LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  1 
  
 
 
 

 
 
Life at the Air Force Academy 
Steven Cromer 
Academy High School 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  2 
 

Jets zoom over as cadets wait for their name to be called. They are now commissioned 
officers in the United States Air Force. Graduates become Second Lieutenants ready to go lead 
the world’s greatest Air Force. The United States Air Force Academy is a public, four year 
undergraduate college located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The Academy was founded in 
1954 and has continued to build leaders ever since (History, 2012). To succeed at the Academy, 
communication is a must. Communication between professors and fellow cadets is essential 
because everyone must succeed as a unit. Cadets at the Air Force Academy are being built to 
handle different challenges during and after their time at the Academy. If success is not attained, 
a lack of communication occurred somewhere, somehow. As you progress, year by year, things 
change for your life at the Academy and you receive different responsibilities. It only gets 
harder, but more rewarding. 
Air Force Academy cadets are held to certain standards. As they enter the Academy for 
the first time and exit for the last time, there is a phrase hanging above their heads. It reads, “We 
will not lie, steal, or cheat, nor tolerate among us anyone who does.” In 2012, seventy­eight 
cadets were suspected of cheating on a math exam they were taking online. Most of the cadets 
found cheating admitted to it and went through a six month academic probation period. [Cadets] 
that lied about cheating were expelled (Steiner, 2012). Captain Tammy Grant, a professor at the 
Air Force Academy explains, “There are hard choices we have to make in life. Asking [cadets] 
about those sorts of things and helping students to craft strong blue fibers so they can make those 
tough choices when they have to,” is part of training cadets to be leaders and make these 
decisions on their own (Academyadmissions, 2011). The faculty members take it upon 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  3 
themselves to guide cadets to make the right choices and to understand that these choices have to 
be made by themselves, without the influence of others. 
It is not an easy road to attend the Air Force Academy. There are countless long nights 
and mounds of paper work. On top of that, there are other requirements set by the Academy. An 
Academy graduate wrote: 
“Getting accepted to the Academy took a lot of time and hard work during my senior year 
in high school. I had a 3.8 GPA and [worked hard] to get into good physical shape…  it 
was required to have a congressional nomination before the Academy would even begin 
to consider you” (Hartman). 
A large portion of the work starts in high school. To help applicants see where they stand, the 
Academy sets benchmarks. There are four main things the admissions board considers for a 
potential Academy cadet: academics, athletics, leadership, and character (Academy Admissions). 
To be a competitive applicant, excellent grades are a must! The average ACT score of the 
graduating class of 2016 was 30 (Ryan, 2012). But, that is just an average. Applicants are rarely 
considered with scores less than a 24 on English or Reading and a 25 on Math or Science 
(Academy Admissions). Grades and test scores are not everything. Aspiring cadets need to 
participate in athletics because while attending the Academy, it is required that every cadet must 
join some sort of extra­curricular activity while attending. If high school students do not play 
sports in high school, they are putting themselves at a disadvantage. While applying to the 
Academy, there is a physical fitness test. Playing a sport or multiple sports in high school will 
greatly enhance the possibility of getting a better score. Here is a table of the average scores for 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  4 
this years junior class. Theses are just averages, some scores could be significantly higher or 
lower than these (Academy Admissions). 
Physical Profile: Class of 2017 
Exercise 

Average for Men 

Average for Women 

Basketball Throw 

70′ 

42′ 

Pull­Ups 

12 

­ 

24 sec 

8.4 sec 

9.5 sec 

Modified Sit­Ups (crunches) 

81 

81 

Push­Ups 

63 

43 

6:12 

7:03 

Flexed Arm Hang (women) 
Shuttle Run 

One Mile Run 
 

Leadership is another thing the Academy considers when making their selection. The admissions 
board knows candidates participated in clubs and sports, but did they hold a leadership position? 
The Academy wants to see if they were presidents in those clubs or captains of their sports’ 
teams. Lastly, they grade your character. The Air Force has three core values: Integrity first. 
Service before self. Excellence in all we do. Being composed of these three things will make 
applicants stand out. The Air Force Academy wants to see how many community service hours a 
student has and for what.This may seem like a lot of work, but it is not impossible. 
Life at the Air Force Academy does not get any easier once accepted. The first, or doolie, 
year is the hardest year of these cadets’ lives. It starts the minute doolies get off the bus; there 
will be an upperclassmen cadet in their face telling them they have no business being there and 
to just go home. Once fourth­class cadets step off of that bus, they’re signing their life away for 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  5 
what seems like forever. It becomes the longest year of their lives. Retired Colonel Sue Ross 
(2012) writes:  
“[Your friends at other colleges] can decide for themselves what they do every minute of 
everyday… College, they say, is a blast. You might question your decision [of attending] 
the Air Force Academy. You hear those voice again: Why am I here? Why am I here?” 
(p. 127).  
When the days get tough at the Academy, and they will, cadets have to think about the big 
picture; being an officer in the United States Air Force. The reason the Academy is as mentally 
challenging as it is academically to make sure cadets do not crack while performing the duties of 
an officer. Officers must stay sharp and in control. To test doolies’ ability to do so, 
upperclassmen make their lives hell. Senior cadets tear doolies down to build them back up 
stronger than before. First, there are seniors, then juniors and sophomores, fifty feet of crap, then 
freshmen. It stays that way until the end of the doolie year with a tradition called ‘Recognition’ 
where first years get to be treated like humans again. Troy Hartman confesses about his 
‘Recognition’ day as being the most memorable day of his life. The little things like looking 
around where he liked, walking instead of running everywhere, and he finally was able to eat 
how he liked made him happier than he could ever imagine (Hartman). Every doolie lives for the 
day they can be normal cadets again. More privileges come along each year such as having a car, 
cell phone, and going off base on the weekends. 
The second year, it gets easier in a way. Mentally it becomes easier, but it stays as 
academically challenging as it always will. Third­class cadets receive more privileges, but they 
still cannot own or maintain a car. But, they have more weekend and communication privileges. 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  6 
As a second year, third­class, cadet they are expected to be responsible for their academic work 
and maintaining their dormitory for morning inspections. They are still low on the totem pole 
because second year cadets do not hold leadership positions so they must report to ranking 
cadets. Each year, cadets will earn more and more respect. 
As each year passes, the road to graduation is slowly approaching. Throughout the 
different parades, balls, and ceremonies, cadets build up excitement for new challenges they will 
face each year. It is their third year, which means less discipline and more privileges such as 
owning a car (Academy Admissions). Second­class cadets have earned more respect and now 
mentor the fourth­class, doolie, cadets. This is where they hunker down because there is only one 
year left until their name is called to receive their gold bars. There is no need to slack off; it is 
fourth quarter for these third year cadets. They have to find a fifth gear and continue moving 
forward with a hundred percent of their effort. 
A cadet’s senior year is where they assume leadership positions. They either lead twenty 
cadets or four thousand. It just depends on their leadership ability and the opportunity. Cadet 
Colonel and first­class cadet, Jake Sortor (2014) was the Academy Wing Commander in the fall 
of 2014 and he believes, “No other school provides the opportunities to succeed and learn like 
the Academy” (USAFA 2014). Fourth year cadets continue to mentor younger cadets and mold 
them into better, future leaders. With perseverance and a lot of hard work, these cadets will soon 
be commissioned officers.  
Graduating from the Academy is the beginning of a new era in these young officers’ 
lives. More than half of them will go to some sort of flight training: pilot training, combat 
systems officers, air battle managers, etc. (Academy Admissions). But what happens to the other 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  7 
fifty or so percent of graduates who do not go to flight training? Well luckily for them, the Air 
Force has become an extremely diverse branch that specializes in space operations and 
cyberspace (Ross, p. 212­213). Jobs in the Air Force do not stop there either. The percentage of 
graduates who choose not to go to flight school are here below (Academy Admissions): 
● Mission Support (Personnel, Police, Public Affairs, Health): 10% 
● Sortie Generation/Logistics (Missile Maintenance, Intelligence): 6% 
● Operations (Air Traffic Controller, Space Operations): 16% 
● Scientific/Technical (Civil Engineering, Communications, Acquisition): 18% 
These four fields are just a few non­flying opportunities graduates have. After graduation, each 
newly commissioned must serve eight years in the Air Force, five of which must active duty and 
the other three may be inactive reserve. Graduates who wish to become pilots sign a ten year 
contract starting after they complete training (Academy Admissions). No matter what the career 
field is, these young officers are dedicating their lives to serve in the United States Air Force.  
Every challenge faced by cadets will prepare them to become excellent officers in the Air 
Force. If an officer fails to communicate with their superiors or subordinates, failures will occur 
which may result in loss of life in extreme cases. The history, prestigiousness, academic 
challenge, personal struggles, and communication are all important aspects in building a leader at 
the United States Air Force Academy. Nothing at the Academy is easy, they make folding shirts 
a challenge. But, cadets must adapt to survive and do whatever it takes to succeed. The Academy 
will not accept failure which is why fellow cadets are going through the same hell. Cadets cannot 
make it through the Academy alone. No one should accept failure. Challenges need to be taken 
head on like grabbing a bull by the horns, and you have to give it a hundred percent effort to 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  8 
wrestle that bull down. If cadets do that, then the Academy will succeed in building them into a 
leader for the United States Air Force. 

 

 

 

 

References 
Academyadmissions. (2011, Jun 27 ). ​
Air Force Academy — Developing Officers of Character​

Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQDmsCEFDEU. 
Air Force Academy Admissions. Retrieved from http://www.academyadmissions.com/. 
Air Force Academy History (2012). Fact sheet. Retrieved from 
http://www.usafa.af.mil/information/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=9409. 
Hartman, Troy. ​
Troy Hartman Biography​
: Air Force Academy. Retrieved from 
http://www.troyhartman.com/air_force.htm. 
Ross, Sue (2012). ​
The Air Force Academy candidate book: How to prepare, how to get in, how 
to survive​
 (5th ed.). Monument, CO: Silver Horn Books.  
Steiner, Matt (2012). 78 AFA cadets accused of cheating on math test. ​
The Gazette​
. Retrieved 
from http://www.gazette.com/article/139802. 

  

 
LIFE AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY  ​
                                                                                  9 
The Office of Congressman Paul Ryan (2012). ​
Demographic Profile of the Class of 2016​

Retrieved from http://paulryan.house.gov/uploadedfiles/usafa_2016.pdf.  
U.S. Air Force Academy (2014). 2014­2015 Catalog: Cadet life. ​
C1C Jake Sortor​
. Retrieved 
from http://usafa.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014­2015/Catalog/Cadet­Life.