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Common Core Standard

Will’s Progress

Craig’s Progress

Both boys had more practice asking
and answering their own questions
through research this quarter. At the
start of units and throughout different
topics within units, the boys would
read, ask questions, and then read
more to find the answers. Both boys
excel at asking questions and are
eager to find the answers. This is a
strength for both.

Both boys had more practice asking
and answering their own questions
through research this quarter. At the
start of units and throughout different
topics within units, the boys would
read, ask questions, and then read
more to find the answers. Both boys
excel at asking questions and are
eager to find the answers. This is a
strength for both. Craig has greatly
improved on asking questions this
quarter. He asks with greater
confidence and without second
guessing himself or checking with a
book or his brother.

This is not a common practice in our
unit study, but both boys explored
character study through our
constellation unit with the book
Coyote Places the Stars. Will did an
excellent job of recalling the problems
Coyote encountered and the ways he
solved them.

Craig also did a good job of recalling
problems from the story and the
solution, but needed to refer back to
the text to answer them. This is a
great skill to have, and with my help,
he knew how to reference the text in
order to answer the questions.

Reading: Literature
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.1

Ask and answer such questions as who,
what, where, when, why, and how to
demonstrate understanding of key details
in a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.2

Recount stories, including fables and
folktales from diverse cultures, and
determine their central message, lesson,
or moral.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.3

Describe how characters in a story
respond to major events and challenges.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.4

Describe how words and phrases (e.g.,
regular beats, alliteration, rhymes,
repeated lines) supply rhythm and
meaning in a story, poem, or song.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.5

Describe the overall structure of a story,
including describing how the beginning
introduces the story and the ending
concludes the action.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.6

Acknowledge differences in the points of
view of characters, including by speaking
in a different voice for each character
when reading dialogue aloud.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.7

Use information gained from the
illustrations and words in a print or digital
text to demonstrate understanding of its
characters, setting, or plot.

In Coyote Places the Stars, the boys
had to make predictions about the
text using pictures. Will had very
imaginative, yet practical predictions
based on the pictures. Will likes to use
text features to help him make sense
of the text. This is a very useful skill.

Craig also excelled at predicting using
the pictures, but seemed to prefer
finding the actual events through the
text. He mastered the skill at
predicting, but this is telling of his
personality that he likes to verify his
predictions.

Will can independently read and
identify the main topic and details of

Craig can identify the main idea and
details of large sections of text with

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.9

Compare and contrast two or more
versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella
stories) by different authors or from
different cultures.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.10

By the end of the year, read and
comprehend literature, including stories
and poetry, in the grades 2-3 text
complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of
the range.
Reading Informational Text
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.2

Identify the main topic of a multi

paragraph text as well as the focus of
specific paragraphs within the text.

short passages of text (1-2 pages at a
time). This is great growth from
identify main idea from text read
aloud to him. This has become a
largely independent skill.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.3

Will (as stated last quarter) does an
excellent job of understanding
connections between events, ideas,
concepts, and step-by-step processes.
He comes up with his own step-bystep procedures as well and also
makes unique connections between
concepts that (on the surface) seem
unrelated. Will made connections
between the different events of the
American Revolution and the affect of
a strong, centralized power on people,
and it leading to rebellion. That
connection (among others) he made
completely on his own. Will also
excels at highlighting important key
words and phrases in text and
explains connections between them
(independently).
Will’s understanding and use of
technical vocabulary is beyond 2nd
grade standards. He seeks new words,
learns them quickly, and uses them.
He excels at vocabulary activities, and

Describe the connection between a series
of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technical procedures
in a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.4

Determine the meaning of words and
phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic
or subject area.

guidance. If there are text features
(headlines, bold print, etc.) he seems
to look for those without reading the
text. This may be because he wants to
answer quickly, but I think he is very
concerned with it being right and has
learned to utilize text features. Over
the course of the past several months,
Craig has been challenged to read
and then identify the main idea and
details. Once challenged, Craig is able
to slow down and identify main idea
and details on his own terms. Craig
does this independently.
Craig (as stated last quarter) makes
connections between events, ideas,
concepts, and procedures. He is able
to add detail to steps, and also likes to
edit steps and concepts through
questioning and trial and error. Craig’s
through process is a little more
technical, and careful than his
brothers (who is more abstract, and
creative). Craig makes on level
connections in topics he is assigned,
and above level connection in topics
he is interested in (bridges, caves,
etc.). Craig also excels at highlighting
important key words and phrases in
text and explains connections
between them (independently).
Craig asks many questions about the
meanings and spellings of new words.
If the word is not of interest to Craig,
it may take him more time to commit
to memory and use it. However, I

you can tell that when he hears new
words (through shows, books, movies,
or through hearing adults speak) he
wants to learn the words and use
them too.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.5

Know and use various text features (e.g.,
captions, bold print, subheadings,
glossaries, indexes, electronic menus,
icons) to locate key facts or information in
a text efficiently.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.6

Identify the main purpose of a text,
including what the author wants to
answer, explain, or describe.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.7

Explain how specific images (e.g., a
diagram showing how a machine works)
contribute to and clarify a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.8

Describe how reasons support specific

This quarter we focused a lot on NonFiction text features. The boys
identified main idea, details, fun facts,
etc. using text features. They made
their own text book pages and
brochures and added in key text
features (planets and islands). Will
recognizes and uses text features to
his advantage, but reads through all
of the features first, rather than using
them as a quick reference. This is a
preference and not at all a concern. It
just means it may take him more time
to understand text. The boys have
just recently started to read and write
their own captions for pictures.
As stated for standard R1.2.2, Will has
an excellent understand of content
through text.
Will can easily explain how something
works by examining images or
diagrams. He seems to enjoy learning
from images or diagrams!

We worked a lot on main point and
specific details this quarter to the

have noticed that Craig notices new
vocabulary in text and loves to point it
out. His favorite, new skill is to
highlight the word because “it is
important. That’s why it is a
vocabulary word!”.
This quarter we focused a lot on NonFiction text features. The boys
identified main idea, details, fun facts,
etc. using text features. They made
their own textbook pages and
brochures and added in key text
features (planets and islands). Craig
depends (at times too much) on text
features to answer questions. He
often looks at the features first (which
is a GREAT reading strategy) but then
uses the features to come up with
ideas/answer questions, instead of
then going to the text. With direction,
Craig will go back and read the text.
The boys have just recently started to
read and write their own captions for
pictures.
As stated for standard R1.2.2, Craig
can usually identify main idea of text
with some redirection (actually read
the text, instead of copying directly
from text features).
Craig can easily explain how
something works by examining
images or diagrams. He seems to
enjoy learning from images or
diagrams and will often make his own
(with labels) in stead of drawing a
scene or picture.
We worked a lot on main point and
specific details this quarter to the

points the author makes in a text.

point where this has become habit.
Both boys understand main idea and
what details support it. They use
details to support their own claim and
arguments as well. Will’s strength
with this standard is that he can put
these main ideas and details in his
own words, rather than copying from
text, and also can add many details to
support arguments!

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.9

Both boys understand compare and

Compare and contrast the most important contrast but have yet to use 2 texts
points presented by two texts on the same on the same topic.
topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.10

By the end of year, read and comprehend
informational texts, including
history/social studies, science, and
technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text
complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of
the range.

Will’s reading and understanding of
text has GREATLY improved. He has
learned tools and strategies to help
him (such as using images, text
features, making predictions,
decoding skills, etc.). His
comprehension of text is VERY
impressive. I can ask him “what did
you read about?” and without looking
at the text he can recall almost
everything he read, down to specific
details. Will’s confidence in reading is
apparent, as he now volunteers to
read out loud and chooses reading as
a “break” activity (or whenever it is a
choice). He prefers to read something
of his choice (and sometimes will pick

point where this has become habit.
Both boys understand main idea and
what details support it. They use
details to support their own claim and
arguments as well. Craig has been
working on putting main ideas and
details into his own words. He finds
security in copying straight from the
text, and for this reason sometimes
struggles to truly understand the
meaning. I have challenged him to
read, set the book aside, and then tell
me what the main point is and then
search for details to support it. This
has helped but is not yet independent
practice.
Both boys understand compare and
contrast but have yet to use 2 texts
on the same topic.
Craig has strong reading skills and
understands word by word, but
sometimes will speed through text
and miss the big picture. If he is asked
to go back and read again, he
immediately understands the events
that happened. The greatest example
of this was when we were reading the
American Revolution book. He would
read, tell me he was done, and I
would ask “so what happened in the
story today?”. He would respond with
“I have no idea what I just read.” I
would ask smaller, specific questions
and receive the same answer. This is
not a concern with his
comprehension, but more so a

something too easy for him) but this
is such an important improvement in
his learning that any and all reading is
encouraged and celebrated!

common readers mistake- speeding
through! I think we all have read
something haphazardly and have had
the same response as Craig. Craig has
recently learned to use a highlighter
while reading. This allows him to slow
down and focus on what is important
in non-fiction text. He highlights more
efficiently and in a more useful way
than most of the 8th graders I taught
last year! What a great tool to have at
such a young age! Craig should be
encouraged to slow down his reading,
and also to talk about it during and
after (he likes to talk about what he
has read- especially during and to ask
questions). Keeping up this habit will
encourage him to slow down and
focus on meaningful reading rather
than finishing reading.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.A

Will can identify long and short vowels
in a regularly spelled one-syllable
word almost always.

Craig can identify long and short
vowels in a regularly spelled onesyllable word almost always.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.B

Will can identify spelling-sound

Craig can identify spelling-sound
correspondences for MOST vowel
teams, usually through memorization
of the word and not the sound.
Craig decodes these words easily.

Phonics and Word Recognition

Distinguish long and short vowels when
reading regularly spelled one-syllable
words.

Know spelling-sound correspondences for correspondences for SOME vowel
teams, usually through memorization
additional common vowel teams.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.C

Decode regularly spelled two-syllable
words with long vowels.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.D

Decode words with common prefixes and
suffixes.

of the word and not the sound.
Will can decode regularly spelled, 2syllable words by breaking down the
sounds and taking his time while
reading.
Will can read most 2nd and some 3rd
grade words with ease.

Craig can read most 2nd and some 3rd
grade words with ease.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.E

Identify words with inconsistent but
common spelling-sound correspondences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.3.F

Recognize and read grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled words.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4.A

Read grade-level text with purpose and
understanding.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4.B

Read grade-level text orally with accuracy,
appropriate rate, and expression on
successive readings.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4.C

Use context to confirm or self-correct
word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.

Will can read most 2nd and some 3rd
grade words with ease. This is easier
for Will when in context.

Craig can read most 2nd and some 3rd
grade words with ease.

Will is better at decoding text but can
also make sense of words in context.
Some irregularly spelled words he has
mastered if they are assigned and
drilled.

Craig can read most grade
appropriate words with ease. Some
irregularly spelled words stump him,
or he is not as confident, so he
verifies that what he is reading is
correct, but rarely gives up.
Will reads with a purpose and
Craig is capable of reading with
understands what he reads. He is
purpose and understanding but often
better at voicing his understanding
has to be reminded of the purpose
verbally, rather than in written format. and to slow down. His goal often
seems to be to finish the text, rather
than to read to understand (unless he
is reading on his own terms).
Will uses his decoding skills to help
Craig reads fluently, especially when
him read orally. He is more willing and asked to slow down.
excited to read out loud and is
confident with his reading. I have not
seen him shut down while reading out
loud since the fall. In this area he has
made great growth, although speed
and fluency could be areas of
opportunity.
One of Will’s many strengths is selfCraig will often ask for help before
correction. He uses his “toolbox” of
self-correcting, but this is improving.
decoding skills to help him rework a
word that may not make sense.

Writing
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.1

Write opinion pieces in which they
introduce the topic or book they are
writing about, state an opinion, supply
reasons that support the opinion, use

Will is able to write a well supported
opinion piece with the use of teacher
guidance and graphic organizers.

Craig is able to write a well supported
opinion piece with the use of teacher
guidance and graphic organizers.

linking words (e.g., because,and, also) to
connect opinion and reasons, and provide
a concluding statement or section.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.2

Will is able to write informative text

Craig is able to write informative text
with the help of graphic organizers
and teacher guidance.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.3

Will is able to write narratives that
show sequence with the use of
graphic organizers and teacher
guidance.

Craig is able to write narratives that
show sequence with the use of
graphic organizers and teacher
guidance.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.5

Will is able to edit his own work for
capitalization, spelling, complete
sentence structure, grade or topic
appropriate spelling, end sentence
punctuation and neatness of
handwriting with the help of a check
list. Sentence structure (punctuation
and capitalization) is an automatic
skill for him.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.6

Will has used a computer to produce
written work. Typing is slow, but
improving with practice and
confidence.

Craig is able to edit his own work for
capitalization, spelling, complete
sentence structure, grade or topic
appropriate spelling, end sentence
punctuation and neatness of
handwriting with the help of a check
list. Craig’s spelling has improved
(and his confidence with it!). Craig has
trouble remembering to capitalize the
first letter of sentences. We are
working on making this a habit.
Craig has used a computer to produce
written work. Typing is slow but
improving with practice and
confidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.7

Will has completed research products
using his own questions, teacher

Craig has completed research
products using his own questions,

Write informative/explanatory texts in
with the help of graphic organizers
which they introduce a topic, use facts and and teacher guidance.
definitions to develop points, and provide
a concluding statement or section.
Write narratives in which they recount a
well-elaborated event or short sequence
of events, include details to describe
actions, thoughts, and feelings, use
temporal words to signal event order, and
provide a sense of closure.
With guidance and support from adults
and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen
writing as needed by revising and editing.

With guidance and support from adults,
use a variety of digital tools to produce
and publish writing, including in
collaboration with peers.
Participate in shared research and writing

projects (e.g., read a number of books on a
single topic to produce a report; record
science observations).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.8

Recall information from experiences or
gather information from provided sources
to answer a question.

created questions, researched
answers using the internet and books,
and produced multiple drafts of a
research paper through the editing
process (planet project).
Will has created questions and
answered them or found the answers
within every unit.

teacher created questions, researched
answers using the internet and books,
and produced multiple drafts of a
research paper through the editing
process (planet project).
Craig has created questions and
answered them or found the answers
within every unit.

Both Will and Craig engage in
collaborative conversations with me
(the teacher) and with each other.
They appropriately engaged (and
welcomed) conversation with a third
child who joined us (Henry). More
opportunity for discussion with others
would be a good opportunity for both
of them.

Both Will and Craig engage in
collaborative conversations with me
(the teacher) and with each other.
They appropriately engaged (and
welcomed) conversation with a third
child who joined us (Henry). More
opportunity for discussion with others
would be a good opportunity for both
of them.

Both Will and Craig are usually
respectful during listening and
discussing but also need reminders to
not talk over each other or to not
criticize others comments. Both speak
in academic terms appropriate to their
grade level (referring to text, etc to
back up arguments).

Both Will and Craig are usually
respectful during listening and
discussing but also need reminders to
not talk over each other or to not
criticize others comments. Both speak
in academic terms appropriate to their
grade level (referring to text, etc to
back up arguments). Craig does have
a tendency to interrupt but with the
best intentions (when an on topic
thought enters his brain, etc.)

Speaking
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1

Participate in collaborative conversations
with diverse partners about grade 2 topics
and texts with peers and adults in small
and larger groups.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A

Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
(e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways,
listening to others with care, speaking one
at a time about the topics and texts under
discussion).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.B

Build on others' talk in conversations by
linking their comments to the remarks of
others.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.C

This is an area both Will and Craig can
work on. They tend to compete, more
so than build off of each other’s
statements. By modeling and
practicing this skill they should begin
to use it, but also, do to the “brother”

This is an area both Will and Craig can
work on. They tend to compete, more
so than build off of each other’s
statements. By modeling and
practicing this skill they should begin

Ask for clarification and further
explanation as needed about the topics
and texts under discussion.

dynamic it may be difficult to not
compete.
Will, at times, will ask for clarification,
but usually he is satisfied with his
current understanding of a topic. He
does seek help when he needs it
(50%) of the time, but sometimes is
unaware when he needs clarification
or help.

to use it, but also, do to the “brother”
dynamic it may be difficult to not
compete.
Craig excels at asking for clarification.
Since the beginning of the year, he
has improved on asking for
clarification on every topic, and tries
to find the answer himself before
asking (in most cases). He is confident
in asking his questions, and likes to
seek more information through asking
questions as well.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.2

Recount or describe key ideas or details
from a text read aloud or information
presented orally or through other media.

Will is very good at recalling key ideas
or details, especially from information
read aloud or presented orally. He is
able to recall important information as
well as the order of events.

Craig is better at recalling events from
written work or reading, after he has
time to review it multiple times. I
think that he feels more confident
with a source in front of him.
Although, if you ask him to relax, and
not think about how he’s going to
answer while he is suppose to be
listening he does much better, but he
does need the reminder and to hear
the information multiple times.

Will, when asked to ask questions, can
come up with questions to ask about
a topic but it is not automatic. This
has declined from the beginning of
the year (I’m not sure why). He does
like to ask questions about a topic
that he is reading about.

As mentioned before, Craig loves to
ask questions (especially “why” or
“how” questions) and does this
automatically. This has strengthened
since the beginning of the year. His
questions have moved more from
clarification to gathering a deeper
understanding of a topic which shows
growth in critical thinking.

Will can recount experiences with

Craig recounts basic events and is

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.3

Ask and answer questions about what a
speaker says in order to clarify
comprehension, gather additional
information, or deepen understanding of a
topic or issue.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.4

Tell a story or recount an experience with

appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive great detail, description and facts. He
doesn’t always speak clearly when he
details, speaking audibly in coherent
is asked to speak on a topic, but if he
sentences.
is simply talking about it, he is very
clear. For example, when he shared a
weather report, Will was very quiet
and mumbling. But when Will talks
about his weekend he is expressive,
detailed, and clear.

concise without adding too much
detail. This is simply his personality.
However, when asked to add
creativity and detail he has showed
great growth. For his weather
forecast, he was excited about adding
detail, character and expression. I was
extremely impressed with his verbal
delivery and confidence.

Both Will and Craig have many
opportunities to add recordings,
drawings, or visual displays to stories
and excel at this creative aspect of
showing what they know about a
topic. They have done this by
illustrating stories, creating clay
models, creating videos on topics,
acting out scenes, etc.

Both Will and Craig have many
opportunities to add recordings,
drawings, or visual displays to stories
and excel at this creative aspect of
showing what they know about a
topic. They have done this by
illustrating stories, creating clay
models, creating videos on topics,
acting out scenes, etc.

Verbally, Will always uses complete
sentences to communicate. However,
Will sometimes struggles with writing
complete sentences. He often writes
as ideas come to his head, and those
don’t always come in the form of
complete sentences. However, when
asked to edit his work, he is able to
recognize fragments and correct them
(with some assistance).

Craig always speaks and writes in
complete sentences; though
sometimes his sentence mechanics
(for writing) are missing (end
punctuation, capitalization) but he is
able to identify errors and correct
them on his own.

Speaking- always uses correct English
grammar, correct use of collective
nouns, irregular plurals, reflexive
pronouns, past tense irregular verbs,
adjectives, adverbs, and speaks in
complex sentences

Speaking- always uses correct English
grammar, correct use of collective
nouns, irregular plurals, reflexive
pronouns, past tense irregular verbs,
adjectives, adverbs, and speaks in
complex sentences

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.5

Create audio recordings of stories or
poems; add drawings or other visual
displays to stories or recounts of
experiences when appropriate to clarify
ideas, thoughts, and feelings.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.6

Produce complete sentences when
appropriate to task and situation in order
to provide requested detail or
clarification. (See grade 2 Language
standards 1 and 3 here for specific
expectations.)

Language
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1

Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.A

Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.B

Form and use frequently occurring
irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children,
teeth, mice, fish).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.C

Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself,
ourselves).

Writing- needs work with forming
complete sentences and verb tense;
Will uses adjectives but avoids using
irregular verbs and plurals (unless
asking for help), he attempts to write
in complex sentence although they
are not always written using the
correct mechanics

Writing- needs work with mechanics
(capitalization and punctuation); Craig
uses adjectives in his work (when
reminded to do so), and uses irregular
plurals and verbs when asking for
help on how to spell them; He often
writes in simple sentences, not
compound or complex (concise is key
for Craig)

Will needs help with automatically
spelling words correctly. He
sometimes uses room resources to
help him spell words correctly. He
usually uses correct capitalization and

Craig needs help with automatically
capitalizing and punctuating
sentences (he can correct his work,
though). His spelling is on grade level
and he uses room resources and asks

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.D

Form and use the past tense of frequently
occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid,
told).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.E

Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose
between them depending on what is to be
modified.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.1.F

Produce, expand, and rearrange complete
simple and compound sentences (e.g., The
boy watched the movie; The little boy
watched the movie; The action movie was
watched by the little boy).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2

Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
when writing.

punctuation.

for help to spell words correctly.

Will inconsistently capitalizes proper
nouns. He knows what a proper noun
is (vs. a common noun), but often
forgets to capitalize them.

Craig inconsistently capitalizes proper
nouns (especially titles). He knows
what a proper noun is (vs. a common
noun), but often forgets to capitalize
them.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2.A

Capitalize holidays, product names, and
geographic names.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2.B

Use commas in greetings and closings of
letters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2.C

Use an apostrophe to form contractions
and frequently occurring possessives.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2.D

Both boys need help and practice with
appropriately using commas.

Both boys will use apostrophes to
form contractions for words that they
already know how to spell. They do
not automatically create contractions
or possessives on their own.

Both boys will use apostrophes to
form contractions for words that they
already know how to spell. They do
not automatically create contractions
or possessives on their own.

Both boys do a good job of using

Generalize learned spelling patterns when spelling patterns. They often think
writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy →
aloud “If I can spell loud, I can spell
proud by…”
boil).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.2.E

Consult reference materials, including
beginning dictionaries, as needed to check
and correct spellings.

Both boys need help and practice with
appropriately using commas.

Both boys use resources in the room
to help them spell, most of the time
without reminding them (word walls,
posters, books, articles, etc.).
Dictionary use should be improved
upon by modeling and providing more
opportunities to do so.

Both boys do a good job of using
spelling patterns. They often think
aloud “If I can spell loud, I can spell
proud by…”
Both boys use resources in the room
to help them spell, most of the time
without reminding them (word walls,
posters, books, articles, etc.).
Dictionary use should be improved
upon by modeling and providing more
opportunities to do so.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.3

Use knowledge of language and its
conventions when writing, speaking,

Both boys have a strong knowledge of
language and its conventions in all

Both boys have a strong knowledge of
language and its conventions in all

reading, or listening.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.3.A

Compare formal and informal uses of
English

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4

Determine or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 2 reading and
content, choosing flexibly from an array of
strategies.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4.A

Use sentence-level context as a clue to the
meaning of a word or phrase.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4.B

Determine the meaning of the new word
formed when a known prefix is added to a
known word (e.g., happy/unhappy,
tell/retell).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4.C

Use a known root word as a clue to the
meaning of an unknown word with the
same root (e.g., addition, additional).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4.D

Use knowledge of the meaning of
individual words to predict the meaning of
compound words (e.g., birdhouse,

aspects of communication. Writing is
their greatest opportunity (due to
mechanics).

aspects of communication. Writing is
their greatest opportunity (due to
mechanics).

The boys have not compared formal
versus informal uses of writing, but
automatically use the appropriate
forms while writing.

The boys have not compared formal
versus informal uses of writing, but
automatically use the appropriate
forms while writing.

Both Will and Craig’s knowledge of
words is above grade level. When
they do not know what something
means, they can usually figure it out
using context clues. If that doesn’t
work, then they ask for clarification.
They enjoy learning the meaning of
new words. In their vocabulary study,
they are asked to figure out word
meanings using pictures, clues,
context, sentences, etc. and usually
do a great job with a few trial and
error practices.

Both Will and Craig’s knowledge of
words is above grade level. When
they do not know what something
means, they can usually figure it out
using context clues. If that doesn’t
work, then they ask for clarification.
They enjoy learning the meaning of
new words. In their vocabulary study,
they are asked to figure out word
meanings using pictures, clues,
context, sentences, etc. and usually
do a great job with a few trial and
error practices.

They understand how prefixes change
words (when speaking) but do not
know how to change the meaning of
the word by adding a prefix to create
a new word on their own.

They understand how prefixes change
words (when speaking) but do not
know how to change the meaning of
the word by adding a prefix to create
a new word on their own.

We have had very little practice with
root words. This is something we
should work on more (although their
word knowledge is very strong, so the
need for 2nd grade level root words
has not been a priority as of yet).

We have had very little practice with
root words. This is something we
should work on more (although their
word knowledge is very strong, so the
need for 2nd grade level root words
has not been a priority as of yet).

lighthouse, housefly; bookshelf, notebook,
bookmark).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.4.E

Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries,
both print and digital, to determine or
clarify the meaning of words and phrases.

Both boys are very good at predicting
the meaning of compound words and
creating compound words (evident
through writing, speaking, and word
work in centers).

Both boys are very good at predicting
the meaning of compound words and
creating compound words (evident
through writing, speaking, and word
work in centers).

As mentioned earlier, we need to work
on modeling and practicing using
dictionaries, glossaries and other
resources. However, both boys can
use reading and non-fiction source
clues (like bold words and captions) to
identify the meaning of words
(evident through non-fiction practice
pages- practiced at minimum weekly).

As mentioned earlier, we need to work
on modeling and practicing using
dictionaries, glossaries and other
resources. However, both boys can
use reading and non-fiction source
clues (like bold words and captions) to
identify the meaning of words
(evident through non-fiction practice
pages- practiced at minimum weekly).

Will does a great job of understanding
relationships between words (evident
through categorization and word
sorts), shades of meaning, and use of
adjectives. He needs to work on
implementing this skill into his writing
consistently. He use to, but now his
focus seems to be on completing a
task quickly, with minimum effort
rather than showing his best, creative
work (which he has demonstrated
most of the year).

Craig understands the relationships
between words (as shown in word
sorts and categorization exercises)
and also understands shades of
meaning, although does not
automatically put adjectives and
verbs (descriptive) into writing
without prompting.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.5

Demonstrate understanding of word
relationships and nuances in word
meanings.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.5.A

Identify real-life connections between
words and their use (e.g., describe foods
that are spicy or juicy).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.5.B

Distinguish shades of meaning among
closely related verbs (e.g., toss, throw, hurl)
and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin,
slender, skinny, scrawny).

(this covers all 3 standards in this
category)

(this covers all 3 standards in this
category)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.2.6

Use words and phrases acquired through

Both boys do an excellent job of

Both boys do an excellent job of

conversations, reading and being read to,
and responding to texts, including using
adjectives and adverbs to describe
(e.g., When other kids are happy that makes
me happy).

adding to their knowledge and
vocabulary using what they have
heard on tv shows, games, reading,
conversation, etc. They excel at
applying new information to
conversations with me and with each
other. Their love of reading (Will’s
increasing love of reading) has helped
with this as well.

adding to their knowledge and
vocabulary using what they have
heard on tv shows, games, reading,
conversation, etc. They excel at
applying new information to
conversations with me and with each
other. Their love of reading has helped
with this as well. Craig’s love of
questioning helps him to dig deeper
on topics that intrigue him.

Common Core  Math Grade 2
Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems
involving addition and
subtraction.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.A.1

Use addition and subtraction within 100 to
solve one- and two-step word problems
involving situations of adding to, taking
from, putting together, taking apart, and
comparing, with unknowns in all positions,
e.g., by using drawings and equations with a

Craig needs to work on committing
addition and subtraction problems to
memory (especially numbers 8-19)

symbol for the unknown number to
represent the problem.1
Add and subtract within 20.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.B.2

Fluently add and subtract within 20 using
mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know
from memory all sums of two one-digit

Will fluently knows how to mentally
subtract and add numbers 1-20.

Craig often uses his fingers or a
number line to add and subtract
within 20 and needs to work on
fluency. When given a strategy, Craig
feels more confident in his math skills.
Fluency is improving but needs to be
continued to be drilled.

numbers.
Work with equal groups of objects to

Will knows basic multiplication and
can use arrays, objects, grouping,
repeated addition and a number line
to solve problems.

gain foundations for multiplication.

Craig knows basic multiplication and
can use arrays, objects, grouping,
repeated addition and a number line
to solve problems.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.C.3

Determine whether a group of objects (up
to 20) has an odd or even number of
members, e.g., by pairing objects or
counting them by 2s; write an equation to
express an even number as a sum of two
equal addends.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.C.4

Use addition to find the total number of

Will knows how to use arrays to
express and solve equations. He also
can create his own arrays in multiple
formats.

objects arranged in rectangular arrays with

Craig knows how to use arrays to
express and solve equations. He also
can create his own arrays in multiple
formats.

up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an
equation to express the total as a sum of
equal addends.
Numbers and Operations in Base 10
 

Understand place value.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1

Understand that the three digits of a three-

Will clearly understands place value of Craig clearly understands place value
hundreds, tens, and ones.
of hundreds, tens, and ones.

digit number represent amounts of
hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7
hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand
the following as special cases:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.A

Will can use base ten blocks to

Craig can use base ten blocks to

100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten
tens — called a "hundred."
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.B

The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600,
700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four,
five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and

demonstrate his understanding of 10
10s is the same as 100.

demonstrate his understanding of 10
10s is the same as 100.

Will understands that the one digit
number in the hundreds spot is
representative of that number in 100s
form (430 is 400+30+0)

Craig understands that the one digit
number in the hundreds spot is
representative of that number in 100s
form (430 is 400+30+0)

Will can skip count by 5s, 10s, 100s

Craig can skip count, but doesn’t
always use this as a strategy to help
him with solving equations.

Will can read and write numbers to
1000 using a variety of strategies
(with help he can read and write in
the billions).

Craig can read and write numbers to
1000 using a variety of strategies
(with help he can read and write in
the billions).

Will can fluently add and subtract
within 100 using mental math,
grouping, and place value strategies.
He prefers to solve math in his head
or using abstract thought. This is
great, however, when facing a difficult

Craig can add and subtract within
100. He prefers to use regrouping and
borrowing strategies as it simplifies
the math in his head
(adding/subtracting 4 and 7 rather
than 464 and 127). He is very

0 tens and 0 ones).
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.2

Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s,
and 100s.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.3

Read and write numbers to 1000 using
base-ten numerals, number names, and
expanded form.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.4

Compare two three-digit numbers based on
meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones
digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record
the results of comparisons.
Use place value understanding and
properties of operations to add and
subtract.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.B.5

Fluently add and subtract within 100 using
strategies based on place value, properties
of operations, and/or the relationship
between addition and subtraction.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.B.6

Add up to four two-digit numbers using
strategies based on place value and
properties of operations.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.B.7

Add and subtract within 1000, using

problem that requires rerouping or
borrowing he makes errors. He knows
how to regroup and borrow but
prefers not to until told he’s made an
error and to try it.

accurate when using these strategies
and it boosts confidence.

This is difficult for Will. It helps to
break the problem into parts. If the
numbers are small, and he is able to
rearrange the numbers to make even
numbers he does well. (Example:
7+5+13+15… he thinks 7+13=20
and 5+15= 20 and 20+20= 40).
Sometimes adding more than 2
numbers is overwhelming for him,
especially if he is tired.

This is difficult for Craig. In order to
accurately solve these numbers, he
needs help to break it down into
steps. After immediate help, he is able
to model the teacher’s strategy to
complete future problems but is not
confident in his answer. This skill is
not fluent.

concrete models or drawings and strategies
based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between
addition and subtraction; relate the strategy
to a written method. Understand that in
adding or subtracting three-digit numbers,
one adds or subtracts hundreds and
hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and
sometimes it is necessary to compose or
decompose tens or hundreds.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.B.8

Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number
100-900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100
from a given number 100-900.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.B.9

Will can fluently add and subtract
within 1000 using mental math,
grouping, and place value strategies.
He prefers to solve math in his head
or using abstract thought. This is
great, however, when facing a difficult
problem that requires regrouping or
borrowing he makes errors. He knows
how to regroup and borrow but
prefers not to until told he’s made an
error and to try it.

Craig can add and subtract within
1000. He prefers to use regrouping
and borrowing strategies as it
simplifies the math in his head
(adding/subtracting 4 and 7 rather
than 464 and 127). He is very
accurate when using these strategies
and it boosts confidence.

Explain why addition and subtraction
strategies work, using place value and the
properties of operations.1

Will can easily add 10 or 100 to a
given number.

Craig can easily add 10 or 100 to a
given number.

Measurement and Data

Measure and estimate lengths in
standard units.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.1

Measure the length of an object by selecting Will can measure the length of
something using appropriate tools. He
and using appropriate tools such as rulers,
sometimes needs to be told which
unit of measurement to use.
yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring

Craig can measure the length of
something using appropriate tools. He
sometimes needs to be told which
unit of measurement to use.

tapes.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.2

Measure the length of an object twice, using
length units of different lengths for the two
measurements; describe how the two
measurements relate to the size of the unit
chosen.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.3

Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet,
centimeters, and meters.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.4

Measure to determine how much longer
one object is than another, expressing the

Will can measure and compare
lengths of objects.

Craig can measure and compare
lengths of objects and add or subtract
lengths with help.

length difference in terms of a standard
length unit.
Relate addition and subtraction
to length.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.B.5

Use addition and subtraction within 100 to
solve word problems involving lengths that
are given in the same units, e.g., by using
drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and
equations with a symbol for the unknown
number to represent the problem.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.B.6

Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0
on a number line diagram with equally
spaced points corresponding to the
numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent wholenumber sums and differences within 100 on
a number line diagram.
Work with time and money.

Will can easily tell and write time from
all types of clocks.

Craig can easily tell and write time
from all types of clocks.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.C.7

Tell and write time from analog and digital
clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. This is challenging for Will. If the
problem is as simple as the example,
and p.m.
he can easily solve it. However, if
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.C.8
more words are involved the words
overwhelm him.
Solve word problems involving dollar bills,
quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using

This is challenging for Craig. Craig
prefers to see the problem in just its
number form.

$ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If
you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many
cents do you have?
Represent and interpret data.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.D.9

Generate measurement data by measuring
lengths of several objects to the nearest
whole unit, or by making repeated
measurements of the same object. Show the
measurements by making a line plot, where
the horizontal scale is marked off in wholenumber units.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.D.10

Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with
single-unit scale) to represent a data set
with up to four categories. Solve simple
put-together, take-apart, and compare
problems1using information presented in a
bar graph.
Geometry

Reason with shapes and their
attributes.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.G.A.1

Recognize and draw shapes having specified
attributes, such as a given number of angles

Will can create a bar graph using data
with up to 4 categories with
instructions. He can answer questions
using the bar graph.

Craig can create a bar graph using
data with up to 4 categories with
instructions. He can answer questions
using the bar graph.

or a given number of equal faces.1 Identify
triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons,
hexagons, and cubes.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.G.A.2

Partition a rectangle into rows and columns
of same-size squares and count to find the
total number of them.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.G.A.3

Partition circles and rectangles into two,
three, or four equal shares, describe the
shares using the words halves, thirds, half
of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as
two halves, three thirds, four fourths.
Recognize that equal shares of identical
wholes need not have the same shape.

*These are the Common Core Standards for the entire second grade. These strands are suppose to be taught and
mastered by the END of the year. I put them on here to check for progress. Almost all schools use these as their basis
for planning.
*In terms of content, most second grade curriculums include the following:
-Science: Units on Space, Matter, Motion, and Life Cycles
-History: Cultural differences and traditions, Civil Rights, Communities, Economics
-Writing: Narratives, Opinion pieces, Persuasive pieces, and Research Papers
As you can see, in terms of Science, we have hit on the major units already (and I believe you said that life cycles was
exhausted in first grade), in addition to these we have also explored weather and meteorology, landforms, and a
variety of STEM topics. For Social Studies we can incorporate these themes, or not. From my understanding it is not
necessarily the content that is important at this level, but what you do within that content (writing, reading, etc.). In
terms of Social Studies units, we have incorporated Social Studies into the landform and weather units. We have also
completed a unit on the American Revolution and are currently doing a unit on Africa where we will focus on cultural

differences, traditions, communities and civil rights. We also will add in Science with animal life and adaptations and
build upon our knowledge of climate and landforms. Mapping has been an important aspect of our last several units as
well as where they are relative to the rest of the world (Me on the Map). For Writing, the boys have wrote all of the
types listed. We have focused a lot on research papers but also write narratives frequently for creative writing
purposes.
The boys major areas of need seem to be in writing. Continuing to write often and implement grammar and creative
writing strategies will help. Both boys do well when they are given some type of scaffolding (sentence frames, graphic
organizers) which is age appropriate (and really should be used throughout schooling until kids are able to create them
for themselves- pre writing). Next year (and this can start over the summer) I would really like to implement a routine
writing workshop where we focus on skills and build on the brainstorming, pre-writing, writing and editing process.

Craig’s Progress Summary
Strengths
Math

Reading

Writing

Behavior

Opportunities

Reading

Writing

Behavior

Math

Will’s Progress Summary
Strengths
Math

Reading

Writing

Behavior

Opportunities

Reading

Writing

Behavior

Math