You are on page 1of 15

Post­traumatic stress disorder 

Jeanine Blais, Carrie Burd 
& T.J. Erhart

Symptoms



Intrusive thoughts or memories about traumatic events 
Avoidance behaviors
Negative thinking or mood
Hyperarousal symptoms
(Mayoclinic.org, 2014)

DSM­5 Criteria
Criterion A: stressor (trauma) 1 required
1.Direct exposure
2.Witnessing
3.Indirect (trauma, accidental or violent death of close friend or relative)
4.Repeated or extreme indirect exposure to aversive details of event, such as: 
Professionals exposed to child abuse details, first responders,  retrieving body 
parts.
Criterion B: intrusion symptoms (re­experiencing the event)1 required
1.Recurrent, involuntary, intrusive memories
2.Traumatic nightmares
3.Dissociative reactions (e.g., flashbacks) from brief episode to complete loss 
of consciousness)
4.Intense/prolonged distress after exposure to reminder/trigger
5.Physiologic reaction after exposure to trigger.
(American Psychiatric Association, 2013)

DSM­5 Criteria
Criterion C: avoidance 1 required
1.Thoughts or feelings related to traumatic event
2.External reminders (people, places, activities, objects, etc.)
Criterion D: negative alterations in cognition/mood 2 required
1.Inability to recall key features of traumatic event (dissociative amnesia)
2.Persistent negative beliefs/expectations about self or world. 
3.Persistent blame of self or others for causing traumatic event
4.Persistent negative trauma­related emotions (fear, anger, guilt, shame)
5.Marked decreased interest in  pre­traumatic activities
6.Feeling alienated from others
7.Constricted affect: persistent inability to experience positive emotions 
(American Psychiatric Association, 2013)

DSM­5 Criteria
Criterion E: alterations in arousal and reactivity 2 required
1.Irritable and aggressive behavior
2.Self­destructive, reckless behavior
3.Hypervigilance
4.Exaggerated startle response
5.Problems concentrating
6.Sleep disturbances
Criterion F: duration
Must have persistent symptoms for more that one month 
Criterion G: functional significance
Significant symptom related distress functional impairment in work, school, 
relationships, etc.
(American Psychiatric Association, 2013)

DSM­5 Criteria
Criterion H: exclusion
Disturbance is not D/T  meds, substance abuse or other illness. 
PT may be diagnosed with dissociative symptoms:
1.Depersonalization: experience of being an outside observer or being in a 
dream. 
2.Derealization: unreality, distance or distortion as though things are not real.
PT may have a delayed expression. 
Full diagnosis is not met until at least six months after trauma. 
Onset of symptoms may occur immediately or years after the event.
(American Psychiatric Association, 2013)

Have you ever served?




Have You Ever Served is a part of a 
national campaign called the Joining 
Forces Campaign. 
Backed by the American Nursing 
Association, First Lady Michelle Obama, 
and Dr. Jill Biden. 
Assessment of symptoms is the first step 
in an integrated treatment approach. 
Always ask the patients “Have you 
served?” 
Anyone can be a veteran, and PTSD as 
well as many other medical concerns are 
seen more commonly in military 
members. 
Identifying a patient as a veteran is 
critical to providing quality care. 

(American academy of nurses, n.d.) 

Therapeutic Communication
• Goal­ to strengthen the person’s motivation for seeking help.
• Any change must be the clients wishes, not the Nurse’s. 
• When talking to clients that display s/s of PTSD, keep the focus of 
the conversation on exploring and resolving ambivalence about 
seeking help. 
• Keep the conversation grounded with a respectful stance, focusing 
on building a rapport. 
• Create conversation that evokes change.
• Keep conversation focused on the client as an individual
 

(American nurses foundation, 2014)

Therapeutic Communication
Open ended questions
•Questions that encourage elaboration and thought. 
•Require more than a “yes” or “no” answer. 
•“Tell me more”
•“How exactly did the fight between the two of you start?”
•These help the client improve cognition.
 (American nurses foundation, 2014)

Therapeutic Communication








Encourage and reaffirm the clients self­examination
Don’t hesitate to offer tactful compliments.
Highlight strengths when possible
Keep focus on clients thoughts, feelings and circumstances. 
Seek to understand and offer that understanding back and confirm 
that the client is understood.
Repeat what client said back to them 
Rephrase what the client already said to you. 
Act as a reflection of the clients feelings.
Summarize or create metaphors to help client understand thoughts.
  (American nurses foundation, 2014) 

Psychotherapy
There are four evidence based treatments used for PTSD.
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)  (most effective)
•Two types: 
– Prolonged exposure (PE): Survivors repeatedly re­experience traumatic 
event by talking through it and safe real world exposure to the stimuli.  
– Cognitive processing therapy (CPT): Changes maladaptive beliefs 
related to the traumatic event, includes written exposure component.
Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)   
PT repeatedly re­experiences traumatic event by talking through it while 
performing eye movement by tracking an object. 
Anxiety management
Involves behavior therapy, management techniques and group therapy.
(Hamblen, Schnurr, Rosenburg & Eftekhari, 2015)
               

Pharmacotherapy
First line of treatment
SSRIs: Paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), fluoxetine (Prozac)
SNRI: Venlafaxine (Effexor)
Second line of treatment
TCAs: Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), imiprimine (Tofranil)
Others: Mirtazapine (Remeron)
Prazosin (minipress) helpful with nightmares only 
Nefazodone, Phenelzyne
If PT is still experiencing symptoms while on medication assess to see if 
medication is being taken as prescribed, often non­adherence is the problem. 
(Freedman, 2015)

Patient Teaching






Take medication as prescribed
Do not stop taking medication
Nefazodone: hepatotoxic, periodic liver function labs are necessary 
Phenelzyne (MAOI): Do not take with other antidepressants, do not eat 
foods containing tyramine; avocados, bananas, raisins, papaya products, 
meat tenderizers, figs, cheese, sour cream, yogurt, beer, wines, many 
processed meats, chocolate, yeast products and others.  
Avoid alcohol and drugs (self­medication)
Avoid opioids and benzodiazepines 
The most effective treatment is psychotherapy with medication. 
CBT has a high rate of remission, with PT remaining in remission for 5+ 
years. 
(Adams, Holland, & Urban, 2014; Freedman, 2015)

Treatment facilities
• SUNY Upstate
• Syracuse VA Medical Center
• Psychology today website lists local
individual providers
• Oswego Health does not offer
services specifically for PTSD.

References
Adams, M., Holland, N., & Urban, C. (2014). Pharmacology for nurses: A 
pathophysiological approach (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson 
Education, Inc.
American academy of nursing. (n.d.). In Have you ever served in the 
military?.  Retrieved from http://www.haveyoueverserved.com
American nurses foundation. (2014). Working with patients. In The PTSD 
toolkit for nurses. Retrieved from http://www.nurseptsdtoolkit.org/ index.php
American Psychiatric Association. (2013) Diagnostic and statistical manual 
of  mental disorders, (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. 
Hamblen, PhD., Schnurr, PhD., Rosenburg, MA., & Eftekhari, PhD. (2015, 
August). Overview for psychotherapy for PTSD. In US department of 
veteran's affairs. Retrieved September 3rd, 2015.
Freedman, M. (2015, August). Pharmacological treatment of PTSD and 
comorbid disorders [Video lecture]. In US department of veteran’s affairs. 
Retrieved September 29th, 2015.
Mayo Clinic. (2014, April). Post­traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In 
Mayoclinc.org. Retrieved September 3rd, 2015.