-Fi access points.

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7.4.

The “Generic” Map Presentation: Statistical Binning

Route data can be distilled into statistics, which can be visualized in map views. The statistical binning is done in one of the following ways: • Area binning: A statistic is calculated for each square in a rectangular grid. Specifically, for each square, the mean value of all route markers within the square is displayed (the value represented by each route marker being determined by the Value Type parameter, as explained in section 4.5.1). All logfiles loaded in the Map window are always included in this calculation. The on-screen presentation of area binning is semi-transparent, allowing lower map layers to shine through (“alpha blending”). When you print a Map window, the area binning is drawn in an ordinary, non-transparent manner. • Time binning: Routes are divided into segments of equal duration, and statistics are calculated for each such segment (and for each route) separately. The presentation of time binning is similar to ordinary route plotting, except that route markers are plotted more sparsely. One route marker is drawn to represent each temporal segment, and the statistic displayed is determined directly by the Value Type parameter (Mean, Best, Worst, or Most Common; again, see section 4.5.1). • Distance binning: This is the same as time binning, except that routes are divided into segments of equal length.

See the examples in section 7.4.3. You select which IEs to show statistics for in the right-hand pane of the Map window, on the Binning tab. • • For area binning, only one IE can be displayed. For time and distance binning, several markers can be displayed at the same time, each marker representing up to three IEs. The representation of IEs in terms of marker color, size, and symbol is precisely the same as that used for ordinary routes (see sections 4.6 and 7.3.4). Where one marker represents more than one IE, all IEs in the group are checked on the Binning tab as soon as you check one of the IEs.

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7.4.1.

Combining Different Types of Statistical Binning; Binning vs. Route Plotting

Time binning and distance binning cannot both be applied to the same information element simultaneously. Area binning can be displayed independently of time and distance binning for any given information element. Area binning can also be displayed in combination with route plotting, whereas time or distance binning replaces routes (since these presentations consist of more sparsely plotted versions of the routes themselves).

7.4.2.

Properties of Statistical Binning

The binning properties can be changed for an individual Map window by rightclicking in the window and choosing Properties → Binning tab. The dialog is the same as in the general properties (section 4.5.3). The settings in a Map window will override the general properties, but only for that window.

7.4.3.

Examples of Statistical Binning

No Binning (Route Plot)

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Area Binning (Bin Size 50 × 50 m; Route Not Plotted)

Time Binning (Interval 20 s)

Distance Binning (Interval 100 m)

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7.5.
• •

Changing Devices

By default a Map window presents data from all MS and DC devices. To restrict the presentation to a single device, right-click the title bar of the Map window and choose the desired device. To revert to the default setting, right-click the title bar of the Map window and choose “ALL”.

7.6.

Slave Map Windows
A slave Map window is created by clicking the button Create Slave Map on the Map window toolbar.

The slave window is a copy of the “master” window from which it was created. In most respects, the slave is dependent on the master: see the list of properties below. What can be manipulated independently in the slave are the Legend tab and the device for which data is displayed (set by rightclicking on the title bar: see section 6.5). This makes slave windows useful for trying out different presentations of a set of data without having to load the data several times into an ordinary Map window. (The latter may be timeconsuming if the logfiles are large.) The slave window has the following properties: • The contents of the slave window are completely controlled by the master window. At creation time, all map files and logfiles loaded into the master window are inherited by the slave window. If you load more map or logfile data into the master window after creating the slave, the new data will display in the slave as well. The slave does not display cell data. The zoom of the map is inherited by the slave at creation time. When you zoom, pan, or center the master window later on, these operations also affect the slave. If you change the information element configuration in the master, the slave is not updated. The slave lacks the toolbar and the context menu. The slave does not show the spider cursor. The slave does not handle tasks. Task presentations do not display in the slave, and task-related settings made in the master window’s combo boxes do not affect the slave in any way.

• •

• • • •

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7.7.

Exporting the Map View to Google Earth

A Map window presentation can be exported as KML files and loaded in Google Earth. A KML file is a kind of XML document designed to supply geographic information to Google Earth. The export is performed from the Map window context menu (see section 7.8). You are prompted to specify where to save the KML files; by default the files are saved in the Logfiles directory beneath the TEMS Investigation installation directory. With the sole exception of area binning, which is not exportable, the map presentation is exported precisely according to the current Map window configuration: • • The logfiles and cells exported are those that are currently loaded in the Map window. The information elements and events included in the export are those that are currently selected in the Map window.

Two KML files are produced by the export, one for cells and one for information elements and events. Properties of the Google Earth Presentation The KML files appear in the Places pane in Google Earth. Beneath the file containing cells, the cells are listed individually. Beneath the IE and events file, each exported information element is represented by its own item; events are represented collectively by one further item. An information element can be plotted • • as successive route markers, as in TEMS Investigation, or as a 3D line chart winding its way along the route, where the IE values are expressed along the vertical dimension and successive points are joined by line segments.

These presentation options are represented in the Places pane by “Point” and “Line”. (Both can be displayed at the same time.) Information element values and event names are printed in the Google Earth image view as route marker labels. Sectors representing cells are drawn with correct orientation and beam width. The sector radius is proportional to the antenna gain. The sector is furthermore drawn at a height above the ground corresponding to the antenna height. The sector color is determined by the scrambling code color

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in Route Analysis. No text labels are printed for cells in the Google Earth image view, but the cell names appear in the Places pane.

7.8.
• •

Map Context Menu

Properties: See sections 7.3.4 and 7.4.2. Reload Data: Updates the Map window presentation of all logfiles that are loaded in the application. If you have modified the presentation and declined to reload data when prompted (see section 7.3.4), you can perform the reload manually with this command. View All Logfiles: Zooms out so that all routes become visible in the map view. Coordinate System: Sets the projection used in the Map window. (This only affects the presentation. You are free to choose any coordinate system you like.) Uniform Map Views: This command refocuses all Map windows so that they show the same geographical area. (It has nothing to do with synchronizing the presentation of data.) Export to Google Earth: Exports the current Map window contents and configuration as a KML file readable by Google Earth. See section 7.7.

• •

7.9.

Map Toolbar
Layer Control: Manage layers or change displaying or labeling properties. Changes are only temporary and cannot be saved. See section 7.11. Selection Tool: On clicking this button, you can click an object in a presentation layer to select it. Zoom In, Zoom Out: Zoom the map. Holding down the Ctrl key swaps the Zoom operations. Note that zooming can also (and more conveniently) be done with the mouse scroll wheel. Center Map: On clicking this button, when you click a spot on the map, the map is centered around this spot. Pan Tool: On clicking this button, you can pan the map by clicking and dragging. Panning can also be done by holding the mouse scroll button

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and moving the pointer. The latter method is superior in that another map tool (such as the Selection tool) can be active instead. Ruler: Measure the distance between two points on the map. Click the starting point, hold the mouse button, and release the button at the endpoint. The distance is shown in a popup window. The unit of distance is governed by the regional settings in Windows. Create Slave Map: Clones the Map window, creating a “slave” Map window with the same configuration and data content as the original window. See section 7.6. The combo boxes on the right are used by some of the analysis tasks. See chapter 8.

7.10.

Map Status Bar

The status bar displays latitude and longitude for the mouse pointer.

7.11.

Map Layers

Layers are distinct sets of data which together make up the contents of a Map window. All of the presentation in Route Analysis is put in a layer called “TEMS Data”. This layer should never be removed, and there is no reason to change any of its properties. Besides the presentation layer, there are also map layers, which make up the map itself and cannot be edited. It is possible to edit some layer settings that do not affect the contents of the layers, for instance to set the visibility of each layer. These settings are detailed below. Note: Changes affect only the individual Map window and cannot be saved. If you want to make changes that can be saved, you can use the Layer Control of the GeoSet Manager, which can be launched by executing the file C:\Program Files\Common Files\MapInfo Shared\MapX Common \GeosetManager40.exe.

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To open the Layer Control: Click the Layer Control button.

Up, Down

Change the order in which layers are superimposed on the screen. (The top layer is first in the list.) To move a layer upwards, select it and click Up. To move a layer downwards, select it and click Down. Add a layer. Select a TAB file and click Open. Remove the selected layer. Check to make the selected layer in the list visible. Not used. Disabled for presentation layers; should be turned off for map layers. Check to make the labels of the selected layer visible. For labels to be visible, the layer they belong to must be visible. Disabled for presentation layers. Note that the visibility of labels may be conditioned by the zoom range. See Labels... below.

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Editable Display Labels

Not used. Disabled for presentation layers; should be turned off for map layers. Set display properties for the selected layer. Set label properties for the selected layer.

7.12.

Copying Map Window Contents

You can copy the contents of a Map window to the Windows clipboard by pressing Ctrl + C with the Map window in focus.

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8.

Multi-logfile Analysis

The strength of the Route Analysis application lies in its ability to analyze large numbers of logfiles, sifting through large volumes of data, and quickly pointing out where trouble lies. Moreover, data can be categorized not only by logfile but also by serving cell, enabling rapid identification of cells plagued by frequent problems. All of the multi-logfile functionality is covered in the present chapter. Route Analysis comes equipped with a number of predefined tasks, that is, methods of filtering logfile data in the Data Selector and Map windows. You can also define tasks of your own.

8.1.

Workflow

Here is a quick overview of how to work with multiple logfiles. The multi-logfile analysis always begins in the Data Selector. • • • • Open a Data Selector window. Right-click in the Data Selector and choose Add Logfiles. Open all the logfiles you want to analyze. Apply an analysis task. The predefined tasks are gone through in sections 8.2–8.10. In the Data Selector, select the desired files, right-click the selection, and choose View in Map. If the task chosen in the Data Selector has an associated map-specific presentation, the same task is automatically selected in the Map window as well. If the task chosen in the Data Selector has no map-specific presentation, “Generic” is selected in the Map window’s task combo box, and only the Generic presentation is shown.

To study a subset of the logfiles in a Map window: •

A new Map window now opens in which the logfiles are plotted. •

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To view a logfile in other presentation windows (line chart, bar chart, Layer 3 message window, etc.), do as follows: • • Right-click the logfile in the Data Selector and choose Load Selected Logfiles in Project. The logfile is now added in the Navigator. In the Navigator, double-click the logfile to make it the current logfile.

This logfile will now be presented in any presentation window that you open.

8.2.

Call Analysis

Suppose that we have loaded a set of logfiles into the Route Analysis tool. We are interested in spotting dropped calls and therefore choose the Call Analysis task in the Data Selector window. • Right-click in the Data Selector and choose Task → Call Analysis.

The Data Selector is now loaded with columns counting the occurrences of call events. By default the counting is done by logfile. We sort on the Dropped Call column to rank logfiles according to the number of dropped calls. The contents of the Data Selector window, or parts thereof, can be copied and pasted into a spreadsheet program. See section 9.1 for details.

Even more usefully, the Data Selector can categorize the events by cell rather than by logfile: • Right-click in the Data Selector and choose View → Cells. If the cell name can be identified, as in the screenshot below, it is shown in the Name column. If not, CGI/Cell Id information is displayed instead.

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The number in brackets at the end of the Name string gives the number of logfiles in which this cell occurs. We are now interested in studying this cell close up, so we right-click it and choose View in Map. All routes involving interaction with the cell in question are then drawn on the map. In the screenshot below, we can immediately identify one of the dropped calls (indicated by the arrow).

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8.3.

Handover Analysis

Like the Call Analysis, this task is event-based. By counting failures of various types of handover, it helps track down areas (cells) infested with handover problems. • Right-click in the Data Selector and choose Task → Handover Analysis.

The Data Selector is now loaded with columns counting the occurrences of handover events. A logfile ranking might look as follows:

8.4.

GPRS Analysis

This is yet another event-based task. It tabulates the occurrences of a number of packet-switched events, thus lending a hand in analyzing GPRS network performance. • Right-click in the Data Selector and choose Task → GPRS Analysis.

The Data Selector is now loaded with GPRS event columns.

8.5.

Map-based Tasks: General

The tasks that follow below differ from the ones previously described in that they do not display any event statistics in the Data Selector. Rather, they plot the outcome of the analysis in a Map window. You use the combo boxes found at the top of the Map window to configure the analysis.

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One configurable parameter in the combo boxes (for WCDMA data) is the scanned UARFCN. These UARFCNs are referred to as “Fn”, where “F1” means “the first UARFCN scanned” (= the UARFCN from which the “Sc 1st” information elements are derived) and so on. When WCDMA scan data is loaded in the map, the combo boxes will also show a value for each Fn. This value applies to the route marker currently selected in the Map window. If no route marker is selected, the combo boxes show the scan setup at the beginning of the last logfile loaded. In filtering criteria expressed by selections in the combo boxes, the UARFCN designations always have the relative meaning defined above; a filtering criterion never involves the requirement that an Fn be equal to a specific UARFCN.

8.6.

Pilot Coverage Analysis (WCDMA)

This task performs a pilot coverage analysis, based on WCDMA scan data, and plots the result in the Map window. The task can also be used to investigate scrambling code usage; see below.

8.6.1.

Functions of the Combo Boxes

Combo box 2: Here you specify the UMTS frequency and optionally the ranking of the scrambling code (from strongest down to 12th strongest). If you choose a UMTS frequency without an SC ranking (e.g. “F1: 10638”), and combine this with a specific SC index in combo box 4, you will plot all the samples where that SC has been strong enough to be ranked. Combo box 3: This combo box has two functions. If you wish to analyze coverage, this is where you choose the coverage parameter on which to base the analysis: Ec/Io, Ec, or Coverage Class. The route marker color will be governed by the chosen parameter. – – By Ec is meant Aggr Ec (not Peak Ec). The coverage classes are defined in the RAN Tuning chapter: see section 16.3.6, page 97. (In the Map window, the thresholds defining the coverage classes are fixed; for the settings, see section 8.6.3.)

Alternatively, if you are not interested in coverage but rather in the usage of SCs, choose Scrambling Code to have the marker color governed by the SC index. The coloring of SCs can be customized in the general properties under Current Workspace → Attributes → Color → WCDMA

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→ Scrambling Code (see section 4.6). On the Legend tab you can list all
SCs that occur, along with the colors currently used to represent them, by selecting “Scrambling Codes” in the Legend tab combo box. • Combo box 4: Scrambling code index. If you choose a specific SC, only samples where that SC is ranked are shown. If you choose “All...”, all SCs are shown.

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8.6.2.
Coverage

Examples

This is an ordinary Ec/Io coverage plot. Scrambling Code Use

By selecting “Scrambling Code”, we plot the SC of the serving cell. The SCs are color-coded. Use the spider cursor (see section 7.3.3) or zoom in on markers (see Text Labels below) to view SC indices and UARFCNs.

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Strength of nth Strongest Scrambling Code

Here we plot the Ec/Io of the third strongest SC in each sample. Where no marker is plotted, this is because less than three SCs were ranked at that point. Index of nth Strongest Scrambling Code

Same as previous plot, except that the SC index is plotted instead.

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Particular Scrambling Code

This plot shows where SC 69 has been ranked, the color indicating the Ec/Io of that SC at these points. We can remove the signal strength information by choosing “Scrambling Code” in combo box 3 instead:

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Text Labels If you zoom in enough on route markers, each marker will be labeled with textual information:

8.6.3.

Threshold Settings for Coverage Classes

Compare section 16.3.6, page 97 (regarding the differing names of quantities, see Information Elements and Events, section 3.3: “Notes on Quantities Denoting Signal Power”, page 87). Threshold Ec/Io High Ec/Io Medium Ec/Io Low Ec High Ec Medium Ec Low Value –9.7 dB –12.0 dB –16.0 dB –92 dBm –95 dBm –107 dBm

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8.7.

Pilot Pollution Analysis (WCDMA)

This task analyzes pilot pollution, taking WCDMA scan data as input, and plots the result in the Map window. In the Data Selector, occurrences of the event More Than 3 Strong SCs are tabulated, indicating situations where pilot pollution may be suspected. The event, with its fixed parameter values (3 SCs, 3 dB power difference; full definition in Information Elements and Events, section 7.3) only gives a rough indication. By performing the Pilot Pollution task, which allows you to vary these parameters, you can obtain a much more detailed picture of how serious the pilot pollution situation is. (Note that when investigating pilot pollution, the spider cursor – covered in section 7.3.3 – is also a helpful tool.) As in the event definition, the signal power measure used is Aggr Ec. Mode of Visualization The pilot pollution can be visualized on the map in two ways. The choice is made in combo box no. 2: • Pie: A pie chart is drawn along the route wherever the pilot pollution event has been reported. Each sector in the chart represents one “strong” scrambling code (i.e. one that is a potential polluter). Value: This is a simpler mode of presentation. A single marker is drawn whose color reflects the number of “strong” SCs at that point.

Choosing the UMTS Frequency and Power Difference Threshold In combo box no. 3, you choose which UMTS frequency to study. You also adjust the threshold that governs whether or not to regard a scrambling code as “strong”. Choosing the Number of SCs In combo box no. 4, you can vary the number of SCs (the total number of strong SCs including the strongest) that must be exceeded for pilot pollution to be indicated. For example, if you choose “Count > 3”, it means that pilot pollution will be indicated if there are at least four strong SCs in total, i.e. at least three strong SCs present besides the strongest SC.

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8.7.1.

Examples

You can list all SCs that occur, along with the colors used to represent them, on the Legend tab by selecting “Scrambling Codes” in the Legend tab combo box.

Text Labels If you zoom in enough on a pie chart, text labels will appear in each of its sectors:

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8.8.

Missing Neighbor Analysis (WCDMA)

In the Data Selector, occurrences of the event Missing Neighbor Detection are tabulated, indicating situations in a WCDMA network where SCs are strong enough to possibly merit inclusion as neighbors. The event has a fixed power difference threshold (3 dB) and therefore only gives a rough indication. (For the full event definition, see Information Elements and Events, section 7.3.) The Missing Neighbor task permits a more flexible analysis where the power difference threshold can be varied. Again, the Map window is used to plot the outcome of the analysis. As in the definition of the Missing Neighbor Detection event, the signal power measure used is Aggr Ec. Note that this task requires that a cell file indicating neighbor relations has been loaded. How neighbor relations are recorded in cell files is detailed in appendices C (CEL format) and D (XML format). Mode of Visualization A pie chart is drawn along the route wherever the missing neighbor event has been reported. Each sector in the chart represents one possible missing neighbor. Choosing the UMTS Frequency In combo box no. 2, you choose which UMTS frequency to study.

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Choosing the Power Difference Threshold In combo box no. 3, you can adjust the threshold that governs how strong a SC must be in order to count as “missing”.

8.8.1.

Example

If there are multiple missing neighbors, the circle is divided into sectors. You can always zoom in on the route marker to view details on the SCs:

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8.9.

Benchmarking

This task allows you to compare the values of one selected information element between operators. The outcome of the comparison is displayed in the form of area binning. Operators are represented by colors in this presentation. The colors are identical with those of the information element MNC (Mobile Network Code). How to modify the color range setup for an IE is explained in section 4.6.1, page 28. You can display the MNC color coding on the Legend tab by selecting “Network Codes” in the Legend tab combo box. The information element you want to base the benchmarking on must first be added in the Map window. How to do this is described in section 4.5.1, page 24. Once you have added an IE, you can choose it in combo box no. 2. What benchmarking criterion is used depends on the Value Type setting for the information element in the Map window. See section 4.5.1.2, page 25. Specifically: Value Type Mean Best Worst Most Common Benchmarking Criterion Best mean value in bin Best single value in bin Worst single value in bin Best “most common” value in bin

“Mean” is probably the most useful setting for benchmarking in most cases. The bin size and other basic area binning settings are as specified in the Properties dialog: see section 4.5.3.1, page 27. Each bin will be assigned the color of the operator that attained the most extreme score (best or worst) for the selected IE in that bin, as detailed in the above table. The Benchmarking task overrides the generic area binning presentation (see section 7.4, page 45); you cannot display both at the same time. The other types of binning, however, can coexist with the Benchmarking task.

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8.9.1.

Example

8.10.

GSM Filter (GSM)

This GSM-specific task allows you to filter out route markers where ARFCN and/or BSIC assume specific values among the serving and neighbor cells. You select the desired ARFCN in combo box no. 2 and the desired BSIC in combo box no. 3. Either or both of these parameters can be specified. The resulting filtering criterion is one of the following: ARFCN Selected Yes No BSIC Selected No Yes

Filtering Criterion Selected ARFCN found among serving and neighbor cells Selected BSIC found among serving and neighbor cells

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ARFCN Selected Yes

BSIC Selected Yes

Filtering Criterion Cell with both ARFCN and BSIC matching found among serving and neighbor cells

8.10.1.

Example

8.11.

User-defined Tasks

User-defined tasks compute event statistics, so their presentation is analogous to that of Call Analysis. See section 8.2, page 55. How to set up user-defined tasks is covered in section 4.4, page 23.

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9.

The Data Selector

The essentials of how to work with the Data Selector window have been covered in section 5.3.1 and chapter 8. The present chapter explains the remaining functionality in this window.

9.1.

Copying Window Contents

The contents of the Data Selector window can be copied, in whole or in part, to the Windows clipboard so that it can be transferred to a spreadsheet application or other suitable program. • Select the lines you want to export, using the mouse and optionally the Ctrl and Shift keys according to the usual conventions in Windows. Press Ctrl + A to select all lines. Right-click in the window and select Copy from the context menu. Paste the copied selection into the desired application.

• •

9.2.

Printing Window Contents

To print the contents of the Data Selector window: Right-click in the window and select Print from the context menu.

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10.

The Line Chart

In the line chart you can plot numeric information elements in order to visualize how their values evolve over time. The line chart can also present events. Line charts always present data from the current logfile.

10.1.

Organization of the Line Chart Window

Chart pane

Chart pane

Legend pane

Additional Information pane

Y-axis pane

The line chart is subdivided into the following panes: • one or several Chart panes, containing the charts themselves; an x-axis is drawn beneath the bottom chart

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• • •

a Y-axis pane for each chart, showing the scales for the plotted information elements a Legend pane, describing the nature and origin of the information elements shown, and indicating their values at a single point in time an Additional Information pane, displaying arbitrary information elements in textual format.

A maximum of four charts can be accommodated, along with their associated Y-axis panes. The legend can only gloss one chart at a time. The relative sizes of the panes can be freely adjusted by dragging the interior frame handles.

10.2.

Contents of the Line Chart Panes

The Chart Pane The information elements that can be plotted in a line chart are chiefly measurements of physical quantities. Up to eight elements can be accommodated in each chart. The plotting can be done either as a curve or in the form of successive vertical bars. The x-axis beneath the bottom chart shows the time. Events are indicated by dashed vertical lines accompanied by a symbol identifying the event type. The symbols used for predefined events are given in Information Elements and Events, chapter 7. To see the names of the events, open an Events window. The Chart pane is synchronized with the Legend and Additional Information panes (as well as with all other open presentation windows, as explained in section 6.4). You can move backwards and forwards in a replayed segment with the left and right arrow keys on your keyboard. In the chart, a solid line indicates the point in time currently selected in the presentation. Scrolling the chart by means of the scroll bar does not change the time instant selected, so neither the text panes nor other presentation windows will be updated. To select a new point in time, just click in the chart. The Y-axis Pane The Y-axis pane associated with a chart shows the scales of the information elements plotted there. Each scale is drawn in the same color as the

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information element. If the pane is too narrow to show all scales at once, you can scroll between scales using the arrow buttons. The scales can be changed; see section 10.4.4 (“Upper Limit”, “Lower Limit”). The Legend Pane In the legend full details are provided (for one chart at a time) on the information elements plotted for the currently selected time instant. Parameters (BSIC/SC/PN, ARFCN/UARFCN/RF channel) associated with elements are given in columns of their own wherever possible. To focus the legend on a different chart, right-click anywhere in the Line Chart window and choose the desired “Legend Chart” item from the context menu. The Additional Information Pane This is a sort of status window where an arbitrary set of information elements can be displayed (for example, elements which cannot be plotted). The contents in this pane is the same regardless of what chart is in focus; it is not possible to set up this pane differently for different charts.

10.3.

Zooming the Line Chart

You can zoom in on a segment of the x-axis by selecting the segment and releasing the mouse button. Besides, commands for zooming in, zooming out, and restoring the default zoom are found in the line chart context menu. The same operations can be performed from the keyboard by holding Ctrl and pressing +, –, and D respectively.

10.4.

Changing Line Chart Contents and Properties

To edit the contents of the line chart and their presentation, right-click anywhere in the Line Chart window and choose Properties.

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10.4.1.

Editing General Line Chart Window Properties

Under Name of line chart, type the text that should appear in the window title bar.

10.4.2.
• •

Adding and Deleting Charts

To add a new chart in the Line Chart window, click Add. A new dialog appears in which you configure the new chart: see section 10.4.4 below. To delete a chart, select it and click Delete.

A Line Chart window can hold up to four charts.

10.4.3.

Rearranging Charts

To change the ordering of the charts in the Line Chart window, select each chart in turn and move it to the desired position using the up and down arrow buttons.

10.4.4.

Editing a Chart

To edit a chart, select it and click Edit.

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General Chart Properties • • Under Chart name, enter a name for the chart. Check Draw horizontal lines to have horizontal grid lines drawn in the background for all subcharts.

Information Elements In the rest of this dialog, you edit the set of information elements to plot and how to present them. The information elements that can be plotted are chiefly those that represent or are derived from measured physical quantities (e.g. signal strength). • To show an element, select it in the Available IEs box and click the “>” button. The element is then copied into the Added IEs box. A maximum of eight elements can be presented. To remove an element from the set that can figure in the presentation, select it in the Added IEs box and click the “<” button. To remove all elements from the presentation, click the “<<” button.

• •

The information element that you add will be picked from the device the line chart is drawn for (see the title bar; by default, MS1). You can always change devices later; see below. For elements with arguments, the last argument is set to the lowest value not already selected. If you move the same element to Added IEs again, one of two things will happen:

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• •

if the element has at least one argument, it is taken from the same device as before, and the last argument is incremented; otherwise, the element is taken from the next device.

To set arguments freely, you need to access the properties of the added IE. When you select an element in the Added IEs box, its customizable properties appear in the Properties box on the right: • • • Equipment: The device from which to pick the information element (“MS1”, etc.). Legend: The name under which the element will be presented in the line chart. If nothing is entered here, the IE string is used. Upper Limit, Lower Limit: These together define the visible range of the information element. By default this range is equal to the native range of the element. Plot Type: Plotted points are either connected by a line or supported by bars. Color: Here you can change the color that is used for drawing. Draw Threshold: If set to Yes, a threshold line will be drawn in the line chart. An additional field named Threshold appears; enter the threshold value here. Scale: Shows or hides the information element scale. IE Format: Format of information element (unit of presentation). This field appears only where applicable. IE Attribute: Attribute of the information element (e.g. sorting order of channels). This field appears only where applicable. IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: Arguments of the information element (e.g. channel index, SC index, [U]ARFCN index). These fields appear only where applicable.

• • •

• • • •

Events • • To decide which events should appear in the line chart presentation, click the Event button in the outer dialog. For each type of event that you want to present, select it in the Available Events box and move it to the Selected Events box.

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Additional Information Tab • To choose the information elements to view in the Additional Information pane, click the Additional Info button in the outer dialog.

This tab works much like the Information Elements tab, except that here any information element can be selected. The settable IE properties on this tab are: • • Equipment: The device from which to pick the information element (“MS1”, etc.). IE Format, IE Attribute, IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: See above under Information Elements.

10.4.5.

Changing Devices

By default the line chart presents data from MS1. To present all data from a different device, there is a short-cut: • • Right-click the title bar of the line chart window. From the context menu, select the desired device.

10.4.6.

CPICH Scan Line Charts

These line charts are covered in full in the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 9.4.

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11.

The Bar Chart

The bar chart is used to view successive snapshots in time of a selected set of information elements. Bar charts always present data from the current logfile.

11.1.

Contents of the Bar Chart Panes

The Chart Pane The information elements that can be plotted in a bar chart are chiefly measurements of physical quantities. The Chart pane is synchronized with the Legend and Additional Information panes, as well as with all other open presentation windows, as explained in section 6.4. Clicking a bar displays max and min indicators, which will from then on keep track of the maximum and minimum values assumed by this parameter since the bar was clicked. To reset the max and min indicators, click on a different bar. The X-axis Pane The X-axis pane provides labels for the data distributed on the x-axis (for one chart at a time). The Y-axis Pane Along the y-axis of a chart are shown the scales of the information elements plotted there. Each scale is colored according to the color ranges of the information element (set in the general properties: see section 4.6.1, page 28). If the pane is too narrow to show all scales at once, you can scroll between scales using the arrow buttons. The scales can be modified; see section 11.2.4 (“Flip Scale”, “Upper Limit”, “Lower Limit”).

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The Legend Pane In the legend full details are provided (for one chart at a time) on the information elements displayed in that chart. To refocus the legend on a different chart, just click in that chart. The Additional Information Pane This is a sort of status window where an arbitrary set of information elements can be displayed (for example, elements which cannot be drawn in a bar chart). You can choose different contents in this pane for different charts, as described in section 11.2.4.

11.2.

Changing Bar Chart Contents and Properties

Right-click in the bar chart window and choose Properties.

11.2.1.

Editing General Bar Chart Window Properties

Under Name of window, type the text that should appear in the window title bar.

11.2.2.
• •

Adding and Deleting Charts

To add a new chart in the Bar Chart window, click Add. A new dialog appears in which you configure the new chart: see section 11.2.4 below. To delete a chart, select it and click Delete.

A Bar Chart window can hold up to four charts.

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11.2.3.

Rearranging Charts

To change the ordering of the charts in the Bar Chart window, select each chart in turn and move it to the desired position using the up and down arrow buttons.

11.2.4.

Editing a Chart

To edit a chart, select it and click Edit.

General Chart Properties • • Under Chart name, enter a name for the chart. Check Draw horizontal lines to have horizontal grid lines drawn in the background for all subcharts.

For scanner bar charts, the “IE on x-axis” box indicates the information element represented along the x-axis. Information Elements Tab • • To show an element, select it in the Available IEs box and click the “>” button. The element is then copied into the Added IEs box. To remove an element from the set that can figure in the presentation, select it in the Added IEs box and click the “<” button.

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To remove all elements from the presentation, click the “<<” button.

The information element that you add will be picked from the device the bar chart is drawn for (see the title bar; by default, MS1). You can always change devices later; see below. For elements with arguments, the last argument is set to the lowest value not already selected. If you move the same element to Added IEs again, one of two things will happen: • • if the element has at least one argument, it is taken from the same device as before, and the last argument is incremented; otherwise, the element is taken from the next device.

To set arguments freely, you need to access the properties of the added IE. When you select an element in the Added IEs box, its customizable properties appear in the Properties box on the right: • • • Equipment: The device from which to pick the information element (“MS1”, etc.). Legend: The name under which the element will be presented in the bar chart. If nothing is entered here, the IE string is used. Upper Limit, Lower Limit: These together define the visible range of the information element. By default this range is equal to the native range of the element. Flip Scale: If set to Yes, the information element scale will be flipped with the lowest value at the top. Fixed Color: If set to Yes, the Select Color field appears, in which you select a fixed color in which the information element will be drawn. By default, this property is set to No, and the bar color is governed by the information element value as defined in the General Properties (see chapter 4). Draw Threshold: If set to Yes, a threshold line will be drawn in the bar chart. An additional field named Threshold appears; enter the threshold value here. IE Format: Format of information element (numeric vs. text; unit of presentation). This field appears only where applicable. IE Attribute: Attribute of the information element. This field appears only where applicable. IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: Arguments of the information element. These fields appear only where applicable.

• •

• • •

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Additional Info Tab Here you choose the information elements to view in the Additional Information pane. This tab works much like the Information Elements tab, except that here any information element can be selected. The settable IE properties on this tab are: • • Equipment: The device from which to pick the information element (“MS1”, etc.). IE Format, IE Attribute, IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: See above under Information Elements Tab.

11.2.5.

Changing Devices

By default the bar chart presents data from MS1. To present all data from a different device, there is a short-cut: • • Right-click the title bar of the bar chart window. From the context menu, select the desired device.

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12.

Status Windows

The status windows present information elements in tabular form. Status windows always present data from the current logfile. A number of ready-made windows are provided for presenting particular categories of information. In addition, there is a blank template which you can use to compose your own status windows.

12.1.

Changing the Configuration of Status Windows
Managing Status Window Contents

12.1.1.

An information element can be added to a status window by drag-and-drop from the Navigator. You can remove rows from a status window by selecting them and then rightclicking and selecting Remove Rows. Select Remove All to blank the window. Rows in a status window can be rearranged by drag and drop within the window.

12.1.2.

Changing Status Window Properties

To modify the contents of a status window, or to modify its appearance beyond the management of rows, access the Properties dialog. • Right-click in the status window and choose Properties from the context menu. The following dialog appears:

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General Properties • • • • • Monitor Name: The name of the status window shown in the title bar. Header: Shows or hides the column headers. Columns: Number of columns in the status window. Rows: Number of rows in the status window. Font Size: Size of body text in the status window.

Column Properties In the left-hand pane, click in a column to edit the header of that column. • Header Text: Text in column header.

Cell Properties In the left-hand pane, click in a cell to edit it. • Type: The cell can hold an information element, arbitrary text, or nothing. If “Text” is chosen under Type, a Text field appears where you enter the text string you want to display. If “Information Element” is chosen under Type, the following fields appear in the dialog:

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• • •

Value Visible: If set to No, the data is not shown in text format in the window cell (but it might appear as a color bar; see below). Value Alignment: Alignment of text string in window cell. Color Bar: Drawing of color bar in window cell. – – Value: Bar drawn with color and length governed by information element value. Value with Min/Max: Same as Value, except that min/max indicators are also drawn keeping track of the all-time-high and all-time-low values of the information element. Background: Bar with fixed length (but color still governed by IE value) drawn in window cell. None: No color bar.

– – • •

Equipment: The device from which the information element should be taken (“MS1”, etc.). IE Category: The category to which the information element belongs. This field governs which elements are selectable in the Information Element field below it. Information Element: The information element to show in the window cell. Enabled only when a selection has been made under IE Category. IE Attribute: Attribute of the information element (e.g. sorting order of channels). This field appears only where applicable. IE Argument 1, IE Argument 2: Arguments of the information element (e.g. channel index, SC index, [U]ARFCN index). These fields appear only where applicable.

• • •

Configuring Cells: An Alternative Mechanism Existing window cells can alternatively be configured directly in the left-hand pane. • • • Click a cell to select it. Right-click the cell to access a context menu mirroring the settings in the “Row x Column y” section of the Properties dialog. In a text-format cell, you can double-click in order to edit the text string.

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12.1.3.

Changing IE Attributes

Certain status windows hold information elements that have attributes governing their internal sorting order (for example, Serving + Neighbors for GSM and CPICH Data for WCDMA). In such windows, you can change to a different attribute by right-clicking and choosing Attributes from the context menu.

12.1.4.

Changing Devices

By default the status window presents data from MS1. To present all data from a different device, there is a short-cut: • • Right-click the title bar of the status window. From the context menu, select the desired device.

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13.

Message Windows

The message windows are used to list messages and reports received or transmitted by external devices (Layer 2 and Layer 3 messages, mode reports, and error reports). They are also used to present events generated by TEMS Investigation Data Collection. Message windows always present data from the current logfile (see section 1.4, page 2). The functionality of the message window is the same as in Data Collection, except for the following which is relevant only in a user interface that is continuously updated (that is, during drive testing or replay in Data Collection): • Message window catch-up. The Reload and Cancel Reload commands are absent in Route Analysis. See the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 18.4. Freezing a message window. See the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 18.6.

Regarding other functionality, see the rest of chapter 18 in the Data Collection User’s Manual. See also below.

13.1.

Changing Devices

By default the message window presents data from all available devices. To present all data from a different device, there is a short-cut: • • Right-click the title bar of the message window. From the context menu, select the desired device. (To revert to presenting messages from all devices, select “ALL”.)

Note that in Route Analysis, this method of device selection overrides whatever choice has been made on the General tab of the message window.

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Chapter 14. Replaying a Logfile

14.

Replaying a Logfile

When a logfile is loaded into Route Analysis, the whole file is always loaded at once. With the replay function you can conveniently traverse a logfile at the speed of your choice. The replay function is essentially analogous to the one in Data Collection and is especially useful for viewing scan data. The logfile that is replayed is the current logfile (see section 1.4, page 2). During replay, the map and other presentation windows are updated in the same way as when you inspect a logfile manually by selecting samples.

14.1.

The Replay Toolbar

The Replay toolbar has the following buttons: Rewind to Beginning: Return to the beginning of the logfile. Play Backward: Play the logfile backward. Step Backward: Go one step backward in the logfile. Pause: Pause the logfile replay. Step Forward: Go one step forward in the logfile. Play Forward: Play the logfile forward. Fast Forward to End: Advance to the end of the logfile. The slide control to the right governs the replay speed in Play Forward and Play Backward mode. Select the desired speed by dragging the pointer to the desired position.

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15.

Searching a Logfile

You can search the current logfile (see section 1.4, page 2) by choosing Edit → Find. This dialog appears:

• • • •

Find What: Enter a text string to search for. When repeating this operation, you can alternatively press F3. Mobile: You can restrict the search to a single device (MS or DC). If you do not want to impose such a restriction, choose “<Any>”. Search In: Here you specify what data fields to search in the logfile. Regular Expression: The search string can be a regular expression.

Only one logfile at a time (the current logfile) can be searched.

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16.

RAN Tuning (UMTS)

RAN Tuning is a reporting tool for UMTS data that creates Microsoft Word document based reports based on user-customizable templates. Optionally, a set of MapInfo files can also be generated. Two versions exist of the RAN Tuning report: • one WCDMA version based primarily on WCDMA data (although GSM data will be included in case of inter-RAT handover to a GSM network): called “RAN Tuning WCDMA” for short in this chapter. one GSM version based on GSM data only (wherever WCDMA messages occur in calls and data sessions, such content is ignored1): called “RAN Tuning GSM” for short in this chapter.

The two report versions are completely separate; in particular, the possible GSM content in RAN Tuning WCDMA is not the same as in RAN Tuning GSM. Both types of RAN Tuning report can be used for in-depth analysis of the accessibility and retainability performance of the radio access network, spanning both circuit-switched and packet-switched services. In both reports, a coverage analysis is also performed based on scanner data. This chapter describes how to set up the generation of the RAN Tuning output. For further technical details on the report contents, see the document “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference”.

16.1.
16.1.1.

General Remarks on RAN Tuning
RAN Tuning WCDMA: WCDMA vs. GSM Data

Since the analysis in RAN Tuning WCDMA deals with inter-RAT situations, GSM data will appear in the output whenever transitions to GSM mode have occurred. The report indicates the proportion of GSM data to WCDMA data,
1. See also section 16.1.2.

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for voice as well as for packet-switched services. GSM-specific drop and block causes are identified separately. Data throughput, however, is presented for WCDMA only, not for GPRS. Packet-switched throughput is RLC throughput for Motorola and Qualcomm phones, while for Sony Ericsson phones, transport channel throughput is presented.

16.1.2.

Incomplete Calls and Data Sessions

An important part of RAN Tuning output consists of event statistics. Events include occurrences such as blocked and dropped calls. The very fact that a call or data session occurs is also an event; statistics on the number, success rate, etc. of calls and data sessions are part of the event statistics. (See Information Elements and Events, chapter 7 for listings of all predefined events.) The RAN Tuning tool calculates event statistics only on complete calls and data sessions. Calls and sessions that are set up before the logfile recording is started, or that end after the logfile recording is stopped, are disregarded in the event statistics. This means that blocks and drops (etc.) are not counted, and the calls and sessions themselves are not counted either. Furthermore, RAN Tuning GSM ignores all events for calls and data sessions where the phone engages with a WCDMA network at some point. (This includes GSMspecific events.) These facts must be taken into consideration when comparing event statistics between RAN Tuning and, for example, TEMS Investigation Data Collection. On the other hand, incomplete calls and data sessions do contribute to other RAN Tuning report output, such as coverage plots.

16.1.3.

Scanner Data

The binning of scanner data (“RF Analysis” section in report) requires that the content information (indicating the type of data recorded) has been written successfully to the scanner data logfiles. This information can be inspected during replay in the Data Collection application (see the Data Collection User's Manual, section 7.2.4, “Logfile Information”). RAN Tuning WCDMA processes CPICH data from all UARFCNs scanned with TEMS Investigation Data Collection. The maximum number of UARFCNs that can be scanned concurrently is scanner-dependent: see the Data Collection User’s Manual, section 9.4.

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16.2.

Prerequisites

See the Getting Started Manual, section 5.1.4.

16.3.

RAN Tuning WCDMA Report Setup

Click the Start RAN-T button on the main window RAN-T toolbar in order to open the RAN Tuning setup wizard.

16.3.1.

Opening or Creating a Database

Before the RAN Tuning tool can generate output (see sections 16.3.9 and 16.5), it must first put all logfile and cell data into a Microsoft Access database (*.mdb). In this step you start defining such a database, or open an existing one. • • If you are creating a new database, you are prompted to select a technology. Choose “WCDMA”. If you are opening an existing database, locate it in the file system.

A license covering WCDMA is required to create or open a WCDMA database. In the absence of such a license these operations will fail, and a message will notify you of this. The recommended procedure is to create a separate database for each drive test in each test area. See also section 16.3.2 below.

16.3.2.

Adding Logfiles

In this step you choose the logfiles you want to cover in the RAN Tuning report. Once you have gone through the setup wizard and created the Microsoft Access database, you can no longer modify the set of logfiles when reopening the database later on (but you can change other aspects of the report setup). Please note that the output takes longer to generate the more data you have put into the database (the size of which is otherwise bounded only by the 2 GB limit imposed by Microsoft Access).

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Note: Your test area should not be so large that scrambling code reuse occurs within it, since RAN Tuning makes use of scrambling codes to uniquely identify cells. The range of logfile types accepted by the RAN Tuning tool are listed in section 5.4, page 33. Once you have added at least one logfile, the Settings button becomes active. Click this button to access the setup dialog for the RAN Tuning report. The tabs of that dialog are gone through in the sections that follow (16.3.3–16.3.7).

16.3.3.

General Report Settings Tab

On this tab you specify some general settings for the report. (The fields marked * below do not currently figure in the DOT files supplied with the application, but they can easily be inserted wherever desired. See section 16.6 for hints on editing DOT files.) • • • • • • • Test area name: The name of the test area to be analyzed. Test area id*: The identity number of the test area. Client name*: The name of the operator for whom the report is being generated. Drive test name*: The name assigned to the drive test. Reporting date: By default set to the current date and time. Prepared by*: The name of the person creating the report. Approved by*: The name of the person who is to approve the report.

Under “Select bin sizes” you specify how to perform binning for various presentations in the report. Bin sizes can only be edited prior to creating the database; afterwards these fields will be grayed out. • • • Statistics: Bin size for coverage statistics. Default: 3 × 3 m. Map files: Bin size for map generation. Default: 25 × 25 m. (Regarding the generation of maps, see section 16.3.9.) Coverage point chart: Bin size for coverage distribution point charts (based on scan data). Default: 50 × 50 m.

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The number of bins should not be exaggerated, since the time required for binning a fixed amount of data increases with the number of bins. Also, if you set all bin sizes to the same value, the report generation is speeded up considerably. • Skip binning: By checking this box you turn off binning and thus deselect generation of all binned plots. (This leaves the other types of presentation, such as charts and tables showing event statistics.) Cell measurement update interval: If creation of a RAN Tuning database fails because the database (limited in size to 2 GB) cannot hold all data, you can work around the problem by reducing the volume of data that is saved in the database prior to binning. There are two ways to reduce the data volume. In either case you specify a reduced update interval in the combo box, by changing “All” to a value “1/N”. – Average data: Average N samples at a time and keep only the averages. In must be noted, however, that this averaging is done locally for each passage through a bin, so if there are typically only one or two samples in each such route segment the data volume will not be greatly reduced. You must then enlarge the bins (e.g. from 3 × 3 to 25 × 25 m) to get more samples in each bin and achieve sufficient data reduction. Skip intermediate data: Decrease the data sample rate by a factor N, discarding samples from intermediate reports. The downsampling is done unconditionally without reference to the bin grid, so the bin size can be kept unchanged in this case.

16.3.4.

UE Report Options Tab

Much of the output in the RAN Tuning report can be grouped into the categories accessibility and retainability/mobility (see the document “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference” for details). Each of these categories can be selected or deselected for each MS device in each logfile: Accessibility Accessibility is the ability of the user to obtain a service within specified tolerances and under other given conditions.

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Retainability

Retainability is the ability of the user to keep a service, once it has been accessed, under given conditions for a requested period of time. If retainability is checked, mobility statistics (handover successes/failures) are also computed on the same data.

GSM data, where present, is included in the accessibility and retainability calculations for voice as well as packet-switched data services.

16.3.5.

Cell File Options Tab

On this tab you load cell data into the RAN Tuning tool. A cell file (*.cel or *.xml) is required for certain presentations in the report; see the document “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference” for details. Here you also have the option of restricting the set of cells that should contribute to certain report charts and tables. These are the ones marked “selected cells only” in the title or caption. Charts and tables without this tag will always be based on all available data, with no cells being filtered out. Besides a cell file, you can also optionally open a cluster file (*.cluster) in this dialog. A cluster (see section 1.4) is simply an arbitrary set of cells; by working with clusters you can conveniently include or exclude predetermined groups of cells. A cluster file must always be used in conjunction with a cell file, and the cells in the cluster file must all appear in the cell file. Do as follows: • If you do not want to exclude any cells anywhere in the report, click the button Select All/None to select all cells in the list. (You must explicitly make this selection, otherwise the charts and tables marked “selected cells only” will be empty.) There is of course no point in using a cluster file in this case. If you want to restrict the set of cells contributing to the presentations marked “selected cells only”, check the cells (and, if applicable, clusters) you want to keep and leave the rest unchecked. The cells that will be included in the output are the union of the cells picked from the cell file and those found in the clusters picked from the cluster file.

Note that if you reopen a cell or cluster file, all items in the file are deselected in the dialog.

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If you load no files in this dialog, all report presentations (i.e. those that can be generated without cell data) will be based on all cells represented in the data. Note: If the number of selected cells is very large (in the thousands), the rendering of tables will be slowed down noticeably.

16.3.6.

Statistics Thresholds Tab

On this tab you set thresholds for various statistics that are computed for the report. Pilot Coverage Classification Pilot coverage is classified based on the Ec/No and RSCP readings. Four coverage levels are distinguished, numbered 1 through 4. Transitions between levels are defined by the thresholds set in this step. For each parameter, three thresholds are set: “High”, “Medium”, and “Low”. The default values for these thresholds are the same as for the Pilot Coverage Analysis task; see section 8.6.3. The conditions determining the pilot coverage level are as follows: Pilot Coverage Class Level 1 Level 2 Condition Ec/No ≥ Ec/No High AND RSCP ≥ RSCP High (Ec/No ≥ Ec/No Medium AND RSCP ≥ RSCP Medium) AND (Ec/No < Ec/No High OR RSCP < RSCP High) (Ec/No ≥ Ec/No Low AND RSCP ≥ RSCP Low) AND (Ec/No < Ec/No Medium OR RSCP < RSCP Medium)

Level 3

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Pilot Coverage Class Level 4

Condition Ec/No < Ec/No Low OR RSCP < RSCP Low

We may depict these conditions graphically (the orientation of the axes has been chosen to coincide with the ordering of coverage classes and hence the color scheme in the report tables):

Ec/No

Level 1 (best) Ec/No High Level 2 Ec/No Medium Level 3 Ec/No Low

Level 4 (worst) RSCP RSCP High RSCP Medium RSCP Low

Dropped Call Classification Each dropped call is classified according to the conditions prior to the drop. The classification rests on the values of four radio environment parameters:

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CPICH RSCP, CPICH Ec/No, UE TxPower, and DL BLER. The following table shows the dropped call classification as a function of these parameters: Dropped Call Classification DL Coverage DL Interference High DL BLER High UL TxPower High UL TxPower and DL BLER No Data No Data No Data No Data

RSCP Low High High High High No Data High High High

Ec/No Any Low High High High Any No Data High High

TxPower Any Any Low High High Any Any No Data Any

DL BLER Any Any High Low High Any Any Any No Data

“Low” and “High” in this table refers to a comparison with the user-settable threshold for each of these parameters. Referring to these thresholds by means of the subscript “thr”, we may state the conditions as follows: RSCP • • Low if RSCP < RSCPthr High if RSCP ≥ RSCPthr

Ec/No • • Low if Ec/No < Ec/Nothr High if Ec/No ≥ Ec/Nothr

TxPower • • Low if TxPower < TxPowerthr High if TxPower ≥ TxPowerthr

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BLER • • Low if BLER < BLERthr High if BLER ≥ BLERthr

In addition to the radio environment, the Dropped Call class may contain an extra prefix or suffix (this is not applicable if the dropped call is “Not Classified”): • If the Dropped Call event has subclass Abnormal RRC Connection Release with cause value = Unspecified, the Dropped Call class will have the prefix “Network Commanded Release -”. If the Dropped Call event is followed by an RRC Connection Request with cause value = Registration, the Dropped Call class will have the suffix “- Next Event: Registration”.

List of Thresholds Threshold Ec/No High, Ec/No Medium, Ec/No Low RSCP High, RSCP Medium, RSCP Low Definition See the above discussion of pilot coverage classes.

See the above discussion of pilot coverage classes. (If Ec/No High and Ec/No Medium are set equal and RSCP High and RSCP Medium are also set equal, the number of coverage classes is reduced to three: L1, L2, and L3. The “Medium” and “Low” thresholds, or even all three thresholds, can be similarly collapsed.) For a pilot to be considered a polluter, it must have an Ec/No reading within this value of the serving pilot Ec/No. This parameter is thus a delta and not in itself an Ec/No ratio. For a pilot to be considered a potential neighbor, it must have an Ec/No reading within this value of the serving pilot Ec/No.

Pilot Pollution Ec/No

Potential Neigh Ec/No Hyst

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Threshold Drop Ec/No Drop RSCP Drop TxPower Drop DL BLER Pilot Pollution Limit No Samples Filter

Definition Ec/No threshold used for classification of dropped calls. See above. RSCP threshold used for classification of dropped calls. See above. Tx Power threshold for classification of dropped calls. See above. Downlink block error rate (BLER) threshold for classification of dropped calls. See above. The number of polluters that need to be present for pilot pollution to be reported. This threshold affects the pilot pollution chart: a bin is removed if the number of samples in it is below the threshold. For a pilot to be considered a polluter, it must have an RSCP reading greater than this value. This percentile will be indicated for each of the following: UE BLER, UE and scanner Ec/No, UE and scanner RSCP, and UE Tx Power.

Pilot Pollution RSCP Filter User-defined Percentile

16.3.7.

Frequency Selection Tab

On this tab you choose which frequencies (UARFCNs) you want to include data from in the output. UARFCNs occurring in scan data and UARFCNs occurring in UE data are listed separately. Note that you must have processed your data into a Microsoft Access database in order for the UARFCNs to display in the dialog. Section 16.3.9 explains how to perform the steps in the correct order.

16.3.8.

Report Template Tab

On this tab you select which report template to use for the report. A predefined template containing all available report sections is selected by default.

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The available sections are: • • • • • • • • Cover Page and TOC Methodology RF Report IRAT Report Voice Report CSD Report PS Report Acronyms

16.3.8.1. Selecting and Modifying Sections
The section structure of the report template is shown in the tree view. By default all available sections are included. Each section has its own Microsoft Word template file (*.dot) specifying its contents and layout. The predefined templates are found beneath the TEMS Investigation installation directory in the subdirectory ReportSections. • You can remove a section from the report template by selecting it in the tree view and clicking the Remove button. You can put the section back by dragging it from the “All available sections” folder to the desired position within the report template structure. Existing report sections can likewise be rearranged arbitrarily by drag-and-drop. You can edit a report section (name, description, associated DOT file) by selecting it in the tree view under “All available sections” and clicking Edit. The changes automatically propagate to all report templates that include the section. You can remove a section from all report templates by selecting it under All available sections and clicking Remove.

You can modify DOT files in order to change the contents and appearance of the report. The insertion of data into the report is controlled by Microsoft Word bookmarks. See section 16.6 regarding technical details, and turn to the document “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference” for bookmark listings. If you have created a DOT file for a new report section, you can add the section to “All available sections” by clicking the “New section” button below the tree view box. A new dialog pops up where you name the new section and associate it with the DOT file.

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16.3.8.2. Working with Report Templates
You can define multiple report templates on this tab. For each report template, you select and (if desired) modify sections as described in section 16.3.8.1. • To create a new report template, click the “New template” button below the tree view box. In the dialog box that appears, enter a name and a description. To change the name and description of an existing report template, select it in the tree view and click Edit. In the dialog box that appears, enter the new information. To delete a report template, select it in the tree view and click Remove. If only one template is defined, it cannot be deleted. Check the “Set as default” box to make this report template the default template. It will then be selected whenever you enter this tab of the dialog.

• •

16.3.9.

Output Options Tab

You are now done with all settings, and you are ready to generate your output: a report in the form of a Microsoft Word document (*.doc) and optionally MapInfo files. • To generate a report, leave the box “Create and display report” checked. Note: To be able to select which UARFCNs should appear in the report (Frequency Selection tab, section 16.3.7) you must first have created the Microsoft Access database (*.mdb). If you wish to modify the set of UARFCNs to include, uncheck “Create and display report” when going through the setup wizard for the first time. The database will then be created without any output being produced. Then open the setup wizard again and modify the Frequency Selection tab as desired. After that you are ready to generate your output. • To generate MapInfo files, leave the box “Create MIF files” checked. For further information on the nature of the MapInfo output, see the document “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference”. In the MapInfo output, you can specify some aspects of how event plots and binned plots should be drawn:

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– –

Events (of all types) are represented by a uniform symbol. Click the Change button to specify the appearance of that symbol. To represent parameter values in binned plots, you can either draw a symbol (configurable as for events) once in each bin regardless of the bin size, or you can draw a rectangle that covers the entire bin. To accomplish the latter, check “Use variable size rectangle”.

By checking the box “Skip device-specific MIF binning” you deselect generation of MapInfo files for individual MS devices, so that only files encompassing all MS devices are produced. Choosing this option reduces the generation time very considerably (up to 80%). Note, however, that this choice is irreversible: you cannot return later to create the device-specific files (i.e. not without also regenerating everything else from scratch). The report configuration can be saved in a configuration file (*.cfg). To specify a name and location for such a file, click the button Save Config As.

16.4.

RAN Tuning GSM Report Setup

This section describes what parts in the RAN Tuning GSM setup differ from RAN Tuning WCDMA. Most steps and options are similar, and these are not repeated here; please refer to section 16.3 above.

16.4.1.

Opening or Creating a Database

If you are creating a new database, choose “GSM” when prompted to select a technology.

The product license always allows creation of GSM reports (no special option required).

16.4.2.

Adding Logfiles

This works the same way as in RAN Tuning WCDMA. The note on scrambling code reuse in section 16.3.2, of course, is not applicable to GSM. There are no restrictions with regard to cellular technology in this step; RAN Tuning GSM is fully capable of interpreting files with WCDMA content.

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16.4.3.

General Report Settings Tab

For GSM you set only one bin size, which is used for all binned plots. Just as for WCDMA, binning can be deselected.

16.4.4.

UE Report Options Tab

These options apply in the same way as for RAN Tuning WCDMA.

16.4.5.

Cell File Options Tab

These options apply in the same way as for RAN Tuning WCDMA.

16.4.6.

Statistics Thresholds Tab

Pilot Coverage Classification This works the same way as in WCDMA, with Ec/No and RSCP replaced by RxQual and RxLev respectively. The conditions become: Pilot Coverage Class Level 1 Level 2 Condition RxLev ≥ RxLev High AND RxQual ≤ RxQual Low (RxLev ≥ RxLev Medium AND RxQual ≤ RxQual Medium) AND (RxLev < RxLev High OR RxQual > RxQual Low) (RxLev ≥ RxLev Low AND RxQual ≤ RxQual High) AND (RxLev < RxLev Medium OR RxQual > RxQual Medium) RxLev < RxLev Low OR RxQual > RxQual High

Level 3

Level 4

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The default values for the thresholds are: Threshold RxQual High RxQual Medium RxQual Low RxLev High RxLev Medium RxLev Low 6.0 4.0 2.0 –70 dBm –85 dBm –100 dBm Value

These conditions may be depicted graphically as follows. As in section 16.3.6, the orientation of the axes has been chosen to match the layout of the report tables:

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RxLev High RxLev Level 1 (best)

RxLev Medium

RxLev Low

RxQual Low Level 2 RxQual Medium Level 3 RxQual High

Level 4 (worst)

RxQual

Dropped Call Classification Dropped calls in GSM are classified as follows: Dropped Call Classification Downlink Coverage (Low signal strength) Downlink Quality Timing Advance

Condition (RxLev < DropRxLev) AND (Channel Release not received) (RxLev ≥ DropRxLev) AND (Channel Release not received) (TA ≥ DropTA) AND (Channel Release received)

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Condition (TA < DropTA) AND (RxLev < DropRxLev) AND (Channel Release received) (TA < DropTA) AND (RxLev ≥ DropRxLev) AND (Channel Release received) Data insufficient to determine if any of the above classification criteria is fulfilled None of the above criteria fulfilled List of Thresholds Threshold RxQual and RxLev thresholds Drop RxLev, Drop TA Definition

Dropped Call Classification Uplink Coverage

Uplink Quality

No Data Not Classified

See the above discussion of coverage classes. Classes can be collapsed as in WCDMA: compare section 16.3.6. Thresholds used for classification of dropped calls. See above.

16.4.7.

Operator Selection Tab

This tab appears here instead of the Frequency Selection tab provided in RAN Tuning WCDMA. On this tab you can filter the input with respect to operators, each identified by a unique MCC and MNC combination.

16.4.8.
• • •

Report Template Tab

In RAN Tuning GSM the available sections are: Cover Page and TOC Methodology RF Report

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• • • • • •

Voice Report PS Report PS GPRS Throughput Report PS EDGE Throughput Report MapInfo File Description Acronyms

16.4.9.

Output Options Tab

These options apply in the same way as for RAN Tuning WCDMA. The note on selecting UARFCN applies equally well to operators in GSM.

16.5.

Generating Output

When you are done in the Report Properties dialog, click OK in that dialog to return to the setup wizard. Under Output directory, you specify where to save the generated report and MapInfo files. By default, the output is saved in the same directory and with the same name as the database file. The files will be overwritten the next time output is generated from the same database. To prevent files from being overwritten, you must rename or move them, or generate the new output in a different directory. After specifying the output directory, click Finish in the setup wizard. The data is now first processed into a Microsoft Access database (*.mdb) if that has not been done already. Then the items you checked on the Output Options tab (section 16.3.9) are generated. Note: It is best not to work with Microsoft Word or Excel while output is being generated. Also avoid using any Windows copy/paste functionality during this time. Output can also be generated from the command prompt by executing the following command: X:\<TEMS Investigation install dir>\InvestigationRANT.exe X:\<TEMS Investigation install dir>\my_config_file.cfg

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where my_config_file.cfg is a configuration file created by the setup wizard (or a file following the same format). You must type the complete paths unless you navigate to <TEMS Investigation install dir>Application.

16.5.1.

Generating Output in Batch Mode

Commands of the form given above can be listed in a batch file. When you start a batch job, a process named “InvestigationRANT” should appear, and the CPU load should rise. If the batch job fails, a text file with extension .err is created in the directory from where you started the batch job, detailing the cause of the failure. (No message appears in the command prompt.)

16.5.2.

Troubleshooting

If charts are not visible in the report, check Tools → Options in Word and verify that the Picture Placeholders check box is cleared.

16.6.

Notes on Microsoft Word Bookmarks

Bookmarks in DOT files serve as placeholders for report elements. When the report is generated, a piece of data is substituted for each bookmark. Bookmarks can be inserted anywhere in a DOT file. Each bookmark recognized by RAN Tuning represents one of the following: a piece of text, a chart, or a table. Users who wish to edit DOT files will find the following hints useful: • • Bookmark names are not case-sensitive. Text bookmarks: The bookmarks actually appearing in the DOT file must have an underscore (_) appended to the name given in “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference”. Furthermore, if you want to use the same text string multiple times in a single DOT file, you must create a unique bookmark for each occurrence by adding further characters after the underscore. (The latter is a requirement in Microsoft Word.) Example: The bookmark given in “RAN Tuning Report Technical Reference” as “ProductName” can be called “ProductName_” the first time it occurs in the DOT file. If this string is going to appear two more times, you need to create two further bookmarks, named for instance “ProductName_2” and “ProductName_3”. (Any characters may be used

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as suffixes; there is no requirement to use integers or letters in ascending order.) • • Chart bookmarks: To limit the size of a chart so that it stays within the margins of the page, place the bookmark inside a single-cell table. Table bookmarks: The table is automatically sized to fit on the page.

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17.

The Converter Tool

The Converter tool is a utility that performs a variety of file conversion tasks. It is used for the following: • • • • Merging of uplink AQM data into logfiles (UMTS): section 17.2 Conversion of CDMA cell files in TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV format to XML using Python scripts: section 17.3 Processing of TEMS Investigation logfiles with Python scripts: section 17.4 Export of TEMS Investigation logfiles in MDM format: section 17.5

17.1.

Launching the Converter Tool

Do one of the following to launch the Converter tool: Click the Start Converter button on the main window toolbar. If you have logfiles loaded in Route Analysis, you will be asked whether you want to load these files into the Converter tool as well. • Alternatively, run the file Converter.exe found in the Application directory beneath the TEMS Investigation installation directory. See section 17.2.3.

The Converter window appears:

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17.2.

Merging Uplink AQM Data into Logfiles (UMTS)

As described in the Data Collection User’s Manual, chapter 27, uplink AQM data is computed by a Call Generator and output in XML files. This uplink data needs to be inserted in the logfiles (*.log) recorded with TEMS Investigation. To perform the merge, you use the Converter tool. The output is a new logfile (still in *.log format) including both uplink and downlink AQM data.

17.2.1.

Retrieving Uplink AQM Data

The uplink AQM data is stored as XML files on the Call Generator PC, by default under C:\TIPESQ in a subfolder named <yyyymmdd><phone number>. The XML files are given random four-digit numbers as names. No special tool is currently provided in Route Analysis for accessing the uplink AQM data; the files must be collected manually from the Call Generator. This could be done in a number of ways, for example: • • • by setting up access to the Call Generator output directory as a network disk by downloading the uplink data files via FTP by copying the files onto a USB stick or a CD/DVD. Note: When downloading the uplink data files it is important to preserve the Call Generator directory structure, since the merge algorithm relies on this structure to locate the correct files.

17.2.2.

Preparing and Performing a Merge

Launch the Converter tool as described in section 17.1. Click the Add button in the Converter tool. The Add Job dialog appears.

• •

Under Input file(s), browse to select the TEMS Investigation logfiles (*.log) that you want to merge. In the Output section, under Format, select “Merge PESQ data”.

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• •

Click the Setup button. The Merge PESQ data dialog appears. You need to indicate to the Converter tool where the uplink AQM data is located (one XML file for each AQM call). Click the Browse button and locate the root directory holding all XML files. Click OK to exit the Merge PESQ data dialog. Back in the Add Job dialog, you also need to specify where the merged output files should be written. To do this, click the Browse button next to the Directory edit box and navigate to the desired directory. Click OK to exit the Add Job dialog.

• •

You are now ready to perform the merge. To start the merge, click the Start button. The progress and final outcome for each file is displayed in the Progress column. The output files will remain TEMS Investigation logfiles with extension .log. The name of each output logfile will consist of the original name plus the suffix “-AQM”. What happens during the merge is that the uplink AQM data is integrated into the logfile, all entries being sorted by their timestamps. To compensate for the delay in computing the AQM data, the Converter tool moves the downlink data 5.5 s backwards in time so that each score aligns with the speech sentence for which it was computed. (Exception: The first score in each pair of Frequent AQM scores needs to be moved a further 2.75 s backwards, or 8.25 s in total.) The uplink data is simply inserted into the logfiles at the correct points in time. For in-depth coverage of the computation of AQM data, including timing issues, see the document “AQM in TEMS Products (Including PESQ)” which is found on the installation CD in the subdirectory Documents. It is possible to perform a merge with an incomplete set of uplink data files, and to repeat the merge procedure later on with further uplink data supplemented. No duplication of data in the output logfile will result from this: the Converter tool processes each AQM call only once.

17.2.3.

Performing a Merge from the Command Prompt

The Converter tool can also be operated from a Windows command prompt by executing the file Converter.exe found in <TEMS Investigation install dir>\Application. The command has the following syntax:

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Converter -outputdir <path1> -aqmdir <path2> <filename> For example, to merge uplink AQM data into the file temslogfile.log, you might type Converter -outputdir "C:\Output Files" -aqmdir "Y:\PESQ UL Data" "C:\Logfiles\temslogfile.log" To perform the merge for all logfiles in a directory, type *.log as file name.

17.3.

Converting TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV Cell Files to XML Format

This conversion is performed using a Python script. It requires that you have installed Python software; see the Getting Started Manual, section 5.1.4. Regarding TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV cell files in general, see appendix D.3, page 129. To convert CSV cell files to XML format, do as follows: • Launch the Converter tool as described in section 17.1. Click the Add button in the Converter tool. The Add Job dialog appears. • • • • • • Under Input file(s), browse to select the cell files that you want to merge. Under “Files of type:”, select “CDMA Cell Files (*.csv)”. In the Output section, under Format, select “Convert Cell File to XML”. Click the Setup button. The Convert Cell File to XML dialog appears. Under Python script, the script written for the cell file conversion is preselected. Under Python path, the path to the Python installation will appear. Under Script parameters, some parameters are defined which are not present in the CSV format but are mandatory in the XML format. Default values for these parameters are entered in the dialog; change the values if required by double-clicking them. Click OK to exit the Convert Cell File to XML dialog. Back in the Add Job dialog, you also need to specify where the output XML files should be written. To do this, click the Browse button next to the Directory edit box and navigate to the desired directory. Click OK to exit the Add Job dialog.

• •

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To start the conversion, click the Start button. The progress and final outcome for each file is displayed in the Progress column.

17.4.

Processing TEMS Investigation Logfiles with Python Scripts

An API is provided for extracting data from TEMS Investigation logfiles using Python scripts. The Converter tool is used to apply Python scripts to logfiles. To run Python scripts you must have Python software installed. See the Getting Started Manual, section 5.1.4. • Launch the Converter tool as described in section 17.1. Click the Add button in the Converter tool. The Add Job dialog appears. • • • • • • Under Input file(s), browse to select the logfiles that you want to process. In the Output section, under Format, select “Execute Python Script”. Click the Setup button. The Execute Python Script dialog appears. Under Python script, browse to select the script you want to execute. Under Python path, the path to the Python installation will appear. The Script parameters section does not have to be used, but it is possible to define parameters here that a Python script should take as input. To add a parameter, right-click in the list and select Add Parameter, then double-click the “parameter” and “value” fields to edit them. Click OK to exit the Execute Python Script dialog. Back in the Add Job dialog, you also need to specify where the output from the Python processing should be written. To do this, click the Browse button next to the Directory edit box and navigate to the desired directory. Click OK to exit the Add Job dialog. To start the Python script processing, click the Start button. The progress and final outcome for each file is displayed in the Progress column.

• •

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17.4.1.

Running Python Scripts from the Command Prompt

Python scripts can alternatively be executed from a Windows command prompt. Example: python ie_example1.py <filename> However, this requires that you have defined certain environment variables in Windows. See the Getting Started Manual, chapter 12 for details.

17.5.

Exporting TEMS Investigation Logfiles in MDM Format

TEMS Investigation logfiles recorded in a CDMA network can be exported in MDM format. This task can alternatively be performed in Data Collection; see the Data Collection User’s Manual, sections 7.5 (introduction) and 7.5.2.6 as well as appendix E.5. The appendix gives some specifics on the MDM output. To export to MDM using the Converter tool, do as follows: • Launch the Converter tool as described in section 17.1. Click the Add button in the Converter tool. The Add Job dialog appears. • • • Under Input file(s), browse to select the CDMA logfiles that you want to export. In the Output section, under Format, select “Export to MDM”. Under Directory, you need to specify where the output MDM files should be written. To do this, click the Browse button next to the Directory edit box and navigate to the desired directory. Click OK to exit the Add Job dialog. To start the export, click the Start button. The progress and final outcome for each file is displayed in the Progress column.

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17.6.

Further Functionality in the Converter Tool

The Converter window has a number of additional features which are independent of the conversion task or tasks you are setting up.

17.6.1.

Editing Conversion Setups

Use the Edit button to modify the conversion setup for a file listed in the Converter window. Select the file, then click the button. Alternatively, from the Edit menu, choose Modify selected item. An Edit Job dialog appears which is identical in content with the Add Job dialog gone through in sections 17.2–17.5.

17.6.2.

Removing Files from the Converter Tool

Click the Delete button to remove one or several selected files from the Converter window. Alternatively, from the Edit menu, choose Remove selected item(s), or press the Delete key.

17.6.3.

Aborting a Conversion

Click the Stop button if you want to abort an ongoing file conversion. Alternatively, from the Convert menu, choose Cancel.

17.6.4.

Checking the Outcome of a Conversion

Click the Open button to view the output directory in a new Explorer window. Alternatively, from the File menu, choose Open result folder. The outcome of a file conversion is logged in a file named Result.txt in the output directory. Click the Show Result button to view this file. Alternatively, from the Convert menu, choose Show log.

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18.

Support Contact Information

For support in using TEMS Investigation, please contact Ericsson according to the directions found at www.ericsson.com/tems under the link “Contact TEMS”. To sign up for the TEMS on-line subscription service, please go to the same web site and click the link “TEMS Subscription Service”. This free service includes e-mail notification of TEMS product launches, version upgrades and patches, as well as on-line TEMS News.

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Appendix A. Keyboard Shortcuts

Function Help Find next Find previous Previous event in message window Next event in message window Open new Data Selector Add logfiles to project Previous worksheet Next worksheet Copy (from message window) Open Find in Logfile dialog New project Open project Save project Clear all windows Exit

Shortcut F1 F3 Ctrl + F3 F7 F8 F9 F10 F11 F12 Ctrl + C Ctrl + F Ctrl + N Ctrl + O Ctrl + S Ctrl + W Alt + F4

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Appendix B. File Types in TEMS Investigation Route Analysis

The following file types are used by TEMS Investigation Route Analysis: Extension .cel .log .trp .trw Cell file Logfile TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis project TEMS Investigation 9.0 Route Analysis workspace File Type

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Appendix C. Format of CEL File (UMTS)

In the current version of the CEL file, columns from the older GSM- and WCDMA-specific versions of the CEL format may be freely combined, with partly different columns being filled in for GSM and WCDMA cells.

C.1.

General

The file is in ASCII format with tab-delimited data. There is no restriction on the number of cells in the file, but very large cell files will slow the application down noticeably. The default file extension is .cel.

C.2.

File Header

The cell file header, which takes up the first line of the file, consists of a revision number and an identification string: <Rev> TEMS_-_Cell_names where <Rev> is a revision number.

C.3.

Column Headers

The second line in the cell file is the column header line. It consists of tabseparated strings, each of which identifies a category of data. The set of column headers used appears from the table in section C.4 below; columns can be arranged in any order as long as their headers are valid.

C.4.

Data

The remainder of the cell file contains data. Each data line represents one cell name entry and is stored in ASCII as:

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data1<HT>data2<HT>data3<HT>...<HT>dataN<CR><NL> The table below describes the format of the data in each column:

C.4.1.

General Data
Data Content and Format Cell name. Text string. Free text field describing the cell. Text string. Latitude and longitude. Text string. The input format must be one of the following, where H is one of {N, n, S, s, W, w, E, e, +, -}, “+” representing N or E, d = degree digit, m = minute digit, s = second digit, * = degree sign, one of {*, ¤, o, O, ^, °}: • H dddmm.mmmm (decimal minutes). Here, minutes must be written with two and degrees with at least two digits. Thus, when entering N 4° 2.86´, the degrees and minutes must be written 0402. H ddd* mm.mmmm’ (decimal minutes). This format, unlike the previous one, does not require padding zeroes in the ddd* mm segment. H ddd* mm’ ss” (degrees, minutes and seconds; the sign for seconds must be a double quote, ASCII 0x22 – it cannot be replaced by two single quotes). H ddd* mm’ ss.ssss” (degrees, minutes and decimal seconds). H ddd.dddd* (decimal degrees). (continued on next page)

Column Header Cell NETWORK_ CELLID Lat, Lon

• •

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Column Header Lat, Lon (continued)

Data Content and Format

In all formats, an unlimited number of decimals can be entered. The presentation format is H dddmm.mmmm, i.e. decimal minutes rounded off to four decimal places (giving a resolution of about 20 cm, i.e. the error is negligible compared to other sources of error). MCC MNC LAC LAC_N_n RA CI Mobile Country Code. Integer, base 10 representation. Mobile Network Code. Integer, base 10 representation. Location Area Code. Integer, base 10 or (with prefix 0x) hexadecimal representation. LAC for neighbor n of this cell. Same format as for LAC. Routing Area Code. Integer, base 10 representation. The Cell Identity reported in System Information. For WCDMA, this is the same as UC-Id = RNC-Id + C-Id in 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.5. Integer, base 10 or (with prefix 0x) hexadecimal representation. Cell Identity of neighbor n of this cell. Same format as for CI. Antenna direction in degrees clockwise from north. Decimal number. (Alternative name: ANT_ORIENTATION) Antenna beam width in degrees. Integer. Antenna type. Text string. Antenna height in meters. Decimal number. Antenna tilt in degrees. Decimal number.

CI_N_n ANT_ DIRECTION ANT_BEAM_ WIDTH ANT_TYPE ANT_HEIGHT ANT_TILT

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Column Header CELL_TYPE

Data Content and Format Cell type (e.g. “Macro”, “Micro”, “Pico”). Text string.

C.4.2.

GSM-specific Data
Data Content and Format ARFCN. Mandatory for GSM cells. Integer. BSIC. Integer in the range 00 ... 77 (octal). ARFCN of TCH no. n used by this cell. Integer.

Column Header ARFCN BSIC TCH_ARFCN_n

C.4.3.

WCDMA-specific Data
Data Content and Format UARFCN. Mandatory for WCDMA cells. Integer. Scrambling code. Integer. Radio Network Controller ID. Equal to the 12-bit RNCId in 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.5. Integer, base 10 or (with prefix 0x) hexadecimal representation. Radio Network Controller ID of neighbor n of this cell. Same format as for RNC-ID. Cell Identity. Equal to the 16-bit C-Id in 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.5. Integer, base 10 or (with prefix 0x) hexadecimal representation. The 28-bit Cell Identity (“UC-Id” in 3GPP) is a concatenation of RNC-ID (see above) and C-ID.

Column Header UARFCN SC RNC-ID

RNC-ID_N_n C-ID

C-ID_N_n URA

Cell Identity of neighbor n of this cell. Same format as for C-ID. UTRAN Registration Area. Integer.

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Column Header TIME_OFFSET CPICH_POWER MAX_TX_ POWER NODE_B NODE_B_ STATUS

Data Content and Format Time offset of P-SCH synchronization signal in chips. Integer. Power (in dBm) on P-CPICH control channel. Decimal number. Maximum transmit power (in dBm) for the cell. Decimal number. Node B identity assigned by the operator. Text string. Node B status (e.g. “Operational”, “Phase 3”). Text string.

C.5.

Comment Lines

A comment line starts with an ‘!’. Comment lines are ignored when the cell file is imported.

C.6.

Neighbor Identification

In GSM, the following parameters are used to identify neighbors: CI, CI_N_n, LAC, LAC_N_n. In WCDMA, the following parameters are used to identify neighbors: either {CI, CI_N_n} or {C-ID, C-ID_N_n, RNC-ID, RNC-ID_N_n}.

C.7.

Example

Below is a sample cell file. The data columns are split into sections here for obvious reasons of presentation; the actual file has one single row of data columns below the header. Cells no. 1–3 are WCDMA cells, while cells no. 4–6 are GSM cells.

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55 TEMS_-_Cell_names

Cell 1 2 3 4 5 6

ARFCN BSIC

UARFCN 10714 10714 10714

SC 32 16 0

617 592 599

21 20 23

Lat N 47.719283 N 47.719283 N 47.719283 N 46.571874 N 46.571874 N 46.571874

Lon W 27.293849 W 27.293849 W 27.293849 W 26.979771 W 27.293849 W 27.293849

MCC 147 147 147 147 147 147

MNC 2 2 2 93 93 93

LAC 201 201 201 76 76 76

CI

LAC_N_1

CI_N_1

32500 32501 32502

76 76 76

32501 32500 32500

RNC-ID 687 687 687

C-ID 3756 3757 3758

RNC-ID_N_1 687 687 687

C-ID_N_1 3757 3756 3756

ANT_DIRECTION 156.2 228.4 310.9 73.1 147.8 266.8

ANT_BEAM_WIDTH 90 90 90 45 45 90

ANT_TYPE Kath1 Kath1 Kath1 Kath2 Kath2 Kath2

ANT_HEIGHT 15.1 13.7 14.2 8.8 9.1 9.5

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ANT_TILT 0.0 11.2 7.8 4.4 14.2 9.9

CELL_TYPE Macro Macro Macro Macro Macro Macro

NODE_B RBS Teleby RBS Teleby RBS Teleby

NODE_B_STATUS Operational Operational Not Operational

RA 1 1 1 1 1 1

URA 4 4 4

TIME_OFFSET 9442 22156 34870

CPICH_POWER 33 33 33

MAX_TX_POWER 45.5 45.5 45.5

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Appendix D. Format of XML Cell File

The XML cell file format is used for representing (primarily) cell and site information and for interchanging such information between products in the TEMS portfolio.

D.1.

Scope of XML Format

The XML format handles cell and site data for GSM, WCDMA, and CDMA (1x as well as EV-DO). It also handles Wi-Fi access point data, which is of interest for GAN-capable user terminals.

D.2.

Relation to CEL Format

No formal mapping exists from the older *.cel format (appendix C) to the XML format, but the correspondences are obvious throughout. All column headings in the *.cel file have their counterparts in XML file elements; in addition, the XML file contains further data. Just note that in the *.cel file, neighbors are indicated by their CIs, whereas in the XML file, cell names are used to identify neighbors.

D.3.

Relation to TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV Format

The CSV cell file format used in TEMS Investigation CDMA can be converted to the XML format using the Converter tool. See section 17.3, page 115. This conversion requires that you have Python installed on the PC; see the Getting Started Manual, section 5.1.4 for details. Please note that the CSV format lacks certain items of information that are present in the XML format. For example, the band class is lacking in CSV but is mandatory in XML (see sections D.7.9.3, D.7.10). This information must be supplied manually when doing the conversion, as explained in section 17.3.

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D.4.

Schemas

The XML-format cell file is based on two XML schemas: The schema TEMSDataTypes.xsd defines TEMS-specific XML data types, derived from the fundamental data types set down in the XML specification. See section D.6. The schema TEMSCell.xsd defines XML attributes and elements that embody cell and site data, relying on the data types in TEMSDataTypes.xsd. See section D.7.

The schemas are found in the directory XMLSchema beneath the TEMS Investigation installation directory. The syntax laid down in the schemas should always be followed when composing XML cell files.

D.5.

General Remarks on Format

The file format should generally follow the recommendation for XML 1.0. See the World Wide Web Consortium recommendation at www.w3.org/TR/RECxml. Files should be encoded in Unicode UTF-8 (RFC2279). They therefore need to begin with: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> When composing XML files it is a good idea to use an XML-capable editor or other tool with XML support. To ensure that language-specific characters are handled correctly, any tool used needs to support the UTF-8 encoding. UTF-8 allows a set of more than 28 = 256 characters to be mapped into 8-bit symbols, by using two-byte sequences for certain characters. For example, Swedish Å needs to be encoded as Ä_ in the XML file. Tools with UTF-8 support normally handle this automatically. The file should have extension .xml. Free text comments must be formatted like this: <!-- Comment goes here -->

D.6.

TEMS-specific Data Types

To facilitate handling of data, a number of TEMS-specific data types are defined. They are collected in the schema TEMSDataTypes.xsd. The

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definition of custom data types enables range checks and validation of cell data. The data types are used in defining the elements and attributes of the XML cell file, as described in section D.7. All TEMS-specific data types are derived from basic (generic) XML schema data types with additional constraints on value ranges or enumeration. It should be noted that these data types do not compare directly to their counterparts in programming languages. For example, it does not follow automatically that the “Long” data types found below should always be represented by a “long” data type in a programming language. Full information on the basic set of XML schema data types, including definitions of int, long, float, double, and string, is found at www.w3.org/TR/ xmlschema-2/. Value ranges below are given in the form of inclusive minimum and maximum values, that is, the endpoints of the ranges are valid values. The TEMS-specific data types are as follows: Data Type Double90_90 Double180_180 Double5000 Float90 Float90_90 Float100 Float180_180 Float360 Int2To3 Long7 Long9 Long255 Long511 Range/Description –90.0 ... 90.0 –180.0 ... 180.0 0.0 ... 5000.0 0.0 ... 90.0 –90.0 ... 90.0 1.0 ... 100.0 –180.0 ... 180.0 0.0 ... 360.0 2, 3 0, ..., 7 0, ..., 9 0, ..., 255 0, ..., 511

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Data Type Long999 Long1023 Long4096 Long16383 Long65535 Long268435455 LongPositive String128 String128_Collapse String_GeodeticDatum

Range/Description 0, ..., 999 0, ..., 1023 0, ..., 4096 0, ..., 16383 0, ..., 65535 0, ..., 268,435,455 0, ..., 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 String with max 128 characters String with max 128 characters, collapsed white spaces a String indicating geodetic datum; one of “WGS84”, “Bessel 1841”, “Krasovsky”, “Clarke 1880“ String; for values see section D.6.1 String equal to one of the following: “GSM”, “WCDMA”, “CDMA”, “EV-DO”, “WIFI”

String_OperatingBand String_SystemType

a. Any leading and trailing spaces are removed when the file is read. Also, any sequences of spaces inside the string are replaced by single spaces. More about white space handling is found at www.w3.org/TR/ xmlschema-2/#rf-whiteSpace.

D.6.1.

String_OperatingBand

A string of type String_OperatingBand can have the following values:

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D.6.1.1.

GSM Bands
Band Description Unspecified GSM band. Can be used when the frequency band is not known or not defined. Self-explanatory. (E-GSM = Extended GSM; R-GSM = Railway GSM.)

GSM

GSM 450, GSM 480, GSM 850, GSM 900, E-GSM 900, R-GSM 900, GSM 1800, GSM 1900

D.6.1.2.

WCDMA Bands
Band Description Unspecified WCDMA band. Can be used when the frequency band is not known or not defined. Band V, AM/China Band VI, JP Band VIII, EU (GSM) Band III, EU/JP/APAC Band IX, JP Band II, AM Band I, EU/JP/APAC Band IV, AM Band VII, Global

W-CDMA

W-CDMA 850 W-CDMA 850 JP W-CDMA 900 W-CDMA 1800 W-CDMA 1800 JP W-CDMA 1900 W-CDMA 2100 W-CDMA 2100 AM W-CDMA 2500

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D.6.1.3.

CDMA Bands

The CDMA band definitions are from 3GPP2 specification C.S0057-B, version 1.0. Band CDMA Description Unspecified CDMA band. Can be used when the frequency band is not known or not defined. Band 0, 800 MHz cellular band Band 1, 1.8 to 2.0 GHz PCS band Band 2, 872 to 960 MHz TACS band Band 3, 832 to 925 MHz JTACS band Band 4, 1.75 to 1.87 GHz Korean PCS band Band 5, 450 MHz NMT band Band 6, 2 GHz IMT-2000 band Band 7, 700 MHz band Band 8, 1800 MHz band Band 9, 900 MHz band Band 10, Secondary 800 MHz band Band 11, 400 MHz European PAMR band Band 12, 800 MHz PAMR band Band 13, 2.5 GHz IMT-2000 Extension band Band 14, US PCS 1.9 GHz band Band 15, AWS band (US) Band 16, US 2.5 GHz band Band 17, US 2.5 GHz Forward Link Only band

CDMA 800 CDMA 1900 CDMA TACS CDMA JTACS CDMA PCS KR CDMA 450 CDMA 2GHz CDMA 700 CDMA 1800 CDMA 900 CDMA 800 2nd CDMA 400 PAMR EU CDMA 800 PAMR CDMA 2.5GHz IMT2000 CDMA 1900 PCS US CDMA AWS CDMA 2.5GHz US CDMA 2.5GHz US FW LO

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D.6.1.4.

Wi-Fi Bands

Wi-Fi uses unlicensed (ISM) frequency bands as specified in IEEE 802.11. These bands are not represented in the XML cell file.

D.7.
D.7.1.

Structure of Cell File
Diagram Conventions

In this section, the structure of the XML cell file is illustrated using tree diagrams. A few conventions in these diagrams need to be explained: • • Solid line box: The element is mandatory. Lines in upper left corner: The element is “atomic”, i.e. it is fully defined in itself and does not contain other elements. Non-atomic elements are drawn without these lines. Arrow: The element type is global. Global element types are ones that are reused multiple times in the file structure, for instance because they are needed for all technologies (e.g. CELLNAME, ANTENNA). The element type is defined only once in the schema file, and all occurrences of the element type refer to that definition. An element without the arrow is local and has a definition of its own. Dashed line box: The element is optional. Plus sign: The entity in the diagram contains other elements within it. The subordinate structure is collapsed in this case. Minus sign: The subordinate structure is expanded. Stacked boxes: Several instances of the element may occur. The permitted number of instances is indicated by a range; in this case, there must be at least one CELL_LIST, but there is no fixed upper limit on the number of such elements.

• •

• •

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The element on the left must precede the element on the right. The element on the left must precede the elements on the right; the latter, however, may come in arbitrary order.

D.7.2.

Overall File Structure

Nearly every piece of data in an XML cell file will be described as an element or attribute. The main root element is TEMS_CELL_EXPORT; it has a mandatory attribute VERSION which indicates the version of the cell file format. At present version 1.2 is used. The GENERATED_DATE element, also mandatory, indicates when the cell file was generated. A number of further, standard attributes need to be included in the cell file to enable schema validation (checking of element names, value ranges, etc.): xmlns:dataType="http://www.ericsson.com/tems/dataTypes"

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xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation="TEMSCell.xsd" VERSION="1.2"> Please note that no path should be given to TEMSCell.xsd.

D.7.3.

GSM Cell Data

GSM cell data is organized as follows:

The “GSM” element contains at least one and optionally several CELL_LIST elements. Cell lists are intended to be used to distinguish operators. Each cell list element contains at least one GSM cell. There is no limit to the number of either cells or cell lists. Like the main root element, the “GSM” element has a mandatory VERSION attribute stating the version of the GSM cell data structure. The version described here is 1.1. CELL_LIST elements have one mandatory attribute, NET_OPERATOR. For each GSM cell the following elements are specified:

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Each cell element is a container that holds multiple subordinate elements. As can be seen in the diagram, only a few of these are mandatory. One is CELLNAME, whose value must be unique in the entire file. CELLNAME has SYSTEM_TYPE as attribute; if this attribute is not set, it is implicitly assumed that this cell belongs to the system (the communications technology) in whose structure it is found, e.g. GSM.

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D.7.4.

WCDMA Cell Data

WCDMA cell data is organized in the same way as GSM cell data; compare section D.7.3. The version number of the WCDMA cell data structure is 1.1.

For each WCDMA cell the following elements are specified:

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D.7.5.

CDMA Cell Data

CDMA cell data is organized in the same way as GSM cell data; compare section D.7.3. The version number of the CDMA cell data structure is 1.0.

For each CDMA cell the following elements are specified:

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Appendix D. Format of XML Cell File

D.7.6.

EV-DO Cell Data

EV-DO cell data is organized in the same way as GSM cell data; compare section D.7.3. The version number of the EV-DO cell data structure is 1.0.

For each EV-DO cell the following elements are specified:

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D.7.7.

Wi-Fi Access Point Data

Wi-Fi access point data is organized in the same way as GSM cell data; compare section D.7.3. The version number of the Wi-Fi access point data structure is 1.0.1

For each Wi-Fi access point the following elements are specified:

1. For simplicity, the term “CELL” has been retained in the Wi-Fi data structure, although Wi-Fi access points are not in fact cells in a cellular network in the way that (e.g.) GSM cells are.

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D.7.8.

Site Data

The site data structure allows grouping of cells. However, this structure is not used by the present version of TEMS Investigation, and therefore no detailed description of it is provided here.

D.7.9.

Container Elements

This section lists all remaining elements that contain other elements as components. The “atomic” elements follow in section D.7.10. Mandatory components and global ones are indicated as such below. For components whose number may vary, the range of that number is given; “∞” means that there is no fixed upper limit.

D.7.9.1.

ANTENNA

DIRECTION (mandatory) BEAM_WIDTH GAIN HEIGHT POLARIZATION ELECTRICAL_TILT MECHANICAL_TILT TYPE INFORMATION (global)

D.7.9.2.

BSIC (GSM)

NCC (mandatory) BCC (mandatory)

D.7.9.3.

CDMA_CHANNEL_INFO (CDMA, EV-DO)

BAND (mandatory, global) CHANNEL (mandatory, global)

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D.7.9.4.

CGI (GSM, WCDMA)

MCC MNC_LENGTH MNC LAC CI

D.7.9.5.

CHANNEL_INFO (GSM)

BCCH (mandatory; this element contains:) ARFCN (mandatory, global) BAND (global) TCH [0 ... ∞] (this element contains:) ARFCN (global) BAND (global)

D.7.9.6.

INFORMATION 1

INFO [0 ... ∞]

D.7.9.7.

NEIGHBOR_LIST

CELLNAME [1 ... ∞] (mandatory, global)

D.7.9.8.

POSITION

GEODETIC_DATUM (mandatory) LATITUDE (mandatory) LONGITUDE (mandatory) ALTITUDE

1. This element also has the attribute INFO_CATEGORY (section D.7.11).

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D.7.9.9.

REPEATER_LIST (CDMA, EV-DO)

REPEATER [0 ... ∞] (this element contains:) POSITION (mandatory, global) ANTENNA (global)

D.7.9.10. TEMS_INTERNAL
This is data used internally by TEMS products.

D.7.10.

“Atomic” Elements

Under this heading, finally, are listed all elements which do not contain smaller elements as components. Global elements and local technologyspecific elements are collected in a single list.
Element ALTITUDE ARFCN BAND BCC BEAM_WIDTH CELL_NUMBER CELL_TYPE CELLNAME Description Ground height in meters above mean sea level. Absolute Radio Frequency Channel Number. Operating band used for the cell. Base Station Colour Code. Width of antenna beam in degrees. Unique numeric ID for the cell (must be unique in the entire file). Type of the cell, e.g. “Macro”, “Micro”, “Pico”. Text label for cell; must be unique in the entire cell file. This element has the attribute SYSTEM_TYPE (section D.7.11). CHANNEL The CDMA RF channel number. Long1023 Data Type double Long1023 String_ OperatingBand Long7 Float360 LongPositive String128 string

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Element CI

Description Cell Identity. Equal to the 16-bit C-Id in 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.5. The 28-bit Cell Identity (“UC-Id” in 3GPP) is a concatenation of RNC_ID and CI.

Data Type Long65535

CPICH_POWER DIRECTION EIRP

Primary CPICH power in dBm. Direction of the antenna beam in degrees clockwise from north. Effective Isotropic Radiated Power: the apparent power (in W) transmitted towards the receiver. Electrical tilt in degrees. Antenna gain in dB. Date and time of XML file generation: “YYYY-MM-DD”. Reference ellipsoid used by the GPS to calculate coordinates. The default GPS ellipsoid is WGS84. (Note that this element does not indicate the projection.) Height above ground of antenna in meters. Arbitrary additional information. Location Area Code. Latitude in decimal degrees. Identifier used to uniquely identify the set of resources within a Node B required to support a cell (as identified by a C-Id). See 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.6. Longitude in decimal degrees.

double Float360 double

ELECTRICAL_TILT GAIN GENERATED_ DATE GEODETIC_DATUM

Float90 float string String_ GeodeticDatum

HEIGHT INFO LAC LATITUDE LOCALCELLID

double String128 Long65535 Double90_90 Long268435455

LONGITUDE

Double180_180

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Element MAC_ADDRESS

Description MAC address of connected WLAN access point (BSSID in IEEE 802.11 standard). Maximum transmission power (in dBm) for all downlink channels added together. Mechanical tilt in degrees. Mobile Country Code. Mobile Network Code. Number of digits in MNC. Network Colour Code. Name of base station. Status of base station (e.g. “Operational”, “Phase 3”). Polarization of antenna (vertical, horizontal, or circular). Routing Area Code. Radio Network Controller ID. Equal to the 12-bit RNC-Id in 3GPP TS 25.401, section 6.1.5. The 28-bit Cell Identity (“UC-Id” in 3GPP) is a concatenation of RNC_ID and CI.

Data Type String128_ Collapse Double5000

MAX_TX_POWER

MECHANICAL_TILT MCC MNC MNC_LENGTH NCC NODE_B NODE_B_STATUS POLARIZATION RAC RNC_ID

Float90 Long999 Long999 Int2To3 Long7 String128_ Collapse String128_ Collapse String128 Long255 Long4096

SC SSID TIME_OFFSET

Primary downlink scrambling code to be used in the cell. Service Set Identifier of connected WLAN access point. Timing delay used to define starting point of scrambling codes on CPICH, SCH, etc. Expressed as a multiple of 256 chips.

Long511 String128 Long9

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Element TYPE UARFCN_DL URA

Description Type of antenna used. Downlink UARFCN. UTRAN Registration Area.

Data Type String128 Long16383 Long65535

D.7.11.

Attributes
Description Associated with the INFORMATION element (section D.7.9.6). Allows categorization of the data put into this element. Associated with the CELL_LIST element (sections D.7.3–D.7.6). Consists of a string indicating the name of the network operator. Associated with the CELLNAME element (see section D.7.10). Consists of a string indicating the type of network. Associated with • the file as a whole (main root element, TEMS_CELL_EXPORT: section D.7.2) with the elements denoting a communications technology (sections D.7.3–D.7.6). Separate version numbering is applied to each of these entities. Data Type String128_ Collapse

Element INFO_CATEGORY

NET_OPERATOR

String128_ Collapse

SYSTEM_TYPE

String_ SystemType

VERSION

Float100

D.8.

Example of Complete XML File: UMTS

This example shows what an XML cell file with UMTS data may look like. Certain parts which merely repeat previously shown structures are left out; omissions are indicated by “...”.

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A complete file can be found in the directory XMLSchema beneath the TEMS Investigation installation directory.
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!-- Sample XML file: TEMS XML Cell Export File Format v. 1.2 --> <TEMS_CELL_EXPORT xmlns:dataType="http://www.ericsson.com/tems/dataTypes" xmlns:xsi= "http://www.w3.org/2001/ XMLSchema-instance" xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation= "TEMSCell.xsd" VERSION="1.2"> <GENERATED_DATE>2006-11-28</GENERATED_DATE> <GSM VERSION="1.1"> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 1"> <GSM_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">GSM Cell 1</CELLNAME> <CELL_NUMBER>0</CELL_NUMBER> <CELL_TYPE>Macro</CELL_TYPE> <POSITION> <GEODETIC_DATUM>WGS84</GEODETIC_DATUM> <LATITUDE>90.0</LATITUDE> <LONGITUDE>180.0</LONGITUDE> <ALTITUDE>3.14159265358979</ALTITUDE> </POSITION> <ANTENNA> <DIRECTION>360.0</DIRECTION> <BEAM_WIDTH>360.0</BEAM_WIDTH> <GAIN>3.14159</GAIN> <HEIGHT>3.14159265358979</HEIGHT> <POLARIZATION>Vertical</POLARIZATION> <ELECTRICAL_TILT>90.0</ELECTRICAL_TILT> <MECHANICAL_TILT>90.0</MECHANICAL_TILT> <TYPE>Antenna Type 1</TYPE> <INFORMATION> <INFO INFO_CATEGORY="String">Antenna Info 1</INFO> <INFO INFO_CATEGORY="String">Antenna Info 2</INFO> </INFORMATION> </ANTENNA> <RAC>255</RAC> <CGI> <MCC>999</MCC> <MNC_LENGTH>3</MNC_LENGTH> <MNC>999</MNC> <LAC>65535</LAC> <CI>65535</CI> </CGI> <BSIC> <NCC>7</NCC> <BCC>7</BCC> </BSIC> <CHANNEL_INFO>

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<BCCH> <ARFCN>1023</ARFCN> <BAND>GSM 900</BAND> </BCCH> <TCH> <ARFCN>1023</ARFCN> <BAND>GSM 900</BAND> </TCH> <TCH> <ARFCN>1023</ARFCN> <BAND>GSM 900</BAND> </TCH> </CHANNEL_INFO> <EIRP>3.14159265358979</EIRP> <NEIGHBOR_LIST> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">GSM Cell 2</CELLNAME> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">GSM Cell 3</CELLNAME> </NEIGHBOR_LIST> </GSM_CELL> <GSM_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">GSM Cell 2</CELLNAME> ... </GSM_CELL> <GSM_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">GSM Cell 3</CELLNAME> ... </GSM_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 2"> <GSM_CELL> ... </GSM_CELL> <GSM_CELL> ... </GSM_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> </GSM> <WCDMA VERSION="1.1"> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 1"> <WCDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WCDMA">WCDMA Cell 1</CELLNAME> <CELL_NUMBER>0</CELL_NUMBER> <CELL_TYPE>String</CELL_TYPE> <LOCALCELLID>268435455</LOCALCELLID> <POSITION> ... </POSITION>

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<ANTENNA> ... </ANTENNA> <RAC>255</RAC> <CGI> ... </CGI> <SC>511</SC> <UARFCN_DL>16383</UARFCN_DL> <RNC_ID>4096</RNC_ID> <URA>65535</URA> <TIME_OFFSET>9</TIME_OFFSET> <CPICH_POWER>3.14159265358979</CPICH_POWER> <MAX_TX_POWER>5000</MAX_TX_POWER> <NODE_B>Base Station 1</NODE_B> <NODE_B_STATUS>Operational</NODE_B_STATUS> <NEIGHBOR_LIST> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">WCDMA Cell 2</CELLNAME> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="GSM">WCDMA Cell 3</CELLNAME> </NEIGHBOR_LIST> </WCDMA_CELL> <WCDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WCDMA">WCDMA Cell 2</CELLNAME> ... </WCDMA_CELL> <WCDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WCDMA">WCDMA Cell 3</CELLNAME> ... </WCDMA_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 2"> <WCDMA_CELL> ... </WCDMA_CELL> <WCDMA_CELL> ... </WCDMA_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> </WCDMA> <WIFI VERSION="1.0"> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 1"> <WIFI_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WIFI">Wi-Fi AP 1</CELLNAME> <CELL_NUMBER>0</CELL_NUMBER> <CELL_TYPE>String</CELL_TYPE> <LOCALCELLID>268435455</LOCALCELLID> <ANTENNA>

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... </ANTENNA> <MAC_ADDRESS>00-00-00-00-00-00</MAC_ADDRESS> <SSID>MyESS</SSID> <NEIGHBOR_LIST> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WIFI">Wi-Fi AP 2</CELLNAME> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WIFI">Wi-Fi AP 3</CELLNAME> </NEIGHBOR_LIST> </WIFI_CELL> <WIFI_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WIFI">Wi-Fi AP 2</CELLNAME> ... </WIFI_CELL> <WIFI_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="WIFI">Wi-Fi AP 3</CELLNAME> ... </WIFI_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 2"> <WIFI_CELL> ... </WIFI_CELL> <WIFI_CELL> ... </WIFI_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> </WIFI> </TEMS_CELL_EXPORT>

D.9.

Example of Complete XML File: CDMA/EV-DO

Below is an example showing an XML cell file with CDMA and EV-DO data. Again, some parts which repeat previously shown structures are left out; omissions are indicated by “...”. See also section D.8.
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!-- Sample XML file: TEMS XML Cell Export File Format v. 1.2 --> <TEMS_CELL_EXPORT xmlns:dataType="http://www.ericsson.com/tems/dataTypes" xmlns:xsi= "http://www.w3.org/2001/ XMLSchema-instance" xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation= "TEMSCell.xsd" VERSION="1.2"> <GENERATED_DATE>2006-11-28</GENERATED_DATE> <CDMA VERSION="1.0"> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 1"> <CDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="CDMA">CDMA Cell 1</CELLNAME>

152

Appendix D. Format of XML Cell File

<CELL_NUMBER>0</CELL_NUMBER> <CELL_TYPE>Macro</CELL_TYPE> <POSITION> ... </POSITION> <ANTENNA> ... </ANTENNA> <PN_OFFSET>147</PN_OFFSET> <CDMA_CHANNEL_INFO> <BAND>CDMA 450</BAND> <CHANNEL>23</CHANNEL> </CDMA_CHANNEL_INFO> <EIRP>3.14159265358979</EIRP> <MAX_TX_POWER>2.71828182845904</MAX_TX_POWER> <NEIGHBOR_LIST> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="CDMA">CDMA Cell 2</CELLNAME> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="CDMA">CDMA Cell 3</CELLNAME> </NEIGHBOR_LIST> </CDMA_CELL> <CDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="CDMA">CDMA Cell 2</CELLNAME> ... </CDMA_CELL> <CDMA_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="CDMA">CDMA Cell 3</CELLNAME> ... </CDMA_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 2"> <CDMA_CELL> ... </GSM_CELL> <CDMA_CELL> ... </CDMA_CELL> ... </CELL_LIST> </CDMA> <EV-DO VERSION="1.0"> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator 1"> <EV-DO_CELL> <CELLNAME SYSTEM_TYPE="EV-DO">EV-DO Cell 1</CELLNAME> ... </EV-DO_CELL> <EV-DO_CELL> ... </EV-DO_CELL>

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... </CELL_LIST> <CELL_LIST NET_OPERATOR="Operator_2"> ... </CELL_LIST> </EV-DO> </TEMS_CELL_EXPORT>

D.10.

Note on Processing in TEMS Investigation

Any syntax errors found when loading the XML cell file into TEMS Investigation are reported in a single message box. If there are many errors, the entire box might not fit on the screen, so that only part of it will be visible.

154

Appendix E. Cell Identification

Appendix E. Cell Identification

This appendix describes the algorithms used to identify in the cell file those cells that a device interacts with or scans.

E.1.

Cell Identification in GSM

For the cell file formats, see appendices C (CEL format) and D (XML format). The CGI step in the algorithms below can be performed only with devices capable of obtaining CGI data. With other devices, this step is skipped. Compare the descriptions of the information elements Cell Name Algorithm and Neighbor Cell Name Algorithm: see Information Elements and Events, sections 4.3.7.1 and 4.3.5 respectively.

E.1.1.

Serving Cell

The following steps are gone through until a matching cell is found: 1. If CGI (MCC, MNC, LAC, CI) is available, look up the cell in the cell file. 2. Otherwise, try to match the ARFCN and BSIC in the cell file, also considering the geographical position of the sample. A position is considered valid if the distance to the cell is less than 35 km. If multiple matches are found within a 35 km radius, the closest cell is picked. If the position is invalid, no result is returned unless a unique match is found in the cell file.

E.1.2.

Neighbors

The following steps are gone through until a matching cell is found: 1. If CGI (MCC, MNC, LAC, CI) is available, look up the cell in the cell file. 2. Otherwise, if the current serving cell is known, search that cell’s neighbor list as defined in the cell file for a neighbor with matching ARFCN and BSIC.

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3. If the current serving cell is not known, search the entire cell file for cells with matching ARFCN and BSIC, also considering the geographical position of the sample. A position is considered valid if the distance to the cell is less than 35 km. If multiple matches are found within a 35 km radius, the closest cell is picked. If the position is invalid, no result is returned unless a unique match is found in the cell file.

E.2.

Cell Identification in WCDMA

For the cell file formats, see appendix C (CEL format) and appendix D (XML format). Note the following: • • CEL format: CI must be the full 28-bit Cell Id (see appendix C.4). XML format: Both CI and RNC_ID must be set (see appendix D.7.10). 1. If a valid 28-bit Cell Id is available for the SAN (Serving/Active set/ Neighbors) constellation, look up the cell in the cell file. This is possible in idle mode only, because only then can the Cell Id be obtained. 2. Otherwise, try to match the UARFCN and SC in the cell file, also considering the geographical position of the sample. A position is considered valid if the distance to the cell is less than 200 km. If multiple matches are found within a 200 km radius, the closest cell is picked. If the position is invalid, no result is returned unless a unique match is found in the cell file. Step 1 is possible only with a UE. With a scanner, only step 2 is performed.

The following steps are gone through until a matching cell is found:

E.3.

Cell Identification in CDMA

For the cell file format, see appendix D (XML format). The following procedure is used to find a matching cell: • Try to match the sample’s system type (CDMA/EV-DO), frequency band, RF channel and PN offset in the cell file, also considering the geographical position of the sample. A position is considered valid if the distance to the cell is less than 100 km. If multiple matches are found within a 100 km radius, the closest cell is picked. If the position is invalid, no result is returned unless a unique match is found in the cell file.

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Index

Index

A
accessibility (option in RAN Tuning) 95 Anritsu scanners importing files logged by Anritsu ML8720 (i.e. in Anritsu format) 34 AQM merging uplink AQM data into logfiles 113 arguments of information elements 3 attributes of information elements 4

B
bar charts 79 adding and deleting subcharts 80 Additional Information pane 80 changing contents and properties 80 changing devices in 83 Chart pane 79 editing general properties 80 editing subcharts 81 Legend pane 80 rearranging subcharts within 81 selecting additional information 83 X-axis pane 79 Y-axis pane 79 basics of Route Analysis application 6 Benchmarking task 68 binning 45 by area 27 by distance 28 by time 27 examples 46 properties 27

C
Call Analysis task 55

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cell files CEL format, description of 122 converting TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV files to XML format 115 loading 30 permissible formats 30 XML format, description of 129 cell identification (algorithms for) 155 clusters 2 color presentation attribute of information elements 28 contents of Route Analysis User’s Manual 1 Converter tool 8, 112 aborting a conversion 118 checking the outcome of a conversion 118 converting TEMS Investigation CDMA CSV cell files to XML format 115 editing conversion setups 118 exporting TEMS Investigation logfiles in MDM format 117 launching 112 merging uplink AQM data into logfiles 113 processing TEMS Investigation logfiles with Python scripts 116 removing files from 118 coverage classes (GSM) 105 coverage classes (WCDMA) 97 threshold settings in Pilot Coverage task 63 CPICH Scan line charts (WCDMA) 78 current logfile 3 current project settings (in general properties) 17 current workspace settings (in general properties) 17

D
Data Selector window 7, 71 copying contents from 71 loading logfiles into 31 printing contents from 71 datum 28 default properties 5, 17 definitions of TEMS Investigation concepts 2

E
Edit menu 14 events 3 error events, configuring 18 in Map windows 27

158

Index

user-defined 19 adding information element criteria 19 adding Layer 3 message criteria 21 adding predefined-event criteria 20 advanced syntax options 21 basic syntax rules 21 composing 19 debugging 22 example of 22

F
FAQ (on TEMS website) 2 file extensions in Route Analysis 121 File menu 14 file types in Route Analysis 121

G
general properties 5 configuration of 17 Getting Started Manual, contents of 1 Google Earth, exporting map views to 49 GPRS Analysis task 57 GSM Filter task 69

H
Handover Analysis task 57 Help menu 15

I
information element groups 3 information elements 3 arguments of 3 attributes of 4 colors of 28 IE tab in Navigator 12 in Map windows 24 Info Element tab in Navigator 12 presentation attributes of 4, 28 presentation in Map window 42 presentation in Navigator 18 installing TEMS Investigation 6

K
keyboard shortcuts 16, 120

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L
line charts 72 adding charts 75 Additional Information pane 74 changing contents and properties 74 changing devices in 78 Chart pane 73 editing 75 editing general properties 75 general properties of subcharts 76 Legend pane 74 organization of window 72 rearranging subcharts within 75 selecting additional information 78 Y-axis pane 73 zooming 74 loading data 30 loading data into Route Analysis 7 loading logfiles from other sources 33 logfile cache, clearing 34 logfiles analyzing multiple logfiles 54 current logfile 3 loading from other sources 33 loading into Route Analysis 31 replaying 89 searching 90

M
Map window "Generic" presentation 38, 45 active set presentation 40 binning 45 combining different types of 46 examples 46 properties of 46 binning properties 27 cell presentation 39 centering map 50 changing devices in 48 context menu 50 copying contents of 53 datum properties 28

160

Index

event configuration 27 event presentation 43 exporting map view to Google Earth 49 Info tab 44 information element configuration 24 information element presentation 42 layers 51 Legend tab 44 measuring distance in 51 neighbor presentation 40 notes on IE plotting and updating 43 panning map 50 projection 50 properties of 24 reloading logfiles manually in 50 route presentation 38 serving cell presentation 40 slave maps 48, 51 spider cursor 40 statistical binning 45 status bar 51 toolbar 50 uniforming map views 50 zooming map 50 Map windows 37 maps 37 loading 30 permissible file formats 30 MDM format, exporting TEMS Investigation logfiles in 117 menu bar 14 message windows 88 messages 4 Missing Neighbor Analysis task 66 mode reports 4 multi-logfile analysis 54 Benchmarking task 68 Call Analysis task 55 GPRS Analysis task 57 GSM Filter task 69 Handover Analysis task 57 Missing Neighbor Analysis task 66 Pilot Coverage Analysis task 58

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Pilot Pollution Analysis task 64 user-defined tasks 70 workflow 54

N
Navigator pane 10

O
online help 15 Open Logfile command 7, 32

P
phones 4 Pilot Coverage Analysis task 58 Pilot Pollution Analysis task 64 pinpoint markers in Map window 44 plotting density in Map window 43 presentation attributes of information elements 4, 28 Presentation menu 14 presentation of data 35 presentation windows changing devices in 36 configuration 35 Menu tab in Navigator 14 synchronization 36 types of 35 updating 36 presenting data 7 projects 5, 9, 17 automatic reloading of 18 Project tab in Navigator 11 Python scripts, processing TEMS Investigation logfiles with 116

R
RAN Tuning 7, 91 editing bookmarks in DOT files 110 generating MapInfo files 103 generating output 109 generating output in batch mode 110 prerequisites 93 scanner data 92 treatment of incomplete calls and data sessions 92 troubleshooting 110

162

Index

RAN Tuning GSM 91 adding logfiles 104 Cell File Options tab 105 creating a database 104 General Report Settings tab 105 opening a database 104 Operator Selection tab 108 Output Options tab 109 pilot coverage classification 105 Report Template tab 108 selecting cells and clusters 105 setting statistics thresholds 105 setting up a report 104 Statistics Thresholds tab 105 UE Report Options tab 105 RAN Tuning WCDMA 91 adding logfiles 93 Cell File Options tab 96 creating a database 93 dropped call classification 98, 107 Frequency Selection tab 101 General Report Settings tab 94 opening a database 93 Output Options tab 103 pilot coverage classification 97 Report Template tab 101 selecting cells and clusters 96 setting statistics thresholds 97 setting up a report 93 Statistics Thresholds tab 97 UE Report Options tab 95 WCDMA vs. GSM data 91 Readme file 2 recommended skills 6 Release Note 2 Replay toolbar 89 replaying a logfile 89 retainability (option in RAN Tuning) 96

S
scanners 5 searching a logfile 90 size presentation attribute of information elements 29

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skills recommended for Route Analysis users 6 slave map windows 48 starting the Route Analysis application 6 statistical binning in Map window 45 status bar 16 status windows 84 changing devices in 87, 88 changing IE attributes in 87 changing properties of 84 configuration of 84 managing contents of 84 support contact information 2, 119 symbol presentation attribute of information elements 29

T
tasks 5, 54 map-based, general properties of 57 user-defined 23, 70 composing 23 TEMS on-line subscription service 2 toolbars 15

U
user interface 9 user-defined events 19 user-defined tasks 23, 70

V
View menu 14

W
what’s new in this TEMS Investigation version 1 Wi-Fi access points presentation on map 40 Window menu 15 worksheets 10 Worksheets tab in Navigator 14 workspaces 5, 10, 17

164

TEMS™ Optimization Solutions — the number one choice for operators worldwide. For every stage of a wireless network’s life cycle and supporting all major technologies, the TEMS portfolio helps operators maximize their Quality of Service and get the most out of their network investment. Ericsson’s experience and technological leadership give network operators the strong partnership they need and a commitment to quality, accuracy, and success. TEMS Optimization Solutions — Making Wireless Better.

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