Public Art Investigations

By Ryan Mathews

A Teacher Work Sample Submitted in Partial fulfillment Of the
Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts/Art Education

Department of Art Education

Rocky Mountain College of Art +Design

Spring 2015

Teacher Work Sample

By
Ryan Ann Mathews
Title
Public Art Investigations
Instructional Focus or Theme
Public Art
School and Location
Jefferson County Open School (JCOS)
Grade Level of Students
Grade 10-12
Cooperating Teacher
Kelly Carswell
RMCAD Supervising Faculty
Theresa Clowes
Submission Date
Spring 2015
-1-

Table of Contents

Cover Page ...............................................................................................................1
Table of Contents .....................................................................................................2
Teaching and Learning Context .......................................................................................... 3

Unit/ Class Overview ............................................................................................31
Lesson and Unit Plans ............................................................................................46
Pre and Post Assessment ......................................................................................109
Analysis/Summary of Assessment……………………………………………...141
Reflective Essay………………………………………………………………...146
References………………………………………………………………………149
Appendix………………………………………………………………………..151

-2-

Teaching and Learning Context

-3-

Introduction
Jefferson County Open School, also known as JCOS, is located in the
heart of Lakewood, CO, just south of Colfax. Besides the mainstream of traffic on
the street and the RTD Lightrail that connects a block away, the school itself is
surround by a quiet neighborhood. The Lightrail is a means of transportation for
many secondary students. JCOS has grades from Kindergarten to 12th all in one
building, totaling at about 525 students. In secondary there are about 275 students.
However, they don’t have a graded class system, 7th- 9th grade is referred to as
pre-walkabout and 10th-12th grade is considered walkabout. JCOS is an
alternative curriculum system because they cater a self-directed learning system
with each individual student. It is a both ungraded and not graded system
providing students with the opportunity for self-exploration and direct career
paths.

Jefferson County Open School System and Values

Jefferson County Open School is about providing students with an
individual and self-directed learning system, in which they grow and develop

-4-

from. The Open school caters to each individual student’s potential, supporting
the development of mind and body. Through self-direction, dedication and
interests a student can learn strengths, and weaknesses. A student can also
discover life skills outside the school curriculum. JCOS is considered in
alternative education system because of the curriculum planning and set up.
Students have a choice in classes they want to take, while credits for English,
Math and Sciences are required for graduation, students can participate in special
classes, trips, and intensives (shorter than a week, class that involve culture
experience).

JCOS Mission Statement

“The Open School provides a dynamic environment that fosters the development
of the unique potential in each individual by nurturing and challenging the whole
person. There is an emphasis on self-direction, learning through experience,
shared responsibility, and the development of life long-skills.”
“JCOS is committed to preserving educational choices for all students and parents.
In the face of increasing standardization, our emphasis on personal, social, and
intellectual development helps to prepare students for an ever-changing world”.

-5-

Cooperating Teacher
I will be student teaching under Kelly Carswell’s supervision; however, I
will also be working with Jenny Long who is a high school art teacher at JCOS.
Kelly teaches Language Arts and Art for 7th -12th grade. She also has her own
advising made up of 7th -9th graders. She can leave the students alone for any
amount of time. It’s a very trusting environment and the students do not take
advantage. Kelly often has meetings before and after school but doesn’t have any
extra clubs or organizations. In the past she was on Leadership committee but is
not required be involved.

About Kelly Carswell

Kelly Carswell teaches 7th-9th grade language arts and 7th-12th grade
arts.
She has a BFA in Sculpture from CU Boulder and has a Masters in Special
Education. She has been teaching for about 15 years and has been at the Open
School for 10 years. She spent 6 years at the open school teaching Special
Education and switched to Language arts/ arts 4 years ago. Kelly really enjoys the
alternative curriculum style. Her first 5 years of teaching was spent at a very
structured and strict school. Dress codes, and standardized tests were valued there.
Kelly believes that students should express themselves through dress and freedom
of speech. She also doesn’t agree with standardized test as an assessment strategy.
-6-

Students were not allowed to kiss in the hallways or create art in expressive ways.
Kelly soon found her place at the Open School, were the environment fostered
expression and individuality.

Assessment

Assessment at JCOS is different from any other school, they don’t do a graded
system. Instead students write evaluations after each class and project they
complete. In order to graduation student have to fulfill 6 passages or projects in
different areas of study. They also have required classes they have to complete,
like math and English credits. More specifically, the assessment comes down to
self-evaluation, progress and growth. Both Kelly and Jenny use authentic
assessments, in their art classes. “At JCOS and in my classroom, the focus is on
-7-

authentic assessment - supporting students to truly know themselves as learners
and to be able to evaluate their own work - this is achieved through a loop of
students setting learning goals and discovering strategies for meeting those goals,
being self-directed in their work, and then self-evaluation with feedback from me
and often their peers - this is then used set more goals and the pattern continues
ultimately, this is a portfolio process My role in this is to develop and maintain
genuine relationships and trust with my students to support them to set real goals
and then to truly reflect on their learning - these relationships also allow me to
give my students individualized feedback that addresses their personal, social and
intellectual growth - I often need to push them to take creative risks and to guide
them to strategies - I watch and listen to my students - I am as interested in their
creative process as I am in their product - I encourage them to consider concept
and content as well as technique and craftsmanship - my art classes are also
important for students to learn a studio ethic that helps them to become leaders
and healthy community members - I assess my students ability to critically look at,
talk about and make art - I am as interested in providing meaningful art
experiences to students who might not make art regularly in their later life as to
students who go on to art school”- Jenny Long

-8-

JCOS Curriculum Overview
Students graduate from JCOS on the basis of demonstrated competencies
rather than the more traditional "seat time" and grades which add up to what is
commonly known as Carnegie units or credits.

Open School classes are both ungraded and nongraded:
Ungraded: Students write narrative self-evaluations in order to complete classes
and teachers respond indicating whether a student has achieved an appropriate
level of proficiency.
Nongraded: Students enroll in a multi-aged grouping such as Early Learning
Center (typically grades 1-3) or Pre-Walkabout (typically grades 7-9), and the
vast majority of course offerings are multi-aged.
 Students are not expected to graduate in a specified time period but are
expected to remain at JCOS until sufficient personal, social, and
intellectual growth has taken place.
 In addition to coursework, students must complete six Passages or major
independent projects (see: self-directed curriculum) and other activities
such as teaching a class, participating in service projects or off-campus
internships, and independent study plans.

-9-

 Curriculum at the Jefferson County Open School (JCOS) encourages
student ownership of learning, demands documented or demonstrated
competency of Graduation Expectations (requirements), and allows for
a highly individualized path towards graduation.

Teaching at the Open School

I spent eight weeks at JCOS teaching full time with Kelly. I didn’t take
over her classes, instead I taught my own courses. I built up my own curriculum
and put the classes in the schedule for students to choose. I have 2 main classes,
the first is Public Art Investigations and the second is a Visual design course. My
public art class is for Walkabout, 1.5 hours, twice a week. Visual design is mixed
grade Pre-Walkabout and Walkabout for 55 minutes twice a week. In addition to
my classes I also team teach with Kelly. I assist here with curriculum in her
language arts classes as well as her art classes. Some of her classes include:
Communications, Newspaper, Russian Toast, ceramics, and Tattoo (the history
and art form). I experience a lot teaching but I was also privileged to work with
Kelly Advisory and get to know each one. I also worked with individual advisees
who need more structure and support. With 15 students in my public art class and

- 10 -

nine students in my visual design class I was prepared to teach all my students
meaningful and creative art units that left them inspired to create and impact
communities as leaders of tomorrow.

- 11 -

Jefferson County Open
School
History and Curriculum Guide

- 12 -

13

Open School History K-12th grade

.

The first class of students was welcomed into the Open Living School
in Arvada in 1970. Due to overwhelming success and interest, two
additional campuses were added the following year in Edgewater
and Evergreen. In 1975 Mountain Open High School
was added to the Evergreen campus, making Evergreen a
preKindergarten through 12th grade program. Eventually, the
elementary programs were unified in Golden as Tanglewood Open
Living School, while the high school remained in Evergreen. In
1989, Tanglewood and Mountain Open were reunited as a preKindergarten through 12th grade program at the current location in
Lakewood
14

Mission Statement

The Open School provides a dynamic environment that
fosters the development of the unique potential in each
individual by nurturing and challenging the whole person.
There is an emphasis on self-direction, learning through
experience, shared responsibility, and the development of
life long-skills.
JCOS is committed to preserving educational choices
for all students and parents. In the face of increasing
standardization, our emphasis on personal, social, and
intellectual development helps to prepare students for an
ever-changing world.

15

Goals and Values
GOALS:
Students will be able to:
 Rediscover the joy of learning
 Seek meaning in life
 Adapt to the world as it is
 Prepare for the world that might be
 Create the world as it ought to be

OPEN SCHOOL VALUES:
CURIOSITY - Continuous engagement in learning, exploration, and questioning
in the process of discovering personal passions and understanding.
RESPONSIBILITY - Ability to be trusted and depended on as part of a supportive
community. Honest about owning your own actions.

COURAGE - Confidence to take healthy risks and ability to do the right thing in
the face of pressure.
PERSONAL BEST - Striving for personal excellence in personal, social, and
intellectual growth.
RESPECT - Appreciation for the value of each person in our community through
words, attitude, and actions.
16

Guiding philosophy
LEARNING
To create a positive, nurturing, and

challenging culture where each person can
experience the joy of learning;
To create a culture where the five goals of the

Open School apply to all students;
To be a place where all are teachers and

learners as we develop our skills and abilities
as life-long learners;
To develop the potential of the whole child

by striving for Excellence across the Open
School Graduation Expectation continuum;

17

To assess student learning in ways that

challenge students to demonstrate personal,
social, and intellectual growth.

18

Guiding Philosophy
COMMUNITY
To create a community where each student is known

and supported to achieve his/her potential;
To create an Advising program where each student

understands his/her unique place in the larger
community through personalized adult guidance;
To create a community that is truly centered on the

five goals of the Open School and where personal,
social, and intellectual growth are seen as
interconnected endeavors, not separate;
To embrace the positive community created through

a small school environment;
To actively encourage parents to partner with the

Open School and play a significant role in the lives and
learning of their children.

19

Guiding Philosophy
INDIVIDUAL
To instill in students the desire and knowledge to

pursue self-directed learning through self-reliance,
responsibility and shared decision-making;
To engage students in the creation of an

individualized education plan in order to personalize
curriculum that empowers the pursuit of passions;
To reflect on learning and personal growth through

the development and assessment of personal, social,
and intellectual goals;
To embrace the balance between the needs of the

individual and the responsibilities of the community;
To celebrate the accomplishments of all students as

they strive to achieve the potential.

20

CURRICULUM “HOW IT
WORKS” OVERVIEW

 Students graduate from JCOS on the basis of demonstrated

competencies rather than the more traditional "seat time" and
grades which add up to what is commonly known as
Carnegie units or credits.
 Open School classes are both ungraded and nongraded:
 Ungraded: Students write narrative self-evaluations in order

to complete classes and teachers respond indicating whether
a student has achieved an appropriate level of proficiency.
 Nongraded: Students enroll in a multi-aged grouping such as

Early Learning Center (typically grades 1-3) or PreWalkabout (typically grades 7-9), and the vast majority of
course offerings are multi-aged.
 Students are not expected to graduate in a specified time

period but are expected to remain at JCOS until sufficient
personal, social, and intellectual growth has taken place.

21

CURRICULUM

 In addition to coursework, students must complete six

Passages or major independent projects (see: self-directed
curriculum) and other activities such as teaching a class,
participating in service projects or off-campus internships,
and independent study plans.
 Curriculum at the Jefferson County Open School (JCOS)

encourages student ownership of learning, demands
documented or demonstrated competency of Graduation
Expectations (requirements), and allows for a highly
individualized path towards graduation.

22

23

24

25

About Me

26

Art Education Teaching Philosophy

The biggest requirement in my classroom is that students feel they can accomplish
anything. A student should never feel his or her abilities to be limited. To assure this standard, I
have to teach in way so that all students understand assignments, requirements and
expectations. Often, when the instructional process moves too quickly, students who get left
behind may lose ambition to even try the assignment; they feel defeated and automatically
limited in their abilities. Teaching at a speed at which students can comprehend the material is
vital; however, it is possible that some students may still need clarification. The instructional
process must be relevant and engaging to that age group. For example, when explaining an
assignment, I must intrigue the class by asking questions and creating demonstrations.
A community aspect will be included in my curriculum. I want students to reach outside the
confines of assignments and classwork and understand importance of the skills they are being
taught. My students will understand the power of art in a society and in a community. I want my
students to use skills of expression and creative to impact a community. Subjects such as public
art and community integrated art projects will be included in the curriculum. Students will learn
and understand aspects of collaboration and teamwork.
Secondly, students should learn that art speaks to expression; I will direct students to use
their own expressive creativity. Art can express words that cannot be spoken. It is important in
teaching an art assignment that students know and utilize creativity. Creativity from my
perspective is expressing oneself, taking colors, tools and material to execute meaning and
make something original. I aspire to teach my students to create what they feel, not just what
they see. Assignments will reflect their own creativity and expression as well as the objective
of the assignment.

Thirdly, mutual understanding between the students and I is fundamental.
27

Students should enjoy art and have fun while fulfilling the assignments requirements. To fulfill
this, I need to be aware of different types of learners and accommodations students might need.
My class will learn the love of art, be interested in the assignments and at the end of the year
come out of the class feeling that they have accomplished their creative goals and learned new
things.
An important aspect of being a teacher is learning from your students as well.
Lastly, an environmental education will be included within my curriculum. It is important
for a student to learn about sustainability and the environment. Studies were completed, by
Hillary Green called Shades of green, that proves that the environment enhances a student’s
creativity. Children should feel empowered by nature and inspired to make a difference. An
environmental education would not only focus on embracing creativity, it would also teach
students multiple purposes of art. For example, a powerful art piece serving as a protest against
pollution, can teach students about the power of art. An Environmental education can really
teach students the objective of an arts education.
I am in art education because I believe art is extremely powerful for a student and
community. My goal in art education is to teach my students another form of expression they can
always use. By teaching students creative outlooks it can help them solve all problems in creative
ways. It is important to me to teach my students everything the arts can do. It is essential for art
to be a part of a learning environment. The arts create a form of expression and perspective that
cannot be found anywhere else in school curriculum.
List of classes
Leap Language Arts (Communications) - Kelly’s Class that occupies two periods in a row.
This classes aims to teach 9th grade students about the significance of proper grammar, reading

28

and writing skills. There were about 20 students in each class period. I assisted here in teaching
this class and grading papers.

Newspaper- Kelly’s class that has about 9 students and together they write a newspaper for the
school. The grade range was 7th-12th grade. I assisted in the teaching of this class and
discussion leading.

Prizewinning Lit- Kelly’s writing class that focuses students around global literature concepts
and traditions. Included grades 7th-12th. I assisted with this class and helped students with
projects and group discussions.

Russian Toast- A class that was jointly taught with Kelly and another teacher Tony. Students
in this class learned about Russian history, concepts and culture. This included field trips and
art projects. Included in this class were grades 7th-12th.

Tattoo You- This was one of Kelly’s Art classes. Here students learned and explored about
tattoo history significance and techniques. Students also learned about modern culture and
tattoos.

Public Art Investigations- This was my class built from my own curriculum and interests in
public art and the direction is going pertaining to economic value and community populations
from a global perspective as well as specific places. Grades included were 10th-12th grade.

29

Visual design- This was another one of my classes built from my own curriculum design
focusing around visual design concepts, elements and principles of design, color theory,
structured critique and design projects. This class included grades 7th-12th grade and 9 students.

Ceramics- this is class Kelly and I taught together. This class consisted of hand building clay
techniques and wheel throwing pottery. This class had 30 students in it grades 7th-12th.

30

Unit Overview

31

Learning Context and Unit Basis: Public Art Investigations

Public art is a reflection of time and place. All public art installations have historical
context and mark a significant time, place and influence that has contributed to the building of a
community. Public art advocates imagination and encourages people to perceive more deeply the
environment that they occupy. This type of art form is also uniquely accessible and enables
people to experience art in the course of daily life, outside of museums. It is also unique because
it forces the viewer to be part of the installation process. In addition, the effort of creating art for
the public purpose is not individual. The artist and board members and many others collaborate
on a creative viewpoint throughout the project and so all perspectives are seen and are as
successful as possible at the end of the project. As a result of this, many community members
participate and share ownership of the work when it is done. Therefore, the artist’s aesthetic
contributions and creativity are placed in the public realm where a collaborative environment is
formed by those different viewpoints. Public art can also create civic icons, but art is
transformative on many different levels, transforming playgrounds, train stations, and hospitals
into vibrant expression can be very powerful in a city. Americans For the Art Public Network
Council says that by actively shaping the public art future the value of public art can only
increase, and thrive in future America.

Today, public art and art in general has become a huge part of every city. Public art
offers a lot of benefits. Gary Steuer is Philadelphia chief cultural officer; he says that the arts
industries are deeply connected with the economic development of his city. Steuer says that art

32

has intrinsic value and instrumental value. Intrinsic relates to the aesthetic value of any work of
art, its individual expression. Instrumental relates to the ability of art, such as education,
tourism, protest, revolution and reform. The public arts are needed within a city because of
intrinsic and instrumental value. Despite others’ beliefs, art is not only strictly ornamental in a
house but holds many other purposes within a community and a city. Intrinsic and instrumental
value are two very interesting concepts because there are raging debates over whether art hold
more intrinsic or instrumental value. Steuer states that most artists working the city think art
can do both: provide aesthetic value and change the world. Linda Slodki from Mt. Airy Art
Garage, a nonprofit organization art hub in Philadelphia, says the arts are a highly cost effective
way of driving economic revitalization in the urban areas. She also says that the arts also
“shape our consciousness, create a collective attitude, inspire, remake behavior and reduce
stress.” Steuer points to Mass MoCA, which is a 13 acre unused building in Massachusetts.
Mass MoCA was turned into a space for large art installation, which has had a transformative
effect on the community. This “Museum” has contributed 15 million dollars to the local
community; it has also increased local property values by 14 million dollars. Another example
is the Brooklyn Art Museum; it has helped preserve a multicultural neighborhood filled with
old buildings. Both Mass MoCA and the Brooklyn Art Museum have had positive effects
without kick starting gentrification.

Another aspect of public art is its interactive elements. An example of this is The Future
Farmers in San Francisco, who wanted to help bring back the ideas of self-sufficiency, urban
farming and American history, using one project. They set this up outside City Hall, attracting
many more visitors and also educating them about the project and how to grow their own food.
The same group started a similar project in Philadelphia, called Soil Kitchen. Here residents
33

could come get a free soup if they delivered a soil sample from their backyard or neighborhood.
The sample would be used on a sculpture map of the city, in which it was placed where it came
from and tested for contaminants and quality. The goal of the project was to get thousands of
samples to determine a soil remediation plan for the city. Projects like these two not only
engage the community with art but also educate and better the community and the environment.
Public art like this wants to effect social change using art. More social practice art examples are
in
Detroit where a contemporary art museum is featuring artists that don’t make artful objects but
instead provide food, haircuts, education programs and social services to the general public.
None of these things sound like art or the art seen in museums; however, that is the point. Social
practice/ interactive/public art is turning away from the commercial art world that America has
on the forefront. This new movement rides in the shadows of the commercial world through such
projects. For example, there is a community development project in Houston that provides artists
with studios, low-income housing, summer camps, and workshops for teenagers. The public is
responding to these projects positively and is also learning about the city and art history.

34

Abstract Overview: Public Art Investigations PAI:
Tuesdays and Fridays, 8:30 am -10:00 am, 12 weeks
Amount of Students: 17 Students, 10th-12th grade mixed.

As this class is an investigations class gathering summative assessment can be difficult therefore
it is import to create standards and expectations that both meet state and school requirements
while tracking student’s conceptual progress.
Objectives and Assessment are associated around six main elements within the class.

Main projects:
This class consists of three main projects that include fine art techniques, conceptual thought and
influence strong creativity.

Artist list:
This is an artist list that I developed where we read, watch and listen to multiple famous and
nonfamous artists in the public art genre. This was a big part of discussions, critical thinking
questions and even main projects.

Critical Thinking Questions:
These are questions pertaining to public art statistics, controversies and conceptual meanings.
Students would have five minutes to fill out approximately one question per a class. These were
meant to help students explore and reflect specific topics and concerns within public art.

35

Discussions:
Approximately every class we would have a discussion pertaining to the critical thinking
questions and or specific topics. This was a way for students to talk about their opinions and
debate controversies.

Self-Evaluations:
Similar to the Critical thinking questions these were meant to further ones understanding but on a
personal level. Students were given these at the process and final stage of the project.

Collaborative Critiques:
Following a critiques criteria of “What you know, what you want to know and what you
think”
Every student was to add something to the critique of another students work. Part of doing this
was for a students to develop a deeper appreciate for one’s work and a professional way to
assesses another person’s work.

Within each of these elements, professionalism, participation and creativity was included in
the expectations and rubric.

Professionalism:

Student is on time; if tardy has a note or is excused.

36

Ready to get started; is awake and shows me they’re ready to learn, cell phone put
away.

Has all materials they will need: including sketching file and pencils.

Is respectful to teacher and classmates: Nice words, positive attitude, and leaves
classroom only when they have to and for short amounts of time. (It is a student’s right
at JCOS to leave the classroom unexcused for lavatory uses and drinking fountains)

Participation:

Student is adds to or and takes notes during discussions and or critiques. Student
participates in Critical thinking questions and explores concepts beyond the paper
reaching the expectations of CTQ.

Student participates in projects from start to finishes, showing process, evolution and
final product.

Creativity
In my classroom creativity is defined as an exploration of a conceptual idea that includes
fine art techniques and craftsmanship but is completely original and is derived from the
student and their intellectual and creative mind.
Exploration->Discovery-> Creativity

Public Art Investigations Schedule
37

Week

Project/ Objectives

Assessment/ Critical

Artists

Thinking Questions
Week 1

Introductions Class Norms
Images of public Art What
is Public art?
Hubcap project begin.

Pre Assessment: What is
public art what does public
mean?

Local public art/ artists
Presentation,
Discussion of the
demon HORSE.

Week 2

Hubcap project, concept of
Place discussed.
How do you create Place?

Judith Baca and place.

Week 3

Hubcap project continue, paint
and further concept.

CTQ: How does your
concept represent place,
what does your idea mean
to you and to the public.
What is good public art?
Who pays for art?

Week 4

Finish Hubcaps, Introduce
Public policies regarding art.

Aw Wei Wei,
controversies

Week 5

Begin Project two, Public art
proposal project. Students get
work time in class.

Art Funding, controversies
and getting the public
attention.
Critique and group
discussion
Public polices allow for
how much expression?

Week 6

Leo Tanguma visiting artist
comes to class. Continue
project 2 work time, computer
lab/ Library.

Leo Tanguma

Week 7

In process discussion for
project.
_What are you doing for your
project and why?
_Share what you have learned?
_Do you see any possible

What attracts you to a
piece of art? Is in colors or
forms and why? Do you
look for meaning and
puzzles?
What are you doing for
your project and why?
_Share what you have
learned?
_Do you see any possible
controversies involved?

Michael Heizer,
Levitated Mass.

Guerrilla GirlsFeminism,
performance, publicity.
Leo Tanguma

Barbara Kruger –
Graphics, texts and
advertisements
Joseph Beuys –
Relational work, 7,000
oaks, community

38

controversies involved?

Week 8

Finish/ Present projects. Self
evals. Social Practice
PowerPoints and examples.

collaborative

Funding needed? Why did
you choose the genre you
did?
Critique, Group discussion.

Week 9

Finish presentations, all
projects collected. Begin
social practice discussions.
STEAM, Interactive art.
Begin project 3, short
interactive design project.

What is Social Practice
art? What is community’s
impacted art? What is
STEAM?

Nicole DextrasFashion, survival
needs, food The
Regional Arts
Commission, Artist
collective/directors,
civil disobedience,
rights.
JR, Photography,
large scale, social
issues, conflict,
France, international.
Judith Baca, Murals,
community projects,
longest mural in the
world.
Conflict Kitchen,
community food,
ethnic food, awareness
campaign, peace. Juan
William Chávez,
environmental
awareness/regrowth,
nurture projects,
demolitions.

Week 10

Finish and discuss final
What does interactive
projects. Students may begin to mean? How can you create
install if complete.
interactive art that can
impact an economy or a
community? What is
Economic value?

Water Works,
Environmental, water
science, conservation,
and improvements,
collective.
Soil Kitchen, future
Farmers,
soil
improvements, soup
kitchen,
and
community integrated.

Week 11

Final install of projects,
Photo share and discussion,
students who are complete may Critique. Target questions.
create another small interactive
project.

STEAMEstaine, cancer
awareness, fashion,
micro images.
39

Candy Crush,
Typography, community
response, neighborhood
improvement.

Week 12

Final classes, in class evals,
Post Assessment: What is
discussion of each project,
Public art?
Where were we? What did we
do and understand? And Where
are we now?

JR, Photography, large
scale, social issues,
conflict, France,
international.

40

ARTIST LIST
SOCIAL
PRACTICE

1960’S

Barbara Kruger – Graphics, texts and advertisements

1960’S

Joseph Beuys – Relational work, 7,000 oaks, community collaborative

1980’S

Guerrilla Girls- Feminism, performance, publicity

1990’S

Anthony Gromley- Figurative, consumption

2000
CURRENT

The Regional Arts Commission, Artist collective/directors, civil disobedience,

CURRENT

Conflict Kitchen, community food, ethnic food, awareness campaign, peace.

CURRENT

Juan William Chávez, environmental awareness/regrowth, nurture projects,

CURRENT

Water Works, Environmental, water science, conservation, and improvements,

CURRENT

Soil Kitchen, future Farmers, soil improvements, soup kitchen, and

CURRENT

Estaine, cancer awareness, fashion, micro images.

CURRENT
CURRENT

TRADITIONAL
COMMISSIONS

LAND ART

Nicole Dextras- Fashion, survival needs, food

Candy Crush, Typography, community response, neighborhood improvement.
JR, Photography, large scale, social issues, conflict, France, international.

2000’S

Judith Baca, Murals, community projects, longest mural in the world.

1960’S

Wolf Vostell,

1970’S

Robert Indiana, “LOVE”, Sculpture, text, PA

Ruhender Verkehr /Stationary traffic, sculpture, environment influence

CURRENT

Niki de Saint Phalle, Sculpture Color. “Nana’s”, Germany

CURRENT

Salifou Lindou, Sculpture, geometry influence, France.

CURRENT

Christian Moeller, Sculpture, height, CA

CURRENT

Michael heizer, Sculpture, land art influence, “Levitated Mass” CA

CURRENT
1938-1970’S

Andy Goldsworthy, Ice, rocks, structures, environmental art.
Robert Smithsons Spiral Jetty, large scale environmental work.

41

Welcome to: Public Art Investigations!!!
One of the most recent and expanding art movements of the century is
Public art. Public art stands as a cultural symbol, a community asset
and an artful expression. Underneath the umbrella of public art is, Street art,
relational aesthetics, social practice, community integrated public art and
many more! This class will present theories, and philosophies pertaining to
such topics. We will also do direct projects and styles from such theories.

In this class we will learn and understand:
* Art as an asset for a city and a place.
* Meaning in art making.

* Culture as an artistic influence

* Community

* “Outside the gallery” art work.

* Public art Policy

* Visual design techniques.

* Collaboration

* Social Practice art
* Relational aesthetics

42

Grade Break down:
Although this class is P/F you must receive over 60% in total points to pass.
Project 1
Hubcap Painting: 20 points
Project 2
Public Works Proposal Project: 25 points
Project 3
Interactive JCOS: 20 points
Critical Thinking Questions: 5 points
Attendance: 15 points
Participation: 10 points
Total: 100 Points

Content Area

Visual Arts

Course Name/Course

Public Art Investigations

Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

GLE Code

1. Observe and Learn to
Comprehend

1. Visual art has inherent characteristics and expressive
features

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1

2. Historical and cultural context are found in visual art

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.2

3. Art and design have purpose and function

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.3

1. Reflective strategies are used to understand the creative
process

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.1

2. A personal philosophy of art is accomplished through use of
sophisticated language and studio art processes

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.2

3. Interpretation is a means for understanding and evaluating
works of art

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.3

1. Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media,
and apply appropriate and available technology for the
expression of ideas

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.1

2. Assess and produce art with various materials and methods

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.2

3. Make judgments from visual messages

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.3

2. Envision and Critique to
Reflect

3. Invent and Discover to
Create

Grade Level

High School

43

4. Relate and Connect to
Transfer

1. The work of art scholars impacts how art is viewed today

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.1

2. Communication through advanced visual methods is a
necessary skill in everyday life

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.2

3. Art is a lifelong endeavor

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.3

44

Denver Public Art Tour PowerPoint

45

Unit and Lessons Plans

46

Project One
Project 1- Hub Cap painting project, public art installation

Big Idea: Culture
Essential Questions:

What is our culture influenced by?
What does Place mean?

Project description:
Students will choose a hubcap that they will paint with an articulated theme around
culture and place. Students will begin with a sketching process to generate ideas and help
their process. In addition we will have a class discussion around the idea of influences,
culture and place. Each hubcap will become part of a large scale public installation in
Lakewood CO.

Rational:
This project will help students begin to understand the influence of public art and cultural
influences in society. In this project students will also make the connection between
personal and public. In addition students will implement fine art skill and experiment
with painting as sculpture and sculpture as painting, (working on a 3D Hubcap). Lastly,
all hubcaps will be included in a semi-permanent public installation in Lakewood CO,
becoming part of a growing collection of hubcaps.

Culture and context:
47

Ages: 10th grade- 12th grade
Amount: 14 Students
Rooms and details: Jenny’s classroom, videos of public artists while they work on
projects, public artists we have talked about and will continue to investigate throughout
the block (see artist list).

Objectives:
• Students will understand the influence of public art and current influences in
society.

Students will experiment with the meaning of place, and the idea of culture as a
place.



Students will create an original work of art made on a 3deminsional surface.
Students will expand fine art technical skill and embrace process in their work.
Students will connect between personal and public meaning.

State Standards reached in lesson:

CO Visual Standards:
Content Area

Visual Arts

Course Name/Course

Public Art Investigations

Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

GLE Code

5.

4.

Visual art has inherent characteristics and expressive features

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1

5.

Historical and cultural context are found in visual art

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.2

6.

Art and design have purpose and function

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.3

4.

Reflective strategies are used to understand the creative process VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.1

6.

Observe and Learn to
Comprehend

Envision and Critique to
Reflect

Grade Level

High School

5.

A personal philosophy of art is accomplished through use of
sophisticated language and studio art processes

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.2

6.

Interpretation is a means for understanding and evaluating works VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.3
of art

48

7.

Invent and Discover to
Create

8.

4.

Relate and Connect to
Transfer

Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media, and
apply appropriate and available technology for the expression of
ideas

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.1

5.

Assess and produce art with various materials and methods

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.2

6.

Make judgments from visual messages

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.3

4.

The work of art scholars impacts how art is viewed today

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.1

5.

Communication through advanced visual methods is a necessary
skill in everyday life

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.2

6.

Art is a lifelong endeavor

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.3

ELLs:
Sentence stubs, mini discussion, printed handouts and sketches and notes.
Materials: Hubcaps
Enamel paint
Brushes
Paper
Plastic covering for table
PowerPoint
Pencils
References:
Art of the wheel exhibition presentation
Handout
PowerPoint of current hubcaps and history of the collection
40westart.org

Vocabulary: Place
Theme
49

Public
Enamel

Instructional Set:
Day 1:
Discussion around what place and culture mean. Target questions asked to students, is
Place and Culture the same thing? What do we rely on as a culture?
Begin sketching, hand out question slips about process.

Day 2:
Continue work, while watching Art21, and other related video pertaining to public artists.

Day 3: Work day, one on one critiques with students and teacher.
Day 4: Work day more public art investigating
Day 5: Last day to work students finishing up.

Assessment:
Multiple critical thinking question slips, process, content and end result. Self-assessment
and evaluation. Based off Rubric below.

Accommodations:
Physically disabled students having easy access to paints brushes and materials.

50

Public Art Investagtions Class
Project
The Art of the Wheel
For this project you will be painting a hubcap.
1. You will draw an idea with pencil and
paper, research if necessary.
2. Create a white base coat on hubcap. 3.
Paint!!!

Theme: Place, - a particular position or point
in space. In a metropolitan city like Denver
you experience alot in a day with out even
realizing the impact. Think about happenings
in today’s society that impact you(but also a
whole community) or a place significantly.
What are we dependent on as a place and a society?
To start your brainstorming:
Think about: technology, transportation, social media, advertisements, nature, social
issues, population changes, demographics, culture, community and many more!
Choose a specific area and begin to explore creative ideas of displaying something that is
so significant in today’s society!
Tip: The surface of the hubcap can be hard to work with, be sure to integrate your idea
with the shape of your hubcap

Timeframe: about 3 weeks, this project is flexible; to insure students don’t rush; however
you should spend 3-4 hours of painting in total. This should be evident in final product.

FAQs:
Why Paint on hubcaps?
1. Hubcaps offer a sturdy surface that can be displayed outside in bad weather.
2. Hubcaps offer a cultural significant because of transportation.
Will these be displayed publicly?
Yes!! They will be added to a larger public collection completed by other
communities in the last year.
51

Hubcap Painting Project Phase One:
Sketching/Planning

52

Mason- Music

53

Dylan- AA coin/ medal

54

55

Hubcap Painting Project Phase Two: Painting

56

57

58

59

Hubcap Painting Project Phase Three: Display

60

61

Visiting Artist and Guest Speaker:
Leo Tanguma Comes to Public Art
Investigations

62

LEO TANGUMA
Leo Tanguma, the Chicano muralist perhaps best known by Colorado travelers
and the subcultural blogosphere of paranoid doomsday theorists for his dramatic murals
at Denver International Airport, creates his complicated pieces through an organic,
multistep process that weaves Mexican heritage, world history, spirituality, progressive
social ideals, and personal anecdotes. He made his first mural on a chalkboard in fifth
grade, depicting children lynching the town’s corrupt sheriff, for which he was severely
punished, and this experience stoked a rebellious verve in his artistic practice that would
be played out during the coming decades. Much like Los Tres Grandes - Diego Rivera,
José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros - from whom Tanguma draws his
artistic heritage, he has a keen interest in politics and cultural theory, of which his views
swing decidedly left. His sprawling, complicated, large-scale public artworks do contain
a number of secrets: portraits of real people lost to street violence, unsung heroes from
the margins of history books, and the reexamined Chicano myth of a weeping woman, for
example. “Children of the World Dream of Peace” and “In Peace and Harmony with
Nature,” the murals that Tanguma created for Level 5 of the Jeppesen Terminal at DIA,
were almost never to be: Tanguma barely made the proposal submission deadline. As of
this year, he has completed dozens of murals at various public venues across six states,
painting themes of childhood courage and idealism, environmentalism, multiculturalism,
and Tanguma’s uncanny signature of socially-conscientious spirituality. His most recent
work in progress is inspired by the Occupy movement, the pencil drafting of which, sits
on a modest, clean desk in his home studio

63

Public Art
Dear________________,
You were either late or absent last class and you need to make sure to be on time on
Tuesday the 10th because we have a visiting public artist coming to do a project with the
class. Please make sure you are respectful and show up on time (That means
8:30am)!! This is a really amazing opportunity don’t miss out!
Thank you,
Ryan Mathews

Public Art
Dear________________,
You were either late or absent last class and you need to make sure to be on time on
Tuesday the 10th because we have a visiting public artist coming to do a project with the
class. Please make sure you are respectful and show up on time (That means
8:30am)!! This is a really amazing opportunity don’t miss out!
Thank you,
Ryan Mathews

Public Art
Dear________________,
You were either late or absent last class and you need to make sure to be on time on
Tuesday the 10th because we have a visiting public artist coming to do a project with the
class. Please make sure you are respectful and show up on time (That means
8:30am)!! This is a really amazing opportunity don’t miss out!
Thank you,
Ryan Mathews

64

Leo Talking to the class after he presents his work.

65

Social Practice PowerPoint

66

Project Two
Ryan Mathews
Title: Public Art Proposal Project

Big Ideas: Culture

Essential Question:
- What is art from a social standpoint?
- How can you shape a vision or a change using art outside the gallery?
- Is all art outside public art?
- How does a person interact with the art piece?
- What does art with a purpose really mean?

Culture and context:
-Grade 10th-12th
-Length of class: 1 hour 30 mins, 4-5 class periods.
-In the art room, large table, seat 25 students. Library for research.
-Pre-existing: At this point all students have talking a drawing and or a painting class.
Basic design concepts are a plus.

67

Activity:
We will discuss the meaning of art as a cultural asset, art outside the gallery and public
art policies. We will also discuss artful expression and art as an influence. After
discussion students do research on a genre of public art (see list) and develop a project
that include artist examples, research of the genre and their own public art idea. Students
will brainstorm an idea, collaborate, do research and propose a large scale idea using a
visual element (a 3D model, large poster painting with dimensions) and a PowerPoint.,
explaining a rationale and a purpose for the project, and their own art piece proposal.

Objectives:
The purpose of this project to get student thinking about art as less of a craft and more
of a culture asset. Collaboration is also a key point to help them develop skills of working
together a on a large scale. This project is meant to mimic a formal proposal one would
present to the city. This project is an introduction to a thought process about social
practice art and action.

1. CO Visual Standards: Standards – Observe and Learn to Comprehend
Use the visual arts to express, communicate, and make meaning. To perceive
art involves studying art; scrutinizing and examining art; recognizing, noticing,
and seeing art; distinguishing art forms and subtleties; identifying and

68

detecting art; becoming skilled in and gaining knowledge of art; grasping and
realizing art; figuring out art; and sensing and feeling art.

2. Envision and Critique to Reflect
Articulate and implement critical thinking in the visual arts by synthesizing,
evaluating, and analyzing visual information. To value art involves visualizing,
articulating, and conveying art; thinking about, pondering, and contemplating
art; wondering about, assessing, and questioning art concepts and contexts;
expressing art; defining the relevance, significance of, and importance of art;
and experiencing, interpreting, and justifying the aesthetics of art.

3. Invent and Discover to Create
Generate works of arts that employ unique ideas, feelings, and values using
different media, technologies, styles, and forms of expression. To make art
involves creating, inventing, conceiving, formulating, and imagining art;
communicating, ascertaining, and learning about art; building, crafting, and
generating art; assembling and manufacturing art; discovering, fashioning, and
producing art; and causing art to exist.

4. Relate and Connect to Transfer:
Recognize, articulate, and validate the value of the visual arts to lifelong learning and
the human experience. To respond to art involves relating to art; connecting to art;
personally linking to art; associating with art; bonding to art; moving toward art
sensibilities; shifting to art orientations; thinking about art; attaching meaning to
art; replying to art; reacting to art; internalizing art; personalizing art; and relating
art to diverse cultures

69

Materials:
Paper

Foam core

Paints

Cardstock

Drawing pencils
Glue

Tape
Collage
materials

Poster paper
Pens
Tracing paper
Markers

References:
Article
Images
Community art asset book
Policies

Art vocab:
Social practice
Relational art
Community integration
Metaphors
Symbolism
Public art

Artists to cover:
70

Judith Baca

*Instructional set:

71

DAY 1: Discussion and introduction to the class. Article from NYT. Introduce art and theory.
Essential questions, discussion prompt. Break into group begin individual research and
beginning sketches.

DAY 2: Open ideas sharing new ideas, helpful feedback from peers. Continue working in groups,
documenting process. Teamwork.

DAY 3. Opening talk, review. Progress report. Depending on progress, project will be due
tomorrow or day after. For the presentation, all 3 people must take a stance and discuss their
individual ideas, collaboration, result of project and how it would be a community asset.

Day 4: Presentation. Or work day depending of progress. See presentation criteria and
expectations.

Day 5: presentation (see presentation criteria).

*Instructor will assist groups individually and offer them direct feedback and pressing question
to help them through the process.

Accommodations and modifications:
Not necessary here, but instructors will offer more assistance if need be.

Assessment and Evidence:

72

Holistic evaluation at the end of the quarter. For this project, students will write an individual selfreflection and a conclusion to go along with the project and presentation.

Presentation Expectations:
Presentation must include but is not limited to:
-

A visual element that specifically shows extensive detail of the project, size, colors, design.
(Examples include a 3D model, blue prints, maps with 3D elements)

-

A rationale or explanation:
o

Why is it in that form? o Why is there need for such a
project? o How is it a city or state asset?

o

How is it an influence? o How do people interact with
it? o Is there symbolism, if so why?

o

Is this original or an improvement of another kind of
asset?

o

Over the course of 3 years? o Over the course of 5
years? o Based on your research how is this helpful or
needed?

o

Stats and sources?

This can be in the form of a paper, a mapping literal exercise, a PowerPoint or more,
(seek approval from instructor before moving forward)
-

All group members must present an element of the project. (Group leaders OK)
All other information relative to the project, and the licenses you have to obtain in order to move
forward. (Building a shelter would require approval from licensed city inspector and contractor)

-

Present your process of the proposal, idea breakthroughs, and sketches, research ect.
73

Public art investigations
Project 2

Public Works Proposal Project

You will choose a genre of public art (list in classroom).

You will research the genre and include at least one artist from that genre.

1. The Paper

You will write a 2-page statement, on the genre using the artist as an example point.

2. Large Visual Element

You will include a visual element like a presentation board or large paper.
o

You will include images of the artist’s public works.

o

A small written explanation of the genre and the artist (You could paste your paper or a
piece of your paper for this).

3. The Art Piece o You will construct an art piece that demonstrates the genre or and the artist.
(May or may not be attached to the poster).

If you where able to create a public art piece of this genre what would it be?
(don’t do a replica of the artist’s work, develop your own idea)

This can be a blue print type of design for proposing a public project or an actual painting of the
mural you would do (but smaller).
74

If you where to propose this as a public works project, the viewer should be able to see all your
intentions from looking at the Visual Element and art piece.

Due: Feb 10th

You may work
individually or with a
partner if you work with a
partner double the criteria.

Expectations:
Paper
1. Includes important
details about the genre,
Include: Introduce the
genre, background info,
controversies, artists, and your own opinion about it.
2.
Include important details about the artist(s) including, common
pieces, what they mean, how they work in that genre. 3. Is professional,
double-spaced, proofread and is at least 2 pages.

Visual element
1. Includes a written explanation of genre and artist(s), (you may use your paper or pieces of it).
2. Includes pictures of said Artist(s) work and titles, dates, scale, and medium.

Art Piece
1. Shows knowledge of the genre and intentions.
2. Shows craftsmanship and thoughtful artistic decisions.
3. Is original. 4. Has a small written explanation.

Presentation
1. Includes descriptions of the genre.
2. Introduces artist as an example of genre. 3.
Presents your artful public idea!

75

76

77

78

Types of Public Art: Public art is usually constructed for four main reasons that are:
Commemorative, Controversial, Change, and Community

Traditional Commissions- Sculptures, installations, murals, multimedia etc.

Community Integrated or interactive (Judith Baca):

Performance (trash people):

Earthworks/Land art (Robert Smithson):

Graffiti/Street art (Banksy):

Architecture (Ian Ritchie):

Asset Art: (Bike racks, bus stations, maps, benches, playgrounds etc..

Public works- Manuscripts, documents

Advertising, promotions, posters, billboards.
79

Student Example 1- Zaki: Slam Poetry

80

81

82

83

Part Two: PowerPoint

84

Part Three: Poem Art Piece

85

Student Example 2- Jack: Scalable Sculpture

86

Part 1: Research Paper

87

88

89

Part Two: Presentation poster

90

Part Three: Proposal Sketch

91

Social Practice Art PowerPoint

92

Project Three
Lesson title:
Interactive Public art using JCOS

Teacher:
Ryan Mathews

Age:
JCOS high school

Big idea:
Culture

Essential Questions:
How can one influence a reaction from the viewer?

Assignment:
Students will create an interactive public art piece that they will place in the school with intentions
to interact with the viewer. This will be a small scale project; however students will uses
conceptual thinking skill and creativity to create a project.
Students will create an interactive art project that will be displayed/installed in JCOS. Students
project can be themed or simply visual but must be positive and noncontroversial. Examples
include:

93

Butterflies on a trash can (3D, using cardboard, or 2D using paper and tape)

A poem

written by student that is passed from student to student.

Painting on small rocks and placing them outside to be found by students.

Creating cooking recipes, decorating them and taping them on walls.

Objectives:

To promote public art as a positive asset for a community and a place.

To understand community interaction and community interests.

To create art that positively impacts and reflects a place.

To extend knowledge in the area of community reactions and effects it can have person to
person.

ELLS:
Print out power point.
Sentence stubs
Response questions

CO Visual Standards:
Content Area

Visual Arts

Grade Level

Course
Name/Course

Public Art Investigations

Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

High School

GLE Code

9. Observe and 7. Visual art has inherent characteristics and expressive features
Learn to
Comprehend 8. Historical and cultural context are found in visual art

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1

9. Art and design have purpose and function

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.3

7. Reflective strategies are used to understand the creative process

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.1

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.2

94

10. Envision and 8. A personal philosophy of art is accomplished through use of sophisticated
Critique to
Reflect

language and studio art processes
9. Interpretation is a means for understanding and evaluating works of art

11.

Invent and 7. Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media, and apply
Discover to
appropriate and available technology for the expression of ideas
Create
8. Assess and produce art with various materials and methods
9. Make judgments from visual messages

12.

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.2

Relate and 7. The work of art scholars impacts how art is viewed today
Connect to
8. Communication through advanced visual methods is a necessary skill in
Transfer
everyday life
9. Art is a lifelong endeavor

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.3
VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.1
VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.2
VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.3
VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.1
VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.2
VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.3

Vocab:
Social practice
Interactive
Relational Aesthetics
Public art
Non-controversial.
Viewer
Place making
References:
See PowerPoint.

Rules Students Must Follow (No art installed unless followed):
1. Artwork must be non-controversial and keep the peace or influence good, but can personal.
Must be a positive reflection of JCOS.
2. Artwork must be safe, must be secured and in safe locations.*
3. Artwork must leave no damage when removed no: nails, paint on walls, unpeelable stickers or
permanent damage, etc.*
4. Artwork must be approved by teacher before proceeding with idea.
5. Artwork must be anonymous and placed discreetly.
95

6. You must document -photograph your artwork in the location you place it in!! (If not no grade for
project, if you don’t have a camera ask the teacher).
7. Have fun! Do something that interests you!!

* No Artwork will be placed in pathways or break fire codes.
If student/s decide on something 3D, (Butterflies on a trashcan) I will help with install to assure
security.
* Any paintings will be done on paper, cut out and taped to wall. Any stickers will be backed and
taped on the wall to eliminate any risk of damage.

Schedule:

Day 1:
Introduction to project
Brainstorming
Art and meaning
Approval process
Hands on work time
Go over rules sheet

Day 2:
Idea sharing
Discussion about interactive art
Interactive exercises.
Continue work.
96

Day 3:
Last day to work
Full work time
Art and meaning
Approval process.

Day 4: installation day
Photograph
Wrap up projects
Install document and reflect

Assessment:
Reflection questions.
Participation and effort
Completion and conceptual process

What is my project?
What did I intend to receive in reaction from the viewer?
What did I do well?
Big Picture Proposal
Project Title: Interactive Placemaking Public Art, small-scale pieces.
Class: Public Art, 15 students, Walkabout.
97

Teacher: Ryan Mathews (Kelly’s Student Teacher)
Contact info: rmathews@rmcad.edu / 808-222-8245
Timeframe: To be installed March 5th- March 20th (flexible, if preferred could be up for
only 1 week)
Project: Students will create an interactive art project that will be displayed/installed in
JCOS. Students project can be themed or simply visual but must be positive and
noncontroversial. Examples include:
• Butterflies on a trash can (3D, using cardboard, or 2D using paper and tape) A
poem written by student that is passed from student to student.
• Painting on small rocks and placing them outside to be found by students.
• Creating cooking recipes, decorating them and taping them on walls.
Objectives:
• To promote public art as a positive asset for a community and a place.
• To understand community interaction and community interests.
• To create art that positively impacts and reflects a place.
• To extend knowledge in the area of community reactions and effects it can have
person to person.
Rules Students Must Follow (No art installed unless followed):
8. Artwork must be non-controversial and keep the peace or influence good, but can
personal. Must be a positive reflection of JCOS.
9. Artwork must be safe, must be secured and in safe locations.*
10. Artwork must leave no damage when removed no: nails, paint on walls, unpeelable
stickers or permanent damage, etc.*
11. Artwork must be approved by teacher before proceeding with idea.
12. Artwork must be anonymous and placed discreetly.
13. You must document -photograph your artwork in the location you place it in!! (If
not no grade for project, if you don’t have a camera ask the teacher).
14. Have fun! Do something that interests you!!
* No Artwork will be placed in pathways or break fire codes.
If student/s decide on something 3D, (Butterflies on a trashcan) I will help with install to
assure security.
* Any paintings will be done on paper, cut out and taped to wall. Any stickers will be backed
and taped on the wall to eliminate any risk of damage.

98

Examples

99

Interactive Art Rules.
1. Artwork must strive to be non-controversial and keep the
peace or influence good, but can personal. Must be a positive
reflection of the school.
2. Artwork must be safe, must be secured and in safe locations.
3. Artwork must leave no damage when removed no: nails, paint
on walls, unpeelable stickers or permanent damage, etc.
4. Artwork must be approved by teacher before proceeding with
idea.
5. Artwork must be anonymous and placed discreetly.
6. You must document -photograph your artwork in the location
you place it in!! (If not, no grade for project, if you don’t have a
camera ask the teacher).
7. Have fun! Do something that interests you!!

Interactive Art Rules.
1. Artwork must strive to be non-controversial and keep the
peace or influence good, but can personal. Must be a positive
reflection of the school.
2. Artwork must be safe, must be secured and in safe locations.
3. Artwork must leave no damage when removed no: nails, paint
on walls, unpeelable stickers or permanent damage, etc.
4. Artwork must be approved by teacher before proceeding with
idea.
5. Artwork must be anonymous and placed discreetly.
6. You must document photograph your artwork in the location
you place it in!! (If not no grade for project, if you don’t have a
camera ask teacher).
7. Have fun! Do something that interests you!!

100

Interactive Community Art PowerPoint

101

Student Examples: Final Interactive Projects

102

Sedona: Painted rocks placed outside

103

Jack: Facebook Like/Comment icons on posters.

104

Zaki: Painted rocks inside/ Quote posters

105

106

Dylan: Cultural Icon symbolism

107

Mason: Missing posters.

108

Pre and Post Assessment

109

Description of Assessment
Public Art Investigations Assessment standards are based off of the JCOS Graduation
Expectations and CDE State standards for High School visual Arts. Although JCOS and my
curriculum both follow authentic assessment and a pass or fail final grade it was important to me
to track my students progress from a summative and authentic perspective.

As this class is an investigations class gathering summative assessment can be difficult therefore
it is import to create standards and expectations that both meet state and school requirements
while tracking student’s conceptual progress.
Objectives and Assessment are associated around six main elements within the class.

Main projects:
This class consists of three main projects that include fine art techniques, conceptual thought and
influence strong creativity.

Artist list:
This is an artist list that I developed where we read, watch and listen to multiple famous and
nonfamous artists in the public art genre. This was a big part of discussions, critical thinking
questions and even main projects.

Critical Thinking Questions:
These are questions pertaining to public art statistics, controversies and conceptual meanings.

110

Students would have five minutes to fill out approximately one question per a class. These were
meant to help students explore and reflect specific topics and concerns within public art.

Discussions:
Approximately every class we would have a discussion pertaining to the critical thinking
questions and or specific topics. This was a way for students to talk about their opinions and
debate controversies.

Self-Evaluations:
Similar to the Critical thinking questions these were meant to further ones understanding but on a
personal level. Students were given these at the process and final stage of the project.

Collaborative Critiques:
Following a critiques criteria of “What you know, what you want to know and what you think”
Every student was to add something to the critique of another students work. Part of doing this
was for a students to develop a deeper appreciate for one’s work and a professional way to
assesses another person’s work.

Within each of these elements, professionalism, participation and creativity are included in
the expectations and rubric.

Professionalism:

Student is on time; if tardy has a note or is excused.
111

Ready to get started; is awake and shows me they’re ready to learn, cell phone put away.

Has all materials they will need: including sketching file and pencils.

Is respectful to teacher and classmates: Nice words, positive attitude, and leaves
classroom only when they have to and for short amounts of time. (It is a student’s right at
JCOS to leave the classroom unexcused for lavatory uses and drinking fountains)

Participation:

Student is adds to or and takes notes during discussions and or critiques. Student
participates in Critical thinking questions and explores concepts beyond the paper
reaching the expectations of CTQ.

Student participates in projects from start to finishes, showing process, evolution and
final product.

Creativity
In my classroom creativity is defined as an exploration of a conceptual idea that includes fine
art techniques and craftsmanship but is completely original and is derived from the student
and their intellectual and creative mind.
Exploration->Discovery-> Creativity
112

CDE Assessment Standards
Content Area

Visual Arts

Course Name/Course
Code

Public Art Investigations

Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

13. Observe and
Learn to
Comprehend

14. Envision and
Critique to
Reflect

15.

16.

Invent
Discover to
Create

Relate
Connect to
Transfer

Grad
e
Level

High School

GLE Code

10. Visual art has inherent characteristics and expressive
features

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1

11. Historical and cultural context are found in visual art

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.2

12. Art and design have purpose and function

VA09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.3

10. Reflective strategies are used to understand the creative process

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.1

11. A personal philosophy of art is accomplished through use of
sophisticated language and studio art processes

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.2

12. Interpretation is a means for understanding and evaluating works of
art

VA09-GR.HS-S.2-GLE.3

and 10. Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media, and
apply appropriate and available technology for the expression of
ideas

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.1

11. Assess and produce art with various materials and methods

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.2

12. Make judgments from visual messages

VA09-GR.HS-S.3-GLE.3

and 10. The work of art scholars impacts how art is viewed today

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.1

11. Communication through advanced visual methods is a necessary
skill in everyday life

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.2

12. Art is a lifelong endeavor

VA09-GR.HS-S.4-GLE.3

Colorado 21st Century Skills
The Colorado Academic Standards for Visual Arts are not
Invention

Critical Thinking and
Reasoning: Thinking
Deeply, Thinking
Differently
Information Literacy:
Untangling the Web
Collaboration: Working
Together, Learning
Together

Self-Direction: Own Your Learning

Comprehend

Transfer

Creative
Process

Reflect

Create
intended to be taught in a linear (checklist of coverage) fashion,
but rather should be implemented as a cyclical creative process.
Each unit within this

113

114

PASSAGES

115

7655 W 10th Avenue

Jefferson County Open School

Lakewood, CO 80214
phone: 303 982-7045 fax:
303 982-7046

GRADUATION EXPECTATIONS:
The Jefferson County Open School Graduation Expectations establish personal, social, and
intellectual standards which all students must meet at an appropriate level of proficiency prior
to graduation. Considered in the development of each student’s individualized curriculum, the
Graduation Expectations assessment, and monitor progress towards the attainment of
appropriate proficiency.
Each of the nineteen Graduation Expectations incorporates the following: Statement of Expectation,
Rationale, Desired Outcomes, List of Experiences, and Rubric of Growth Indicators. The
Rubrics of Growth Indicators follow a continuum consisting of Exposure, Experience,
Competence, and Excellence, and allow for detailed progress monitoring and assessment.
Assessment is ongoing and utilizes student portfolios against which growth is measured. A
student may utilize a variety of experiences to reach a given level of proficiency, including:
classes within the school, classes at other Jefferson County schools and local colleges,
independent study, group projects, jobs, educational trips, apprenticeships, volunteer service
work within the community, and more. Each learning experience is evaluated by the student
in regard to personal, social and intellectual growth and is validated by the instructor of the
class and by the Academic Advisor. Students utilize their WALKABOUT (including the
completion of six Passages) as a demonstration of the attainment of an appropriate level of
proficiency in each of the Graduation Expectations.
PROCESS FOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS:
1. Advisor conduct an initial formative assessment at the beginning of the year, or as
students enter the program. This assessment incorporates past experiences to begin the
process of developing a body of evidence / portfolio, which is used to monitor progress
along a continuum of all nineteen of the Open School’s Graduation Expectations.
2. Based on the formative assessment, students set individual goals to increase growth in
selected areas. Each set of goals is highly individualized, and the Advisor and Advisee
establish appropriate curricula to meet the goals.
3. From the goals, students develop a Mutually Agreeable Plan, in which student, parent
and Advisor work together to select classes, trips, self-directed learning projects /
Passages, community service projects, etc, to meet those goals.
116

4. At the end of each semester, students complete self-evaluations that reflect on their
growth towards their goals and reevaluate their progress on Graduation Expectations.
This cycle recurs throughout the student’s secondary experience. As the cycle continues,
students build a Body of Evidence through class evaluations, trip evaluations, Passage
Proposals and Passage Wrap-Ups. This Body of Evidence is reviewed throughout the year in
individual Advising meetings.
DATA COLLECTION:
Progress monitoring occurs on an ongoing basis during weekly individual meeting between
Advisor and Advisee; data is formally collected twice a year: once in the fall and once in the
spring. The data collected on individual students from each Advising group provides data for
both the individual student growth measures and school improvement.
Re-discover the Joy of Learning ~ Seek Meaning in Your Life ~ Adapt to the World As It Is
Prepare for the World As It Will Be ~ Create the World As It Ought To Be

To create and maintain healthy relationships.
1.0 Community Involvement - actively contribute to groups, the school, community,
and the world beyond.
2.0 Conflict Resolution - resolve conflict by respectfully confronting others and
accepting confrontation in a positive manner.

117

3.0 Flexibility and Resourcefulness - demonstrate flexibility and resourcefulness in
dealing with unexpected obstacles.
4.0 Individuality within Relationships - understand individuality within relationships
and work to develop respectful and meaningful relationships within the family and
other groups.

To think and apply knowledge.
1.0 Communication - effectively communicate for clarity, purpose, and
understanding.

1.1 Reading - interpret, analyze, and comprehend written language to develop
an appreciation for literature necessary for life-long learning.
1.2 Writing - effectively utilize writing as a tool for communication and
selfexpression.
1.3 Presentation - use oral communication, listening, and formal presentation
skills to effectively articulate personal, social, and intellectual growth.
1.4 Cultural Awareness and Non-Native Language - develop cultural
awareness with a global perspective and effectively communicate in a non-native
language.
2.0 Analytical Reasoning and Problem Solving - utilize, evaluate, and refine the use
of multiple strategies to solve a variety of analytical and mathematical problems.
3.0 Research - conduct research to gather information and utilize a variety of
sources to support inferences and justify conclusions.
4.0 Science and Ecological Awareness - employ the scientific method to act as a
curious observer of natural phenomena to develop an appreciation for ecological
awareness.
5.0 Technological Literacy - understand effective and ethical use of current
technologies.
6.0 Creative Expression and the Arts - express imagination and develop an
understanding of the creative process.
7.0 Sense of History and Political Awareness - utilize historical perspectives to
understand how political systems work in order to act as a responsible citizen at the
local, national, and global levels.
8.0 Life Skills - manage resources, explore vocations, and acquire a variety of
essential life skills.

Individual Expectation Plan
GRADUATION
EXPECTATIONS

Goal or goals

Strategy or
strategies
118

Personal
1

Self-Directedness
.

2
. Risk and Challenge
3
. Values and Moral Decision
Making 4
Wellness
.

Social
1

Community Involvement
.

2
. Conflict Resolution
3
4

. Flexibility and Resourcefulness
Individuality within Relationships
.

Intellectual
1

Communication
.
1

.

Reading
1
1

.

Writing
2
1

.

Presentation
3
1
.
Cultural Awareness and
Non4 native Language
2 Analytical
Reasoning
. Problem Solving
3 Research
.
4
.
5
.
6
.

and

Science and Ecological Awareness
Technological Literacy

Creative Expression and the Arts

119

7
.
8
.

Sense of History and Political
Awareness
Life Skills

Grade Break down:
Although this class is P/F you must receive over 60% in total points to pass.
Project 1
Hubcap Painting: 20 points
Project 2
Public Works Proposal Project: 25 points
Project 3
Interactive JCOS: 20 points
120

Critical Thinking Questions: 5 points
Attendance: 15 points
Participation: 10 points
Total: 100 Points

Each project is based off the rubric below.

Critical Thinking
Questions
Pertaining to
current project

Participation and
professionalism

Creativity and
effort

4-5 points
Student participated in the
writing and discussions
pertaining to critical
thinking questions during
this project. Student
expanded thoughts on
specific topic area to create
a deeper understanding of
concept.
Student was on time, ready
to work, cell phone was put
away. Student was
respectful throughout the
duration of the project and
was fully apart of all
discussions and project
steps.

3-4 points
Student answered most
critical thinking questions
but lacked some detail and
explanation. Student should
have dug further into the
concept to expand concept
understanding.

1-3 points
Students participated
little to none in the
critical thinking
questions

Student was professional
and ready to work but was
missing some elements of
participation and or
professionalism. Student
my need to work in the area
of participating and adding
to the discussion.

Student showed little to
no participation and or
professionalism, student
was often tardy or
absent without being
excused.

Student showed ample
amounts of creativity
exportation during the
project. Student implement
much originality into their
work and showed some
very strong connects in the
final product.

Student was missing some
pure creativity and or effort
but is trying to progress in
those areas. Student has
really good creativity
abilities but just has to
bridge the gap to aces their
full potential.

Students showed little
to no creativity or
effort growth within the
project. Student needs
to implement more
creativity discovery in
order to reach the
graduation
expectations.

121

Reached
Expectations of
assignment

Student followed all
instructions and process
steps to implement a
gradual scale of progress
and a deeper understanding
within the project. Students
reached all laid out
expectations and rules for
project.

Student struggled to follow
all steps regarding
assignment but really tried
in the area of process. As
result student almost
reached all expectations for
project but were messing
some details regarding the
final product.

Student reached little to
none of the
expectations of the
assignment and did not
complete assignment.
Student was either
absent (unexcused) or
struggled to stay
focused enough to
follow all direction to
completion.

122

Pre-Assessment- 01/09/15

123

Post Assessment- 03/12/15

124

125

Project 1 hubcap Painting: Zaki
Grading Scale
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Zaki exceled throughout the duration of the project, answering all critical thinking question and
pushing it further to relate it to her own understanding. She also shared her response with others
and stated a meaningful discussion.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Zaki was on time every class during the project and was ready to work. She brought a positive
attitude and was respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

Creativity and effort -5 points
Zaki always brought new idea to the table. Her Galaxy theme was something that interested her
But she soon discovered what that meant cultural. She also challenged herself of a fine art level
by
choosing a detailed design on a difficult surface but got through it and came out with a very well ut
p together piece with a theme.

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Zaki reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. She was interested in
presentin
ga
very final piece that expanded her fine art skill and also furthered her on a conceptual level. She had a
very clear understanding of the purpose of the project and from a public perspective.

Total 20 Points

Critical Thinking Question
126

127

Jack, Project 1 Hubcap Painting Results.

Grading Scale
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Jack had a late entrance into the class but was determined to make up all the work including CTQS. He added
some new ideas and celebrate the positive sides of CO culture.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Jack was always on time during the project and was ready to work. he brought a positive attitude and was
respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

Creativity and effort -5 points
Jack always brought new ideas to the table. His theme and piece was surrounded by co culture of city and
mountains. He used the hubcap metal in very innovative ways helping the concept of the piece. He is very
aware of his artic talents but consistently pushes him self to another level.

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Jack reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. He was interested in presenting a very
final piece that was untraditional but also expanded his fine art skill. He had a very clear understanding of
the purpose of the project and from a public perspective.

Total 20 Points

128

Zaki Project 2 Results, Public Works Proposal

Grading Scale
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Zaki exceled throughout the duration of the project, answering all critical thinking question and
pushing it further to relate it to her own understanding. She also shared her response with others and
stated a meaningful discussion.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Zaki was on time every class during the project and was ready to work. She brought a positive attitude
and was respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

Creativity and effort -5 points
Zaki always brought new idea to the table. Zaki is very interested in making a difference in society
and that is clear in her work. She wrote a poem for this project and performed in class and for the
whole high school.

129

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Zaki reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. She was interested in
presenting a very final piece that expanded her fine art skill and also furthered her on a conceptual
level. She had a very clear understanding of the purpose of the project and from a public
perspective.

Total 25 Points

Jack Public work project Results
Grading Scale
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Jack had a late entrance into the class but was determined to make up all the work including CTQS. He added
some new ideas and really wanted to share about new innovative public art.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Jack was always on time during the project and was ready to work. He brought a positive attitude and was
respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

Creativity and effort -5 points
Jack always brought new ideas to the table. Although his proposal was very personal he related it to world
on a larger aspect of physical health, cultural art and well-being..

130

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Jack reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. He was interested in presenting a very
final piece that was untraditional but also expanded his fine art skill. He had a very clear understanding of
the purpose of the project and from a public perspective.

Total 25 Points

Zaki: Interactive Community Project Results
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Zaki exceled throughout the duration of the project, answering all critical thinking question and
pushing it further to relate it to her own understanding. She also shared her response with others and
stated a meaningful discussion.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Zaki was on time every class during the project and was ready to work. She brought a positive attitude
and was respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

131

Creativity and effort -5 points
Zaki always brought new idea to the table. Zaki is very interested in making a difference in society
and that is clear in her work. Zaki finished her rocks so created another project to do with them that
gave a similar energy to the community.

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Zaki reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. She was interested in
presenting a very final piece that expanded her fine art skill and also furthered her on a conceptual
level. She had a very clear understanding of the purpose of the project and from a public
perspective.

Total 20 Points

Jack: Interactive Community Project Results
Grading Scale
Critical Thinking Questions Pertaining to current project. - 5points
Jack had a late entrance into the class but was determined to make up all the work including CTQS. He added
some new ideas and really wanted to share about new innovative public art.

Participation and professionalism -5 points
Jack was always on time during the project and was ready to work. He brought a positive attitude and was
respectful to instructor and other students at all times.

132

Creativity and effort -5 points
Jack always brought new ideas to the table. Jack was interested in the impact for Facebook and the web
interface. He involved other people projects by posting the slip of paper below current presentations.

Reached Expectations of assignment -5 points
Jack reached all expectations of the assignment and took it further. He was interested in presenting a very
final piece that was untraditional but also expanded his fine art skill. He had a very clear understanding of
the purpose of the project and from a public perspective.

Total 20 Points

133

Critical Thinking Questions

134

135

136

137

138

139

140

Analysis of Assessment

141

Summary of Assessment

In this class I had many students excel and really expand their thoughts on Creative
Public Practices, although, others did not do as well. Way more students than I expected didn’t
even show up to the class half the time. I was shocked. I would speak to these students
individually and together I would try to come up with solutions but they didn’t seem to stick, the
student was just telling me what I wanted to hear. After meeting with each student’s advisor I

found out those students weren’t attending any of their classes. To me this was very unfortunate,
Some students excel as self-directed leaners others seem to fall through the cracks and not even
come to class.

Final Grade Spread Sheet

___2

____25

___20

____5

___15

____10

Total= 100

0
Name

Projec
t 1,
Hubca
p
paintin
g

Project 2,
Public Works
Proposal
Project

JCOS
Interactive
Community
Project

Critical
Thinking
Questions

Attendance

Participation

Total

Mandy

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Came to class once.

142

Cassidy

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Came to class once
out of 15 class
periods, did not
complete or start
any assignments

Bailey

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

Jack

20

25

20

5

15

10

100

Jake

0

20

20

4

10

8

62

Mason

20

20

20

5

15

10

95

Xaki

20

25

20

5

15

10

100

Was very tardy
when attending
class, did not
complete any
projects. Does have
amazing ideas
Finished all
assignments and
projects despite a
late enrollment.
Brought new ideas
to the class and was
always creative.
Jake had some
attendee issue in the
start of the semester
but really tried to
improve following
the second half. He
did not complete
many things but he
did progress and
focus on many
aspects of the class.
Mason did really
well in this class he
was just missing
part of the public
works project but
completed
everything else.
Zaki did very well
exceeded the
expectations laid
out.

143

Kyle

20

0

10

3

9

6

48

Wednes

20

/

/

/

/

/

/

Julien

20

0

20

4

11

8

63

Sedona

20

25

20

5

15

10

100

Sophia

20

25

20

5

15

10

100

Dylan

0/

/

/

/

/

/

/

Frank

20

0

20

5

13

9

67

day

Kyle was interested
in the class but had
some attendance
and focus issues,
leaving many
incompletes.
Dropped class half
way through.
He was missing
some assignments
but did progress and
try to complete.
She was always 100
percent there, she
even took her
understanding
outside the school
and did additional
projects at home.
She was always 100
percent there, she
even took her
understanding
outside the school
and did additional
projects at home.
Stopped attending
school.
Frank had some
participation and
attendence issues, he
was often trying to
get out of class but
he was very creative
and added
a lot to the class
when he was
present, he is
working to improve.

144

Tyler 02/17

/

/

/

/

/

/

Enrolled in JCOS
very late in the
semester but was
looking for classes
he would enjoy but
not get credit for.

145

Reflective Essay

146

Reflective Essay: Teaching at JCOS
Overall my experience teaching at JCOS was amazing. All my students in my Public art
class really exceeded my expectations. Most students came into the class not knowing what to
expect and they became more interested than ever in social change and community
improvements. I had assumed they would be somewhat interested in public art as social change
but I had not anticipated that it would become their passion. Xaki is a student who really
exceeded all limits. She started out on a very personal level creating art that interested her but
soon became interested in the impact of society and why she was interested in such things. She
broke through to another level on the second project where she used her passion and personal
experience to help others and provide a public voice. Her poem “Boy Shirt” is one she performed
over 10 times for our class, the whole school and her friends and family. She was not only proud
of her work but found the public reception to her performance very moving. Her final project
comes from a personal place but she involved much interaction from the community. Writing
quotes and hanging them in hallways in hopes of cheering numerous people up who are having a
bad day. She also painted take home fishes to place in the bathroom sinks. Xaki really expanded
her knowledge of public art but also used it to help her cause and stand up for others. Watching
her grow over the course of 12 weeks was an incredible experience, she went through many
challenges on each project but turned it around for the better. She was just one of many students
in class that exceeded all limitations.
A lot of my experience was extremely positive; however, I also experienced some
professional growth opportunities. If I was to teach this class again I would reinforce an
attendance policy and a backup structure system for those students who struggle with selfdirection.
This system would create a bridge between direction and self-direction and would be connected to
the final rubric.
147

In conclusion, I witness a lot of success with in my class but also some things that could
make it more successful.

148

References

149

WILDEMEERSCH, D., & VON KOTZE, A. (2014). Multiple Interruptions: Creative
Encounters in Public Art and Public Pedagogy, A North-South Dialogue. Studies In Art
Education, 55(4), 313-327.

Kilaru, A. S., Asch, D. A., Sellers, A., & Merchant, R. M. (2014). Promoting Public Health
Through Public Art in the Digital Age.American Journal Of Public Health, 104(9), 1633-1635.
doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302088

TRAFÍ-PRATS, L., & WOYWOD, C. (2013). We Love Our Public Schools: Art Teachers' Life
Histories in a Time of Loss, Accountability, and New Commonalities. Studies In Art
Education, 55(1), 7-17.

Green Jared. The Many Benefits To Public Art. April 2011. ASLA. ORG. Date Accessed, June
2014.

Kennedy Randy. Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art is intended to Nurture. March 2013.
The New York Times. Date accessed June 2014.

Americans For the Arts Public Art Network Council: Green Paper. Why Public Art Matters. Art
SUSA. Org. Date accessed June 1014.

1314_JCOS Community Owner’s Manual.pdf- Google Drive. (n.d). 1314_ Community Owner’s
Manual.pdf - Google Drive. Retrieved April, 2015.

150

Appendix
Glossary of Terms used at Jefferson County

151

Open School
Advisor:
The role of Advisor at the Open School is the most important responsibility for all teachers. Advisors are
student advocates and learning facilitators who assist students in setting and achieving the goals they create
for their Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). The Advising relationship is paramount in guiding students
toward successful completion of their individualized personal, social, and intellectual programs.
Advising – Group:
Advising is an integral part of the Open School program. Each Advising group has approximately 17
students. Advising groups meet at least twice a week. Group Advising emphasizes community through
group building, problems solving, and support of individuals and community endeavors.
Advising – Individual:
Each Advisor meets individually with each Advisee on a regular basis to build the relationships necessary
to guide students through his or her individualized program. Once a trusting relationship is established,
Advisors can provide deep and meaningful feedback to assist each Advisee in the creation of a relevant
personal, social, and intellectual program.
Community Circle:
Community Circle is an all IA (Elementary grades 4-6) meeting where students participate in the democratic
Governance of the school. In addition to disseminating information, students celebrate successes, discuss
school-wide issues and solve problems collectively.
Community Service:
Community Service involves students in practical, productive experiences which address actual needs and
develops a sense of pride in self and school. Students improve self-image, increase understanding of
personal abilities and limits, break down stereotypes, increase empathy, and create a profound sense of
fulfillment.
Day of Dialogue:
A Day of Dialogue is an educational experience which is student-created. In order to preserve the
institutional flexibility to respond to the teachable moment, a Day of Dialogue allows student and staff to
respond collectively by stopping the daily schedule to dedicate an entire day to focus on current events,
student needs, a student celebration of learning, or a crisis.
DOR:
Demonstration of Readiness is the major Self-Directed Learning project for the LEAP program. Successful
completion of this project is required prior to transitioning into the Walkabout Program.
End-of-Year Transcript:
End-of-Year Transcripts are evaluations of each student’s experience at the end of each school year. EndofYear Transcripts are written by the student and include a Personal Statement, class list, Advisor support
letters, and a written documentation of each individual learning experience. Both Mid- and
Endof-Year Transcripts combine in a continuing document which is incorporated into the Final Transcript.
Evaluations:
152

Narrative evaluations form the foundation of self-assessment documentation, and are critical to monitoring
the progress of each student at the Open School. All class and self-directed learning experiences are
assessed through the evaluation process. By reflecting on their personal, social, and intellectual growth,
students chart their progress through the Graduation Expectations.
Fairness (Student Judiciary):
A Fairness Meeting (Student Judiciary) is designed to problem solve an appropriate response in the event
that a student does not accept responsibility for a norms violation, trust violation, or responds disrespectfully
to an appropriate confrontation.
Four Quadrants:
The four quadrants assist students in recognizing the world is indeed our classroom.

Out of
In School

School
Planned
Unplanned
Final Transcript: The culmination of each student’s experience at the Open School is documented in the
Final Transcript. An Open School Transcript is written by the student and include a Personal Statement,
class list, Advisor support letters, and written documentation of each individual learning experience.
Five Goals:
The Five Goals are guiding principles which influence all aspects of the program. Students should be able
to:
Rediscover the joy of learning,
Seek
meaning in your life,
Adapt to the world as it is,
Prepare for the world as it may be, and Create the world
as it ought to be.
Governance:
Governance is an all-secondary school meeting in which students participate in the democratic
Governance of the school. In addition to disseminating information, students celebrate successes, discuss
school-wide issues and solve problems collectively. The structure of Governance is usually established by
Leadership.
Graduation Expectations:
Considered in the development of each student’s IEP / Goals, the Graduation Expectations establish criteria
for personal, social, and intellectual growth. Students must demonstrate significant growth, to an
appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the Graduation Expectations, as agreed upon by the Advisor and
Advisee. At the Elementary level growth is evaluated based on a continuum consisting of Emerging,
Developing, Expanding, Connecting, and Bridging. At the Secondary level growth is evaluated based on a
continuum consisting of Exposure, Experience, Comprehension, Competence, and Excellence. Evaluation
153

occurs during individual Advising meetings using the Graduation Expectations rubrics and each students
portfolio documentation.
IEP (Individualized Educational Plan):
Each student regularly creates, works toward, and evaluates his/her individual progress through the Open
School by incorporating personal, social, and intellectual goals in an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP).
IEP goals are worked out between each student, parent, and Advisor, and are utilized to develop the
student’s Mutually Agreeable Plan for class schedules and self-directed learning through
SDL/DOR/Passages.

LEAP:
The Leadership Program (LEAP) is an intensive curriculum designed to orient new and transitioning
students into the Walkabout program. Students must demonstrate the internalization of the Three Domains,
Four Quadrants, Five Goals, and Twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner. The
culminating project is the DOR.
Leadership:
This class is designed to support students in the actual Governance of the school. The group works out the details
of various student- or staff-generated proposals which are then distributed to, and discussed in, the democratic
decision-making process, either in Group Advising or Governance.
MAP (Mutually Agreeable Plan):
Mutually Agreeable Plans are designed to provide the greatest possibility of successfully completing a
student’s IEP goals. The MAP includes what is conventionally referred to as a class schedule, but is
expanded to include SDL/DOR/Passage Work, Self-Directed Learning projects, Trips, Community College
classes, Vocational School classes, work study, and other activities designed to help students meet their
personal, social, and intellectual goals.
Mid-Year Transcript:
The Mid-Year Transcript is an evaluation of each student’s experience at the end of the fall semester. MidYear Transcripts are written by students and include a Personal Statement, class list, Advisor support letters,
and a written documentation of each individual learning experience.
Passages:
Passages are personally challenging projects developed by each student in six different areas to demonstrate
the ability to apply skills in the real world. The six Passage areas are: Adventure, Career Exploration,
Creative Expression, Global Awareness, Logical Inquiry and Practical Skills.
Passage Consultant:
The Passage process requires that students work with a Consultant. These are individuals, usually staff
members, who work one-on-one with students to meet the objectives of their Passage. Consultants are
involved throughout the entire process, including being present at both the Passage Proposal and Passage
Wrap-up meetings.
Passage Proposal:

154

The Passage process includes the writing of a proposal which is approved by a committee of peers, the
Advisor and a staff Consultant. Consultant, Advisor and Triad are required to attend this meeting. Mentors
and parents are encouraged to participate.
Passage Wrap Up:
Upon completion of the Passage, the student reconvenes the committee and presents a written summary for
final approval.
PLAID (Personal Learning and Independent Discovery):
Self-Directed learning experiences help students understand themselves as individuals and as contributing
members of society through interdisciplinary, experiential, 'real world' education. PLAID Day plans may
include apprenticeships, community service project, Passage work, and other self-directed projects.

Portfolio:
A body of evidence gathered by each student and their Advisor to document personal, social, and intellectual
growth on the Graduation Expectations. Portfolios are required in order for students to demonstrate
readiness from one level of the program to the next.
Three Domains:
In a holistic approach to teaching and learning all three domains, personal, social, and intellectual, are
equally considered in the learning process.
Triads:
Triads are peer support groups which assist students in personal, social, and intellectual growth. These
groups form a network which supports each member through the Passage process.
Trips:
Trips are an integral part of the Open School program. Trips provide excellent learning opportunities in the
real world and often prove to be a turning point in a student’s life – reawakening the joy of learning,
establishing trust in self, others, and the school community, creating ownership of school and one’s actions,
and reaffirming self-esteem.
Twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner:
The twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner are the primary attributes that any
selfdirected learner must possess.
Has Vision
Has a Goal
Develops a strategic Plan
Has high Self-Esteem
Takes calculated Risks
Is Self-Disciplined, determined and persistent
Is Organized (time, effort, resources)
Has a Support Network
Is Self-Motivating (inner and outer rewards)
Has a powerful, personal Learning-Doing Style
155

Is Self-Assessing (planned feedback)
Is positive, confident (self-efficacy)
Voyage:
Guided: Guided Voyages are design to assist students in beginning the transition from teacher-directed to
student-directed learning. Students develop the skills necessary to develop meaningful independent projects
by setting goals, planning, doing, and evaluating independent work.
Self-Directed: As part of the transition to Pre-Walkabout, Bridges students apply the skills they have learned
through Guided Voyages to a Self-Directed Learning Voyage. SDL Voyages require students to seek out
and secure meaningful projects, write a detailed proposal, set clear goals, follow through on commitments,
and articulate personal, social, and intellectual growth.
Walkabout:
Inspired by an Australian rite-of-Passage, Walkabout is the final phase of the Open School program in
which each student demonstrates readiness to function as an adult by completing six Passages, providing
the actual transition to adulthood.

Wilderness Trip:
The Wilderness Trip is a multi-day backpacking trip designed to orient students to the Walkabout program
and Jefferson County Open School. Students spend the first three days of school participating in wilderness
survival lessons, working together in group building activities, learning about the school community, and
planning the logistics of the trip. Each trail group consists of new students to the Walkabout program,
student leaders, and an Advisor. Although this is a physically and emotionally demanding trip, students
walk away with a sense of accomplishment and deepened relationships with students and staff.

“My kid’s Advisor, who are you? …I have no idea what you do…All you say to me is that I must trust in
you…What’s a Passage? What’s Governance?...A Triad with five people makes no sense…And what the
heck does my kid wear to school on PLAID Day?... No credits, not grades, and a Transcript as big as the
phone book, no college in its right mind will ever give my kid a second look….
From the 2008 Graduation song, sung by Kurt Belknap to the tune of “Rubber Ducky” Recognizing parent's frustration with the confusing language and processes of the Open School!

156

provides a dynamic environment that fosters the development of the unique potential in each
individual by nurturing and challenging the whole person. There is an emphasis on selfdirection,
learning through experience, shared responsibility, and the development of life longskills.

GOALS:
Students will be able to:


Rediscover the joy of learning;
Seek meaning in life;
Adapt to the world as it is; • Prepare for the world as it might be;

Create the world as it ought to be.

To create a positive, nurturing, and challenging culture where each person can
experience the joy of learning;


To create a culture where the five goals of the Open School apply to all students;
To be a place where all are teachers and learners as we develop our skills and abilities as
life-long learners;

To develop the potential of the whole child by striving for Excellence across the Open
School Graduation Expectation continuum;

To assess student learning in ways that challenge students to demonstrate personal,
social, and intellectual growth.

COMMUNITY

To create a community where each student is known and supported to achieve
his/her potential;
To create an Advising program where each student understands his/her unique

GUIDING P HILOSOPHY

:
157

LEARNING

place in the larger community through personalized adult
guidance;

To create a community that is truly centered on the five goals of the Open School
and where personal, social, and intellectual growth are seen as interconnected
endeavors, not separate;


To embrace the positive community created through a small school environment;
To actively encourage parents to partner with the Open School and play a significant
role in the lives and learning of their children.

INDIVIDUAL

To instill in students the desire and knowledge to pursue self-directed learning
through self-reliance, responsibility and shared decision-making;

To engage students in the creation of an individualized education plan in order to
personalize curriculum that empowers the pursuit of passions;

To reflect on learning and personal growth through the development and assessment
of personal, social, and intellectual goals;

To embrace the balance between the needs of the individual and the responsibilities of
the community;

To celebrate the accomplishments of all students as they strive to achieve the
potential.

JEFFERSON COUNTY OPEN SCHOOL PROGRAM
E

XPECTATIONS

1. ADVISOR DISCRETION
Jefferson County Open School is a highly individualized program that seeks to develop the
unique potential of each student while simultaneously working to develop a supportive
community of learners. Individualization and community can be paradoxically opposed.
Therefore, Advisors are given the discretionary authority, in partnership with students, parents,
and the community, to determine individualized curriculum, freedoms, and consequences which
are deemed appropriate for their Advisees. This authority is paramount, as it is through the
Advisor-Advisee relationship that a partnership is developed which creates the greatest
possibility for success. The trust, latitude, and responsibility afforded through Advisor Discretion
are necessary as Advisors facilitate the personal, social, and intellectual growth of each Advisee.
While Advisors are guided by the program’s common mission, goals, values, and philosophy,
Advisor Discretion will necessarily result in variations in programmatic, policy, and procedural
implementation in relation to individual students. It is understood by all Advisors that what is
equal is not always fair, and what is fair is not always equal. It is the responsibility of every
Advisor to help create and facilitate an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for each individual
158

Advisee and to determine appropriate and necessary consequences for Advisees in need of such
intervention. At all times Advisors must operate in accordance with the JPS Code of Conduct.
Note: In accordance Jefferson County Public Schools Choice Enrollment Policy, Advisors at the
Open School have the discretion to rescind or reassign choice enrollments if the student no
longer meets the criteria essential for membership in the Jefferson County Open School
Program.

2. PROGRAM OVERVIEW AND SEQUENCE (FROM ELC THROUGH WALKABOUT
STUDENTS TYPICALLY SPEND THREE YEARS IN AN ADVISING GROUP.)

OPEN SCHOOL PROGRAM
KINDERGARTEN EARLY LEARNING CENTER INTERMEDIATE AREA

PRE-WALKABOUT

WALKABOUT
(ELC)

(IA)

BRIDGES
LEAP YEAR
FOUNDATIONS

PORTFOLIO
PRESENTATION

VOYAGE/PORTFOLIO
PRESENTATION

PRESENTATION OF
LEARNING

DOR

FINAL SUPPORT
MEETING

KINDERGARTEN
ESSENTIAL TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE KINDERGARTEN

159

Have an Advisor – a staff advocate.
• Be actively involved in the Advising group.
• Complete personal, social, and intellectual learning activities.
• Be safe, kind, and appropriate.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION TO THE ELC
• Successfully participate in the Kindergarten program.
• Begin emerging as a personal, social, and intellectual learner within the Open School
community.

EARLY LEARNING CENTER (ELC)
The ELC introduces students the Open School by artfully balancing the needs of the individual
and the community. The following expectations emphasize the personal, social, and intellectual
development of each student.
ESSENTIAL FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ELC
• Have an Advisor – a staff advocate
• Have personal, social, and intellectual goals to guide learning.
• Complete learning activities and maintain documentation personal, social, and
intellectual growth.
• Be safe, kind, and appropriate.
TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE ELC • Be
actively involved in the Advising group.
• Complete learning activities and maintain documentation personal, social, and
intellectual growth.
• Contribute (give as well as take) meaningfully to the Open School community at
large.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION TO THE INTERMEDIATE AREA
• Successfully complete an ELC Trip.
• In a portfolio, document significant personal, social, and intellectual growth to an
appropriate level of proficiency, as agreed upon by Advisor, Advisee, and Parent(s).

INTERMEDIATE AREA (IA)
In the Intermediate Area, students work to develop the skills, attitudes, knowledge and behavior
necessary to be successful in self-directed learning environment. IA expectations include:
160

ESSENTIAL FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE IA
• Have an Advisor – a staff advocate
• Have personal, social, and intellectual goals to guide learning.
• Complete learning activities and maintain portfolio documentation of personal, social,
and intellectual growth.
• Be safe, kind, and appropriate.
TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE INTERMEDIATE AREA
• Be actively involved in the community including Advising and Community Circle.
• Maintain an organized portfolio documenting personal, social, and intellectual
growth.
• Contribute (give as well as take) meaningfully to the Open School community at
large.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION TO PRE-WALKABOUT




Successfully complete IA Trips.
Successfully complete the Bridges class.
Successfully complete a Self-Directed Voyage.
Document learning in a Voyage presentation.
In a portfolio, document significant personal, social, and intellectual growth to an
appropriate level of proficiency, as agreed upon by Advisor, Advisee, and Parent(s).

PRE-WALKABOUT
FOUNDATIONS:
Upon entering Pre-Walkabout, students begin working towards completion of the Foundations
expectations which include:
ESSENTIAL FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE PRE-WALKABOUT FOUNDATIONS
• Have an Advisor – a staff advocate
• Have an Individual Education Plan (based on a Self-Assessment and Graduation
Expectations Outcomes Inventory), establishing meaningful goals toward the
acquisition of skills, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors to prepare for the LEAP
program and life long learning.
161

• Complete an Advising/Beginnings Trip each year.
• Have and follow a Mutually Agreeable Program each Block (based on IEP and
supported by advisor and parent).
• Write a mid-year and end-of-year transcript, reflecting on all learning experiences.
Maintain documentation of personal, social, and intellectual growth on the
Graduation Expectations.
TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE PRE-WALKABOUT PROGRAM
• Be actively involved in Advising, Triad, PLAID Days, and Governance.
• Attend Advising/Support Network meetings (Group, Individual, Triad).
• Maintain an organized portfolio documenting personal, social, and intellectual growth
on the Graduation Expectations.
• Contribute (give as well as take) meaningfully to the Open School community at
large.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION TO LEAP
• Successfully complete an Advising/Beginnings Trip.
• Successfully complete an appropriate percentage of classes as determined by Advisor
and Advisee (no less than sixty percent and a trend of improvement).
• Successfully complete at least one extended trip (other than an Advising/Beginnings
Trip and extending at least three days and two nights).
• Successfully complete five Self-Directed Learning Projects (SDLs).
• Contribute to the Open School community by completing a minimum of 20 hours of
community service each year.
• Show significant growth to an appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the
Graduation Expectations as agreed upon by Advisor, Advisee, and Parent.
• Document learning in a LEAP Self-Assessment and Presentation of Learning (POL).
• Successful PLAID experiences as determined by Advisor, Advisee, and Parent.
PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS







Learning Activities Sheet and Documentation of Schedules
Evaluations with feedback from the facilitator of the learning experience
SDL Progress sheet, Proposals, Wrap-ups, and Documentation.
Graduation Expectations Assessments
IEP Goals
Mid-Year, End-of-Year and LEAP Self-Assessment
Completion Rubric
Documentation of successful use of PLAID experiences.
162

LEADERSHIP PROGRAM (LEAP):
Students who have completed the Foundations expectations culminating in a POL, transition into
the LEAP program where they work to fulfill the following expectations:
ESSENTIAL FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE PRE-WALKABOUT LEAP PROGRAM
• Have an Advisor – a staff advocate
• Have an Individual Education Plan (based on a Self-Assessment and Graduation
Expectations Outcomes Inventory), establishing meaningful goals toward the
acquisition of skills attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors to prepare for the Walkabout
program and life long learning.
• Complete an Advising/Beginnings and LEAP Trip (Leadership).
• Have a Mutually Agreeable Program each Block (based on IEP and supported by
advisor and parent).
• Write a Mid-Year and End-of-Year transcript, reflecting on all learning experiences.
• Maintain documentation of personal, social, and intellectual growth on the
Graduation Expectations.
TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE PRE-WALKABOUT PROGRAM
• Be actively involved in Advising, Triad, PLAID Days, and Governance.
• Attend Advising meetings (Group, Individual, Triad).
• Maintain an organized portfolio documenting growth in all Graduation Expectations.
• Contribute (give as well as take) meaningfully to the Open School community at
large.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION TO WALKABOUT
• Successfully complete an Advising/Beginnings and LEAP Trip (Leadership)..
• Successfully complete an appropriate percentage of classes as determined by Advisor
and Advisee (no less than sixty percent).
• Successfully complete a Demonstration of Readiness (DOR).
• Contribute to the Open School community by completing a minimum of 20 hours of
community service each year.
• Show significant growth to an appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the
Graduation Expectations as agreed upon by Advisor and Advisee.
• Document learning in a DOR Presentation.
163

• Successful PLAID experiences as determined by Advisor, Advisee, and Parent.
PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS
• Learning Activities Sheet and Documentation of Schedules.
• Evaluations with feedback from the facilitator of the learning experience (Including
LEAP classes).
• DOR Progress sheet, Proposal, Wrap-up, and Documentation.
• Graduation Expectations Assessments.
IEP Goals.
• Mid-year and End-of-Year Transcript.
• Completion Rubric.
• Documentation of successful use of PLAID experiences.

WALKABOUT:
Once students demonstrate their readiness for Walkabout by successfully completing the
aforementioned expectations they make the transition into Walkabout. During the
Walkabout Program students are required to meet the following expectations:
ESSENTIAL FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE WALKABOUT PROGRAM
• Have an Advisor – a staff advocate.
• Have an Individual Education Plan (based on the Self Assessment and Graduation
Expectations Outcomes Inventory), establishing meaningful goals toward the
acquisition of skills, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors to prepare for adulthood.
• Complete the Wilderness Trip.
• Have a Mutually Agreeable Program each Block (based on the IEP and supported by
the Advisor)
• Write mid-year and end-of-year transcript, reflecting on all learning experiences.
• Maintain documentation of growth in all of the Graduation Expectations.
TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE WALKABOUT PROGRAM
• Be actively involved in Advising, Triad, PLAID Days and Governance.
• Attend Advising meetings (Group, Individual, Triad).
• Maintain an organized portfolio documenting growth in all of the Graduation
Expectations.
• Contribute (give as well as take) meaningfully to the Open School community at
large.

164


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
• Successfully complete the Wilderness Trip.
• Document each learning experience to be included in the transcript (usually through
the writing of an evaluation).
• Successfully complete one extended trip (other than the Wilderness Trip or Advising
trips).
• Successfully complete six Passages, which includes community service in the greater
community.
• Contribute to the Open School community by completing a minimum of 40 hours of
community service each year.
• Show significant growth, to an appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the
Graduation.
Expectations, as agreed upon by the Advisor and Advisee.
• Complete a final transcript.
PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS




Evaluations with feedback from the facilitator of the learning experience.
Passage Proposals and Wrap-ups.
Midyear and End-of-Year Evaluations/Transcripts.
Graduation Expectation Packet.
Suggested for inclusion.
⋅ Authentic Artifacts
⋅ Activity Sheets (copies kept with Advisor)
⋅ Schedules

3. ADVISING
ADVISOR
The role of Advisor at the Open School is the most import responsibility for all teachers. As
Advisors, teachers are student advocates and learning facilitators who assist students in setting
and achieving the goals they set for their Goals/Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The
Advising relationship is paramount in guiding students towards successful completion of all
aspects of their program including
Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passages, Class schedules, and other mutually agreed upon personal,
social, and intellectual programs. There is a shared Advisor-parent responsibility to
communicate regarding the Advisee’s personal, social, and intellectual progress in the program.
Note: Advisors are the parent(s) first point of contact for all issues related to their student.

165

Please consult our web site jeffco.k12.co.us/high/jcos/ or call 303-982-7045 for contact
information for your student’s Advisor.
GROUP ADVISING
Advising is an integral part of the program. Each Advising group ranges in size from
approximately 16 students in the secondary to 22 student the elementary. Advising groups meet
twice a week or more and emphasize group building, planning, problem-solving, support of
individuals, and school community endeavors.
INDIVIDUAL ADVISING
Advisors meet individually with each student on a regular basis to build the relationships
necessary to guide students through their individualized program. Once a trusting relationship is

166

established, Advisors can provide deep and meaningful feedback to assist each student in the
creation of a challenging personal, social, and intellectual program.

4. TRIADS (IA THROUGH WALKABOUT)
Triads are peer support groups, usually developed within each Advising group, which aid
students in personal, social, and intellectual growth. These groups form a network which
supports each member through the Self-Directed Learning process (Voyage/SDL/DOR/Passage).
In order to graduate from the Open School Program, each student is required to contribute to and
receive support from a working Triad. Triads can be the strongest support system to assist a
student as s/he negotiates the Secondary Program.
TRIAD EXPECTATION:

All students must be part of a Triad;
Triad members must be at every Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage meeting. (If a Triad
member legitimately cannot attend s/he will give written feedback to the Triad
member having the meeting);

Each Triad member will read and give feedback on all
Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage work prior to the meeting (proposals, wrap-ups, portfolios,
off campus proposals, research papers, etc.);

It is the Triad’s responsibility to actively participate in
Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage meeting, by asking questions, giving thoughtful
commentary, and helping to connect the goals of the Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage to the
Triad member’s Goals/IEP;

In the Secondary, Triads will meet for an hour a week to share Goals/IEPs, monitor
progress through the program, support one another on issues relevant to personal,
social, and intellectual growth and challenges, read one another’s work, check on
success with classes, trips and other learning opportunities;

Triads will evaluate their effectiveness on a regular basis and hold one another
accountable;
Triad effectiveness will be evaluated by each student in their Mid-Year and EndofYear Transcripts.

5. GRADUATION EXPECTATIONS
Considered in the development of each student’s Goals/IEP, the Graduation Expectations
establish a measure for personal, social, and intellectual growth. Students must demonstrate
significant growth, to an appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the Graduation Expectations,
as agreed upon by the Advisor and Advisee prior to graduation. Growth is evaluated based on a
continuum consisting of: Emerging, Developing, Expanding, Connecting, and Bridging at the
167

elementary level and Exposure, Experience, Comprehension, Competence, and Excellence at the
secondary level. Evaluation occurs during individual Advising meetings using the Graduation
Expectations rubrics and portfolio documentation. The Graduation Expectations are:

PERSONAL

Self-Directedness: identify passions, create a vision for excellence by taking personal
responsibility to meet commitments, organize priorities, set goals and self-assess.

Risk and Challenge: take healthy risks and embrace challenges.

Values and Moral Decision Making: identify personal values and principles to develop a
strong work ethic and the ability to make moral decisions.

Wellness: assess and enhance emotional and physical wellness.

SOCIAL

Community Involvement: identify passions, create a vision for excellence by taking personal
responsibility to meet commitments, organize priorities, set goals and self-assess.

Conflict Resolution: take healthy risks and embrace challenges.

Flexibility and Resourcefulness: identify personal values and principles to develop a strong
work ethic and the ability to make moral decisions.

Individuality within Relationships: assess and enhance emotional and physical wellness.

INTELLECTUAL

Communication: effectively communicate for clarity, purpose, and understanding. ⋅ Reading:
interpret, analyze, and comprehend written language to develop an appreciation for literature necessary for
life-long learning.

Writing: effectively utilize writing as a tool for communication and self-expression. ⋅
Presentation: use oral communication, listening, and formal presentation skills to effectively articulate
personal, social, and intellectual growth.
⋅ Cultural Awareness and Non-Native Language: develop cultural awareness with a global perspective and
effectively communicate in a non-native language.

Analytical Reasoning and Problem Solving: utilize, evaluate, and refine the use of multiple

strategies to solve a variety of analytical and mathematical problems.
Research: conduct research to gather information and utilize a variety of sources to support
inferences and justify conclusions.
Science and Ecological Awareness: employ the scientific method to act as a curious
observer of natural phenomena to develop an appreciation for ecological awareness.
Technological Literacy: understand effective and ethical use of current technologies.

Creative Expression and the Arts: express imagination and develop an understanding of the


creative process.

168

Sense of History and Political Awareness: utilize historical perspectives to understand how
political systems work in order to act as a responsible citizen at the local, national, and global
levels.
• Life Skills: manage resources, explore vocations, and acquire a variety of
essential life skills.

6. INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PLANS (IEP)/ GOALS
The process of developing a highly individualized curriculum for each student begins with the
creation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Each student utilizes the Graduation
Expectations in the process of designing, executing, and evaluating goals for growth within each
of the three domains; personal, social, and intellectual. IEP goals are worked out between each
student, parent, and Advisor, and are utilized to develop the student’s Mutually Agreeable Plan
(MAP) at the Secondary Level and to guide self-directed learning through
Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passages.

7. MUTUALLY AGREEABLE PLAN (MAP)/SCHEDULES (SECONDARY)
CLASS SCHEDULES
Each Secondary student at the Open School designs a unique schedule. During their day, students
are expected to engage in classes which address the personal, social, and intellectual goals as
outlined on the students’ IEPs. Additionally, students should select classes which meet their
individual needs, and provide challenge and the opportunity to rediscover the joy of learning.
Note: All student schedules must be signed by the student, parent, and Advisor indicating mutual
agreement of the appropriateness of the schedule.
SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING TIME
With Advisor support and parent approval, students have the option to utilize self-directed learning
time in lieu of a class during a particular time period. During this time, students may pursue selfdirected learning options such as community service or apprenticeship. Most students, however,
explore these options on Wednesday as part of the PLAID day experience. Note: Pre-Walkabout
students must submit a written proposal for any self-directed learning times that are built into their
class schedule prior to registration.
STUDENT LED CLASSES
At the Open School we believe that all community members equal partners in the
teaching and learning process. Consequently, students may propose to teach a Student Led
Class. In order to teach a Student Led Class, students must go through the Proposal Process to
obtain the approval of their parent, Advisor, and Triad prior to placing a class on the schedule.
All student led classes will be supported by the student’s advisor for the duration of the class.
Note: Please be aware that students may enroll in Student Led Class. Check the Block Schedule
to determine which classes are Student Led.

169

SCHEDULE BUILDING
PROCESS Selecting
Classes

Students should create a class schedule with an appropriate level of challenge.
Class levels are related to their placement in the program, Pre-Walkabout,
Walkabout, Combination (Combo) classes which are open to all secondary
students. Students are encouraged to take classes which support their IEP goals.

Students should be sure to select second choice classes unless they are guaranteed
a spot in a continuing class. Registration

Students should consider their IEP goals as they register for each class. Students
are encouraged to talk to teachers to check for class compatibility with student’s
desire, ability, and IEP goals.

Class sizes are limited; therefore students and parents should be aware that not all
students get all of their first choice classes.

Problem Solving

The teacher of an overfilled class uses a lottery system to reduce the size of the
class, and creates a list of students who were “bumped” from a class.


Teachers share the list with Advisors.
An updated schedule of open classes (with # of spaces remaining) and closed
classes is generated.

Advising/Round Two Registration

Students are informed by their Advisor if they have been bumped from any of
their first choice classes.

Those who have been “bumped” should be re-advised to register for second
choice classes that are still open, or look for alternatives.

Students then re-register for another class during those class periods that have
been affected.

8. CLASS COMPLETION STATUS (SECONDARY)
Narrative evaluations form the foundation of self-assessment documentation and are critical to
monitoring the progress of each student at the Open School. All classes, self-directed learning,
and other significant experiences are evaluated by the student with written feedback from the
sponsor of the experience.
Completion of classes is determined by the student and teacher and is indicated through written
feedback on the evaluation. Classes are Transcriptable/Complete, NonTranscriptable/NonComplete, or Incomplete. Incomplete classes are those in which the student
has the opportunity to complete the necessary work to change the class status to Transcriptable
within a limited time frame as established by the teacher.
Note: Students may not include Non-Transciptable classes in their Final Transcripts for
graduation purposes or to be submitted for college admissions.
170

9. PERSONAL LEARNING
(SECONDARY)

AND

INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY (PLAID)

Self-Directed Learning experiences help students understand themselves as individuals and as
contributing members of society through interdisciplinary, experiential, 'real world' education.
PLAID Experiences, usually scheduled for Wednesdays afternoons, may include
apprenticeships, community service projects, Passage work, and other self-directed projects.
Successful completion of all levels of the Secondary Program requires effective planning and
utilization of PLAID experiences. Documentation of PLAID experiences must be included in
the body of evidence/portfolio through SDL/DOR/Passage proposals, wrap-ups, and other forms
of mutually agreed-upon record keeping.
Note: Please see the Open Campus policy of guidance on the specific details for student, parent,
and Advisor agreements for PLAID Experiences.

10. STUDENT GENERATED CURRICULUM (IA THROUGH WALKABOUT)
GUIDED VOYAGES (IA)
In the IA, students are guided by teachers through the Self-Directed Learning process as part of
Guided Voyages that are attached to thematic units that occur throughout the year. Guided
Voyages are design to assist students in beginning the transition from teacher-directed to
studentdirected learning. Students develop the skills necessary to develop meaningful
independent projects by setting goals, planning, doing, and evaluating independent work.
SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING VOYAGES (IA)
As part of the transition to Pre-Walkabout, Bridges students apply the skills they have learned
through Guided Voyages in a Self-Directed Learning Voyage. SDL Voyages require students to
utilize the skills they have gained in Guided Voyages by seeking out and securing meaningful
projects, write detailed proposals, setting clear goals, follow through on commitments, and
articulate personal, social, and intellectual growth.
SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING PROJECTS (SDLS) (PRE-WALKABOUT)
Students engage in a minimum of five Self-Directed Learning Projects during their Foundations
career. Projects include Apprenticeship, Community Service, and Dynamic Investigation of
Great Stuff (DIGS). Student must complete at least one of each type of SDL. An SDL is design
to assist students in beginning the transition from teacher -directed to student-directed learning.
Students develop the skills necessary to seek out and secure meaningful projects, write detailed
proposals, set clear goals, follow through on commitments, and articulate personal, social, and
intellectual growth.

APPRENTICESHIP - This SDL helps you explore the world outside of school, make
connections in the community, and explore how to participate in a work environment.

COMMUNITY SERVICE - Giving back to a community in which you believe you
could make a difference is the purpose of this SDL. The importance of this SDL is in the
171

understanding of helping others so that you may make a positive impact in the
community.

Dynamic Investigation of Great Stuff - In this SDL you will explore a topic
indepth. There are several parts to a DIGS include developing a formal plan, conducting
background research, an experiential “DO” part, a formal sharing designed to educate
peers, and an evaluation.
DEMONSTRATION OF READINESS (DOR) (PRE-WALKABOUT )
LEAP students demonstrate readiness for Walkabout by meeting a set of expectations which
demonstrate the acquisition of skills, attitudes, knowledge and behavior necessary to be
successful in the Walkabout program.
LEAP students must complete one major independent self-directed learning project as part of
their Demonstration of Readiness (DOR). DOR projects can be on any topic of the students
choosing, but must follow the Passage Process to demonstrate understanding of the steps
required to complete a high quality Passage. Knowledge of, and ability to, effectively use the
Passage Process includes the following:

Taking a vision of learning from the idea stage to completion.
Utilizing support network including your Advisor, Consultant, Triad, family, and
friends in the execution of the project.

Writing a high quality final draft Proposal and Wrap-Up which has been through
a peer editing process with Triad, Advisor, and Consultant.


Documenting use of the consulting system.
Clearly articulating the Proposal and Wrap-Up phases during the appropriate
Walkabout meetings.
Thoroughly documenting both the process and product.

DOR PRESENTATION
A formal presentation of readiness for Walkabout is required to make the transition from
PreWalkabout to Walkabout. This is a presentation of learning that highlights the challenges and
accomplishments which the student experienced during the execution of the DOR. Students
must clearly articulate and provide documentation of the following:

Completed product

Documented use of an effective PLAID Day plan

Knowledge, understanding, and utilization of the Three Domains, Four
Quadrants, Five Goals, and Twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner

PASSAGES (WALKABOUT)
Walkabout, inspired by an Australian rite-of-passage, is the final phase of the program in which
each student demonstrates readiness to function as an adult by doing six Passages, the actual
transition to adulthood. Passages are begun when the advisor agrees that the student has the
foundation of skills, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to succeed and has
172

demonstrated the ability to set meaningful goals and attain them. Passages are personally
challenging projects developed by each student in six different areas to demonstrate the ability to
apply his or her skills in the real world. The Passage process includes the writing of a proposal
which is approved by a committee of peers, the advisor, and a staff consultant. Mentors and
parents may also participate. Upon completion of the Passage, the student reconvenes the
committee and presents a written summary for final approval. The six Passage areas are as
follows:
ADVENTURE: A quest, a personal and meaningful challenge, the pursuit of which requires
courage, endurance, self-reliance, and intelligent decision-making.

CAREER EXPLORATION: A broad investigation of a field of employment, including
an in-depth study of at least one job within that field, with particular attention to
possibilities for the future.

CREATIVITY: The development of a product that is an expression of one’s personal
imagination, together with a detailed analysis of the process by which it was created.

GLOBAL AWARENESS: The identification of an issue having global impact,
followed by a study of how one’s own culture and at least one other culture deal with this
issue, culminating in a service project designed to influence the issue on a local level.

LOGICAL INQUIRY: An investigation which includes the generation of an
hypothesis, the development of a systematic approach to data collection, and sufficient
documentation to allow replication of the study.

PRACTICAL SKILLS: The development of proficiency in a skill or set of skills for
which one was formerly
dependent on others and which has the potential for life-long usefulness.
WALKABOUT DAYS (SECONDARY)
As students work to create a personally meaningful, challenging, and rewarding curriculum, they
are guided through the process by their Advisor. The Proposal/ Wrap-Up Process requires that
students schedule, organize, and participate in Walkabout Meetings. Walkabout Meetings can
occur at anytime during the school year however, Walkabout days are schedule throughout the
school year.
Note: Walkabout Days are scheduled approximately eight times a year in lieu of classes to
accommodate Walkabout Meetings.

11. TRAVEL PROGRAM
Experiential learning through travel is an integral part of the Open School program. Travel
provides an excellent learning opportunity in the real world and often proves to be a turning
point in a student’s life. The objectives of the Travel Program include re-discovering the joy of
learning, establishing trust in self, others, and the school community, creating ownership of
school and one’s actions, and reaffirming self-esteem. Note: Throughout the Open School
program trips are required. Required trips include: ELC and IA Advising Trips, Pre-Walkabout
173

Beginnings Trips, Wilderness Trip, and one additional extended trip at both the PreWalkabout
and Walkabout level.
ADVISOR SUPPORT/TRUST
Due to the nature of risks involved in the Travel Program at the Open School, students must
demonstrate a high level of trust and responsibility prior to being eligible to attend any trip
(except for orientation trips such as the Wilderness Trip). As a result, every student must have
Advisor support in writing submitted to the trip sponsor prior to departure. Advisor discretion is
a critical factor in determining student eligibility for the Travel Program; the following is a list of
some indicators that may be used to assess student trust levels:

Maintenance of an open dialogue with the Advisor through regular attendance and
positive participation in individual Advising meetings;

Regular attendance and positive participation in Advising, classes, Governance,
and Triad meetings;
Transciptable completion of the majority of classes each block;
Ongoing participation and successful completion of past SDL, DOR or Passage
work;
Documentation of a variety of learning experience through a Body of
Evidence/Portfolio;
Documentation of a variety of personal, social and intellectual growth through the
Graduation Expectations.




FOUR NON-NEGOTIABLES
Due to the risk inherent in operating the Travel Program, the Open School has adopted four
nonnegotiable standards of behavior for all school related activities (commonly referred to as the
Four “No’s”). Violations of the Four “No’s” will result in the immediate removal of the student
from the travel experience at the parents’ time and expense. In addition the Drug, Alcohol,
Violence and Trust policy will take effect.



No Sex
No Drugs/Alcohol
No Tobacco
No Violence

TRAVEL GRANTS/SCHOLARSHIPS (SECONDARY ONLY)
In order to make the Travel Program accessible to all students the Open School has created a
Grant/Scholarship Program to assist those students in need. It is the responsibility of the student
to secure all Grant/Scholarships a minimum of two weeks prior to departing on any trip.
Grants/Scholarships are obtained by completing all necessary paperwork (see the Financial
Secretary), securing an in-school service project for Grant Payback, and attending a Budget
Committee meeting for approval. The maximum number of Grants a student may receive during
a school year is two. A grant will cover half of the trip cost, up to $150.
174

Note: All Grants must be paid back in full through a thoroughly documented, school-based
service project prior to obtaining another travel Grant/Scholarship.

12. STUDENT LED CONFERENCES
Throughout their Open School career, students are responsible for documenting their own
progress through each phase of the program. Documentation includes a body of evidence or
portfolio which details their personal, social, and intellectual growth on their MAP including his
or her progress on the Graduation Expectations, Goals/IEP, SDL/DOR/Passage, Class
Completion and more. Students detail their progress in an oral presentation with the Advisor and
parent bi-yearly at Student Led Conferences.

13. COMMUNITY CIRCLE/GOVERNANCE/LEADERSHIP
Community Circle is an all IA meeting while Governance is the all-secondary school meeting
where students participate in the democratic Governance of the school. In addition to
disseminating information, students celebrate successes, discuss school-wide issues and solve
problems collectively. The structure of Governance is often established by Leadership.
Leadership is a class designed to support students in the actual Governance of the school. It is a
group that often works out the details of various proposal which are then distributed to, and
discussed in, the democratic decision-making process either in Group Advising or Governance.

14. TRANSCRIPTS (SECONDARY)
The culmination of each student’s experience at the Open School is documented in the Final
Transcript. Open School transcripts are written by the student and include a Personal Statement,
class list, Advisor support letters, and a summary of each individual learning experience.
Students include detailed information about knowledge and skills gained and what was of
personal significance to the student. When a student includes an Open School class in his or her
Transcript, this indicates that the student has met or exceeded all course requirements for that
experience. Transcripts are authenticated by the student’s academic Advisor, another faculty
member familiar with the student’s accomplishments, and the school Principal. The Transcript is
the official record used for college and job applications.
GRADUATION from the Open School is based on successful completion of individualized goals
related to the
Graduation Expectations (personal, social, intellectual), the Wilderness and one other extended
trip, the six Passages of the Walkabout program, and a Final Transcript in which the student
describes his or her learning experiences and accomplishments as a high school student.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT, CODE OF CONDUCT

175

In addition to the following policies, as a Jefferson County School District Option School the
Open School is subject to all the terms and conditions outlined in the Jeffco Public Schools Code
of Conduct. All Open School students and parent/guardians are expected to be familiar with the
responsibilities outlined in the Code of Conduct.

1. ADVISOR DISCRETION
Advisor Discretion is paramount to the Advisee/Advisor relationship in all facets of the Jefferson
County Open School program. Please refer to “Advisor Discretion” on page two for a more
detailed description.
ADVISOR CHANGE PROCEDURE (SECONDARY)
As the Advisor-Advisee relationship is critical to the success of each student in the program,
students and Advisors are empowered to initiate a change of Advisor. The Change Procedure has
been adopted to guide the Advisor change process.
STUDENT INITIATED:
Students wishing to initiate a change of Advisor should follow the steps listed below:

Demonstrate good standing within the community by having had a successful
block (including developing and maintaining an appropriate MAP/Schedule, full
attendance, positive participation, and successful completion of classes);

Discuss the possibility of making the proposed change with parents, Advisor, and
prospective Advisor(s);

Visit the prospective Advising group; an Advising change is both a change of
group and a change of Advisor;


Schedule a meeting with the current and prospective Advisor;
Celebrate the change.

ADVISOR INITIATED:
Advisors who have experienced a loss of trust in an Advisee so great as to warrant and Advisor
change by withdrawal of support should follow the steps listed below:

Employ a ladder of well-documented interventions designed to support the
Advisee to correct inappropriate behavior, including individual conversations
with the Advisee, phone calls to the parent, parent meetings, support plans,
behavior contracts, etc;

Discuss issues and strategies related to the Advisee with peers, support group, or
in staff meetings;
Discuss the possibility of an Advisor change with the team in a staff meeting to
determine if the Advisee has support to seek out a new Advisor. If it is
determined that the Advisee has support to change Advisors, provide a window of
time for the Advisee to seek out a new Advisor.

176


If there is support, set up a meeting with the Advisee and the prospective new
Advisor to facilitate the change.
Because the Advisory system is paramount to student success, if it is determined,
in the staff meeting, that no staff person is willing to support the Advisee in an
Advising capacity, then the Advisee will be asked to leave the program.

2. ATTENDANCE
To report absences please contact our attendance line at 303-982-7053.
The goal of our attendance policy is to support families and children. We believe strongly in the
experiential nature of learning at the Open School; students who miss school are not able to
make up this aspect of their education. We recognize that excessive tardiness or absence can be a
cry for help from the family or the student. We believe that if we work together within our
school and with Jeffco Public Schools Student Outreach, we can make a difference for children.
Attendance issue brought to
Advisor’s attention

1. Office staff will create a Bi-Monthly Attendance Reports for each
advisor that lists students who have 5 days of unexcused or
questionable absences.

Advisor makes parent contact

2. Advisor makes first family contact and begins to keep track
of attendance related contacts with family.
3. Advisor will keep records of family contacts as part of
Advising.

Attendance Reminder
Letter

4. When a student has 10 unexcused or excused absences, an
Attendance Reminder Letter will be sent by the Office staff.

Medical Letter

5. At any time when 10 or more days of excused absences for the first
semester or 20 or more days of excused absences for the school year, a
parent can provide the school with a Medical
Letter.
6. If parent is taking student out of school for a learning
experience, the parent and/or student should provide notification
to the advisor indicating purpose and duration
7. Student will still be counted absent and when student has 10
excused the Attendance Reminder Letter will be sent home.

Notification of Out of
School Learning
Experiences/First Letter

Request a Compulsory
Letter

Request an Initial Hearing
from Student Outreach

8. If there are three or more days of unexcused absences after the
Attendance Reminder Letter, office staff will send completed Request
for Compulsory Letter to the Parent/Guardian and a copy, with a copy
of updated attendance, will be sent to the JPS Student Outreach Office.
The Advisor will receive a copy of this letter.
9.

If there are three additional days of unexcused absences after the
Compulsory Letter is sent, office staff will send a Request for
Initial Hearing along with a copy of updated attendance to the JPS
Student Outreach Office.
10. A record of all attendance contacts (from advisor and from office
staff) will be requested prior to the hearing date.

3. BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS AND DISCIPLINE LADDER
177

ELEMENTARY STUDENT NORMS
At each level of the elementary; Kindergarten, ELC, and IA students and staff collectively
establish student norms. Student norms are general agreements for guiding student behavior and
responsibilities. Students who violate the norms may experience a loss of trust from their
Advisor and/or the community and other appropriate consequences in accordance with the
Jefferson County School Code of Conduct. The three general behavioral guidelines in the
elementary program are:


Is it safe?
Is it kind?
Is it appropriate?

SECONDARY STUDENT NORMS
Each year students work collectively to establish a series of school-wide norms. Student norms
are general agreements for guiding student behavior and responsibilities. Students who violate
the norms may experience a loss of trust from their Advisor and/or the community.
DISCIPLINE LADDER
The values and norms of the Open School are designed to ensure a caring, safe, and productive
learning environment for all members of the community. We believe each member of the
community is responsible for upholding these values and norms, including monitoring one’s own
behavior and confronting peers who choose to act inappropriately. We also understand that
anybody can make a mistake and make poor decisions sometimes. In the Open School discipline
model, we view mistakes as learning opportunities both for individuals and the community as a
whole. Therefore, peer groups such as Advising groups and Triads may be involved at all levels
of student discipline, if such involvement is appropriate.
At any point in time, individuals who violate community values and norms can choose to control
their own behavior, accept confrontation from peers or staff, and accept responsibility for their
actions, rectify the situation, and make better choices in the future. In these cases, no further
intervention would be needed.
The vast majority of norms violations are resolved quickly with a reminder or confrontation. The
following interventions occur when that first confrontation does not work. In cases where
students are not ready or willing to accept responsibility for changing their behaviors that violate
community norms, the following practices will be implemented.
Note: In severe cases student may move from the lowest level of the discipline to the highest
without following a prescribed sequence. Additionally, the Advisor will always be the first point
of contact with the parent in the event of any discipline matter.

Intervention

Possible Solutions

178

Lowest Level
Self-monitoring

• Self-Control and Self-Advocacy.

Peer-to- Peer Confrontation


Apology, Peace Table, Advisor, or Peer
Mediation.

More Serious
Teacher/Advisor Confrontation


New seat, Time Out, Individual Meeting
with Advisor, Student reflection (i.e. Situation
Evaluation Plan, Solve it Plan), incomplete classes,
loss of specials privileges (elem.), loss of Off
Campus privileges (Sec.), removal from class,
and/or other consequences deemed appropriate by
the advisor.

Advisor Informed


Problem-solving meeting, Incident Report,
loss of trust, loss of specials privileges (elem.) loss
of Off Campus and/or Open Campus privileges
(sec.), Peace table, and/or other consequences
deemed appropriate by the advisor.

Severe or Repeated Violations
Advisor, Parent, and/or Administrator involved


Problem solving meeting, Incident Report,
loss of trust, loss of specials privileges
(elem.), loss of Off Campus and/or Open Campus
privileges (Sec.), Peace Table, Service to
community, Retention at given level of program,
and/or other consequences deemed appropriate by
the advisor.

Informal and Formal Suspensions
Note: Informal Suspensions are determined and
directed by the Advisor, in collaboration with
an Administrator. Formal Suspensions are
determined and documented in accordance to
JeffCo Schools Code of Conduct.


Loss of privilege to attend school for a
given period of time, make-up work, re-entry
meeting, Peace table, Service to community,
Retention at a given level of the program, and/or
other consequences deemed appropriate by the
advisor.

Contract


Re-clarification of Open School values
and norms and individual responsibilities with
clear terms to demonstrate appropriateness of the
program, and/or other consequences deemed
appropriate by the advisor.

Withdrawal of support


Privilege of attending Open School
withdrawn

4. OPEN AND OFF CAMPUS PROPOSAL PROCESS (SECONDARY)
OPEN CAMPUS: A core philosophical tenet of Open Education is that learning occurs in a variety
of settings, both planned and unplanned and in and out of the school building. In order to
successfully complete SelfDirected Learning Projects (SDLs), Demonstrations of Readiness
(DORs), or the Passage Process, students are expected to seek learning opportunities beyond the
179

school walls. While engaged in Personal Learning and Individual Direction (PLAID) days,
students will necessarily be out of the building as they pursue apprenticeships, community
service work, and other learning opportunities. As a result, students will not be directly
supervised by Jefferson County Open School staff during these times. It is therefore required that
students communicate all relevant information (address, phone number, times, transportation
methods, etc.) in a written proposal that has been signed by their parent, Advisor, Consultant,
and Triad prior to beginning a SDL/DOR/Passage learning experience. Note: parent consent is
not negotiable. The aforementioned signatures are indicative of the high level of trust the student
has attained and the full support and knowledge of the risks inherent in such activities. While
trust has elements of subjectivity which must be determined by the Parent and Advisor, some
indicators include:

Maintenance of an ongoing, open dialogue with the Advisor through regular
attendance and positive participation in individual Advising meetings;

Consistent attendance and positive participation in Advising, classes, Governance,
and Triad meetings;
Transciptable completion of the majority of classes each block;
Well written SDL, DOR, or Passage proposal;
Ongoing participation and successful completion of past SDL, DOR or Passage
work;
Documentation of a variety of learning experience through a Portfolio;
Documentation of a variety of personal, social and intellectual growth through the
Graduation Expectations;






Constructive use of unstructured time.
Note: See the Secondary Drug/Alcohol, Violence and Trust Policy for additional information.
OFF CAMPUS: (Pre-Walkabout)
At the Pre-Walkabout level high levels of trust must be demonstrated for students to earn the
right to participate in curricular-based Open Campus opportunities. Pre-Walkabout students who
demonstrate exemplary leadership, community involvement, and self-direction may also propose
to earn the added privilege of going Off Campus during the lunch period. In addition to meeting
the conditions outlined above for Open Campus, a proposal for Off Campus will require:

Demonstration of exemplary leadership, community involvement, and
selfdirection;

Approval of a school wide Off Campus proposal from Secondary Leadership to
Community Advisory with ratification by a majority vote of Secondary Advising groups;

Well written individual proposal with parents, Advisor, and Triad support
signatures;
Advisor reviews on a block-by-block basis to ensure that trust has been
maintained through compliance with all previously listed criteria.

5. TRUST
180

At the Open School, students have a responsibility to able to be trusted and depended on as part
of the Open School community. It is a core belief that all students are inherently good, and given
the choice, students will to do the right thing. As a result, students are trusted to make important
decisions about their education including appropriate class schedules, PLAID day activities,
Travel Program participation, and more. It is therefore critical that students and parents work
with the Advisor to establish a trusting and supportive relationship.
TRUST VIOLATIONS
Violations of student norms, expectations, and responsibilities are taken seriously. Violations of
Trust will result in a loss of privileges and/or suspension/expulsion as detailed in the Code of
Conduct. Details will be determined by the Advisor, parent, student, and/or Administrator (if
necessary). In addition to suspension/expulsion, privileges that may be revoked could include,
but are not limited to: Open and/or Off Campus, participation in the Travel Program,
participation in the PLAID day program, etc. The Open School utilizes a discipline model which
views mistakes as learning opportunities, both for individuals and the community as a whole. It
is therefore the student’s responsibility to reestablish a trusting relationship with the Advisor and
the Open School community.
Note: In the event of a Trust Violation the JPS Code of Conduct will be consulted and students
will be subject to possible suspension/expulsion.
FOUR NON-NEGOTIABLES
Due to the risks inherent in operating a program like the Open School which includes travel,
Open and/or Off Campus privileges, PLAID days, etc., the Open School has adopted the four
non-negotiable standards of behavior for all school related activities (commonly referred to as
the Four “No"s”). • No Sex

No Drugs/Alcohol

No Tobacco

No Violence

SECONDARY DRUG/ALCOHOL, VIOLENCE AND TRUST VIOLATION POLICY
Jefferson County Open School is a unique, K-12 experiential program that provides many
opportunities for students to function independently on extended trips, Voyages / SDLs / DORs /
Passages, independent study and travel, PLAID experiences and other Open/Off-campus
activities. In order to enjoy the continued support of parents, staff, community, and district
leadership, the Open School has developed a policy to address serious violations of trust,
including use of drugs or alcohol, or violence. Any student who is involved, either directly or
indirectly, in any of these behaviors violates the trust of the Advisory relationship and the
community, and is excluded from such independent activities for as long as it takes to rebuild a
trusting relationship.
Note: This may include students who witness inappropriate activities but take no action to
address the situation, or failure to relay critical information to a staff member.

181

In cases of student possession, use, abuse, intent to use, trafficking of alcohol or other drugs,
including overthe-counter medications, the Open School upholds the JPS Code of Conduct.
Violence is defined as any physical act of shoving, punching, slapping, hitting, or any manner of
violating another person’s body or space. This includes sexual harassment, as well as threatening
another person verbally, physically, or with any kind of weapon. Verbal abuse may include
threats or the use of abusive language.
First offense- District policies are followed regarding formal suspension or expulsion for drugs,
alcohol or violence; an Advisor may impose an informal suspension for general trust violations.
Before re-entry into the community, the student must take part in a conference attended by the
parent(s), Advisor, and Administrator. In addition to the aforementioned suspensions, the student
is prohibited from taking part in overnight trips, including Advisory trips, for a minimum of six
months (with the exception of required curricular trips such as the Wilderness Trip). The six
month travel ban is non-negotiable. This trip suspension begins on the first day of the formal or
informal suspension.
After a trusting relationship has been re-established with the student’s Advisor and the school
community, a student may request to have trip privileges reinstated by presenting a convincing
case to a committee comprised of the Advisor, Administrator, parents, Triad, and trip sponsor.
The committee will decide, by consensus, whether the student has satisfactorily demonstrated
that he or she is trustworthy.
Second offense- All district policies apply. At this time, the question of whether the Open School
is the right learning environment for the student becomes the paramount topic of discussion. A
parent conference/support group will be convened to consider alternatives, which can include a
plan for counseling, treatment, therapy, or other appropriate help. A contract will be developed
governing the actions and expectations for the student; in most cases, the contract will include an
appropriate leave from the school with the return based on the demonstration of the ability to
make responsible choices and to be trustworthy.
In situations where the trusting relationship between Advisor and Advisee has been
compromised to such an extent that the Advisor can no longer work with the student, the Advisor
may withdraw support for the student to remain in his/her Advisory group. If this occurs, the
student may seek the support of another appropriate level Advisor (i.e. PreWalkabout or
Walkabout), if such a choice is determined appropriate by the greater staff. If no support is found
on the secondary team, the student will be asked to leave the program.
Withdrawal of support for a specific trip- General trust violations may include lying, cheating,
stealing, other egregious acts committed against members of the community, or serious lack of
engagement in the program as demonstrated by failure to follow the IEP, meet community
expectations, attend classes or complete evaluations. An Advisor may withdraw support for a
specific trip if the Advisee demonstrates behaviors which cause his/her ability to be sufficiently
trusted to be in doubt.

182

6. VISITORS
In order to provide the best educational experience to our visitors, and ensuring safe and smooth
operations, we follow a policy that addresses the various types of visitors:

Parents- parents are always welcome to visit. As a courtesy, parents should call in
advance to coordinate the visit;

Educational professionals; college students; students from other choice schools,
sister schools, etc.- Any staff member may arrange this type of visit. It’s important to
inform the Principal so the visit is scheduled for an optimal time. Visitors should sign in
at the office and wear a visitor’s pass;

Alumni- Graduates are welcome to visit. They should sign in at the office and
wear a visitor’s pass;

Prospective students- Our orientation process requires that families attend an
evening information night, and visit for at least a half day. These visits are coordinated
through the Public Relations class. Visitors sign in at the office and wear a visitor’s pass;

Voyage/SDL/DOR/Passage Meetings- Our students may invite friends and family
to these meetings. Visitors should sign in, wear a visitor’s pass, attend the activity, and
sign out;

Other- Former students, and friends and family of current students often express
interest in visiting. We do not encourage or support visits unless a student is genuinely
interested in enrolling in our program.
Note: Unless circumstances are extremely unusual, and Advisors have been contacted IN
ADVANCE, we will not allow visitors who are not prospective students.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED AT OPEN SCHOOL
Advisor:
The role of Advisor at the Open School is the most important responsibility for all teachers.
Advisors are student advocates and learning facilitators who assist students in setting and
achieving the goals they create for their Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). The Advising
relationship is paramount in guiding students toward successful completion of their
individualized personal, social, and intellectual programs.
Advising – Group:
Advising is an integral part of the Open School program. Group Advising emphasizes
community through group building, problems solving, and support of individuals and
community endeavors.
Advising – Individual:
Each Advisor meets individually with each Advisee on a regular basis to build the relationships
necessary to guide students through his or her individualized program. Once a trusting
183

relationship is established, Advisors can provide deep and meaningful feedback to assist each
Advisee in the creation of a relevant personal, social, and intellectual program.
Consultant:
The SDL/DOR/Passage process requires that students work with a Consultant. These are
individuals, usually staff members, who work one-on-one with students to meet the objectives of
their SDL/DOR/Passage. Consultants are involved throughout the entire process, including
being present at both the Proposal and Passage Wrap-up meetings.
Community Circle:
Community Circle is an all IA (Elementary grades 4-6) meeting where students participate in the
democratic Governance of the school. In addition to disseminating information, students
celebrate successes, discuss school-wide issues and solve problems collectively.
Community Service:
Community Service involves students in practical, productive experiences which address actual
needs and develops a sense of pride in self and school. Students improve self-image, increase
understanding of personal abilities and limits, break down stereotypes, increase empathy, and
create a profound sense of fulfillment.
Day of Dialogue:
A Day of Dialogue is an educational experience which is student-created. In order to preserve the
institutional flexibility to respond to the teachable moment, a Day of Dialogue allows student
and staff to respond collectively by stopping the daily schedule to dedicate an entire day to focus
on current events, student needs, a student celebration of learning, or a crisis.
DOR:
Demonstration of Readiness is the major Self-Directed Learning project for the LEAP program.
Successful completion of this project is required prior to transitioning into the Walkabout
Program.
End-of-Year Transcript:
End-of-Year Transcripts are evaluations of each student’s experience at the end of each school
year. End-ofYear Transcripts are written by the student and include a Personal Statement, class
list, Advisor support letters, and a written documentation of each individual learning experience.
Both Mid- and End-of-Year Transcripts combine in a continuing document which is incorporated
into the Final Transcript.
Evaluations:
Narrative evaluations form the foundation of self-assessment documentation, and are critical to
monitoring the progress of each student at the Open School. All class and self-directed learning
experiences are assessed through the evaluation process. By reflecting on their personal, social,
and intellectual growth, students chart their progress through the Graduation Expectations.
Fairness (Student Judiciary):
184

A Fairness Meeting (Student Judiciary) is designed to problem solve an appropriate response in
the event that a student does not accept responsibility for a norms violation, trust violation, or
responds disrespectfully to an appropriate confrontation.
Four Quadrants:
The four quadrants assist students in recognizing the world is indeed our classroom.
In School

Out of

School
Planned
Unplanned
Final Transcript:
The culmination of each student’s experience at the Open School is documented in the Final
Transcript. An Open School Transcript is written by the student and includes a Personal
Statement, class list, Advisor support letters, and written documentation of each individual
learning experience.
Five Goals:
The Five Goals are guiding principles which influence all aspects of the program. Students
should be able to:




Rediscover the joy of learning,
Seek meaning in your life,
Adapt to the world as it is,
Prepare for the world as it might be, and
Create the world as it ought to be.

Governance:
Governance is an all-secondary school meeting in which students participate in the democratic
Governance of the school. In addition to disseminating information, students celebrate successes,
discuss school-wide issues and solve problems collectively. The structure of Governance is
usually established by Leadership.
Graduation Expectations:
Considered in the development of each student’s IEP / Goals, the Graduation Expectations
establish criteria for personal, social, and intellectual growth. Students must demonstrate
significant growth, to an appropriate level of proficiency, in each of the Graduation Expectations,
as agreed upon by the Advisor and Advisee. At the Elementary level growth is evaluated based
on a continuum consisting of Emerging, Developing, Expanding, Connecting, and Bridging. At
the Secondary level growth is evaluated based on a continuum consisting of Exposure,
Experience, Comprehension, Competence, and Excellence. Evaluation occurs during individual
185

Advising meetings using the Graduation Expectations rubrics and each students portfolio
documentation.
IEP (Individualized Educational Plan):
Each student regularly creates, works toward, and evaluates his/her individual progress through
the Open
School by incorporating personal, social, and intellectual goals in an Individualized Educational
Plan (IEP). IEP goals are worked out between each student, parent, and Advisor, and are utilized
to develop the student’s Mutually Agreeable Plan for class schedules and self-directed learning
through SDL/DOR/Passages.
LEAP:
The Leadership Program (LEAP) is an intensive curriculum designed to orient new and
transitioning students into the Walkabout program. Students must demonstrate the internalization
of the Three Domains, Four Quadrants, Five Goals, and Twelve Characteristics of an Effective
Self-Directed Learner. The culminating project is the DOR.
Leadership:
This class is designed to support students in the actual Governance of the school. The group
works out the details of various student- or staff-generated proposals which are then distributed
to, and discussed in, the democratic decision-making process, either in Group Advising or
Governance.
MAP (Mutually Agreeable Plan):
Mutually Agreeable Plans are designed to provide the greatest possibility of successfully
completing a student’s IEP goals. The MAP includes what is conventionally referred to as a class
schedule, but is expanded to include SDL/DOR/Passage Work, Self-Directed Learning projects,
Trips, Community College classes, Vocational School classes, work study, and other activities
designed to help students meet their personal, social, and intellectual goals.
Mid-Year Transcript:
The Mid-Year Transcript is an evaluation of each student’s experience at the end of the fall
semester. MidYear Transcripts are written by students and include a Personal Statement, class
list, Advisor support letters, and a written documentation of each individual learning experience.
Passages:
Passages are personally challenging projects developed by each student in six different areas to
demonstrate the ability to apply skills in the real world. The six Passage areas are: Adventure,
Career Exploration, Creative Expression, Global Awareness, Logical Inquiry and Practical
Skills.
PreWalkabout:
Students spend two to three years are spent in the Pre-Walkabout program. This is to prepare
them for their final three years that they will spend in the Walkabout program.
186

Proposal:
The SDL/DOR/Passage process includes the writing of a proposal which is approved by a
committee of peers, the Advisor and a staff Consultant. Consultant, Advisor and Triad are
required to attend this meeting. Mentors and parents are encouraged to participate.
PLAID (Personal Learning and Independent Discovery):
Self-Directed learning experiences help students understand themselves as individuals and as
contributing members of society through interdisciplinary, experiential, 'real world' education.
PLAID Day plans may include apprenticeships, community service project, Passage work, and
other self-directed projects.
Portfolio:
A body of evidence gathered by each student and their Advisor to document personal, social, and
intellectual growth on the Graduation Expectations. Portfolios are required in order for students
to demonstrate readiness from one level of the program to the next.
Three Domains:
In a holistic approach to teaching and learning all three domains, personal, social, and
intellectual, are equally considered in the learning process.
Triads:
Triads are peer support groups which assist students in personal, social, and intellectual growth.
These groups form a network which supports each member through the Passage process.
Trips:
Trips are an integral part of the Open School program. Trips provide excellent learning
opportunities in the real world and often prove to be a turning point in a student’s life –
reawakening the joy of learning, establishing trust in self, others, and the school community,
creating ownership of school and one’s actions, and reaffirming self-esteem.
Twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner:
The twelve Characteristics of an Effective Self-Directed Learner are the primary attributes that
any selfdirected learner must possess.







Has Vision
Has a Goal
Develops a strategic Plan
Has high Self-Esteem
Takes calculated Risks
Is Self-Disciplined, determined and persistent
Is Organized (time, effort, resources)
Has a Support Network
187




Is Self-Motivating (inner and outer rewards)
Has a powerful, personal Learning-Doing Style
Is Self-Assessing (planned feedback)
Is positive, confident (self-efficacy)

Voyage:
Guided: Guided Voyages are design to assist students in beginning the transition from
teacherdirected to student-directed learning. Students develop the skills necessary to develop
meaningful independent projects by setting goals, planning, doing, and evaluating independent
work.

Self-Directed: As part of the transition to Pre-Walkabout, Bridges students apply the skills they
have learned through Guided Voyages to a Self-Directed Learning Voyage. SDL Voyages
require students to seek out and secure meaningful projects, write a detailed proposal, set clear
goals, follow through on commitments, and articulate personal, social, and intellectual growth.
Walkabout:
Inspired by an Australian rite-of-Passage, Walkabout is the final phase of the Open School
program in which each student demonstrates readiness to function as an adult by completing six
Passages, providing the actual transition to adulthood.
Wilderness Trip:
The Wilderness Trip is a multi-day backpacking trip designed to orient students to the
Walkabout program and Jefferson County Open School. Students spend the first three days of
school participating in wilderness survival lessons, working together in group building activities,
learning about the school community, and planning the logistics of the trip. Each trail group
consists of new students to the Walkabout program, student leaders, and an Advisor. Although
this is a physically and emotionally demanding trip, students walk away with a sense of
accomplishment and deepened relationships with students and staff.
Wrap Up:
Upon completion of the SDL/DOR/Passage, the student reconvenes the committee that was
present for the proposal and presents a written summary for final approval.

TRIADS (IA THROUGH WALKABOUT)

188

Triads are peer support groups, usually developed within each Advising group, which aid
students in personal, social, and intellectual growth. These groups form a network which
supports each member through the Self-Directed Learning process
(Voyage/SDL/DOR/Passage). In order to graduate from the Open School Program, each student
is required to contribute to and receive support from a working Triad. Triads can be the
strongest support system to assist a student as s/he negotiates the Secondary Program.
TRIAD EXPECTATION:

All students must be part of a Triad;
Triad members must be at every Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage meeting. (If a Triad
member legitimately cannot attend s/he will give written feedback to the Triad member
having the meeting);

Each Triad member will read and give feedback on all Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage work
prior to the meeting (proposals, wrap-ups, portfolios, off campus proposals, research
papers, etc.);

It is the Triad’s responsibility to actively participate in Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage
meeting, by asking questions, giving thoughtful commentary, and helping to connect the
goals of the Voyages/SDL/DOR/Passage to the Triad member’s Goals/IEP;

In the Secondary, Triads will meet for an hour a week to share Goals/IEPs, monitor
progress through the program, support one another on issues relevant to personal, social,
and intellectual growth and challenges, read one another’s work, check on success with
classes, trips and other learning opportunities;

Triads will evaluate their effectiveness on a regular basis and hold one another
accountable;

Triad effectiveness will be evaluated by each student in their Mid-Year and End-of-Year
Transcripts.

CONDUCT CODE and JEFFERSON COUNTY OPEN SCHOOL Owner’s Manual
SIGNATURE PAGE
2014-2015
189

The Jefferson County Public Schools Conduct Code is
http://www.jeffcopublicschools.org/publications/conduct_code.html

accessible

online

at

The Jefferson County Open School (JCOS) “Owner’s Manual” (aka: Student/Parent Handbook) is accessible
online at http://tinyurl.com/1415-Owner-s-Manual
These booklets have been prepared to provide you and your student with information relating to your
student’s rights and responsibilities as a student in Jefferson County Public Schools, in addition to the
mission, goals, philosophy and practices of the Open School. In order for the Open School program to
have the greatest positive effect, we need the support of you and your student. This form must be signed
and returned at registration.

Please read and sign below:
I understand that copies of the Jefferson County Public Schools Conduct Code and the Jefferson County
Open School (JCOS) Owner’s Manual are available online and may also be accessed for review in the
office at the school. I further understand that it is my responsibility to review these booklets. If I have any
questions I may contact Scott Bain, Principal, or Melyssa Dominguez, Assistant Principal for information.

Student Name (please print)

Grade

Parent/Guardian Signature

Date

STUDENT USE OF THE INTERNET (Acceptable Use Agreement)
JS-E1– Exhibit for District Policy JS
Adopted: June 26, 1997
Revised: May 3, 2010
In order to provide for the appropriate use of the Internet in accordance with district policy JS, "Student
Use of the Internet", and other applicable district policies, the following "Acceptable Use Agreement" has
190

been developed. (A copy of this agreement will be distributed to students and must be completed and
signed by the student and/the student's parent/legal guardian before a student is allowed to access district
computing resources.)
Acceptable Use Agreement for Students
All computers having Internet access must be used in a responsible, efficient, ethical and legal manner.
Failure to adhere to district policy JS, "Student Use of the Internet," will result in revocation of access
privileges; restitution for costs associated with damages; and, may result in disciplinary action as
indicated the paragraphs below, and/or legal action. I have read and understand district policy JS,
"Student Use of the Internet," and agree to abide by its terms. I further understand that violation of district
policy JS, "Student Use of the Internet." may result in my loss of Internet access and/or computer use
privileges, and school discipline (including suspension or expulsion) being taken against me, legal action
being taken against me, and/or restitution by me for costs associated with any damages caused by such
violations.

_____________________________________ ______________________________
Student’s Name (PLEASE PRINT)
Today’s Date

_____________________________________
Student’s Signature
Parent or Guardian: As the parent or legal guardian of the above student, I give my consent to his/her
use of school computers to access the Internet for school-related academic purposes while at school under
the terms and conditions set forth above. All students regardless of age must have this contract signed by
a parent/guardian in order to access the Internet at school.

_____________________________________ ______________________________
Parent’s Name (PLEASE PRINT)
Today’s Date

_____________________________________
Parent’s Signature

191

192

193

194

195

196

197

198